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I stayed in Colorado's most 'haunted' hotel and quickly learned why it inspired Stephen King to write 'The Shining'

  • I spent a night at the Stanley Hotel, the place that inspired Stephen King to write "The Shining."
  • There are accounts of doors slamming, beds shaking, and lights flickering across the hotel's property. 
  • While I didn't see any spirits, I couldn't shake an eerie feeling as I left the hotel. 

As you're driving along US 36, you know you've reached the small town of Estes Park, Colorado, when a bright-white building with a rust-red roof comes into view.

haunted room the shining

It's the famed Stanley Hotel. Built in 1909 by Freelan Oscar Stanley, the hotel is considered one of the most "haunted" hotels in the US.

haunted room the shining

Source: Insider

Perhaps the most popular advocate of its supposed paranormal activity is novelist Stephen King, who spent a night at the hotel in 1974 and left with the entire plot line for his thriller, "The Shining."

haunted room the shining

Exactly 47 years later on September 30, 2021, I was following King's footsteps: I had a one-night stay booked in the famous hotel. As fog filled the surrounding mountain landscape, I quickly understood why King was haunted by this place.

haunted room the shining

According to a guide who took me on a tour of the hotel, King claims he was "haunted" by a possessed fire hose during his stay. The tour guide also shared accounts of doors slamming, beds shaking, lights flickering, and the voices of children floating through the hallways.

haunted room the shining

Stepping inside the hotel felt like traveling back in time. Patterned carpet fills the reception area, dark oak paneling covers the walls, and a grand staircase leads guests upstairs.

haunted room the shining

I wasn't the only one eager to begin my stay. As the 4 p.m. check-in time approached, a line stretched the entire length of the first floor.

haunted room the shining

Instead of waiting in line, I toured the hotel's property. Outside, I navigated through the hotel's hedge maze, which was built in 2015. A maze is a key element in "The Shining," and after years of guests inquiring about it, the hotel finally added one.

haunted room the shining

The property is comprised of four main buildings, including a concert hall built by Freelan Oscar Stanley for his wife. Today, it's one of the hotel's most "haunted" buildings, the tour guide said.

haunted room the shining

Back inside the main building, there's a classic grand ballroom, named the McGregor Ballroom.

haunted room the shining

Across from the ballroom is a music room and billiards room. I stepped inside the billiards room where I saw a familiar-looking bar.

haunted room the shining

It's the bar that inspired the iconic bar scene in "The Shining." According to the tour guide, King visited the last night before the hotel shut down for the winter and, since the business had filed its taxes for the year, the bartender wouldn't take his money so King drank for free.

haunted room the shining

Upstairs is perhaps the most famous room: room 217, where King and his wife spent a single night. When Stanley Kubrick was adapting King's novel into a movie, producers changed it from room 217 to 237, afraid that no one would want to stay in a "haunted" room. But today, room 217 is the most popular in the hotel.

haunted room the shining

After exploring the property, I headed to the now-deserted reception desk where rows of antique keys filled the wall. Unfortunately, I was handed a typical, plastic room key.

haunted room the shining

With my key in hand, I stepped into the hotel's original elevator from 1909 and headed to the fourth floor where room 402 awaited me.

haunted room the shining

When I arrived, the key oddly wouldn't work. I debated whether on not this was a bad omen and headed back downstairs for a replacement.

haunted room the shining

Finally, I entered the suite, which was one of the hotel's original historic rooms. While I expected it to have a lavish, classic feel like the rest of the hotel, the bedroom felt dated.

haunted room the shining

When I stepped inside, there was a living-room area with a fold-out couch, coffee table, and entertainment unit with a TV inside.

haunted room the shining

The bedroom had a matching headboard, a small desk, and another TV.

haunted room the shining

While the bedroom was home to a mysteriously locked door, there wasn't a mini fridge or AC.

haunted room the shining

But there were breathtaking views from the bedroom window.

haunted room the shining

Perhaps the spookiest part of my room was the bathroom. There wasn't an air vent, so mold filled cracks between tiles and a discolored shower curtain hung from the rod.

haunted room the shining

Of course, I wasn't paying $359 a night for a lavish room — I was on the lookout for a potential ghost sighting. So as the sun set and only hotel guests remained, I explored the empty hotel.

haunted room the shining

I returned to King's famed room, and this time noticed someone had written "REDRUM," a reference to "The Shining," in the corner of a nearby mirror.

haunted room the shining

I also took another moment near what the hotel calls "the vortex," which is a spiral staircase with supposedly high spiritual energy.

haunted room the shining

Back up on my floor, I stopped at room 428, where a ghostly cowboy is said to haunt the room. The floor is apparently also known for its sightings and sounds of children in the halls. Unfortunately, I didn't spot anything out of the ordinary.

haunted room the shining

But the empty hallways left me thoroughly spooked out. I retreated back to my room for the night. And as I attempted to fall asleep, I waited for any signs that the hotel was haunted.

haunted room the shining

I woke up the next morning with no nightmares or recollections of ghostly visits. But thanks to the tour guide, I did leave with a collection of ghost stories I won't forget anytime soon.

haunted room the shining

  • The Shining (film)
  • The Shining (miniseries)
  • The Shining (opera)
  • The Shining (hhn)
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Room 237 , not to be confused with the documentary of the same name, was a room in the Overlook Hotel in The Shining . In the book it was called "217".

  • 3 Appearances

History [ ]

The room was inhabited in the past, by a Lorraine Massey who would usually seduce young bellboys who would visit her room. One time Danny Torrance visited this room after a ball strangely rolled to him from its open doors. Later, he claimed that a "crazy woman" tried to strangle him. Jack Torrance then entered 237, in search of what his son claimed to have confronted. He instead encountered a young naked woman in the bathroom, having a bath who came out and kissed him. That woman then became a rather ugly, rotting old woman who chased Jack out, cackling at his infidelity. It is assumed that the rotting old woman is Lorraine Massey . 

  • According to the Timberline Lodge website, http://www.timberlinelodge.com , "Kubrick was asked not to depict Room 217 (featured in the book) in The Shining, because future guests at the Lodge might be afraid to stay there. So a nonexistent room, Room 237, was substituted in the film. Curiously, and somewhat ironically, Room 217 is requested more often than any other room at Timberline.".
  • For the film adaptation of The Shining, Room 237 was filmed on the Colorado Lounge set on Stage 3 at Elstree Studios.

Appearances [ ]

  • The Shining (as Room 217)
  • Doctor Sleep (film)
  • 1 Overlook Hotel
  • 3 Horace M. Derwent

What Only True Horror Fans Know About The Shining's Room 237

Danny Lloyd in The Shining

The Shining remains one of the most notable works to exist within the horror genre . Whether it's the original Stephen King novel or Stanley Kubrick's film adaptation of the book, both versions of this haunted hotel story tell a truly terrifying tale. Both the film and novel follow Wendy, Danny, and Jack, a family staying in the Overlook Hotel for the winter after Jack takes on a job that requires him to look after the hotel. After settling in, the family begins to experience horrific events that slowly chip away at their sanity until it comes to a boil in a climactic ending.

Despite how universally praised the horror film is , it does take some serious departures from the Stephen King novel. While at its core, the plot remains intact — an alcoholic father goes on a murderous rampage in a hotel once cabin fever sets in — but there are a few key moments that were changed in the film. One of these instances involves Room 237, a room in the Overlook Hotel that houses a malevolent spirit. In the novel, however, this room was Room 217, which at first might seem like a minor change. It turns out, this was intentional for a reason that many fans might not realize at first.

Why was Room 217 changed to Room 237?

In both versions of The Shining , Danny experiences a traumatizing encounter with one of the hotel's many ghosts in this specific room. Additionally, when Jack goes to check out the space, he also experiences a fright that worsens his already fragile mental state. Fans of The Shining know that the ghost that haunts this room is Lorraine Massey , a former Overlook Hotel guest who took her own life. Due to these terrifying moments involving this ghost, reps for the real-life Timberline Lodge (which was the Overlook Hotel's exterior in the film) requested that Kubrick change the room number in the film.

This information can be found on the hotel's website under the Timberline Lodge's history page . "Kubrick was asked not to depict Room 217 (featured in the book) in The Shining , because future guests at the Lodge might be afraid to stay there," the page states. "So a nonexistent room, Room 237, was substituted in the film." Funny enough, guests are actually interested in the room. "Curiously, and somewhat ironically, Room 217 is requested more often than any other room at Timberline," the page reads.

Despite Kubrick's best efforts to mask Room 217, fans of The Shining will definitely continue to connect with the horrifying story. Hopefully anyone who checks into Room 217 in the Timberline Lodge stays away from the tub.

Screen Rant

The shining: the true story & real-life hotel behind the movie.

Was The Shining based on a true story? Here's the story behind Stephen King's experience that inspired the Overlook Hotel and the 1977 horror novel.

  • The supernatural elements in The Shining are inspired by a real haunting in Colorado, adding a sense of authenticity to the story.
  • The Overlook Hotel in The Shining was inspired by the Stanley Hotel in Colorado, which has a haunted history and provided Stephen King with inspiration for the novel.
  • The Shining 's adaptation by Stanley Kubrick deviated from Stephen King's vision of the Overlook Hotel, leading to King's dissatisfaction and the creation of his own TV miniseries.

The Shining is partially based on a true story, as the supernatural elements of Jack Torrance's stay at the Overlook Hotel are inspired by a real haunting in Colorado. Stephen King's The Shining tells the story of Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson), a recovering alcoholic who takes a job as the caretaker of a historic hotel during its off-season. Jack, his wife, Wendy (Shelley Duvall), and their son, Danny (Danny Lloyd), move into the Overlook Hotel deep in the Colorado Rockies. Danny possesses "the shining", a psychic ability that gives him insight into the hotel's terrifying past, but they start to learn about the supernatural dangers that reside within.

