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One of the hardest parts of writing a research paper can be just finding a good topic to write about. Fortunately we've done the hard work for you and have compiled a list of 113 interesting research paper topics. They've been organized into ten categories and cover a wide range of subjects so you can easily find the best topic for you.

In addition to the list of good research topics, we've included advice on what makes a good research paper topic and how you can use your topic to start writing a great paper.

What Makes a Good Research Paper Topic?

Not all research paper topics are created equal, and you want to make sure you choose a great topic before you start writing. Below are the three most important factors to consider to make sure you choose the best research paper topics.

#1: It's Something You're Interested In

A paper is always easier to write if you're interested in the topic, and you'll be more motivated to do in-depth research and write a paper that really covers the entire subject. Even if a certain research paper topic is getting a lot of buzz right now or other people seem interested in writing about it, don't feel tempted to make it your topic unless you genuinely have some sort of interest in it as well.

#2: There's Enough Information to Write a Paper

Even if you come up with the absolute best research paper topic and you're so excited to write about it, you won't be able to produce a good paper if there isn't enough research about the topic. This can happen for very specific or specialized topics, as well as topics that are too new to have enough research done on them at the moment. Easy research paper topics will always be topics with enough information to write a full-length paper.

Trying to write a research paper on a topic that doesn't have much research on it is incredibly hard, so before you decide on a topic, do a bit of preliminary searching and make sure you'll have all the information you need to write your paper.

#3: It Fits Your Teacher's Guidelines

Don't get so carried away looking at lists of research paper topics that you forget any requirements or restrictions your teacher may have put on research topic ideas. If you're writing a research paper on a health-related topic, deciding to write about the impact of rap on the music scene probably won't be allowed, but there may be some sort of leeway. For example, if you're really interested in current events but your teacher wants you to write a research paper on a history topic, you may be able to choose a topic that fits both categories, like exploring the relationship between the US and North Korea. No matter what, always get your research paper topic approved by your teacher first before you begin writing.

113 Good Research Paper Topics

Below are 113 good research topics to help you get you started on your paper. We've organized them into ten categories to make it easier to find the type of research paper topics you're looking for.

Arts/Culture

  • Discuss the main differences in art from the Italian Renaissance and the Northern Renaissance .
  • Analyze the impact a famous artist had on the world.
  • How is sexism portrayed in different types of media (music, film, video games, etc.)? Has the amount/type of sexism changed over the years?
  • How has the music of slaves brought over from Africa shaped modern American music?
  • How has rap music evolved in the past decade?
  • How has the portrayal of minorities in the media changed?

music-277279_640

Current Events

  • What have been the impacts of China's one child policy?
  • How have the goals of feminists changed over the decades?
  • How has the Trump presidency changed international relations?
  • Analyze the history of the relationship between the United States and North Korea.
  • What factors contributed to the current decline in the rate of unemployment?
  • What have been the impacts of states which have increased their minimum wage?
  • How do US immigration laws compare to immigration laws of other countries?
  • How have the US's immigration laws changed in the past few years/decades?
  • How has the Black Lives Matter movement affected discussions and view about racism in the US?
  • What impact has the Affordable Care Act had on healthcare in the US?
  • What factors contributed to the UK deciding to leave the EU (Brexit)?
  • What factors contributed to China becoming an economic power?
  • Discuss the history of Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies  (some of which tokenize the S&P 500 Index on the blockchain) .
  • Do students in schools that eliminate grades do better in college and their careers?
  • Do students from wealthier backgrounds score higher on standardized tests?
  • Do students who receive free meals at school get higher grades compared to when they weren't receiving a free meal?
  • Do students who attend charter schools score higher on standardized tests than students in public schools?
  • Do students learn better in same-sex classrooms?
  • How does giving each student access to an iPad or laptop affect their studies?
  • What are the benefits and drawbacks of the Montessori Method ?
  • Do children who attend preschool do better in school later on?
  • What was the impact of the No Child Left Behind act?
  • How does the US education system compare to education systems in other countries?
  • What impact does mandatory physical education classes have on students' health?
  • Which methods are most effective at reducing bullying in schools?
  • Do homeschoolers who attend college do as well as students who attended traditional schools?
  • Does offering tenure increase or decrease quality of teaching?
  • How does college debt affect future life choices of students?
  • Should graduate students be able to form unions?

