Calvary Chapel

Understanding Cessationism: The Gifts of the Spirit & the Church Today

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

Kellen Criswell

Kellen Criswell M.A. previously served as Global Strategist of Calvary Global Network and calvarychapel.com. In addition, Kellen has served as a worship pastor, assistant pastor, senior pastor, church planter, missionary and Bible college instructor.

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

Blog Archives

Subscribe for latest news and posts, you may also like.

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

Jesus Offers A Greater Rest

Bruce Zachary

The Real Saint Nick

Wayne Taylor

Brought to you by the team at Calvary Global Network

  • Ministry & Leadership
  • Christian Living
  • Discipleship
  • History & Holidays
  • Chuck Smith
  • Church Finder
  • Calvary Music
  • Conferences / Archives

© 2024 Calvary Chapel. All Rights Reserved.

  • Authors and Writers
  • Explore The Archives
  • What We Believe
  • Series: Things That Matter
  • Series: Living Grace
  • Youtube Channel
  • Vimeo Channel
  • Our History
  • Our Founder: Chuck Smith
  • How To Know God
  • Pastor Chuck’s Sermons
  • Calvary Distribution
  • Calvary Español
  • Calvary Romania
  • CGN Website
  • Upcoming Conference
  • Conference Archives

The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit by John MacArthur

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

This teaching is made available from Grace to You. Founded in 1969, Grace to You is the nonprofit organization responsible for developing, producing, and distributing John MacArthur's books, audio resources, and the "Grace to You" radio and television programs.

John MacArthur image

John MacArthur

Pastor / Teacher

More Sermons

Teaching Info

Teacher: John MacArthur

Text: Selected Scriptures

Ministry: Grace Pulpit

Topics: Ministry of the Holy Spirit Sin

Date: 10/23/2011

Sermon Correction/Question

We recently have updated the security settings on our website. Old versions of web browsers or outdated web browsers, including Internet Explorer, are no longer supported. If you’re experiencing issues with the media content on our website , please try updating your browser.

Did you find incorrect or missing information related to a sermon? Examples could include: incorrect or missing pastor/teacher name, sermon title, scripture reference, ministry association, spelling error, etc. Thank you for your assistance in making sure we have the right information.

Please login or create an account to use this feature

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

  • en English (US)
  • en English (UK) English (UK)
  • es Español Spanish
  • de Deutsch German
  • ko 한국어 Korean
  • pt Português Portuguese
  • zh 中文 (简体) Chinese (Simplified)
  • it Italiano Italian
  • Report a translation error

Blaspheming the Holy Spirit

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

  • Download HQ Audio
  • Download Audio

“‘Therefore I say to you, any sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven men, but blasphemy against the Spirit shall not be forgiven. And whoever shall speak a word against the Son of Man, it shall be forgiven him; but whoever shall speak against the Holy Spirit, it shall not be forgiven him, either in this age, or in the age to come’” (Matthew 12:31–32).

Few passages of Scripture have been more misinterpreted and misunderstood than these two verses. Because of their extreme seriousness and finality; it is critical to understand them correctly.

Jesus first stated that any sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven men. Although blasphemy is a form of sin, in this passage and context the two are treated separately-with blasphemy representing the most extreme form of sin. Sin here represents the full gamut of immoral and ungodly thoughts and actions, whereas blasphemy represents conscious denouncing and rejection of God. Blasphemy is defiant irreverence, the uniquely terrible sin of intentionally and openly speaking evil against holy God or defaming or mocking Him (cf. Mark. 2:7). The Old Testament penalty for such blasphemy was death by stoning (Lev. 24:16). In the last days blasphemy will be an outstanding characteristic of those who rebelliously and insolently oppose God (Rev. 13:5–6; 16:9; 17:3). . . .

http://www.macarthurcommentaries.com

Latest Sermons

1-800-55-GRACE

Send a Message

Report Translation Error

If you find a mistake or problem with translated text on the page, please tell us about it below.

  • The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit (Selected Scriptures)

 John MacArthur The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit (Selected Scriptures) 

Subscribe and Get Sermons and Live Streams by John MacArthur DIRECTLY TO YOUR INBOX!

Please enable the javascript to submit this form

The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit (Selected Scriptures)

Leave a comment

i thanx God for this pastor's wisdom and ministry.....

John MacArthur

  • John MacArthur

John MacArthur is the pastor-teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California, as well as an author, conference speaker, chancellor of The Master’s University and Seminary, and featured teacher with the Grace to You media ministry.

After graduating from Talbot Theological Seminary, John came to Grace Community Church in 1969. The emphasis of his pulpit ministry is the careful study and verse-by-verse exposition of the Bible, ...

Latest from John MacArthur

  • Replacing Judas (Acts 1:12-26) John MacArthur
  • The Mysteries of Christ’s Birth - John MacArthur Sermon
  • John MacArthur - The Power of Persecution (Acts 8:1–8)
  • Identifying with Christ - John MacArthur Daily Devotional (January-06-2024)
  • Join John MacArthur Sunday Service Live Stream January-07-2024 at Grace Community Church
  • You are here:  
  • Sermons Online
  • Victory Channel

John MacArthur Collections Sermon Archive MacArthur's Bible Study Guides MacArthur's Questions & Answers

Note: "After 24 years of association with the Ministry of John MacArthur, we have now been asked by Grace To You to no longer maintain John's resources directly on Bible Bulletin Board.  The reason is that all of John's works are now available in totality on their website.  For many years there was no online ministry for MacArthur, but now there is, and it is a superb ministry.  We, at Bible Bulletin Board count it a distinct privilege and blessing to have been able to provide John's works here for so long. The links listed above will now take you directly to the Grace To You website.  May you continued to be blessed and enriched by the MacArthur ministry."

Tony Capoccia

Bible Bulletin Board PO Box 199 Middletown, DE 19709

www.biblebb.com

www.gospelgems.com

  • The Worst Christian of 2023
  • Stevie Flockhart, 901, and the Next Season: Part 1
  • Nominees: The Worst Christian of 2023
  • SBC Messengers: Beware Paredes and the Platform
  • From Bad to Jonathan Howe: Baptist Press Covers for New Baptist CEO.

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

Abusing The Holy Spirit … United Methodist Style

United Methodist Clergywomen’s Global Gathering, August 2016 “The Holy Spirit is the most forgotten, the most misrepresented, the most dishonored, the most grieved, the most abused, and I might even say the most blasphemed of the members of the Trinity.”  John MacArthur

That statement by John MacArthur comes from a sermon in 2011, just two years prior to the release of his book Strange Fire and the highly impactful conference of the same name.  (You can find the above-referenced sermon HERE , the book HERE and the Strange Fire conference HERE .)