As time goes on, the evil forces deteriorate Jack's sanity leading him to turn on his family. The Shining book was the basis for Stanley Kubrick's 1980 masterpiece film, and the horror movie introduced millions of viewers to the Overlook Hotel. While many aspects of The Shining 's story are fantastical and far-fetched, the story told by Stephen King and adopted by Stanley Kubrick was partially inspired by real events. While The Overlook Hotel is not an existing location itself, a real hotel in Colorado has an eerie true story that's behind parts of The Shining.

The Shining Ending Explained: Why Jack Is In The Photo

The shining’s hotel is based on a haunted room at the stanley hotel, colorado, the overlook hotel was inspired by a real haunting.

Many elements in The Shining, including the hotel itself, were inspired by the Stanley Hotel in Colorado. While The Shining true story doesn't involve a man like Jack Torrance losing his mind and killing his family, the locale of the book and Stanley Kubrick's movie do have a real-life counterpart. In 1974, King and his wife spent time at the isolated Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado .

When King stayed at The Shining's Overlook Hotel's inspiration , the Stanley Hotel, in the mid-70s, King resided with his wife in room 217. That specific room has a haunted history involving the chief housekeeper , Elizabeth Wilson. In 1911, Wilson was injured in an explosion caused by lighting a lantern. Though she survived the event, it's said that she still wanders around the room, moving luggage and folding clothes. King claimed to have seen a young boy while going to his room, which wasn't possible considering he and his wife were the only confirmed guests. There have been several other accounts detailing unexplained noises, figures, and personal objects stolen or broken.

While roaming the real hotel, King felt inspired by the long corridors and the isolation from the world. His experience instantly gave him the idea for the horror novel. The Stanley Hotel was built in 1909 by Freelan Oscar Stanley of the Stanley Steamer fame. The 142-room resort was meant for wealthy vacationers and also served as a health retreat for those suffering from tuberculosis. The Stanley Hotel is still in operation and remains a tourist destination due to its panoramic views of the Rockies. The hotel also has a very haunted history which has helped attract viewers and paranormal investigators.

During the author and his wife's stay, the couple checked in just before the hotel was shutting down for the winter, and they were the only guests there. King, a natural horror writer, noted the eerie feeling of being in an empty hotel. This, the story of Elizabeth Wilson, and King's own experience of ghostly apparitions inspired The Shining 's ominous Overlook Hotel, a location that has become an iconic landmark in pop culture from the Grady twins down the hall to the carpeting on the floor.

What Jack Nicholson Was Really Like Filming The Shining

Stephen king doesn’t think the overlook hotel does the shining’s real hotel justice, the author of the shining has notes on kubrick's version of the overlook.

Kubrick's version of The Shining 's Overlook Hotel doesn't match King's vision of the resort . Kubrick changed much of the layout and added the hedge maze at the front of the property. The infamous room was also changed from 217 to 237. Due to King's displeasure with Kubrick's The Shining adaptation , the author made his own TV miniseries based on the novel in 1997, with the Stanley Hotel being used as the filming location. Due to The Shining 's popularity, the Stanley Hotel has embraced the connection by hosting tours and events related to the story. In 2015, the so-called real The Shining hotel in Colorado added the hedge maze, which has been a hit with visitors.

Doctor Sleep Ruined The Shining’s Real-Life Mystery

The 2019 sequel to the shining replaced the true story with fictional lore.

A key component of Stephen King's real-life experience at the Stanley Hotel and the rendition of the Overlook Hotel presented in Kubrick's The Shining movie is the locations' sense of mystery, but The Shining's 2019sequel Doctor Sleep compromises this. Throughout The Shining , as in King's own experience, it's never clear precisely what's going on. One of the greatest strengths of The Shining 's real-life and fictional story (and what makes it so genuinely terrifying) is how it consistently contradicts itself, never revealing whether the Overlook is possessed by ghosts, demons, or simply madness.

In direct opposition to this approach, Doctor Sleep attempts to explain many of its predecessor's purposeful mysteries ; it chalks up The Shining 's events to ghosts that wanted to extract energy from Danny's Shining. While it's an impressive feat to impose so much continuity onto a story propelled by the discomfort of the unknown, Doctor Sleep winds up ruining what made The Shining and Stephen King's original Stanley Hotel experience so chilling.

Doctor Sleep is available to stream on Max.

How Doctor Sleep's Box Office Killed The Overlook Hotel Shining Prequel

A movie focusing on the overlook hotel was canceled.

An Overlook-Hotel-centric The Shining prequel was in talks at Warner Bros. until Doctor Sleep came out. Despite being a Stephen King adaptation and a sequel to one of the most successful horror movies of all time, Doctor Sleep performed poorly at the box office , grossing only $72 million on a budget of $45 million (via Box Office Mojo ). While it was received well by King fans and many critics, it failed to pull in the revenue Warner Bros. expected from such a seemingly bankable project. As the Shining sequel didn't translate into healthy ticket sales, it was a setback that Warner Bros. couldn't ignore.

In what's becoming a typical move for the flighty studio, the Overlook Hotel Shining prequel project was put on hold. This also meant an opportunity was missed to finally do The Overlook Hotel the justice it deserves. Stephen King's opinion on The Shining 's location has yet to be given the attention it deserves, and if the original setting for King's inspiring corridor wanderings was enough to spook even the Master of Horror himself, then the studio should aspire to capture it on-screen in a way that harnesses the truly weird energy of the hotel. Sadly, because of Doctor Sleep 's poor performance, there might not be another opportunity.

The Shining

The true story that inspired the hotel from "The Shining"

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Created by Destination Strange - September 19th 2016

In horror movies, setting is everything. This is super apparent in "The Shining", Stephen King's novel which was adapted for the screen by Stanley Kubrick. Both book and film delve into the tricks the mind can play on those susceptible to paranoia, fear and violence when trapped and cut off from the real, rational and sane world.

Jack Torrance, his wife, and their kid move into a secluded and completely eerie mountain resort called the Overlook Hotel to care for it while it closes for the winter. They slowly succumb to the maddening isolation and fear of the beautiful but spooky old hotel.

Photo of The Stanley Hotel

333 Wonderview Avenue, Estes Park, CO, US

The Stanley Hotel

Click to discover a great deal!

The hotel that inspired Stephen King to pen the novel is The Stanley in Estes Park, CO just outside Rocky Mountain National Park. He checked into the hotel in 1973 for a one-night stay with his wife, Tabitha. Fortuitously, they were the only guests at the hotel that night. They pretty much had the run of the place, but King wasn’t convinced they were actually alone. The room he stayed in was Room 217, which is, to this day, the hotel’s most-requested room. The Shining, was inspired by these events and the overall experience of being secluded in the grand resort hotel alone.

The Stanley appeared in the 1990s King-sanctioned made-for-TV series version, as he wasn't a fan of Stanley Kubrick's atmosphere-heavy, plot-light take on his material. Today you can watch both King's and Kubrick's versions on a nonstop loop on the hotel’s Channel 42.

King might not have been crazy, though. The Stanley Hotel was originally opened in 1909, by Massachusetts couple F.O. and Flora Stanley, as a secluded, grand mountain resort. Though the Stanleys have passed, many believe they never actually left. Mr. Stanley has been reported as hovering behind employees at the reception desk, and Mrs. Stanley can still be heard playing piano in the hotel’s music room.

Haunted events have been recorded at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, since as far back as 1911, when Ms. Elizabeth Wilson, a housekeeper, was electrocuted during a lightening storm. Though she wasn’t killed, the room where it happened, Room 217, has become a hotbed of paranormal activity.

Over the years, every single room in the hotel has experienced something strange, from clothes being mysteriously unpacked, to items moving on their own, and lights turning themselves on and off. The fourth floor is often filled with the spectral laughter of children giggling and running down the halls. However, the staff at the Stanley are quick to point out that “there are never any reports of sinister or evil events happening here, because there are only happy ghosts at the Stanley Hotel!” Suuuuure.

Photo of Timberline Lodge

27500 E Timberline Rd, OR, US

Timberline Lodge

As for Kubrick's version, it was not filmed at the Stanley. The exterior shots were filmed at Mount Hood's Timberline Lodge. Built during the Great Depression as a WPA project, it features year-round skiing, a heated hot tub, and incredible rustic cabin vibes. If you're worried about getting snowed in and being driven mad by cabin fever, just stop by for a drink in the bar.

Sadly, the hedge maze from the movie was filmed at the studio, but the Stanley has one now in honor of the novel!

Photo of The Ahwahnee Hotel

9005 Ahwahnee Drive, Yosemite Valley, CA, US

The Ahwahnee Hotel

The interiors were filmed at a studio, but heavily drew inspiration from the Ahwahnee in Yosemite National Park. The interior design of the Ahwahnee is actually pretty distinctive, especially where "parkitecture" is concerned: it's got the natural wood and stone look of most other National Park Service lodges, but the interior almost featured a Mayan revival motif, as designed by Henry Lovins. Ultimately, the look blends Art Deco, Native American, and Arts and Crafts elements with a touch of Middle Eastern flair.

Photo of Going-to-The-Sun Road

Going-to-The-Sun Road

So we've seen inspiration from the Rockies and Yosemite... but to throw another park into the mix, the opening scene was filmed along the famously stunning Going-to-The-Sun Road in Glacier National Park in Montana.

The isolated but breathtaking atmosphere of all of these rustic lodges definitely wavers between hauntingly beautiful and hauntingly... well, haunting. Just try to get some sleep if you happen to stay in one, and ignore any nightmares!