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  • What are different ways to lower gun-related deaths in the US?
  • How and why have divorce rates changed over time?
  • Is affirmative action still necessary in education and/or the workplace?
  • Should physician-assisted suicide be legal?
  • How has stem cell research impacted the medical field?
  • How can human trafficking be reduced in the United States/world?
  • Should people be able to donate organs in exchange for money?
  • Which types of juvenile punishment have proven most effective at preventing future crimes?
  • Has the increase in US airport security made passengers safer?
  • Analyze the immigration policies of certain countries and how they are similar and different from one another.
  • Several states have legalized recreational marijuana. What positive and negative impacts have they experienced as a result?
  • Do tariffs increase the number of domestic jobs?
  • Which prison reforms have proven most effective?
  • Should governments be able to censor certain information on the internet?
  • Which methods/programs have been most effective at reducing teen pregnancy?
  • What are the benefits and drawbacks of the Keto diet?
  • How effective are different exercise regimes for losing weight and maintaining weight loss?
  • How do the healthcare plans of various countries differ from each other?
  • What are the most effective ways to treat depression ?
  • What are the pros and cons of genetically modified foods?
  • Which methods are most effective for improving memory?
  • What can be done to lower healthcare costs in the US?
  • What factors contributed to the current opioid crisis?
  • Analyze the history and impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic .
  • Are low-carbohydrate or low-fat diets more effective for weight loss?
  • How much exercise should the average adult be getting each week?
  • Which methods are most effective to get parents to vaccinate their children?
  • What are the pros and cons of clean needle programs?
  • How does stress affect the body?
  • Discuss the history of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.
  • What were the causes and effects of the Salem Witch Trials?
  • Who was responsible for the Iran-Contra situation?
  • How has New Orleans and the government's response to natural disasters changed since Hurricane Katrina?
  • What events led to the fall of the Roman Empire?
  • What were the impacts of British rule in India ?
  • Was the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki necessary?
  • What were the successes and failures of the women's suffrage movement in the United States?
  • What were the causes of the Civil War?
  • How did Abraham Lincoln's assassination impact the country and reconstruction after the Civil War?
  • Which factors contributed to the colonies winning the American Revolution?
  • What caused Hitler's rise to power?
  • Discuss how a specific invention impacted history.
  • What led to Cleopatra's fall as ruler of Egypt?
  • How has Japan changed and evolved over the centuries?
  • What were the causes of the Rwandan genocide ?

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  • Why did Martin Luther decide to split with the Catholic Church?
  • Analyze the history and impact of a well-known cult (Jonestown, Manson family, etc.)
  • How did the sexual abuse scandal impact how people view the Catholic Church?
  • How has the Catholic church's power changed over the past decades/centuries?
  • What are the causes behind the rise in atheism/ agnosticism in the United States?
  • What were the influences in Siddhartha's life resulted in him becoming the Buddha?
  • How has media portrayal of Islam/Muslims changed since September 11th?

Science/Environment

  • How has the earth's climate changed in the past few decades?
  • How has the use and elimination of DDT affected bird populations in the US?
  • Analyze how the number and severity of natural disasters have increased in the past few decades.
  • Analyze deforestation rates in a certain area or globally over a period of time.
  • How have past oil spills changed regulations and cleanup methods?
  • How has the Flint water crisis changed water regulation safety?
  • What are the pros and cons of fracking?
  • What impact has the Paris Climate Agreement had so far?
  • What have NASA's biggest successes and failures been?
  • How can we improve access to clean water around the world?
  • Does ecotourism actually have a positive impact on the environment?
  • Should the US rely on nuclear energy more?
  • What can be done to save amphibian species currently at risk of extinction?
  • What impact has climate change had on coral reefs?
  • How are black holes created?
  • Are teens who spend more time on social media more likely to suffer anxiety and/or depression?
  • How will the loss of net neutrality affect internet users?
  • Analyze the history and progress of self-driving vehicles.
  • How has the use of drones changed surveillance and warfare methods?
  • Has social media made people more or less connected?
  • What progress has currently been made with artificial intelligence ?
  • Do smartphones increase or decrease workplace productivity?
  • What are the most effective ways to use technology in the classroom?
  • How is Google search affecting our intelligence?
  • When is the best age for a child to begin owning a smartphone?
  • Has frequent texting reduced teen literacy rates?