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

Abuse of the Holy Spirit has become a mainstream industry. It has become increasingly commonplace in once more theologically conservative denominations.  Abuses against Him are regularly seen in the growing infatuation of contemplative spirituality (for example, Jesus Calling ), in preaching where emphasis is on the Holy Spirit rather than Christ, in the growing evangelical fascination with “visions, dreams, and voices from heaven,” as MacArthur note s, and in “Christian” bookstores where Biblically-deviant teachers and teachings on the Holy Spirit are rife.  (Consider, for example, the Southern Baptist Convention’s LifeWay and their continued sales of modalist T.D. Jakes’ “Christianized” self-help tomes.)

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

According to an April 11, 2017, article in Good News, a magazine subtitled as “Leading United Methodists to a Faithful Future,” blasphemy against the Holy Spirit is hitting mainstream Methodism.   Entitled “Invoking The Spirit,” the article gives us evidence of the denomination’s increasing disregard of Scripture and its abuse of the Holy Spirit.

“The Holy Spirit had swept across the room; its power and presence real and obvious. It was a sacred moment on holy ground.”

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

But the “it” of the UMC article had “swept across the room” for a very particular and very Scripture-defying reason … “the election of the Rev. Karen Oliveto, an openly married, lesbian, as a bishop of The United Methodist Church.”

According to the official website for the UMC, we glean the following under the topic of “ Women in Leadership: ”

In the Methodist tradition, women were ordained as ministers as early as the late 19th century, and in 1956 the Methodist Church, a predecessor body of The United Methodist Church, granted women full clergy rights. Women now make up approximately 25% of clergy in The United Methodist Church.

A few months ago, my wife and I were sharing the gospel with the manager of a large used bookstore that I tend to frequent.  The manager – a woman – was very receptive to a conversation about matters of faith and theology.  But when the mention of the New Testament writings of the Apostle Paul arose, so did her ire.  “I disregard him.  He’s a misogynist.  That’s not Christian.”  It’s certainly a retort offered more and more frequently in our post-modern culture (If you haven’t encountered it yourself, you might add an apologetic response for it to your “defense for the hope that is within you!” 1 Peter 3:15 ).

Here’s the thing, though.  The Holy Spirit inspired Scripture.  The Holy Spirit is eternal God.  When He inspired Paul to write such things as “I do not permit a woman to teach or have authority over a man,” (1 Timothy 2:12) the Holy Spirit, as transcendent God, was not bound by the social norms and religious dictates of Paul’s first-century culture.  The Holy Spirit was uttering God-breathed Truth and inspiring Paul such that His words would become Holy Scripture.

The Holy Spirit said exactly what He meant, inspired only what He meant, and has providentially transmitted fully what He meant – even to 21st-century readers.   That our culture finds Paul misogynistic isn’t a reflection on Scripture’s inadequacy in addressing our particular cultural needs and craving for “tolerance.”  It’s not as though the Holy Spirit didn’t know that the God-established authority of man as  “head of the wife” (Ephesians 5:22-33) would be socially distasteful and ecclesiastically challenged when our post-modern era rolled around.  The problem isn’t with the Word of God.  The problem – as always – is with us.  We don’t get to question the potter.  We don’t get to challenge the order of things established by our sovereign Creator.

But God-breathed Scripture – in its authority and in its sufficiency – is clearly something the UMC isn’t much concerned about.  Ordaining women as pastors is a clear violation of Scripture’s teaching.  Scripture nowhere instructs us to adjust it to cultural expectations so that God’s message might be more “inclusive.”   Rightly handling the Word (2 Timothy 2:15)  demands obedience to it.  The standard isn’t inclusiveness … it’s faithfulness.

That’s not all, though.  Ponder this from the UMC article:

“The Spirit is moving … and wherever we are willing to join in her work, she will birth fruit through us… Holy One, you have assured us that though we cannot see the Spirit herself, we can see the fruit of her work in one another, in our lives, and in the world. We know she is there wherever we see love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. Against these things, you have told us, there is no such law.”

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

Perhaps you caught the problem.  This progressive group within the UMC chooses either to refer to the Spirit as some sort of impersonal “it” or as a culture-assuaging, gender-specific “she.”

“ When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth”  John 16:13

For the Biblically-obedient, however, we can refer to Christ’s words about the Holy Spirit and then, knowing that God is immutable (Malachi 3:6) – inclusive of all three persons of the Trinity – understand with certainty that the Holy Spirit has not suddenly become transgendered in the 21 st century simply because it’s the attention-grabbing, culturally-chic thing to do.

The author of the article takes exception to the claims made by the progressives in the UMC that the Holy Spirit is affirming the LGBTQ segment of the denomination. He says the General Conference of the denomination – which serves as its deliberative oversight body – “received no word from the Holy Spirit compelling it to overturn its sexual ethics and teachings on marriage. Instead, it heard just the opposite: the Holy Spirit’s reaffirmation or reconfirmation of ethics and teachings rooted in Scripture and 2,000 years of church history.”

Now, that sounds like a pretty solid affirmation of Scripture and the witness of the church’s  historic orthodox obedience to it.  But, the author is speaking only to the issue of the LGBTQ progressives who are seeking full inclusion within the denomination. What the UMC, in a much broader way, has already established is a precedent that persuades them to disregard Scripture by their disobedient willingness to ordain and employ women in their pulpits. ( A 2011 study reported over 11,000 ordained “clergy-women” in the UMC.)   Winning on the LGBTQ issue certainly won’t fill the sails of the denomination with the winds of the Holy Spirit, when they are already eager to disregard His clear teaching on other, much more foundational issues.

Still, the author is calling for an outright denominational split over the issue.

Given the long and acrimonious debate, and now the progressives’ claim that the Holy Spirit is leading them to not just contest, but to defy the teachings of the UM Church, they need to fully embrace where they believe the Spirit is leading. For the sake of comity, and the larger mission of the church, it is time for them to create a new denomination in order to follow the Holy Spirit to a place where the UM Church does not believe it is leading.

The problem in all of this, so far as the UMC is concerned specifically – but which speaks more broadly to the evangelical church as a whole – is that Scripture is not a doctrinal buffet from which we may serve ourselves with the delicacies that appeal while avoiding the ones that are distasteful.   Approaching Scripture through the lens of contemporary culture is not a responsible, Biblical hermeneutic.

“ … God does not want to be worshiped in illegitimate ways.  God wants to be worshiped for who He is, for what He has done in the way He has declared.  It is open season on abusing the Holy Spirit, outrageous dishonor of the Holy Spirit, claiming He is saying things and doing things and generating things that have nothing to do with the Holy Spirit at all.  …  It is a shameful and dangerous sin to heap such abuse on the Holy Spirit.  In fact, the idea of bringing dishonor on the Holy Spirit ought to make any thinking person tremble.”  John MacArthur

Jesus gave us an important insight into the ministry of the Holy Spirit, a ministry that the UMC is rejecting, regardless of the stance it takes on the homosexual issue.