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Why The Room 237 Scene In 'The Shining' Is So Damn Terrifying

The Shining Room 237 Scene

(Welcome to  Scariest Scene Ever , a column dedicated to the most pulse-pounding moments in horror. In this edition: The Shining boasts one of horror's most iconic movie moments of all time.) The Stephen King renaissance that began in earnest with 2017's It has continued to gain momentum, bearing no signs of slowing down any time soon. Between the upcoming releases of It Chapter Two , Netflix's In the Tall Grass , a Creepshow revival TV series on Shudder, and Mike Flanagan's adaptation of Doctor Sleep , this fall is all about the prolific horror author's works. It only makes sense to preface the next wave of King adaptations by looking back at one of horror's all-time classics; The Shining . The second of King's novels to ever be adapted for screen, this adaptation happens to be one of the more divisive. At least from the perspective of King and Constant Reader purists, as director and co-screenwriter Stanley Kubrick presents the loosest interpretation of the story. It's offset by a foreboding atmosphere, iconic imagery, unsettling score, and one nightmarish scene that marks the point of no return.

Aspiring writer and recovering alcoholic Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) has been hired on as caretaker of the sprawling Overlook hotel during the winter offseason. He brings along his meek but supportive wife Wendy (Shelley Duvall) and young son Danny (Danny Lloyd), as the wintry conditions will leave them alone and isolated for months. Danny's unique psychic ability causes him to suffer horrific visions of the hotel's tragic past and its lingering ghosts, and only the Overlook's head chef Dick Hallorann (Scatman Crothers) can understand. He shares the same ability, which he refers to as the Shining. Too bad that Dick is thousands of miles away, and the hotel's sinister presence is having a detrimental effect on Jack's mental stability. 

The Story So Far

A month has passed since the Torrance family first arrived at the Overlook hotel, and the heavy snowfall has left them effectively cut off from the outside world. Wendy peacefully spends her days caring for her family and trying to keep spirits up, while Danny either watches TV with her or travels the labyrinthine corridors of the hotel by tricycle. As for Jack, well, he's detaching further and further from both his family and reality. He's become nocturnal, sleeping his days away while spending nights clacking away at the typewriter. He's even found a sympathetic ear in the Gold Room from bartender Lloyd. Never mind that all booze was removed from premises prior to offseason closure, or that the Torrances are technically the only living beings in the place. Despite warnings from Hallorann to stay out of Room 237, Danny's curiosity finally gets the better of him. His foray into that threatening room happens off screen, though; only the aftermath is shown as he wanders up to his parents in a daze, bruised and clothes tattered. Wendy assumes Jack is back to his abusive ways and retreats with her son. Until, that is, Wendy learns the truth about what happened in Room 237 from Danny.

In a dreamlike scene, Jack enters room 237 and discovers firsthand the nightmare incarnate that attacked his son. Ominous music cues us that something is amiss as we, through Jack's eyes, first glimpse the peacock patterned carpet before taking in the rest of the room as the camera zooms over to the bathroom door skewed ajar. As he pushes it wide open, the camera reverts back to third person as it pans around and shows Jack in the grip of fear. His fear evaporates, morphing to lust at the sight of a young woman lying naked in the bathtub at the far reaches of the mint green bathroom. She slowly rises, steps into the middle of the room, and stops in front of the mirror to let him gaze upon her as she waits. The seduction is near complete. Up until this moment, Kubrick has kept the audience off kilter, consistently increasing the levels of permeating unease and dread through distorted spatial awareness and disorienting color contrast. The Overlook itself is a modern hotel (for its time) with modern amenities, the polar opposite of traditional haunted spaces. Yet Kubrick makes it feel haunted by creating an intentionally confusing sense of geography; the Overlook's layout seems to mirror the expansive hedge maze with its constant twists and turns and endless vast hallways that threaten to engulf the Torrances. The use of color also manipulates the overall mood. When bold, angry reds are the primary palette, Kubrick subtly uses its complement, green, to create a subconscious feeling of safety. Red, the color most associated with rage, violence, and aggression, pervades the entire film. From clothing, to the now iconic carpet, to the elevator walls that flood with blood, red is everywhere. It's a signal that something is very amiss with this place. Conversely, its color opposite is sparingly used in places of comfort. Wendy's plaid shirt, the service areas furthest from any activity, even Hallorann's bed sheets are all shades of green; all in areas and in characters that provide comfort. Clinically, mint green is meant as a calming color. This is why, when Jack enters Room 237, the viewer becomes distressed long before the woman's clammy cold truth is revealed. We know danger lurks because we've seen the repercussion in Danny. We know it because the pulsing score is a terrible warning. That it's happening in a soothing mint green place is a corruption of the space we've been trained to feel was secure from harm.  Kubrick rips the rug out from under us completely when Jack steps into the woman's welcoming embrace. They lock in passion, and Jack gets lost in the moment. Until the bathroom mirror shatters the illusion. First, he sees the bloated backside, rotting and green. Then, he sees her as she is, decayed and horrid. She cackles as he backs out of the room, terrified, but it's too late. The hotel's seduction of him is complete, and so too is the contamination of any lingering safe spaces for our protagonists. This pivotal moment, halfway through the film, is the point of no return for Jack Torrance. And it's absolutely terrifying.

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Inside the creepy hotel that inspired ‘the shining’.

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haunted room the shining

In 1974, master of horror Stephen King and his wife Tabitha spent just one night in Room 217 at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colo. By morning, his seminal 1977 novel “The Shining” was born.

“They were just getting ready to close for the season, and we found ourselves the only guests in the place — with all those long, empty corridors,” King told writer George Beahm in the 1998 book “ Stephen King: America’s Best-Loved Boogeyman .”

What followed was a sweaty night filled with ghastly visions of his screaming 3-year-old son being chased through the halls. “I got up, lit a cigarette, sat in a chair looking out the window at the Rockies,” recalls King, “and by the time the cigarette was done, I had the bones of the book firmly set in my mind.”

Now, to capitalize off the book’s success — and Stanley Kubrick’s cult classic film of the same name — the owners of the 106-year-old lodge are planning to open the “world’s first horror-themed museum, film archive and film production studio.” The proposed 43,000-square-foot facility would house a 500-seat auditorium, a 30,000-square-foot interactive museum featuring rotating exhibits, classrooms, workshops and a 3,000-square-foot sound stage, according to project backers (including Hollywood names like “Night of the Living Dead” director George A. Romero and Elijah Wood).

Before they can do that, however, the state of Colorado will have to get on board: The hotel is requesting $11.5 million in tourism funds to contribute to the estimated $24 million it will take to complete the project .

But don’t play the waiting game. The 104-room property — a hotbed of reported paranormal activity since the ’70s — already offers visitors plenty of “Shining”-inspired fun, including a hedge maze and a “ ghost adventure package ,” complete with REDRUM mugs.

Go inside the notoriously haunted hotel in the gallery above.

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Is ‘The Shining’ Hotel Really Haunted?

Posted: December 28, 2023 | Last updated: December 29, 2023

  • Stephen King was inspired to write The Shining after he had strange encounters at The Stanley Hotel.
  • Rumors of the hotel being haunted existed before The Shining 's release, but reports of paranormal activity escalated to new heights after the release of the movie.
  • The ghost of chambermaid Elizabeth Wilson and other spirits are said to haunt the hotel, with paranormal activities often reported by guests and staff.

Stephen King has a knack for creating the perfect, eerie setting for his novels, so much so that the setting often feels like a character on its own. One of the most famous examples is The Shining and its setting of the Overlook Hotel . During a stay in The Stanley Hotel in Boulder, Colorado, King had a series of strange encounters that inspired him to write The Shining and set it in a haunted hotel reminiscent of The Stanley. In fact, when King set out to make his own miniseries of The Shining , The Stanley Hotel was used a filming location , bringing the story back to its roots.

Since the release of the novel and the subsequent film, rumors have continuously been spread claiming that the Stanley Hotel is haunted, with people still showing up to this day to find out firsthand. A lot of horror films tend to garner speculation when they film in or are inspired by real-life locations, but The Shining took this to new heights. The question is, is any of it true?

The Shining

A family heads to an isolated hotel for the winter where a sinister presence influences the father into violence, while his psychic son sees horrific forebodings from both past and future. 

What Was Stephen King's Inspiration for the Overlook Hotel?

To fully understand where the mystery begins we have to go back to the beginning, 1974 specifically, when King was just beginning what would eventually become The Shining and was struggling to write it. At the time, the novel had the working title of "Darkshine" and was set in an amusement park , however, he wasn’t satisfied with the setting or the story itself. It was meant to follow a psychic boy in an amusement park, but he abandoned the idea — that is until he and his wife Tabitha checked into the Stanley Hotel while in Boulder. They only stayed one night, but that one night would change everything.

At the time of their stay, the hotel was shutting down for the winter season , meaning most of its guests were checking out. King roamed the quiet halls that night and went down to the hotel bar where he met the bartender named Grady. And when he finally went back to his room (room 217, which is naturally the hotel's most requested room to this day), his mind was abuzz with ideas and inspiration. From the remoteness of the hotel’s location to the large, almost disorientingly so, size, and the emptiness of its many rooms, King says that by the time he went to bed that night, the entire story was firmly planted in his mind. That night, King says he dreamed of his three-year-old son running around the halls of the hotel, eyes wide and screaming as he was chased by a fire hose.

“I woke up with a tremendous jerk, sweating all over, within an inch of falling out of bed,” He said. “I got up, lit a cigarette, sat in a chair looking out the window at the Rockies, and by the time the cigarette was done, I had the bones of the book firmly set in my mind.”

Is the Stanley Hotel Really Haunted?