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How to Write a Great Research Paper

Even great research paper topics won't give you a great research paper if you don't hone your topic before and during the writing process. Follow these three tips to turn good research paper topics into great papers.

#1: Figure Out Your Thesis Early

Before you start writing a single word of your paper, you first need to know what your thesis will be. Your thesis is a statement that explains what you intend to prove/show in your paper. Every sentence in your research paper will relate back to your thesis, so you don't want to start writing without it!

As some examples, if you're writing a research paper on if students learn better in same-sex classrooms, your thesis might be "Research has shown that elementary-age students in same-sex classrooms score higher on standardized tests and report feeling more comfortable in the classroom."

If you're writing a paper on the causes of the Civil War, your thesis might be "While the dispute between the North and South over slavery is the most well-known cause of the Civil War, other key causes include differences in the economies of the North and South, states' rights, and territorial expansion."

#2: Back Every Statement Up With Research

Remember, this is a research paper you're writing, so you'll need to use lots of research to make your points. Every statement you give must be backed up with research, properly cited the way your teacher requested. You're allowed to include opinions of your own, but they must also be supported by the research you give.

#3: Do Your Research Before You Begin Writing

You don't want to start writing your research paper and then learn that there isn't enough research to back up the points you're making, or, even worse, that the research contradicts the points you're trying to make!

Get most of your research on your good research topics done before you begin writing. Then use the research you've collected to create a rough outline of what your paper will cover and the key points you're going to make. This will help keep your paper clear and organized, and it'll ensure you have enough research to produce a strong paper.

What's Next?

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These recommendations are based solely on our knowledge and experience. If you purchase an item through one of our links, PrepScholar may receive a commission.

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Christine graduated from Michigan State University with degrees in Environmental Biology and Geography and received her Master's from Duke University. In high school she scored in the 99th percentile on the SAT and was named a National Merit Finalist. She has taught English and biology in several countries.

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How to Craft Your Ideal Thesis Research Topic

How to Craft Your Ideal Thesis Research Topic

Table of contents

what to put in a research topic

Catherine Miller

Writing your undergraduate thesis is probably one of the most interesting parts of studying, especially because you get to choose your area of study. But as both a student and a teacher who’s helped countless students develop their research topics, I know this freedom can be just as intimidating as it is liberating.

Fortunately, there’a a step-by-step process you can follow that will help make the whole process a lot easier. In this article, I’ll show you how to choose a unique, specific thesis topic that’s true to your passions and interests, while making a contribution to your field.

what to put in a research topic

Choose a topic that you’re interested in

First things first: double-check with your teachers or supervisor if there are any constraints on your research topic. Once your parameters are clear, it’s time to identify what lights you up — after all, you’re going to be spending a lot of time thinking about it.

Within your field of study, you probably already have some topics that have grabbed your attention more than others. This can be a great place to start. Additionally, consider using the rest of your academic and extra-curricular interests as a source of ideas. At this stage, you only need a broad topic before you narrow it down to a specific question. 

If you’re feeling stuck, here are some things to try:

  • Look back through old course notes to remind yourself of topics you previously covered. Do any of these inspire you?
  • Talk to potential supervisors about your ideas, as they can point you toward areas you might not have considered.
  • Think about the things you enjoy in everyday life — whether that’s cycling, cinema, cooking, or fashion — then consider if there are any overlaps with your field of study.
  • Imagine you have been asked to give a presentation or record a podcast in the next three days. What topics would you feel confident discussing?
  • Watch a selection of existing lectures or explainer videos, or listen to podcasts by experts in your field. Note which topics you feel curious to explore further.
  • Discuss your field of study with teachers friends and family, some with existing knowledge and some without. Which aspects do you enjoy talking about? 