And when he comes, he will convict the world concerning sin and righteousness and judgment: , concerning sin, because they do not believe in me; concerning righteousness, because I go to the Father, and you will see me no longer; concerning judgment, because the ruler of this world is judged.  John 16:8-11

The denial of any portion of God’s Word is abusive to the Holy Spirit who authored, inspired, preserved and transmitted it. Attributing things to the Holy Spirit that He did not do – such as leading a denomination to ordain women as pastors – is blasphemy, whether those women are lesbians or not.

By their own precedent, however, such blasphemy is welcomed in the UMC.

“There is no broader way to apostasy than to reject God’s sovereignty in all things concerning the revelation of himself and our obedience…”  John Owen

[ Contributed by Bud Ahlheim]

H/T – William Guilkey

  • Free Masonry and the God-Shaped Hole: A Personal Testimony
  • Visiting Hank Hanegraaff’s New Greek Orthodox Church

You May Also Like

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

Southern Baptist CEO Wants New Word from God

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

Listen to JD Hall Discuss Evangelical Immigration Scripture-Twisting on Texas Talk Radio

Evangelicals: fornicating with the harlot.

John MacArthur, Strange Fire and Blasphemy of the Spirit

Charismatic/ Spiritual Gifts

Pastor John MacArthur has announced a “strange fire” conference to be held this October, claiming that part of the charismatic movement “offers to God unacceptable worship, distorted worship. It blasphemes the Holy Spirit. It attributes to the Holy Spirit even the work of Satan.”

If these charges are true, this means that many leaders in the charismatic movement have committed the unpardonable sin and are therefore hell-bound.

If these charges are not true, Pastor MacArthur has seriously overstepped his bounds and misused the Word of God.

And it is only fair to ask whether Pastor MacArthur, in his rightful zeal to correct excesses or errors in the charismatic movement—what he calls “strange fire”—is also guilty of rejecting the true fire.

Does he embrace the glorious things the Holy Spirit is doing worldwide, resulting in the salvation of tens of millions of souls, or does he write them off as the result of emotionalism and deception?

Before addressing these very weighty questions, let me express my deep appreciation for Pastor MacArthur.

He has been in high-profile ministry for decades without a hint of a sexual or monetary scandal. He has been an unashamed witness for Jesus before the world; he has preached the cross and the blood; he has renounced cheap grace and emphasized the importance of the lordship of the Son of God; and he has been a devoted student of the Scriptures.

In all these ways, if we had more leaders like John MacArthur, the church and the world would be in much better shape.

At the same time, he has made sweeping, critical statements, often throwing out the baby with the bathwater, not only rejecting the dangerous excesses and extremes in the charismatic movement but also labeling some genuine works of the Spirit as “charismatic chaos.”

The fact is that there has never been a true outpouring of the Spirit that has not been controversial, be it in the ministry of Jesus, at Pentecost in Acts 2 or throughout church history, right up to our day. Yet all too often, sincere leaders like Pastor MacArthur have failed to discern what God was doing in the midst of the human emotion and response.

One church historian pointed out that during the Great Awakening in 18th-century America, the biggest difference between Jonathan Edwards, the preeminent leader of the awakening, and Charles Chauncey, the foremost critic of the awakening, was that Edwards focused on the wheat while Chauncey focused on the chaff. Has Pastor MacArthur been guilty of doing the same thing when it comes to the charismatic movement?

Without a doubt, there are horrific things being done in the name of Jesus and the Spirit, often on Christian TV for the whole world to see—and this stuff is downright shameful, bringing reproach to the reputation of the Lord. Along with other charismatic leaders, I have renounced these things for decades. But is it the responsibility of every charismatic-Pentecostal pastor and leader to renounce these things all the time?

Pastor MacArthur has called on his Pentecostal brothers and sisters to stand up and speak out against these abuses, joining him at his upcoming conference; but if a pastor is shepherding his flock and feeding them God’s Word and his people are not guilty of these abuses or watching these TV preachers, why is it his responsibility to address these errors? Does Pastor MacArthur feel the responsibility to monitor the preaching of tens of thousands of non-charismatic pastors across the country and publicly renounce their errors? Why, then, must Pentecostal and charismatic pastors renounce extremes in their movement to somehow prove their orthodoxy?

And which is worse? To preach a carnal prosperity message or to give people false assurance that, once they are saved, no matter how they live, no matter what they do, even if they renounce Jesus, they are still saved? Which message will result in more people being misled and finding themselves in hell?

Pastor MacArthur rightly renounces the carnal prosperity message, yet many non-charismatics who follow him embrace an extremely dangerous version of the "once saved, always saved" doctrine. Why the double standard here?

Again, I am not for a moment excusing doctrinal errors, emotional manipulation, financial greed or other spiritual abuses often perpetuated in the name of the Spirit, but it is absolutely outrageous that Pastor MacArthur claims, “The charismatic movement is largely the reason the church is in the mess it is today. In virtually every area where church life is unbiblical, you can attribute it to the charismatic movement. In virtually every area—bad theology, superficial worship, ego, prosperity gospel, personality elevation. All of that comes out of the charismatic movement.”

And he is quite wrong when he states, “Its theology is bad. It is unbiblical. It is bad. It is aberrant. It is destructive to people because it promises what it can't deliver, and then God gets blamed when it doesn't come. It is a very destructive movement.”

In reality, more people have been saved—wonderfully saved—as a result of the Pentecostal-charismatic movement worldwide than through any other movement in church history (to the tune of perhaps a half-billion souls), as documented recently in Allan Heaton Anderson’s To the Ends of the Earth: Pentecostalism and the Transformation of World Christianity. And professor Craig Keener has provided overwhelming testimony to the reality of God’s miraculous power worldwide today (see his brilliant two-volume study Miracles).

Tragically, rather than recognizing the outpouring of the Spirit worldwide—God’s true fire, falling in abundance in many nations—and focusing on the spiritual deadness that exists in many Spirit-denying churches, Pastor MacArthur has chosen to focus on aberrations and extremes in the charismatic movement, even making the extremely dangerous claims that charismatics are blaspheming the Spirit and attributing “to the Holy Spirit even the work of Satan.”

To be perfectly clear, I am not for a second claiming that Pastor MacArthur is blaspheming the Spirit (God forbid!), but in the New Testament, blasphemy of the Spirit is knowingly attributing the works of the Spirit to Satan (Mark 3:23-30), and I am far more concerned about denying the true fire than I am about putting out every aberrant charismatic brush fire.