The Stanley Hotel first opened back in 1909, and guests were blown away by the fact that, even though it was surrounded by woods, it still managed to have electricity, modern bathrooms, maids, cooking staff, and even telephones, according to the hotel's wesbite. For years, the hotel was seen as an idyllic mountain getaway, but by the 1970s the hotel fell into disrepair and was facing demolishment. That is until The Shining was released and rejuvenated the hotel’s business. But interestingly enough, its reputation for hosting the spooky and scary goes back far earlier than The Shining ’s influence, to just two years after the hotel first opened its doors.

After a flood in the valley, the hotel’s power went out for the first time, so gas lanterns were installed in each room to provide the guests with light. But a leak caused a buildup of gas in none other than room 217. A chambermaid named Elizabeth Wilson entered the room with a lit candle, setting off an explosion which she miraculously survived despite being launched from the room down to the dining hall on the first floor. She returned to work at the hotel in 1913 and remained an employee until 1950, and according to guests of the hotel and even the staff, her spirit still lurks in room 217 . According to guests though, her spirit isn’t a scary one but rather a helpful one, they claim they’d wake up in the morning to organized suitcases and a tidy room. However, it has been said that she isn't a fan of unmarried couples sharing a bed, with some guests recounting feeling a cold presence between them while they sleep.

Who Are the Ghosts That Supposedly Haunt the Stanley Hotel?

But it isn’t just Wilson’s spirit that supposedly haunts the hotel, as many believe Mr. Stanley (who passed in 1940) can still be seen around the hotel , with his most prominent locations being in the bar or billiard room. His wife Flora is also said to be found playing the piano at night. Guests who stay on the fourth floor have also made note of hearing children’s laughter in the hall but found it empty when they looked. In fact, the entire fourth floor is said to be the most active, with room 428 having the most encounters . There are heavy footsteps heard, furniture is rearranged as its occupants sleep, and some guests have even claimed to see a cowboy sitting at the end of their bed. The hotel has even been the focus of paranormal investigation shows such as Ghost Hunters and Ghost Adventures .

As if that wasn’t creepy enough, the hotel also hosts a series of underground tunnels and a pet cemetery. The tunnels were used for the staff of the hotel to easily travel from the hotel’s amenities to the guest’s rooms without being seen, as back in that time it was seen as unprofessional for staff to be seen by guests. And as for the pet cemetery? Many of the hotel’s staff’s pets have been laid to rest there, with a golden retriever named Cassie said to still haunt the place , bringing newspapers and scratching at doors to be let in.

So if you’ve ever wondered if the Stanley Hotel is haunted, the answer seems to be a resounding yes — with both guests and staff having confirmed paranormal sightings around the hotel. Though it may just be something you’ll have to see for yourself if you’re still not a believer.

The Shining is available to stream on Apple TV in the U.S.

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Is ‘The Shining’ Hotel Really Haunted?

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The Shining: The True History at the Stanley Hotel

One of the most well-known horror movies of all time, The Shining, has some dark, true history behind its creation.

Anyone who enjoys the genre of horror and psychological thrillers has definitely either read or watched The Shining . This was first written as a book by the King of horror himself, Stephen King , and later was turned into Stanley Kubrick's film. Both works to this day are untouchable masterpieces. It tells the story of Jack Torrance, a recovering alcoholic who takes a job as the caretaker of a historic hotel during the off-season. Jack, his wife, Wendy, and their son, Danny (Danny Lloyd), move into the Overlook Hotel deep in the Colorado Rockies. Unknown to most, Danny possesses a psychic ability called, "the shining,". This gives him a glimpse of the hotel’s terrifying past . A snowstorm then forces the family to stay indoors, and they begin learning about the supernatural dangers in the hotel . The evil forces behind these dangers succeed in deteriorating Jack's sanity, and he then becomes a danger to his own family .

While most aspects of this masterpiece may be far-fetched and fictional, one crucial detail was actually based on facts: the Overlook Hotel. While it may not exist in real life, it was inspired by actual experiences Stephen King had at The Stanley Hotel. Here's the true history behind it!

Inspired by The Stanley Hotel's Infamous Haunted Room

As surprising as it may sound, the Stanley Hotel helped lay the groundwork for many plot points, including the hotel's structure in The Shining . King and his spouse stayed at the secluded Stanley Hotel in Colorado in 1974. One disturbing thing from the get-go was the fact that they were the only people staying at the hotel, because when the couple arrived, it was just before it was closing for the winter. King, being the natural-born writer of the horror genre, observed the unnerving atmosphere of a deserted hotel. When King explored the hotel, he was inspired by the spacious hallways and sense of seclusion from the entire world. His entire experience at the place immediately inspired him to write a horror tale.

Stephen King and his wife stayed in Room 217 of the Stanley Hotel, which served as the inspiration for the Overlook Hotel. Many people had reported seeing a ghost of Elizabeth Wilson, the head housekeeper, in that particular room. Wilson suffered injuries in an explosion brought on by the lighting of a lantern in 1911. Even though she didn't die because of that incident, it is believed that she is still seen wandering around the room, folding clothes, and moving suitcases. Stephen King also claims that he saw a young boy walking towards his rooms, which couldn't have been any human, as they were literally the only two people in the entire hotel. All of this collectively became the ultimate inspiration behind The Shining .

King Wrote The Shining After Having a Nightmare at The Stanley Hotel

As mentioned earlier, the entire hotel was a massive inspiration for Stephen King's novel . However, if one wants to know what actually made him pick up his pen and start writing, they will be baffled to know it wasn't any encounter with a ghost, but instead, actually having a nightmare! When he and his wife stayed in the haunted Room 217, he had a nightmare that night that a fire hose was chasing his 3-year-old son through the hotel hallways, as he ran and screamed in terror. This was so petrifying for him that he woke up feeling sweaty and just an inch from falling out of their hotel bed. While this would make any other person either leave the hotel or talk to their child, it made him light a cigarette and map out the entire premise of the whole book in his head.

Related: The Shining: Explaining the Many Fan Theories and Analysis

Initially Constructed as a Place for Tuberculosis Patients

Unfortunately, in 1903, Freelan Oscar Stanley, the man who created the steam-powered automobile, battled tuberculosis. The optimal way to proceed and get treatment was simply dry, fresh air and sunlight. Therefore, Stanley and his wife Flora naturally traveled to the Rocky Mountains. Upon seeing his health significantly and rapidly improve, he made the decision to develop Estes Park as a resort community for people seeking to regain their health, and for the East Coast's elite, who simply wanted to unwind in the mountains. And that is how the Stanley Hotel came into being. While it may sound wholesome at first, one must not forget that with health issues like tuberculosis, many people end up losing the battle, which means people passed away in this resort , and that thought should be enough to make the place eerie enough to not spend a night there.

King Thinks Kubrick's Overlook Hotel Didn't Do Justice

This is a proven fact that movies cannot do justice to the book and, in this case, a truly existing place. This is on the grounds that the King's conception of the resort differs from Kubrick's depiction of The Shining 's Overlook Hotel. A significant proportion of the property's design was altered by Kubrick. Additionally, he changed the most crucial element, which was turning Room 217 into 237. King disliked Kubrick's adaptation to this extent: in 1997, he produced his original TV miniseries adapted from the book. The series also ended up using the actual Stanley Hotel as the filming location.

Related: Here's Shelley! The Shining's Shelley Duvall Returns to Acting After 20+ Years in The Forest Hills

The Hotel Has a Creepy Pet Cemetery

As unreal as it may sound, not all the ghosts at the Stanley are said to be human. The owner of the hotel had created a pet cemetery, where they buried their pets for several years, and many guests have claimed to encounter the ghosts of some of the buried animals walking the hotel. This includes Comanche, a white cat, and a golden retriever named Cassie. Both have been spotted throughout the entire property, even in the halls and guest rooms. Ironically enough, Stephen King has another book titled Pet Sematary , in which pets come back from the dead after being buried inside a cursed cemetery. Even though Cassie and Comanche don't come back to life, some visitors claim that they are still around. While being confronted by a spirit cat or dog would certainly be less frightening than being confronted by a person, it doesn't make it any less terrifying or unnerving.

People Experience Paranormal Activities at the Hotel

While most paranormal incidents in the novel were based on fictional inspirations, and fortunately, King didn't experience any severe spirit encounters, numerous people have reported experiencing paranormal activities at the hotel. This began in 1911, which was right after the infamous explosion that occurred in the hotel. The Stanley hotel now even offers people a Spirited Night Tour in which they take people through all the unnerving sites of the hotel where people have reported experiencing paranormal activities.

Apart from seeing the founder of the hotel's spirit wandering around, the terrifying fact about the place is that each and every room in this place has experienced a sinister, spooky incident. Many people reported their clothes being unpacked mysteriously, objects changing places, or lights turning off and on. Many guests even claim to hear kids' laughter or someone running down the corridors. The bone-chilling part is the fact that the Stanley Hotel employees do not deny it and, in fact, claim them to be happy ghosts, which doesn't make it any less scary.

WFTS - Tampa, Florida

The Stanley Hotel’s haunted reputation and how it inspired ‘The Shining’

ESTES PARK, Colo. – The Rocky Mountains are home to a hotel that’s widely considered one of the most haunted places in America and it has ties to a renowned horror film.

The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, is said to be haunted by several different ghosts, from past owners to children, and even a couple pets.

Along with its haunted reputation, the Colonial Revival-style hotel also inspired author Stephen King to write “The Shining,” one of his most popular novels that was adapted into a 1980 film starring Jack Nicholson.

Haunted history of The Stanley Hotel

The Stanley Hotel was built by inventor Freelan Oscar (F.O.) Stanley , who moved out to Colorado hoping that the fresh air and plentiful sunlight would relieve his tuberculosis. When he arrived in 1903, he was weak and underweight, but after just one season, hotel staff says his health was restored.