By doing all this, you might uncover some unusual and exciting avenues for research. For example, when writing my Master’s dissertation, I decided to combine my field of study (English teaching methodology) with one of my passions outside work (creative writing). In my undergraduate course, a friend drew on her lived experience of disability to look into the literary portrayal of disability in the ancient world. 

Do your research

Once you’ve chosen your topic of interest, it’s time to dive into research. This is a really important part of this early process because it allows you to:

  • See what other people have written about the topic — you don’t want to cover the same old ground as everyone else.
  • Gain perspective on the big questions surrounding the topic. 
  • Go deeper into the parts that interest you to help you decide where to focus.
  • Start building your bibliography and a bank of interesting quotations. 

A great way to start is to visit your library for an introductory book. For example, the “A Very Short Introduction” series from the Oxford University Press provides overviews of a range of themes. Similar types of overviews may have the title “ A Companion to [Subject]” or “[Subject] A Student Companion”. Ask your librarian or teacher if you’re not sure where to begin. 

Your introductory volume can spark ideas for further research, and the bibliography can give you some pointers about where to go next. You can also use keywords to research online via academic sites like JStor or Google Scholar. Check which subscriptions are available via your institution.

At this stage, you may not wish to read every single paper you come across in full — this could take a very long time and not everything will be relevant. Summarizing software like Wordtune could be very useful here.

Just upload a PDF or link to an online article using Wordtune, and it will produce a summary of the whole paper with a list of key points. This helps you to quickly sift through papers to grasp their central ideas and identify which ones to read in full. 

Screenshot of Wordtune's summarizing tool

Get Wordtune for free > Get Wordtune for free >

You can also use Wordtune for semantic search. In this case, the tool focuses its summary around your chosen search term, making it even easier to get what you need from the paper.

what to put in a research topic

As you go, make sure you keep organized notes of what you’ve read, including the author and publication information and the page number of any citations you want to use. 

Some people are happy to do this process with pen and paper, but if you prefer a digital method, there are several software options, including Zotero , EndNote , and Mendeley . Your institution may have an existing subscription so check before you sign up.

Narrowing down your thesis research topic

Now you’ve read around the topic, it’s time to narrow down your ideas so you can craft your final question. For example, when it came to my undergraduate thesis, I knew I wanted to write about Ancient Greek religion and I was interested in the topic of goddesses. So, I:

  • Did some wide reading around the topic of goddesses
  • Learned that the goddess Hera was not as well researched as others and that there were some fascinating aspects I wanted to explore
  • Decided (with my supervisor’s support) to focus on her temples in the Argive region of Greece

what to put in a research topic

As part of this process, it can be helpful to consider the “5 Ws”: why, what, who, when, and where, as you move from the bigger picture to something more precise. 

Why did you choose this research topic?

Come back to the reasons you originally chose your theme. What grabbed you? Why is this topic important to you — or to the wider world? In my example, I knew I wanted to write about goddesses because, as a woman, I was interested in how a society in which female lives were often highly controlled dealt with having powerful female deities. My research highlighted Hera as one of the most powerful goddesses, tying into my key interest.

What are some of the big questions about your topic?

During your research, you’ll probably run into the same themes time and time again. Some of the questions that arise may not have been answered yet or might benefit from a fresh look. 

Equally, there may be questions that haven’t yet been asked, especially if you are approaching the topic from a modern perspective or combining research that hasn’t been considered before. This might include taking a post-colonial, feminist, or queer approach to older texts or bringing in research using new scientific methods.

In my example, I knew there were still controversies about why so many temples to the goddess Hera were built in a certain region, and was keen to explore these further.

Who is the research topic relevant to?

Considering the “who” might help you open up new avenues. Is there a particular audience you want to reach? What might they be interested in? Is this a new audience for this field? Are there people out there who might be affected by the outcome of this research — for example, people with a particular medical condition — who might be able to use your conclusions?

Which period will you focus on?

Depending on the nature of your field, you might be able to choose a timeframe, which can help narrow the topic down. For example, you might focus on historical events that took place over a handful of years, look at the impact of a work of literature at a certain point after its publication, or review scientific progress over the last five years. 