Let God’s holy fire fall!

You've got a target on your back. Are you prepared for the fight?

If you are a believer in Jesus, you are in a spiritual battle. The battle lines have been drawn, and like it or not we are in the fray.

Get equipped with scriptural wisdom, courage, truth, and love to overcome the moral chaos of today.

Subscribe to the (free) FRONTL|NE Monthly Newsletter and keep up-to-date with The Line of Fire .

Get the FREE Monthly FRONTL|NE Newsletter and helpful weekly wisdom

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

  • Faith/Statement
  • Rules/engagement:

What is the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit? By Dr John Macarthur

John Macarthur

Now here you have this very important area of the unpardonable sin.  You have the statement “it shall not be forgiven” twice: once in verse 31 and once in verse 32.  People always say, “Well, what is it that cannot be forgiven?  What is the one thing that cannot be forgiven?” and some people have said it is rejection of Jesus Christ.  That isn’t true because that can be forgiven.  You can reject Jesus Christ at one point in your life, receive him at another point, and have the past forgiven.  Is that true?  So it can’t simply be rejecting Jesus Christ. The Pentecostal people tell us that the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit is when you say their experience in the Holy Spirit isn’t valid, and that isn’t true either.  That isn’t even the issue here!  Nobody is even talking about that!  What is the issue here is simply this: Jesus did what He did by the power of the Holy Spirit.  He yielded himself as a submissive Son to the will of the Father and to the power of the Spirit.  When He was baptized (you’ll recall in Matthew 3) the Holy Spirit did what?  Descended upon him as a dove and empowered him for his life and his work among men.  He was God, but He set aside the prerogatives of his deity and submitted himself to the will of the Father and the power of the Holy Spirit. So, in a true sense, what Jesus did, He did by the power of the Holy Spirit working through him.  His virgin birth was conceived of the Spirit.  His empowerment for ministry was at his baptism and was generated by the Holy Spirit.  And so, Jesus operated on the principle of submission to the Father and the power of the Holy Spirit. Now, it was one thing (notice in verse 32) to speak against the Son of Man, to say something against the humanness of Jesus or against his earthly presence or his earthly work.  But to blaspheme the Holy Spirit was quite another thing. Now, what it means is this: these people had received all the revelation they could receive.  They had heard Jesus teach—and He said, “You should believe me for the words I speak.”  They had seen the works that He had done, miracle after miracle after miracle…  Many of them.  So many of them that John says in John 20, “I suppose that if all the things that Jesus did were written, the books of all the world couldn’t hold them.”  They had seen hundreds and perhaps thousands upon thousands of miracles.  And Jesus said, “If you won’t believe me for the words, believe me for the very”—what?  “Works’ sake.” The point here is, here were a group of men, the leaders of Israel, who had had the epitome of revelation.  They had it all.  The fulfillment of all Messianic prophecy in the Old Testament, the corroboration by the very statements of Christ and the deeds of Christ that He was the Messiah, and their conclusion was that He was of Satan.  Now, what happened?  With all the revelation that God could possibly give them, they concluded the very opposite.  And our Lord says, “It’s impossible for you to be saved.”  Why?  “Because when you had all the revelation, you concluded that I was satanic.”  That’s hopeless.  That’s hopeless. This, then, is the unpardonable sin.  It was a historic thing.  It was committed at a very specific period in time by some specific people who attributed the works of Christ to Satan.  And when they evaluated everything that Jesus was and did, they said He was from the devil.  That was the opposite to the truth and Jesus simply said, “If, when all the revelation is in, you conclude that I am satanic, you’re done.  Because you couldn’t get any more than all the revelation, could you?  You’re hopeless.  You could never be forgiven!  If you spoke a word against the Son of Man, the humanness, the life of Jesus Christ—you may misunderstand that, but you could never misunderstand the work of the Holy Spirit to this extent, that when He is pointing to me as God, you conclude that I’m Satan.  You’re hopeless.” Now, can people commit that sin today?  No, I don’t think so; I think that has to be committed when Christ is here on earth. Notice at the end of verse 32: “It shall not be forgiven him neither in this age”—and what age was this? Think about it. “Pre-cross”…what age was it? Well, it was really the last part of the Old Testament era, wasn’t it? It was the gospel period before Christ died and rose; it wasn’t the church age, was it? No. “Neither in this age, neither in the age to come, to every Jew”—what was the “age to come”? The kingdom. I believe this sin will again be committed in the kingdom when people will see Jesus Christ and they will see the work of Jesus Christ. He’ll be visibly present on the earth. They’ll see everything that He does, they’ll hear everything that He says, and they’ll conclude the same kind of blasphemous conclusion, and they’ll be just as unpardonable as these were at that time. I don’t think it has any reference to what a man does today. The closest thing to it would be Hebrews 6 where somebody has tasted the heavenly gift, been enlightened, had all the information possible, and fallen away: it’s impossible for him to be renewed to repentance. Why? Because when he had all revelation, he didn’t believe; how’s he ever going to believe at any point less than that? So that is the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit: attributing the works of Christ while He’s here on earth, manifesting his deity, to Satan. The opposite conclusion leaves a man hopeless.

Share this:

' src=

About defendtheword

Recent posts.

  • Tolstoy on Self delusion and avoidance of responsibility
  • CS Lewis on Christian attitudes
  • Why is Christian faith important?
  • The meaning of life
  • Time alone with God
  • Matthew 14:13 – 21 The Feeding of the Five Thousand
  • Problem with Absolutism and Relativism
  • Not alone anymore
  • To love someone means to see him as God intended him. – Dostoyevski
  • 2 Kings 6:8-23 Looking at things Gods way
  • Matthew 1:18–25 Obedience of Joseph and Promise of God
  • Matthew 3:1–12 Uncompromising message by the submissive servant
  • 2 Corinthians 5:14–6:2 Temporal and Eternal / Old and New
  • What does Christ mean to you?
  • When pain and faith collide
  • The Bible: Which Books Belong in It? by Dr. John Ankerberg, Dr. Norman Geisler
  • Search for:

Recent Comments

  • Apologetics
  • Christianity
  • Church History
  • Discernment
  • Photography
  • Sermon notes
  • Stetement Of Faith
  • Uncategorized

https://twitter.com/defendtheword

  • Entries feed
  • Comments feed
  • WordPress.com

' src=

  • Already have a WordPress.com account? Log in now.
  • Subscribe Subscribed
  • Copy shortlink
  • Report this content
  • View post in Reader
  • Manage subscriptions
  • Collapse this bar

NOTICE : Store prices and specials on the Banner of Truth UK site are not available for orders shipped to North America. Please use the Banner of Truth USA site .