The hotel says Stanley was so overjoyed that he vowed to return each summer and ended up building the hotel to bring a level of sophistication to the region. The Stanley Hotel opened in 1909.

Stanley died in 1940 at the age of 91, but his spirit is said to still roam the hotel. Specifically, staff says he’s often spotted in the hotel’s billiard room and bar. Stanley’s wife, Flora, has also reportedly been spotted in the hotel and is known to tickle the keys of a piano.

Staircase in lobby of Stanley Hotel

Another ghost that’s been said to show up is a former housekeeper of the hotel, Elizabeth Wilson or Mrs. Wilson. Tour guides say Wilson was lighting lanterns in room 217 when she was seriously injured in an explosion. She survived the blast but passed away years later. Now, it seems Wilson is a regular in room 217. Guests report items being moved, luggage being packed up and lights going off and on. It also seems Wilson is rather conservative – guides say she’s not a fan of unmarried couples. People who aren’t married have reported feeling a cold presence between them while in bed.

Room 217 where Stephen King stayed

The spirits aren’t limited to adults. Tour guides say the ghost of a child with autism also roams the grounds and is known to play with the hair of guests. Staff says the boy, named Billy, is drawn to people who work with people with autism or are familiar with the developmental disorder.

On the fourth floor, guests have also reported hearing children running around, laughing and playing. Guides say that’s where nannies and the kids they watched would spend much of their time back in the day.

Fourth floor hallway

Not all of the hotel’s purported ghosts stand on two legs. There’s a pet cemetery on the grounds that guides say is the final resting place of some of the owners’ animals. Staff says the ghosts of a cat and a dog have been seen roaming around.

Pet Cemetery on grounds of Stanley Hotel

Guides end their tours in a cave system below the hotel, where staff says there’s a higher-than-average concentration of limestone and quartz which is believed by some to draw spirits to the property.

Tunnel below Stanley Hotel

How the hotel inspired Stephen King

During a recent appearance on “The View,” Stephen King explained that he was living in Boulder, working on “The Stand,” when he and his wife took a weekend off from their kids.

“We ended up staying at a place called The Stanley Hotel,” said King. “It was their last day of the season. Everybody was leaving and nobody was coming in, and we said ‘can we check in?’”

An employee told King that they could stay if they could pay cash, because the hotel had already sent its credit receipts back to Denver. King happened to have the money.

“We were the only people in that hotel and the wind was whistling outside and the rooms were all empty.”

Legend has it that during King’s stay in room 217, he had a lucid nightmare about his young son being chased around the hotel. Guides say the author jerked out of bed, went outside to smoke a cigarette and that’s when he started to lay the groundwork for “The Shining.”

Over the years, many people have claimed to have captured the ghosts of the hotel on camera. One instance was in 2016 . During tours of the hotel, guides also share some of the photos that they say show the spirits.

The Stanley Hotel today

Today, The Stanley Hotel has been beautifully restored and hosts guests year-round.

Those interested in learning more about the history of the legendary hotel and its haunted folklore can go on a range of tours .

The hotel also hosts weddings, corporate events and other parties throughout the year.

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Stephen King’s Terrifying Night at the Stanley Hotel That Inspired The Shining

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In 1974, Stephen King stayed in room 217 at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado. What was meant to be a quiet night’s sleep turned into a nightmare that later inspired his classic horror novel The Shining.

If you’re short on time, here’s the quick story: King was disturbed by paranormal activity in his room, had vivid nightmares, and was shocked to learn the hotel’s empty halls were haunted . These scary experiences provided the basis for The Shining’s Overlook Hotel setting.

In this deep dive, we’ll cover everything that happened during Stephen King’s fateful and frightening stay at the Stanley Hotel room that sparked his creative imagination to write one of the most legendary horror stories of all time.

King’s Initial Impressions of the Stanley Hotel

When Stephen King visited the historic Stanley Hotel in the shoulder season of 1974, little did he know that it would become the inspiration for one of his most iconic novels, “The Shining.” During his stay, King was struck by several aspects of the hotel that left a lasting impression on him.

Visited the Stanley in Shoulder Season in 1974

King’s visit to the Stanley Hotel took place during the shoulder season in 1974, a time when the hotel was relatively empty and not as frequented by guests. This allowed King to experience the hotel in a unique and eerie way, providing him with the perfect setting for his chilling tale.

Struck By the Isolation and Emptiness

As King explored the hallways and rooms of the Stanley Hotel, he couldn’t help but feel a sense of isolation and emptiness. The vast emptiness of the hotel during the shoulder season amplified the eerie atmosphere, fueling King’s imagination and giving him a glimpse into the potential horrors that could unfold within its walls.

Learned About Freelan Oscar Stanley, the Hotel’s Founder

During his stay at the Stanley Hotel, King learned about its fascinating history and the man behind its creation, Freelan Oscar Stanley. Stanley, the inventor of the Stanley Steamer automobile, built the hotel in 1909 as a luxurious retreat for wealthy travelers seeking the healing benefits of the mountain air.

King found this backstory intriguing and incorporated elements of it into his novel, adding depth and historical context to the story.

For more information about the Stanley Hotel and its connection to “The Shining,” you can visit https://www.stanleyhotel.com/

The Disturbances and Paranormal Activity in Room 217

King’s wife refused to stay in the haunted room.

During their stay at the historic Stanley Hotel, renowned author Stephen King and his wife Tabitha had a chilling encounter with the paranormal. As they were shown to their room, Room 217, they were informed by the hotel staff that it was one of the most haunted rooms in the entire building.

Intrigued by the idea, Stephen King was ready to embrace the experience. However, Tabitha, upon learning about the room’s reputation, adamantly refused to stay there.

Tabitha’s refusal to spend a single night in Room 217 was not without reason. Over the years, there have been numerous reports from hotel guests and staff members about strange occurrences in the room.

From unexplained noises to unsettling apparitions, Room 217 has earned a notorious reputation for its paranormal activity.

Heard Strange Noises Like a Child’s Marbles Rolling

Despite his wife’s reluctance, Stephen King decided to spend the night in Room 217 alone. As he settled into his room, he couldn’t help but notice the eerie atmosphere that surrounded him. In the dead of night, he started hearing strange noises, similar to the sound of marbles rolling across the floor.

The unsettling part was that there were no marbles in the room, yet the noise persisted.

This experience left King feeling both intrigued and unnerved. As a writer known for his mastery of horror and suspense, he couldn’t help but wonder if the paranormal activity in Room 217 was the perfect inspiration for his next terrifying tale.

Lights Turned On and Off, And Their Pillows Were Fluffed

As if the strange noises weren’t enough, Stephen King also encountered other bizarre incidents during his night in Room 217. The lights in the room flickered on and off, seemingly on their own accord, creating a nerve-wracking atmosphere.

Additionally, when King woke up the next morning, he discovered that the pillows on the bed had been mysteriously fluffed, despite no one else entering the room.

These disturbances left King fascinated by the paranormal occurrences at the Stanley Hotel. They served as a catalyst for his imagination and ultimately inspired his iconic novel, “The Shining.” The experiences he had that night in Room 217 stayed with him, providing a foundation for the eerie and terrifying events that unfold within the fictional Overlook Hotel in his novel.

The Stanley Hotel continues to be a popular destination for those seeking a taste of the supernatural. Room 217 remains one of the most requested rooms, attracting visitors who are eager to experience the same disturbances that captivated Stephen King’s imagination.

The Nightmares and Visions That Night

The night Stephen King spent at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, would forever be etched in his memory. As an acclaimed horror writer, King often sought inspiration from real-life experiences, and this particular night would serve as the catalyst for one of his most iconic novels, The Shining .

Throughout the night, King experienced a series of nightmares and vivid visions that would shape the eerie and haunting atmosphere of the Overlook Hotel in his book.

Dreamed His Son Was Being Chased Through the Hotel

One of the most unsettling nightmares King had that night was the vivid dream of his young son being chased through the corridors of the hotel. In this chilling vision, his son’s terrified screams echoed through the empty hallways as unseen forces pursued him relentlessly.

This nightmare became the genesis for the character of Danny Torrance, the young boy with psychic abilities who becomes the target of supernatural entities in The Shining .

Imagined a Fire-Hose Chasing His Son in the Halls

As if one nightmare wasn’t enough, King’s imagination took another terrifying turn during his stay at the Stanley Hotel. In this vision, he imagined a fire-hose coming to life, snaking its way through the corridors, and pursuing his son.

The image of this inanimate object transforming into a menacing entity haunted King’s thoughts and found its way into the eerie scenes of the novel, where the hotel’s inanimate objects seemingly come alive.

Envisioned a Masquerade Party of Ghostly Guests

One of the most surreal visions King had that night was the image of a masquerade party taking place in the hotel’s grand ballroom. However, the guests at this party were not ordinary people but ethereal figures, ghostly apparitions from the past.

The sight of these ghostly guests, adorned in elaborate costumes and masks, left an indelible impression on King’s mind and served as the inspiration for the chilling scenes of the hotel’s spectral inhabitants in The Shining .

It is worth noting that the Stanley Hotel has embraced its connection to Stephen King’s novel and has capitalized on its notoriety. Visitors can now take guided tours of the hotel, where they can explore the very rooms and hallways that inspired King’s nightmares.

Whether you are a fan of King’s work or simply intrigued by the supernatural, a visit to the Stanley Hotel offers a unique opportunity to immerse yourself in the eerie atmosphere that sparked the creation of one of the most iconic horror novels of all time.

Learning About the Hotel’s Ghostly Reputation

When Stephen King arrived at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, he was not aware of the hotel’s ghostly reputation. However, he soon learned about the paranormal history of the hotel from the staff members.