With my thesis, I decided to focus on the time when the temples were built rather than considering the hundreds of years for which they have existed, which would have taken me far too long.

Where does your topic relate to?

Place can be another means of narrowing down the topic. For example, consider the impact of your topic on a particular neighborhood, city, or country, rather than trying to process a global question. 

In my example, I chose to focus my research on one area of Greece, where there were lots of temples to Hera. This meant skipping other important locations, but including these would have made the thesis too wide-ranging.

Create an outline and get feedback

Once you have an idea of what you are going to write about, create an outline or summary and get feedback from your teacher(s). It’s okay if you don’t know exactly how you’re going to answer your thesis question yet, but based on your research you should have a rough plan of the key points you want to cover. So, for me, the outline was as follows:

  • Context: who was the goddess Hera?
  • Overview of her sanctuaries in the Argive region
  • Their initial development 
  • Political and cultural influences
  • The importance of the mythical past

In the final thesis, I took a strong view on why the goddess was so important in this region, but it took more research, writing, and discussion with my supervisor to pin down my argument.

To choose a thesis research topic, find something you’re passionate about, research widely to get the big picture, and then move to a more focused view. Bringing a fresh perspective to a popular theme, finding an underserved audience who could benefit from your research, or answering a controversial question can make your thesis stand out from the crowd.

For tips on how to start writing your thesis, don’t miss our advice on writing a great research abstract and a stellar literature review . And don’t forget that Wordtune can also support you with proofreading, making it even easier to submit a polished thesis.

How do you come up with a research topic for a thesis?

To help you find a thesis topic, speak to your professor, look through your old course notes, think about what you already enjoy in everyday life, talk about your field of study with friends and family, and research podcasts and videos to find a topic that is interesting for you. It’s a good idea to refine your topic so that it’s not too general or broad.  

Do you choose your own thesis topic?

Yes, you usually choose your own thesis topic. You can get help from your professor(s), friends, and family to figure out which research topic is interesting to you. 

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How To Choose A Research Topic

Step-By-Step Tutorial With Examples + Free Topic Evaluator

By: Derek Jansen (MBA) | Expert Reviewer: Dr Eunice Rautenbach | April 2024

Choosing the right research topic is likely the  most important decision you’ll make on your dissertation or thesis journey. To make the right choice, you need to take a systematic approach and evaluate each of your candidate ideas across a consistent set of criteria. In this tutorial, we’ll unpack five essential criteria that will help you evaluate your prospective research ideas and choose a winner.

Overview: The “Big 5” Key Criteria

  • Topic originality or novelty
  • Value and significance
  • Access to data and equipment
  • Time limitations and implications
  • Ethical requirements and constraints

Criterion #1: Originality & Novelty

As we’ve discussed extensively on this blog, originality in a research topic is essential. In other words, you need a clear research gap . The uniqueness of your topic determines its contribution to the field and its potential to stand out in the academic community. So, for each of your prospective topics, ask yourself the following questions:

  • What research gap and research problem am I filling?
  • Does my topic offer new insights?
  • Am I combining existing ideas in a unique way?
  • Am I taking a unique methodological approach?

To objectively evaluate the originality of each of your topic candidates, rate them on these aspects. This process will not only help in choosing a topic that stands out, but also one that can capture the interest of your audience and possibly contribute significantly to the field of study – which brings us to our next criterion.

Research topic evaluator

Criterion #2: Value & Significance

Next, you’ll need to assess the value and significance of each prospective topic. To do this, you’ll need to ask some hard questions.

  • Why is it important to explore these research questions?
  • Who stands to benefit from this study?
  • How will they benefit, specifically?

By clearly understanding and outlining the significance of each potential topic, you’ll not only be justifying your final choice – you’ll essentially be laying the groundwork for a persuasive research proposal , which is equally important.

Criterion #3: Access to Data & Equipment

Naturally, access to relevant data and equipment is crucial for the success of your research project. So, for each of your prospective topic ideas, you’ll need to evaluate whether you have the necessary resources to collect data and conduct your study.