Reexamining the Eternal Sonship of Christ – John Macarthur

The following was first published in the Journal for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood 6, no. 1 (2001): 21-23. It can be found on the Grace to You website here , and was first republished on the Banner website on March 1, 2000.

Near the end of his life, Augustine of Hippo meticulously reviewed everything he had ever published. He wrote an entire catalogue of his own works, a painstakingly annotated bibliography with hundreds of revisions and amendments to correct flaws he saw in his own earlier material. The book, titled Retractationes , is powerful evidence of Augustine’s humility and zeal for truth. Not one of his earlier publications escaped the more mature theologian’s scrutiny. And Augustine was as bold in recanting the errors he perceived in his own work as he had been in refuting the heresies of his theological adversaries. Because he reviewed his works in chronological order, Retractationes is a wonderful memoir of Augustine’s relentless, lifelong pursuit of spiritual maturity and theological precision. His forthrightness in addressing his own shortcomings is a good example of why Augustine is esteemed as a rare model of both godliness and scholarship.

I’ve often wished for the opportunity to review and amend all my own published material, but I doubt I’ll ever have the time or the energy to undertake the task. In this day of electronic recordings, my ‘published’ material includes not just the books I have written but also nearly every sermon I have ever preached-about 3,000 of them so far. It’s far too much material to be able to critique exhaustively the way I wish I could.

Not that I would make sweeping or wholesale revisions. Throughout my ministry, my theological perspective has remained fundamentally unchanged. The basic doctrinal statement I subscribe to today is the same one I affirmed when I was ordained to the ministry almost 40 years ago. I am not someone whose convictions are easily malleable. I trust I am not a reed shaken in the wind, or the kind of person who is naively tossed about by various winds of doctrine.

But at the same time, I do not want to be resistant to growth and correction, especially when my comprehension of Scripture can be sharpened. If more precise understanding on an important point of doctrine demands a change in my thinking–even if it means amending or correcting already-published material–I want to be willing to make the necessary changes.

I have made many such revisions over the years, often taking measures to delete erroneous or confusing statements from my own tapes, and sometimes even preaching again through portions of Scripture with a better understanding of the text. Whenever I have changed my opinion on any significant doctrinal issue, I have sought to make my change of opinion, and the reasons for it, as clear as possible. To that end, I want to state publicly that I have abandoned the doctrine of ‘incarnational sonship.’ Careful study and reflection have brought me to understand that Scripture does indeed present the relationship between God the Father and Christ the Son as an eternal Father-Son relationship. I no longer regard Christ’s sonship as a role he assumed in his incarnation.

My earlier position arose out of my study of Hebrews 1:5, which appears to speak of the Father’s begetting the Son as an event that takes place at a point in time: ‘This day have I begotten thee’; ‘I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son.’

That verse presents some very difficult concepts. ‘Begetting’ normally speaks of a person’s origin. Moreover, sons are generally subordinate to their fathers. I therefore found it difficult to see how an eternal Father-Son relationship could be compatible with perfect equality and eternality among the Persons of the Trinity. ‘Sonship,’ I concluded, bespeaks the place of voluntary submission to which Christ condescended at his incarnation (cf. Phil. 2:5-8; John 5:19).

My aim was to defend, not in any way to undermine, Christ’s absolute deity and eternality. And I endeavored from the beginning to make that as clear as possible.

Nonetheless, when I first published my views on the subject (in my 1983 commentary on Hebrews), a few outspoken critics accused me of attacking the deity of Christ or questioning his eternality. In 1989 I responded to those charges in a plenary session of the annual convention of the Independent Fundamental Churches of America (the denomination that ordained me). Shortly after that session, to explain my views further, I wrote an article titled ‘The Sonship of Christ’ (published in 1991 in booklet form).

In both instances I re-emphasized my unqualified and unequivocal commitment to the biblical truth that Jesus is eternally God. The ‘incarnational sonship’ view, while admittedly a minority opinion, is by no means rank heresy. The heart of my defense of the view consisted of statements that affirmed as clearly as possible my absolute commitment to the evangelical essentials of Christ’s deity and eternality.

Still, controversy continued to swirl around my views on ‘incarnational sonship,’ prompting me to re-examine and rethink the pertinent biblical texts. Through that study I have gained a new appreciation for the significance and the complexity of this issue. More important, my views on the matter have changed. Here are two major reasons for my change of opinion:

1. I am now convinced that the title ‘Son of God’ when applied to Christ in Scripture always speaks of his essential deity and absolute equality with God, not his voluntary subordination. The Jewish leaders of Jesus’ time understood this perfectly. John 5:18 says they sought the death penalty against Jesus, charging him with blasphemy ‘because he not only had broken the sabbath, but said also that God was his Father, making himself equal with God.’

In that culture, a dignitary’s adult son was deemed equal in stature and privilege with his father. The same deference demanded by a king was afforded to his adult son. The son was, after all, of the very same essence as his father, heir to all the father’s rights and privileges-and therefore equal in every significant regard. So when Jesus was called “Son of God,” it was understood categorically by all as a title of deity, making Him equal with God and (more significantly) of the same essence as the Father. That is precisely why the Jewish leaders regarded the title “Son of God” as high blasphemy.

If Jesus’ sonship signifies his deity and utter equality with the Father, it cannot be a title that pertains only to his incarnation. In fact, the main gist of what is meant by ‘sonship’ (and certainly this would include Jesus’ divine essence) must pertain to the eternal attributes of Christ, not merely the humanity he assumed.

2. It is now my conviction that the begetting spoken of in Psalm 2 and Hebrews 1 is not an event that takes place in time. Even though at first glance Scripture seems to employ terminology with temporal overtones (‘this day have I begotten thee’), the context of Psalm 2:7 seems clearly to be a reference to the eternal decree of God. It is reasonable to conclude that the begetting spoken of there is also something that pertains to eternity rather than a point in time. The temporal language should therefore be understood as figurative, not literal.

Most theologians recognize this, and when dealing with the sonship of Christ, they employ the term ‘eternal generation.’ I’m not fond of the expression. In Spurgeon’s words, it is ‘a term that does not convey to us any great meaning; it simply covers up our ignorance.’ And yet the concept itself, I am now convinced, is biblical. Scripture refers to Christ as ‘the only begotten of the Father’ (John 1:14; cf. v. 18; 3:16, 18; Heb. 11:17). The Greek word translated ‘only begotten’ is monogenes. The thrust of its meaning has to do with Christ’s utter uniqueness. Literally, it may be rendered ‘one of a kind’ — and yet it also clearly signifies that he is of the very same essence as the Father. This, I believe, is the very heart of what is meant by the expression ‘only begotten.’