They informed him about the various reported sightings, strange occurrences, and unexplained phenomena that had taken place within the hotel’s walls.

Informed of Paranormal History by Hotel Staff

The hotel staff at the Stanley Hotel did not shy away from sharing the hotel’s ghostly reputation with Stephen King. They told him about the numerous accounts of ghostly apparitions, mysterious footsteps, and objects moving on their own.

They also mentioned the hotel’s haunted Room 217, which had a particularly chilling history. This information intrigued King, and it sparked his curiosity to explore the supernatural elements that would later inspire his iconic novel, The Shining.

Multiple Room 217 Sightings Reported Before His Stay

Prior to Stephen King’s stay at the Stanley Hotel, there had been multiple reported sightings and strange occurrences in Room 217. Guests had reported seeing a ghostly figure of a woman in 19th-century clothing, believed to be the spirit of Elizabeth Wilson, a former housekeeper.

Some guests also claimed to have experienced flickering lights, cold spots, and even objects mysteriously moving. These sightings and experiences added to the hotel’s reputation and further piqued King’s interest in the supernatural.

Other Hotel Guests Reported Similar Experiences

The Stanley Hotel’s ghostly reputation was not limited to Room 217. Numerous other guests had reported similar paranormal experiences throughout the hotel. Some claimed to have seen apparitions in the hallways, while others heard disembodied voices or felt an eerie presence in their rooms.

These accounts of unexplained phenomena from various guests provided further evidence of the hotel’s haunted reputation and contributed to the eerie atmosphere that inspired King’s writing.

Writing The Shining Inspired by His Stay

Stephen King’s terrifying night at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, served as the catalyst for his iconic novel, The Shining. The eerie experience he had during his stay influenced him to write one of the most renowned horror stories of all time.

Quickly Started Drafting The Shining After His Visit

After spending a night in the haunted Stanley Hotel, Stephen King was deeply affected by the strange occurrences he witnessed. He couldn’t shake off the chilling atmosphere and the unsettling feeling that lingered within him.

Determined to capture his experience in words, King began drafting The Shining shortly after his visit. The novel, published in 1977, became an instant bestseller and solidified King’s reputation as a master of horror.

Used the Setting and Themes for His Haunted Hotel Story

The Stanley Hotel provided the perfect setting for The Shining. Nestled in the Rocky Mountains, the hotel’s grandeur and isolation added a sense of eerie isolation that mirrored the characters’ experiences in the novel.

King cleverly incorporated elements of the hotel’s history, such as its alleged paranormal activity, into the storyline. The haunted nature of the hotel and its surroundings became a crucial backdrop for the terrifying events that unfolded in The Shining.

Included Real Details Like the Fire Hose and Room Number

One of the fascinating aspects of The Shining is the inclusion of real details from King’s stay at the Stanley Hotel. For example, the infamous Room 217, where many of the novel’s spine-chilling scenes take place, was inspired by King’s own experience in Room 217 during his stay.

Additionally, the presence of a fire hose in the story was directly influenced by a fire hose King noticed in the hotel’s hallway. These details add an extra layer of authenticity to the novel, making it even more unsettling for readers.

For more information on Stephen King’s inspiration for The Shining, you can visit the official Stanley Hotel website at www.stanleyhotel.com .

Stephen King’s alarming night spent in room 217 of the Stanley Hotel profoundly inspired him to write one of horror’s most iconic novels. The empty halls, eerie paranormal activity, and terrifying nightmares provided the foundation for The Shining’s critically acclaimed Overlook Hotel setting and story.

Decades later, King’s stay is legendary, and fans can even book the room to get a taste of the ambiance that sparked his imagination and created a masterpiece of horror.

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Sara Thomas is the founder of HotelChantelle.com, a website dedicated to hotel safety products that travelers can use for added security and peace of mind.

After an unsettling hotel stay during a work trip, Sara realized a need for portable products that could secure hotel rooms. She launched HotelChantelle.com to provide devices like hidden camera detectors, portable door locks, and other discreet safety tools for travelers.

With a background in law enforcement, Sara understood the vulnerabilities of hotel rooms and wanted to empower travelers to protect themselves. She heads up a team that tests and reviews innovative security products for travelers to use in hotels globally.

Sara is committed to helping travelers feel relaxed and secure during hotel stays through access to protective gear they can easily take on any trip. The site covers products like personal safety alarms, RFID blocking gear to prevent digital pickpocketing, and items to safeguard personal data and belongings in lodging.

When she's not reviewing new products or running the site, Sara enjoys planning family vacations using the safety tools she sells on HotelChantelle.com. She lives with her husband and kids in Atlanta.

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17 Unsettling Staff And Guest Stories Of Hauntings At The Hotel ‘The Shining’ Is Based On

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The Stanley hotel in Estes Park, Colorado is allegedly one of the most haunted locations in the US. Hundreds of paranormal investigations take place their each year, with mixed results. Stephen King stayed there with his family — and woke up from a nightmare to begin writing a novel based on his stay there , The Shining . Jim Carrey stayed there while filming Dumb and Dumber at the hotel, and only lasted three hours.

Here are some of the most compelling stories from staff and hotel guests:

“The hotel was getting ready to shut down for the season due to the fact that they did not have heat in the hotel (and wouldn’t till the 80s I believe) and it was just to cold, so they were surprised when Mr. King showed up unexpectedly with his family. They were stuck in a snow storm and so were offered bedding for the night, making them essentially the only people in the hotel that. Later on, when exploring the halls of the hotel, he witnessed an apparition of a woman that chilled him to the bone. The apparition was said to be that of a former employee who was the head maid. Many years before, the hotel had lost power due to a storm and she was asked by the manager of the hotel to go through and light the lamps (their back up source of light). What no one knew was there was a gas leak in one of the rooms. When she opened the door her open flame ignited the gas and essentially blew the room apart and sent her through the floor and into the room a story down. That room was 217. The same room Stephen King was staying in the night he was visiting the hotel. Now the maid did survive this catastrophe and went on to work at the hotel for a few more years but she still sticks around. If Stephen King hadn’t been stuck in a snow storm and offered boarding we wouldn’t have The Shining today.”

“A male ghost, who some believe to be an Irish man named Lord Dunraven, is reported to be in this room. Although he never visited the hotel in life, as it was built 20 years after he left Estes Park, it was built on land he once owned. In the closet, women feel their hair being played with, an arm around their shoulder or waist, or a hand moving up the back of their leg. Men don’t feel particularly welcome in this room sometimes, as they have felt someone is pressing them into bed or their jewelry disappearing. This was the room where Jason of the Ghost Hunters television show had his drinking glass, which was set on the night stand, implode while he was sleeping. The closet door also opened and closed on its own.”

“People have reported being “tucked in” in this room. A little boy said that he kept kicking his covers off, and they kept coming back up throughout the night. His mother was quite shocked and said that she hadn’t woken during the night, and certainly didn’t keep covering him. Another guest reported feeling someone sit on the edge of the bed, but when she turned the light on, no one was there. She did, however, see an indentation, as if someone had just gotten up.”

“Ghost children do mischievous things in this room. Covers are sometimes removed during the night, and hangers are known to move on their own. Bathroom lights have also been reported to turn on and off on their own. A little girl, about 4 years old, and her mother stayed in there a few years ago. The following morning, the girl reported being tickled by a little boy during the night. She wasn’t afraid though. Instead, she simply told the little boy to stop, and he did!”

“A ghost cowboy tends to frequent this room. A couple a few years back awoke to find a Wild West cowboy pacing at the end of their bed. After watching him for a few minutes, they politely asked him to leave, which he did, but not before leaning over the lady as if kissing her. Female guests sometimes wake to find him leaning in for a kiss on the forehead!”

“Many housekeeping events happen in this room. Guests have reported returning to their room after dropping off their bags, and finding their luggage has been unpacked for them. Other guests have also reported their shoes being lined up, neatly, on the end of the bed. Shadows have also been reported passing through walls, as this room was once part of a much larger suite until the mid-2000s.”

“A male ghost has been seen as a shadow in this room, walking near the walls. Photos have been known to fly off the walls, and Grant from Ghost Hunters had a table levitate while changing film.”

“Several guests have reported seeing a man dressed in “old-fashioned” clothes standing in the corner of the room. The face of a man in a blue ball has also been seen on the outside door of the room.”

The concert hall

“The Concert Hall also is a hot spot of paranormal activity. Paul worked at The Stanley from 1995-2005 and died of a heart attack while en route from the hotel to the hospital after suffering chest pains. Known as a jack-of–all-trades, one of Paul’s responsibilities was to enforce the hotel’s 11 p.m. curfew. It’s not uncommon to hear a faint and ominous “get out” in the after hours, though it’s unclear if he’d be so bold as to shush hotel founder Flora Stanley, who can often be heard playing the piano, some seven decades after her demise. A construction worker sanding the floor just a few years ago believes Paul was brazen enough to physically nudge him to the door after feeling two arms pull him back. Paul is also known to flicker the flashlights of touring groups.”

The concert hall basement

View post on imgur.com

“Over the weekend, about 15 coworkers and myself had our company trip to The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, known for being Stephen King’s inspiration for “The Shining”. We took an 8pm ghost tour, where we joined about 15 other people to get guided around the property and told stories about it’s history and creepy things that are said to have happened. We were told to take lots of pictures, I’m sure to try and capture orbs or ghosts. Many green orbs were caught in pictures, but I don’t think anything is as creepy as this photo taken by my coworker- a little girl in a hot pink dress, who was definitely not on our tour.