Here are some questions to ask for each potential topic:

  • Will I be able to access the sample of interest (e.g., people, animals, etc.)?
  • Do I have (or can I get) access to the required equipment, at the time that I need it?
  • Are there costs associated with any of this? If so, what are they?

Keep in mind that getting access to certain types of data may also require special permissions and legalities, especially if your topic involves vulnerable groups (patients, youths, etc.). You may also need to adhere to specific data protection laws, depending on the country. So, be sure to evaluate these aspects thoroughly for each topic. Overlooking any of these can lead to significant complications down the line.

Free Webinar: How To Find A Dissertation Research Topic

Criterion #4: Time Requirements & Implications

Naturally, having a realistic timeline for each potential research idea is crucial. So, consider the scope of each potential topic and estimate how long each phase of the research will take — from literature review to data collection and analysis, to writing and revisions. Underestimating the time needed for a research project is extremely common , so it’s important to include buffer time for unforeseen delays.

Remember, efficient time management is not just about the duration but also about the timing . For example, if your research involves fieldwork, there may specific times of the year when this is most doable (or not doable at all).  So, be sure to consider both time and timing for each of your prospective topics.

Criterion #5: Ethical Compliance

Failing to adhere to your university’s research ethics policy is a surefire way to get your proposal rejected . So, you’ll need to evaluate each topic for potential ethical issues, especially if your research involves human subjects, sensitive data, or has any potential environmental impact.

Remember that ethical compliance is not just a formality – it’s a responsibility to ensure the integrity and social responsibility of your research. Topics that pose significant ethical challenges are typically the first to be rejected, so you need to take this seriously. It’s also useful to keep in mind that some topics are more “ethically sensitive” than others , which usually means that they’ll require multiple levels of approval. Ideally, you want to avoid this additional admin, so mark down any prospective topics that fall into an ethical “grey zone”.

If you’re unsure about the details of your university’s ethics policy, ask for a copy or speak directly to your course coordinator. Don’t make any assumptions when it comes to research ethics!

Key Takeaways

In this post, we’ve explored how to choose a research topic using a systematic approach. To recap, the “Big 5” assessment criteria include:

  • Topic originality and novelty
  • Time requirements
  • Ethical compliance

Be sure to grab a copy of our free research topic evaluator sheet here to fast-track your topic selection process. If you need hands-on help finding and refining a high-quality research topic for your dissertation or thesis, you can also check out our private coaching service .

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Top-notch Research Paper Topics List

29 November, 2020

16 minutes read

Author:  Kate Smith

You know how they say: “Be strong; the beginnings to great things are always the hardest”? And though you might not consider writing a research paper and choosing a good research paper topic a really great thing, you see our point. If you are having troubles getting started with the composition in question, we have good news for you.

Research Paper Topics

We have come up with a lengthy list of good research paper topics that will come in handy if you are running out of research paper ideas. Sounds like something you can use? Then don’t hesitate to make the most out of it!

And if you would rather order a whole piece from a professional, we can be of much help here too. Our research paper writing service can craft a piece for you at any time and on any topic. Just drop us a line!

But before we dive into various topics we have to offer, consider checking out our recommendations on how to find argumentative research paper topics all by yourself.

What is a Good Topic for a Research Paper?

good research paper topic

There are several facets of a good research paper topic. To put it short, your theme should be:

When you pose a topic for your research, be sure that it is clear. A reader should be able to understand its purpose right away. If he doesn’t, you did not do a very good job formulating the subject line.

No kidding: you should do your best to be innovative even if you are writing a paper on something as old as time. It might not be simple, but we’re sure you can find a new perspective if you dedicate enough time to the search.

The paper must contain precise figures or facts. They are at the core of your research. Don’t confuse this type of composition with descriptive writing. They have nothing in common. So, focus on precise data: that’s exactly what your readers expect from you.

How to Choose Interesting Research Paper Topics

how to choose research paper topic

Before you take one of the topics we suggest, we recommend you to try to come up with a good topic yourself. It might be easier than you think. Here are several ways to spot an interesting idea:

Think of Something You Find Interesting.