To say that Christ is ‘begotten’ is itself a difficult concept. Within the realm of creation, the term ‘begotten’ speaks of the origin of one’s offspring. The begetting of a son denotes his conception — the point at which he comes into being. Some thus assume that ‘only begotten’ refers to the conception of the human Jesus in the womb of the virgin Mary. Yet Matthew 1:20 attributes the conception of the incarnate Christ to the Holy Spirit, not to God the Father. The begetting referred to in Psalm 2 and John 1:14 clearly seems to be something more than the conception of Christ’s humanity in Mary’s womb.

And indeed, there is another, more vital, significance to the idea of ‘begetting’ than merely the origin of one’s offspring. In the design of God, each creature begets offspring ‘after his kind’ (Gen. 1:11-12; 21-25). The offspring bear the exact likeness of the parent. The fact that a son is generated by the father guarantees that the son shares the same essence as the father.

I believe this is the sense Scripture aims to convey when it speaks of the begetting of Christ by the Father. Christ is not a created being (John 1:1-3). He had no beginning but is as timeless as God himself. Therefore, the ‘begetting’ mentioned in Psalm 2 and its cross-references has nothing to do with his origin.

But it has everything to do with the fact that he is of the same essence as the Father. Expressions like ‘eternal generation,’ ‘only begotten Son,’ and others pertaining to the filiation of Christ must all be understood in this sense: Scripture employs them to underscore the absolute oneness of essence between Father and Son. In other words, such expressions aren’t intended to evoke the idea of procreation; they are meant to convey the truth about the essential oneness shared by the Members of the Trinity.

My previous view was that Scripture employed Father-Son terminology anthropomorphically — accommodating unfathomable heavenly truths to our finite minds by casting them in human terms. Now I am inclined to think that the opposite is true: Human father-son relationships are merely earthly pictures of an infinitely greater heavenly reality. The one true, archetypical Father-Son relationship exists eternally within the Trinity. All others are merely earthly replicas, imperfect because they are bound up in our finiteness, yet illustrating a vital eternal reality.

If Christ’s sonship is all about his deity, someone will wonder why this applies to the Second Member of the Trinity alone, and not to the Third. After all, we don’t refer to the Holy Spirit as God’s Son, do we? Yet isn’t he also of the same essence as the Father?

Of course he is. The full, undiluted, undivided essence of God belongs alike to Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. God is but one essence; yet he exists in three Persons. The three Persons are co-equal, but they are still distinct Persons. And the chief characteristics that distinguish between the Persons are wrapped up in the properties suggested by the names Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Theologians have labeled these properties paternity, filiation, and spiration. That such distinctions are vital to our understanding of the Trinity is clear from Scripture. How to explain them fully remains something of a mystery.

In fact, many aspects of these truths may remain forever inscrutable, but this basic understanding of the eternal relationships within the Trinity nonetheless represents the best consensus of Christian understanding over many centuries of Church history. I therefore affirm the doctrine of Christ’s eternal sonship while acknowledging it as a mystery into which we should not expect to pry too deeply.

Featured Photo: a detail from a photo of Annaba, Algeria, close to the ruins of Hippo Regius, where Augustine ministered, by Azzedine Rouichi on Unsplash.

Latest Articles

Modern theories of the atonement – b. b. warfield 3 january 2024.

The following was an address delivered at the “Religious Conference,” held in the Theo­logical Seminary, Princeton, on October 13, 1902. Reprinted from The Princeton Theological Review, i. 1903, pp. 81-92. The article forms a part of Warfield’s Studies in Theology (1932, rep. Banner of Truth, 1988), which is currently out of print. WE may as […]

Observations on My Sufferings 13 December 2023

The meditations below are from the Memoirs of the Rev. James Fraser of Brea, Minister of the Gospel at Culross, Written by Himself, as these appear in Vol. II of Scottish Puritans: Select Biographies. Fraser lived and ministered at a time of great trouble for the Church in Scotland, when those who had signed the […]

Patheos

  • Seasonal Holidays
  • Faith and Mental Health
  • Forgiveness
  • Resurrection

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit and John MacArthur’s #StrangeFire Conference

LOGO

Evangelicals have a tremendously awkward time wrestling with the concept of an unforgivable sin. It goes against our core doctrine of justification by faith, that anybody no matter what they’ve done can be saved if they accept Jesus as their Lord and savior. For this reason, many evangelicals try to define blasphemy of the Holy Spirit as whatever the opposite of justification by faith is. For example, a site called Rapture Ready (yes, there really is a non-satirical Christian website called Rapture Ready) has this definition:

Those who blaspheme the Holy Spirit are those who consciously and perhaps repeatedly reject Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior and are not even be concerned about it.

This is what you have to say if you start with your doctrine and then twist scripture around to fit it (which plenty of “Biblical,” rapture-ready Christians do all the time). But when we look at the context of the passage where Jesus uses the phrase, something different is clearly going on. Here is Mark 3:19-30:

Then he went home; and the crowd came together again, so that they could not even eat. When his family heard it, they went out to restrain him, for people were saying, “He has gone out of his mind.” And the scribes who came down from Jerusalem said, “He has Beelzebul, and by the ruler of the demons he casts out demons.” And he called them to him, and spoke to them in parables, “How can Satan cast out Satan? If a kingdom is divided against itself, that kingdom cannot stand. And if a house is divided against itself, that house will not be able to stand. And if Satan has risen up against himself and is divided, he cannot stand, but his end has come. But no one can enter a strong man’s house and plunder his property without first tying up the strong man; then indeed the house can be plundered. “Truly I tell you, people will be forgiven for their sins and whatever blasphemies they utter; but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit can never have forgiveness, but is guilty of an eternal sin”— for they had said, “He has an unclean spirit.”

What did the scribes do to trigger this response from Jesus? They accused Him of engaging in demonic activity because He was performing supernatural deeds they couldn’t understand or account for with their religious doctrine. Jesus did His miracles by the power of the Holy Spirit, not by consorting with demons. Verse 30 makes it clear that he was responding to their accusation that he “had an unclean spirit,” not that they rejected him as messiah or any of the other speculative meanings that evangelicals try to superimpose on this text. So the definition of blasphemy of the Holy Spirit in this text is pretty straightforward:  falsely attributing the work of the Holy Spirit to demonic activity.