And apparently years ago, a young girl (12-13) by the name of Lucy was squatting in the basement of the concert hall (which is where this photo was taken), and discovered upon plans to begin some construction. She was forced to leave, the night got below freezing, and she froze to death. Everyone on my tour has vouched that this girl was not on our tour (who wouldn’t remember someone wearing that hot pink?). The man pictured is our tour guide- no one would have been in front of him. I am convinced this is the ghost of Lucy. Just one more added note, though I doubt if anyone would believe me, but there was only ONE time throughout the tour where I felt any strange energy or feeling, and it was right here, heading down to the basement of the concert hall.”

“Elizabeth Wilson was the chief housekeeper who, during an early summer storm in 1911, was injured in an explosion as she was lighting the acetylene lanterns in room 217. She survived with broken ankles, but to this day takes special care of room 217’s guests, possibly even King, who stayed there just days before the near-deserted Stanley closed for the winter. King is said to have encountered a young child during his stay, though there were no children visiting at that time. Guests have reported items moved, luggage unpacked, and lights being turned on and off.”

“Lucy also wanders the Concert Hall, tampering with lights and lifting spirits. She’s been known to actively communicate with and answer questions from staff and parapsychologists via flashlights, but her story and pre-death connection to The Stanley remain unclear. It is surmised she was a runaway or homeless woman who found refuge there. Whatever her history, employees insist Lucy’s presence and distant melodious humming lightens the energy and mood wherever she lingers.”

The hotel at large

“Eddie, who initially presented himself with a foul odor, earning him the nickname “Stinky Man.” Apparently offended by the moniker, Eddie switched tactics and began exuding a more pleasant smell. His presence, however, seems to cause discomfort, possibly due to a life of hardship, according to visiting psychics and mediums. He has since lightened up, but remains the resident prankster and apparently a ladies’ man, often suspected of stroking the hair and kissing their cheeks of female guests. Eddie began visiting The Stanley just a few years ago and has no known connection to the property. It is wondered if Lucy and Eddie are simply a new demographic of guests, and raises the question of travel in the afterlife.”

“A myriad of phenomena, not necessarily attributed to the aforementioned usual suspects, has been reported throughout the property. The sounds of partygoers, bygone celebrations, and children laughing (particularly on the fourth floor where children and nannies once stayed), can often be heard. The hotel’s preternatural afterlife is often palpable and has attracted professional skeptics and paranormal investigators alike. The Travel Channel’s Ghost Adventures and Syfy’s Ghost Hunters are just two of many teams to investigate the occurrences. Most claim to have heard voices and thumping and saw strange lights, shadows and orbs. Ghost Hunter’s lead investigator Jason Hawes had a glass on his nightstand shatter not long after the closet door opened and closed.”

“I’m pretty skeptical when it comes to supernatural or paranormal happenings but one thing in particular really messed with my head; at the beginning of the tour you follow tour guide to the music hall which would often be occupied by children playing during the day time.

When you arrive in the hall you’re are seated in the observation box and given an introduction of sorts explaining that none of the spirits or activity are angry or violent and that alot of the activity was thought to be that of children (especially in this hall). So, our guide asked by show of hands if any of the tour members are good with kids to which I, along with 4 or 5 others raised our hands; everyone who raised their hands she gave a dum dum sucker to for us to hold out on our palm as if we were handing it to a child and depending on the spirits comfortablity with you they would supposedly pull on the the sucker. Some people claimed to feel movement, some didn’t feel a thing but, I personally felt and watched this fucking sucker drag from the middle of my hand all the way off to the ground.

That fucked with my shit.”

The staircase to nowhere

“When I was a kid, the Stanley was just a pretty hotel with dumpy rooms (1970s canary yellow and olive drab. Borderline craphole). We never stayed there, it was just a place to get a good, cheap lunch. (Obviously, this was before the miniseries, when it was still cheap and not haunted).

Anyway, I’d screw around and explore the hotel because hotels are fun to screw around in and explore. My brother, my sister, and myself were wandering the hotel after lunch, poking our heads into open rooms and whatnot. Well, we round the corner of the hallway and to our right is an small opening in the wall of the hall leading to a set of very narrow and steep circular stairs descending into pitch black darkness. None of us had the cojones to check it out. Wish we had, I never saw that staircase again.”

“My ex-girlfriend and I went there around New Years a couple of years ago. I can confirm it is very haunted. On the 3rd floor, my ex turned white as a sheet after stopping in front of a particular door. I asked her what had happened, she said that something had ran their hand from her backside up to the nape of her neck. There was no one else around but us. When the docent got all of the tour members gathered around the door she had the experience at, she began to tell the group about an apparition that likes to grope pretty young ladies and run his hand from their back side up to their neck. Super Spooky!”

The ballroom

“It’s absolutely beautiful- and haunted. My sister lived in Colorado for years so one winter we were visiting we decided to make the trip to Estes Park. Well being the rule breakers we are in my family, we ditched the official tour and took our own. We came across this big room with chairs covered in white cloth. We decided to “play ghost” and drape the cloths over ourselves, pretend to be ghosts, and take pictures. We, of course, thought we were hilarious. The ghosts decided to delete every picture we took in that room. All the pictures we took before and after were still on the camera, just the ones where we were playing ghost were deleted. Weird place!”

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Stanley Hotel

Stanley Hotel | A Breeding Ground of Paranormal Events

Has it ever occurred to you, whilst spending a night in a hotel room, is your room haunted? What would you do if it is? Well, most likely, you’d run screaming. In America, a hotel called Stanley Hotel inspired the infamous movie ‘ Stanley Hotel The Shining.’ A film that made us all sleepless and paranoid at night.

The Stanley Hotel Colorado was built by Freelan Oscar Stanley and Flora Stanley in 1908 as an isolated mountain resort. Although they have passed away, many still believe they haven’t really left.

While, some yet question- is the Stanley hotel haunted?

haunted room the shining

Post Contents

Stanley Hotel History

It is a historic hotel located in Estes Park, Colorado, USA. The hotel was opened in 1909 by Freelan Oscar Stanley, an inventor and businessman. The hotel was built to provide a luxurious retreat for travellers who wanted to explore the nearby Rocky Mountain National Park. The hotel became famous after the author Stephen King stayed there in 1974 and wrote the book “The Shining,” which was later adapted into a movie by the same name.

The hotel has a fascinating past and has hosted many famous guests, including presidents and celebrities.

Although it is known to be a place where ghosts are often seen, the hotel remains a famous tourist spot recognized for its stunning architecture and stunning views.

Stanley Hotel Shining Inspiration

In Stephen King’s infamous horror book ‘The Shining’, the Stanley Hotel room 237 is actually room 217 .

He altered the room no’s in his book as the hotel staff feared that no one would take room no. 217 if everyone would find the room a breeding ground of paranormal events.

Though the book represented the events based on being isolated in the large hotel all alone, the book digs into the deceptions the mind could play on those prone to fear, violence and paranoia when stuck and detached from the world.

MMT Hotels [CPS] IN

However, the movie, directed by Stanley Kubrick, was apparently filmed on a London soundstage along with outdoor shots taken at Timberlane Lodge in Mt. Oregon.

stanley haunted room hotel

King wasn’t impressed with Kubrick’s adaptation of his work; in 1990, he revisited the “Hotel” to shoot a mini-series more like King’s novel.

A Ghost Hunt at Stanley Hotel

The Stanley Hotel ghost tour costs $50 if you want to participate in the 5-hour ghost hunt, headed by a paranormal investigator who educates you on using the equipment to look for the ghosts.

The hotel apparently has a psychic named Madame Vera as a resident and a paranormal researcher Callea Seck. The hotel also offers 1.5 hours of a ghost tour at half a price.

Haunted Spots in the Stanley Hotel

The Stanley Hotel, located in the lovely Estes Park, Colorado, is well-known for its magnificent architecture, rich history, and role as Stephen King’s inspiration for his book “The Shining.”

The hotel is famous for its purported paranormal activities and luxury. Both guests and investigators have been drawn to a few haunting locations within the hotel:

Concert Hall

Why is the Stanley Hotel famous? So the answer is:

When Stanley King and his wife arrived at the hotel, the hotel was closing down for the period, and they were the only two guests living there for the night.

After eating their dinner, they went to their expansive room on the second floor.

Stephen woke up during the night from a horrific nightmare where he saw his 3-year-old son being chased through the hallways and screaming.

Stanley Hotel

He jumped off the bed, comprehending it was just a nightmare . That’s where the plot of his book evolved.

People assume the ghost living in the room is Elizabeth Wilson, the hotel’s head housekeeper. As mentioned above, she was hit by a lightning bolt though she survived it- only broke her ankle.

Stanley Hotel

There are several paranormal uproars reported in the concert hall of the hotel.

One of the ghosts, named Paul, who is said to be a master at doing different kinds of work but not very competent in all of them, haunts the hotel. What are his duties?

Imposing an 11 pm deadline at the hotel could be the reason why guests hear ’get out’ being spoken. A spot is also a favourite place for the hotel’s founder, Flora Stanley, as many have listened to the piano being played.

Another spectre that wanders the hall is Lucy, who is presumed to be possibly a homeless woman who found shelter in the building. She amuses the ghost hunters by fulfilling their requests, frequently interacting with them with flashing lights .

front view of the haunted place

Anyone who books a room on the fourth floor really gets a badge of bravery . Not kidding! However, you get a bonus point if you book room no.428 .

Guests have started hearing footsteps coming from above and moving furniture. People say that the room is haunted by a friendly cowboy who appears at the edge of the bed.

Stanley Hotel room 418 also has a story to tell. One of the guide members said she’d been hugged twice by a kid’s ghost in that room before.

In 2016 , a guest from Houston took some photographs of the hotel, and after returning home, he reviewed those photographs.

One of the photographs depicted an apparition at the top of the stairway. He doesn’t even recall someone being on the stars while he was taking photos.

parking area in hotel

Dumb and Dumber Stanley Hotel

The movie featured the hotel as the chic ‘Danbury hotel’ where Lloyd and Harry stop, immediately burning millions of dollars they just discovered in baggage.

The Murder by Death event is held every year. Murder by Death is a concert gala series held in January 2019. 

Where is the Stanley Hotel?

The staff and the guests reported numerous ghostly events in the Stanley Hotel, Estes Park, Colorado. The paranormal phenomena in the hotel were first recorded back in 1911.

A housekeeper named Ms Elizabeth Wilson electrocuted at some point in a lightning storm. However, she wasn’t killed. The room where the incident occurred was room no.217. And since then, hotel room 217 hasn’t stopped getting attention due to its paranormal stories.

Statue outside the hotel

Throughout the years, every room of the Hotel has witnessed something eerie, from clothes being put together in place, to items relocating on their own, to lights turning on & off themselves.

The fourth floor of the Hotel is appalling, as many reported hearing ghostly laughter of children running and giggling down the halls.

However, the hotel staff members stated that there are no reports of any evil or menacing events happening due to the ghosts at Stanley hotel Since the Hotel ghosts are friendly and don’t hold any ill will. Yeah, sure. We believe you.

First of all, nobody got killed in the Stanley Hotel, and it was mostly peaceful, except for a fatal gas explosion that happened in 1911. The hotel owners, Freelan and Flora Stanley, had a good time at the mountain resort and lived to be old, according to the hotel’s website.

Click Here to know the answer: StanleyHotel

Yes, a hotel in Greece is named “The Stanley Hotel Athens”.

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IMAGES

  1. The Haunted Hotel From The Shining

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  2. Stay At A Real Haunted Hotel For A Creepy Halloween

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  3. 10 Haunting Details Surrounding The Real-Life “The Shining” Hotel

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  4. The Shining (1980)

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  5. The Shining (1980) is creative director Stanley Kubrick's intense, epic

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  6. Shining, The

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VIDEO

  1. The Shining: Who’s in Room 237?

  2. The Shining- Ghost

  3. ROOM 237

  4. Exploring the Haunted History of the Stanley Hotel

  5. The Shining

  6. [4K] The Shining Maze Highlights

COMMENTS

  1. Inside The Stanley Hotel That Inspired 'The Shining'

    Room 217, the room in which King himself stayed and the one that is haunted in the novel (changed to 237 in Stanley Kubrick's film adaptation), remains extremely popular with guests who want the "Shining Hotel" experience and is usually booked months in advance. Pinterest

  2. What It's Like to Stay at the Stanley Hotel Known for 'the Shining'

    When Stanley Kubrick was adapting King's novel into a movie, producers changed it from room 217 to 237, afraid that no one would want to stay in a "haunted" room. But today, room 217 is the most popular in the hotel. In "The Shining" it's room 237, but in actuality, Stephen King stayed in room 217.

  3. Room 237

    Room 237, not to be confused with the documentary of the same name, was a room in the Overlook Hotel in The Shining. In the book it was called "217". The room was inhabited in the past, by a Lorraine Massey who would usually seduce young bellboys who would visit her room. One time Danny Torrance visited this room after a ball strangely rolled to him from its open doors. Later, he claimed that ...

  4. What Only True Horror Fans Know About The Shining's Room 237

    Fans of The Shining know that the ghost that haunts this room is Lorraine Massey, a former Overlook Hotel guest who took her own life. Due to these terrifying moments involving this ghost, reps ...

  5. The Shining: The True Story & Real-Life Hotel Behind The Movie

    The Shining is partially based on a true story, as the supernatural elements of Jack Torrance's stay at the Overlook Hotel are inspired by a real haunting in Colorado. Stephen King's The Shining tells the story of Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson), a recovering alcoholic who takes a job as the caretaker of a historic hotel during its off-season. Jack, his wife, Wendy (Shelley Duvall), and their ...

  6. The Haunted Stanley Hotel

    Room 401 is said to be the most haunted room in the house. Stephen King stayed in room 217, which is the focus haunted room in The Shining novel. Stanley Kubrick's Shining infamously changed the haunted room in the movie to room 237. Room 407 is haunted by an older man smoking a pipe. Room 207 is haunted by the ghost of Elizabeth Wilson.

  7. Room 237

    Room 237 is a 2012 American documentary film directed by Rodney Ascher about interpretations of Stanley Kubrick's film The Shining (1980) which was adapted from the 1977 novel of the same name by Stephen King. The documentary includes footage from The Shining and other Kubrick films, along with discussions by Kubrick enthusiasts.Room 237 has nine segments, each focusing on a different element ...

  8. The Haunted History Behind The Shining's Stanley Hotel

    Room 407 is supposedly haunted by Lord Dunraven, the man who owned the land prior to Stanley. ... especially when there's a channel on the TV in every room that plays Kubrick's "The Shining" on a ...

  9. The true story that inspired the hotel from "The Shining"

    The Shining, was inspired by these events and the overall experience of being secluded in the grand resort hotel alone. The Stanley appeared in the 1990s King-sanctioned made-for-TV series version, as he wasn't a fan of Stanley Kubrick's atmosphere-heavy, plot-light take on his material. Today you can watch both King's and Kubrick's versions on ...

  10. Inside The Spooky Hotel That Inspired 'The Shining'

    On Oct. 30, 1874, acclaimed horror author Stephen King stayed in The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, the hotel that inspired the famous Overlook Hotel...

  11. Explaining the real mystery behind 'The Shining'

    One of the most iconic aspects of The Shining is the haunted Room 237, a hotel apartment in the Overlook that possesses an evil spirit. Changed from the novel — originally Room 217 — Kubrick made the switch out of respect for the owners of the real-life hotel who didn't want to freak out their guests into thinking their Room 217 was ...

  12. Why The Room 237 Scene In 'The Shining' Is So Damn Terrifying

    The Scene. In a dreamlike scene, Jack enters room 237 and discovers firsthand the nightmare incarnate that attacked his son. Ominous music cues us that something is amiss as we, through Jack's ...

  13. Inside the creepy hotel that inspired 'The Shining'

    In 1974, master of horror Stephen King and his wife Tabitha spent just one night in Room 217 at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colo. By morning, his seminal 1977 novel "The Shining" was born ...

  14. Is 'The Shining' Hotel Really Haunted?

    Mr. Stanley (who passed in 1940) can still be seen around the hotel with room 428 having the most encounters Ghost Hunters Ghost Adventures. So if you've ever wondered if the Stanley Hotel is ...

  15. What Happened at The Stanley Hotel? The True Story Behind The Shining's

    Room 217 and the Ghostly Housekeeper: Room 217 is perhaps the most famously haunted room in the hotel. According to legend, a housekeeper named Elizabeth Wilson died in the room in 1911 after an explosion occurred while she was lighting a lantern. ... Aside from "The Shining," The Stanley Hotel has been featured in several other films and ...

  16. The Shining: The True History at the Stanley Hotel

    It tells the story of Jack Torrance, a recovering alcoholic who takes a job as the caretaker of a historic hotel during the off-season. Jack, his wife, Wendy, and their son, Danny (Danny Lloyd ...

  17. Colorado hotel with haunted history inspired 'The Shining'

    The Stanley Hotel in Colorado is said to be haunted by several different spirits and Stephen King says it inspired him to write his horror novel, "The Shining." ... King's stay in room 217, he ...

  18. Inside The REAL Haunted Hotel That Inspired THE SHINING: The ...

    Emmy-Winner Jake Hamilton travels to Estes Park, Colorado to visit The Stanley Hotel -- the hotel that inspired Stephen King to write THE SHINING. The direct...

  19. The Shining (film)

    The Shining is a 1980 horror film produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick and co-written with novelist Diane Johnson.It is based on Stephen King's 1977 novel of the same name and stars Jack Nicholson, Danny Lloyd, Shelley Duvall, and Scatman Crothers.Nicholson plays Jack Torrance, a writer and recovering alcoholic who accepts a new position as the off-season caretaker of the Overlook Hotel.

  20. The Shining (novel)

    The Shining is a 1977 horror novel by American author Stephen King. It is King's third published novel and first hardcover bestseller; its success firmly established King as a preeminent author in the horror genre. ... Taped orchestral music played in the room and theirs was the only table set for dining: "Except for our table all the chairs ...

  21. Stephen King's Terrifying Night at the Stanley Hotel That Inspired The

    The haunted nature of the hotel and its surroundings became a crucial backdrop for the terrifying events that unfolded in The Shining. Included Real Details Like the Fire Hose and Room Number One of the fascinating aspects of The Shining is the inclusion of real details from King's stay at the Stanley Hotel.

  22. 17 Unsettling Staff And Guest Stories Of Hauntings At The Hotel 'The

    Shadows have also been reported passing through walls, as this room was once part of a much larger suite until the mid-2000s." Room #302 "A male ghost has been seen as a shadow in this room, walking near the walls. Photos have been known to fly off the walls, and Grant from Ghost Hunters had a table levitate while changing film." Room #413

  23. Stanley Hotel

    In Stephen King's infamous horror book 'The Shining', the Stanley Hotel room 237 is actually room 217. He altered the room no's in his book as the hotel staff feared that no one would take room no. 217 if everyone would find the room a breeding ground of paranormal events. Though the book represented the events based on being isolated ...

  24. These Historical Photos on Instagram: "Though its story remains lesser

    98 likes, 0 comments - thesehistoricalphotos on October 29, 2023: "Though its story remains lesser-known, the hotel that inspired The Shining is just as chilling as..." These Historical Photos on Instagram: "Though its story remains lesser-known, the hotel that inspired The Shining is just as chilling as its fictional counterpart.