So borrowing from Adrian Warnock’s blog , here’s what John MacArthur said about charismatics and Pentecostals at Strange Fire:

“Why don’t evangelical leaders speak against this movement?  Why is their such silence? Look When somebody attacks the person of Christ the Evangelical world rises up and says “no, no, no!”  . . . the Holy Spirit has been under massive assault for decades and decades, and I’ve been asking the question ‘where are the people rising up in protest against the abuse and the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit?‘”

Warnock also shares a previous sermon from MacArthur which elaborates on MacArthur’s understanding of blasphemy of the Holy Spirit:

How do they do it? By attributing to the Holy Spirit words that He didn’t say, deeds that He didn’t do, and experiences that He didn’t produce, attributing to the Holy Spirit that which is not the work of the Holy Spirit. Endless human experiences, emotional experiences, bizarre experiences and demonic experiences are said to come from the Holy Spirit…visions, revelations, voices from heaven, messages from the Spirit through transcendental means, dreams, speaking in tongues, prophecies, out of body experiences, trips to heaven, anointings, miracles. All false, all lies, all deceptions attributed falsely to the Holy Spirit…

The problem with the way MacArthur defines blasphemy of the Holy Spirit is that it’s not the way Jesus used the phrase. Jesus wasn’t talking about people falsely claiming that the Holy Spirit was at work when it was really demons. He was talking about the opposite : falsely claiming that demons were at work when it was the Holy Spirit. Now why would this be an unforgivable sin?

I see a clue in Jesus’ statement in verse 24: “If a kingdom is divided against itself, that kingdom cannot stand.” This statement is not only true about the kingdom of Satan; it’s also true about the kingdom of God. God’s kingdom would not stand if God allowed Christians to misrepresent and denigrate the Holy Spirit’s work in other Christians just because the Spirit used a different set of Bible verses, doctrines, and life experiences to draw them to Christ. It would split into thousands of different denominations, each of which thought that every other one is not only wrong but on its way to hell. (Oh wait, that’s kind of what happened, isn’t it?)

I do agree that there are some Pentecostal preachers out there who are making indefensibly crazy and wildly un-Biblical claims (e.g. Rafael Cruz’s dominionist theology). But it’s astonishing to me that any Christian would have the self-certainty to accuse an entire branch of the Christian tree of blasphemy. And part of the damning evidence MacArthur gives for charismatic Christianity’s apostasy is its ecumenism with Roman Catholicism:

We know the Holy Spirit to convict the world of sin, righteousness, of judgment, to bear historical witness to the Gospel, to empower those who preach its saving message. The Holy Spirit is faithful to the Gospel and would never misrepresent the Gospel. So wherever the devaluing of Gospel truth is visible, we know that’s not the work of the Holy Spirit. And let me be blunt: Any movement that can fully embrace Roman Catholicism is not a movement of the Holy Spirit, because that’s a false gospel.

Wow. I guess a Methodist pastor who attends a weekly Catholic mass because of the charismatic experiences he’s had there is doubly damned. Behind John MacArthur’s condemnation of multiple branches of Christianity is a very high view of Satan’s power:

Satan is behind the corrupt religion, the false systems of belief… The world is imprisoned in false belief systems. They are fortified there, in the sense that they are impregnable in their ideologies. Those fortifications become their prisons and end up as their tombs. And the architect of all of them is Satan himself. He is the father of lies, the ultimate deceiver, the angel of light that purveys his great work through false belief systems.

I don’t disagree that there are many entrenched ideologies in our world that imprison Christians, laissez-faire capitalism and American exceptionalism being the main examples in our country. But I think the difference between John MacArthur and me is that I have as high a view of the Holy Spirit’s sovereignty as he has of Satan’s. I don’t think that God is watching helplessly as Satan steals billions of Christians from His flock for having different doctrine than John MacArthur. God promises us in Matthew 7:7: “Ask, and you will receive. Search, and you will find. Knock, and the door will be opened for you.” I believe that people who seek God with sincere hearts will find Him even if their relationship is filtered through different doctrinal lenses.

There are certainly some doctrines that create a greater obstacle to finding God than others, but God isn’t waiting to start a relationship with us until after we’ve read all of John MacArthur’s books and know exactly what to believe. There are millions of doctrinally confused Christians who trust in Jesus and are being used and shaped by the Holy Spirit in spite of whatever heresies they espouse. It is the posture of trust which is our justification, not the correctness of our doctrine. And incidentally, people who are obsessed with the latter raise questions about whether they really have been justified by Christ.

Yes, it’s true that there are false prophets and quirky beliefs in all corners of Christianity. And of course it’s appropriate to call out false prophecy when it happens, but that can be done without condemning an entire movement . The Holy Spirit always has to work in imperfect contexts to bring people to God, even moving in the thick, granite hearts of hard-core cessationist Calvinists like MacArthur.

I don’t know why some charismatics claim to have strange visions and paranormal encounters with the Holy Spirit. I don’t know why Catholics throughout history have claimed to encounter apparitions of the Virgin Mary that resulted in a unique place for her within Catholic liturgy. But I can’t say for certain that the Holy Spirit hasn’t been at work in those circumstances, so I’m not going to make presumptuous condemnations against personal testimonies that I cannot verify one way or another. I won’t even say confidently that the Holy Spirit is absent from John MacArthur despite however egregiously he seems to blaspheme the Spirit’s work. Jesus often spoke in hyperbole. Hopefully that’s what he was doing in Mark 3:29. Because if he wasn’t, then there are more than a few schismatic accusers within the church who will soon find themselves in a strange lake of fire.

  • Adrian Warnock
  • Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit
  • Charismatic
  • Holy Spirit
  • John MacArthur
  • Pentecostal
  • Rafael Cruz
  • Strange Fire

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

  • Library of World Religions
  • Advertise With Us
  • Write for Us
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms of Service
  • Do Not Sell My Data
  • Manage Newsletter Subscriptions
  • Unsubscribe From Notifications

blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

IMAGES

  1. The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit

    blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

  2. John MacArthur blasphemes the work of the Holy Spirit

    blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

  3. John MacArthur (March-19-2020) The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit

    blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

  4. John MacArthur Rebukes Pentecostals, Charismatics, for Blaspheming Holy

    blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

  5. John MacArthur: The Modern Blasphemy Of The Holy Spirit

    blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

  6. John MacArthur (December-16-2020) The Essential Ministry of the Holy

    blasphemy of the holy spirit john macarthur

VIDEO

  1. What is Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit? #Shorts

  2. Have I Blasphemed The Holy Spirit??

  3. Who Walks In The Spirit?

  4. John MacArthur Contemplates the Impact His Departure From Ministry Will Have

  5. John Macarthur Church Worship Today #johnmacarthursermons #reformedteachings #Johnmacarthur

  6. Christians Blaspheme The Holy Spirit More Than A Sinner!

COMMENTS

  1. What Does It Mean to Blaspheme the Holy Spirit?

    The following is an excerpt from The MacArthur New Testament Commentary on Matthew 12. Therefore I say to you, any sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven men, but blasphemy against the Spirit shall not be forgiven.

  2. The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit

    It is open season on abusing the Holy Spirit, outrageous dishonor of the Holy Spirit, claiming He is saying things and doing things and generating things that have nothing to do with the Holy Spirit at all. It is a reckless kind of movement. It is a shameful and dangerous sin to heap such abuse on the Holy Spirit.

  3. The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit (Selected Scriptures)

    Testing the Spirits (John MacArthur) (Selected Scriptures) Heaven on Earth, Part 2 God Saves Only Sinners A Conversation with John Piper & John MacArthur: 2022 The Essential Ministry of...

  4. Blaspheming the Holy Spirit

    Series Topic Title By Scripture: How Can You Avoid God's Judgment? We are all, by nature, God's enemies, and we deserve His wrath. But, there is hope! Find out how you can be at peace with God for eternity as John MacArthur shows you fifteen words that sum up the most powerful truth in all of Scripture. Fifteen Words of Hope 2 Corinthians 5:21

  5. Understanding Cessationism: The Gifts of the Spirit & the Church Today

    John MacArthur, noted above as one of the most avid and aggressive proponents of cessationism, often pushes this point in support of his view. For example, in a 2010 article he warns: "Although charismatics deny that they are trying to add to Scripture, their views on prophetic utterance, gifts of prophecy, and revelation really do just that.

  6. The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit

    The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit by John MacArthur This teaching is made available from Grace to You. Founded in 1969, Grace to You is the nonprofit organization responsible for developing, producing, and distributing John MacArthur's books, audio resources, and the "Grace to You" radio and television programs.

  7. THE MODERN BLASPHEMY OF THE HOLY SPIRIT

    John MacArthur postcast is the media ministry of John MacArthur—pastor-teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California, as well as an author, con...

  8. John MacArthur blasphemes the work of the Holy Spirit

    During the Ligonier's 2017 National Conference, pastor, and teacher of Grace Community Church, John MacArthur, spoke blasphemous words against the Holy Spir...

  9. Blaspheming the Holy Spirit

    Pastor John MacArthur | Grace to You

  10. Blaspheme the Holy Spirit (Matthew 12) John MacArthur on Vimeo

    Blasphemy is defiant irreverence, the uniquely terrible sin of intentionally and openly speaking evil against holy God or defaming or mocking Him (cf. Mark. 2:7). The Old Testament penalty for such blasphemy was death by stoning (Lev. 24:16 ). In the last days blasphemy will be an outstanding characteristic of those who rebelliously and ...

  11. John MacArthur The Modern Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit (Selected

    John MacArthur is the pastor-teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California, as well as an author, conference speaker, chancellor of The Master's University and Seminary, and featured teacher with the Grace to You media ministry. After graduating from Talbot Theological Seminary, John came to Grace Community Church in 1969.

  12. What is the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit? -- John MacArthur

    What is the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit? -- John MacArthur John MacArthur Collections Sermon Archive MacArthur's Bible Study Guides MacArthur's Questions & Answers Note: "After 24 years of association with the Ministry of John MacArthur, we have now been asked by Grace To You to no longer maintain John's resources directly on Bible Bulletin Board.

  13. John MacArthur accuses half-a-billion Christians of blasphemy against

    In it John MacArthur accuses the charismatic movement as a whole of blasphemy against the Holy Spirit: Here is a transcript of the relevant portions: "Why don't evangelical leaders speak...

  14. Setting the Record Straight on the Work of the Holy Spirit

    The Holy Spirit secures us and gives us assurance so that we cry, "Abba, Father.". The primary work of the Holy Spirit, the wondrous work, is to conforming us to Christ, making us more and more like Christ, 2 Corinthians 3:18, "from one level of glory to the next, as we gaze at Christ.".

  15. Abusing The Holy Spirit … United Methodist Style

    John MacArthur That statement by John MacArthur comes from a sermon in 2011, just two years prior to the release of his book Strange Fire and the highly impactful conference of the same name. (You can find the above-referenced sermon HERE, the book HERE and the Strange Fire conference HERE .)

  16. John MacArthur, Strange Fire and Blasphemy of the Spirit

    Pastor John MacArthur has announced a "strange fire" conference, claiming that part of the charismatic movement "offers to God unacceptable worship, distorted worship. It blasphemes the Holy Spirit. It attributes to the Holy Spirit even the work of Satan." If these charges are true, this means that many leaders in the charismatic movement have committed the unpardonable sin and are ...

  17. John Macarthur on the abuse of the Holy Spirit

    John Macarthur talks about the hyper charismatic abuse and blasphemy of the Holy Spirit.

  18. What is the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit? By Dr John Macarthur

    I'd invite you—and you're going to need your Bible and you're going to have to turn quick because we want to hurry—but this draws us to Matthew 12. What is the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit? Jesus presented himself to Israel as the King, the Messiah, the Anointed One, the fulfillment of all Old Testament prophecy.

  19. Reexamining the Eternal Sonship of Christ

    Yet Matthew 1:20 attributes the conception of the incarnate Christ to the Holy Spirit, not to God the Father. The begetting referred to in Psalm 2 and John 1:14 clearly seems to be something more than the conception of Christ's humanity in Mary's womb.

  20. Misconceptions of the Holy Spirit

    "Worship God." That's how the Bible begins and that's how the Bible ends. Jesus said in John 4 that He had come to seek worshipers who would worship the Father in spirit and in truth. The whole reason for redemption is to create true worshipers of God. That's what we'll do forever.

  21. Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit and John MacArthur's #StrangeFire

    Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit and John MacArthur's #StrangeFire Conference Last updated on: July 17, 2014 at 2:00 pm October 22, 2013 by Morgan Guyton Maybe you haven't heard of John...

  22. John MacArthur, Strange Fire and Blasphemy of the Spirit

    June 20, 2013 Pastor John MacArthur has announced a "strange fire" conference to be held this October, claiming that part of the charismatic movement "offers to God unacceptable worship, distorted worship. It blasphemes the Holy Spirit. It attributes to the Holy Spirit even the work of Satan."

  23. The Work Of The Holy Spirit

    Great sermon by John MacArthur: The Modern Blasphemy Of The Holy SpiritFull sermon: https://youtu.be/R8fHRZWuoioSupport this channel:https://www.buymeacoffee...

  24. 𝚁𝚎𝚊𝚍𝚎𝚛 𝙰𝚗𝚝𝚑𝚘𝚗𝚢 ☦︎ on Instagram: "St Stephen intercede for us!☦️ Today

    americas.few on December 27, 2023: "St Stephen intercede for us!☦️ Today we celebrate the Holy Protomartyr and Archdeacon St..."