There are always things we find astonishing but don’t have enough time to explore deeper. Maybe this is your chance to give it some time and conduct in-depth research. Of course, take into account the discipline and the academic level required. Thus, it’s pretty clear that you can’t talk about the Vietnam War for the Social Studies class paper (unless you’re looking into the differences of the military operations impact on the civilians and soldiers).

Choose a Topic With Sufficient Data for the Research.

The main point of writing this paper lies in finding information at various credible sources and refining it. Therefore, if you pick a subject that is somewhat new or wasn’t studied well in the past, you’ll have no information to work with. That is why the availability of credible information is vital to the success of the writing process.

Narrow the Subject Down.

The subject you find great interest in might be too broad. Not to sound too shallow, it’s better for you to pick just one perspective of the problem and study it carefully. This way you will be able to dive deep enough into the research instead of just hitting the high spots.

These are our recommendations on how to choose a theme on your own. Now let’s look into other tips we’d like to offer to you before you get down to writing.

Related post: How to write an Argumentative essay 

How to write an outline for a research paper

While you can find all the essential information in our guide on how to write a perfect research paper outline , here we’ll introduce you to the basics.

  • Find an engaging topic. For it, read on to see what subject line we have to offer.
  • Create a list of credible sources to take a look at. You can either ask you tutor for recommendations, surf the web, or go old school and visit a library for suggestions.
  • Mark all the elements you will add to your outline.
  • Briefly explain what each of these components will be about. But don’t bury the blueprint under too many details. Keep it short!
  • Finally, find good examples to explore.

Now, that you understand how to craft a plan for your paper, have our tips to help you out along the way, your only job is to find good topic ideas to write about. And we can help you with that too!

Note that our company provides academic writing help. You can buy a research paper written from scratch by our  essay writer .

Now that you know your ways around crafting good research papers, we want to introduce you to our list of various ideas you can conduct a thorough research on. Use our ideas if coming up with your own is something you don’t want to deal with at the moment.

Psychology Research Paper Topics

  • Are people with the IQ level above the average really unhappy?
  • Eating disorders: Are they necessarily associated with the self-image issues?
  • The impact of stress on the mental health of a person.
  • The nature and causes of child violence.
  • Insomnia as a valid excuse for breaking the rules or committing crimes.
  • Race relations in the USA in the 20th century and today.
  • The nature and causes of sexual orientation: Different perspectives on the issue.

Easy Research Paper Topics

  • The glass ceiling: Myth or reality?
  • Popular ventures started without money.
  • The history of the social media boom around the globe.
  • Top tech startups of the 21st century.
  • Video games and their impact on the development of young people.
  • Animal testing across the globe.
  • Is global warming real?
  • Has the Internet become a safer place with the cybersecurity principles implementation?
  • The impact of the screen time on a child’s mental development.
  • The US election system: The history and principles behind it.

World History Research Paper Topics

  • The life and traditions of the first Gladiators.
  • Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Bits and pieces of the tragedy.
  • The history of Singapore: From worst to first.
  • North Korea: Dictatorship ideology and its complications.
  • The establishment of the League of Nations.
  • Racial discrimination origins.
  • The history of the Gutenberg Bible.
  • The most powerful opponent of Germany in the WWI.
  • Egyptian pyramids: The history and meaning.
  • The history of Christianity.

Controversial Topics for Research Paper

  • The history of modern Israel.
  • Abortion: “My body – my rules” or the discrimination of the unborns’ rights?
  • How Facebook shaped the way people communicate today.
  • Beauty pageants: Celebration of the beauty or discrimination in disguise?
  • Death penalty around the globe.
  • Implications of gun control in the USA.
  • Creationism against Evolution.
  • Physical punishment as a core principle of children’s upbringing.
  • The origins of the “invasion of privacy” notion across the world.
  • The impact of social media addiction on young people.
  • Genetic predisposition to committing a crime.

High School Research Paper Topics

  • School uniform: The good, the bad, and the ugly.
  • The effect of sexual acts displays on TV.
  • The American Dream of Generation X and the Millennials.
  • Biggest cults existing today in the world.
  • Learning disabilities: Their nature, causes, and solutions.
  • The history of Somalia.
  • The portrayal of a woman in the social media today and 20 years ago.
  • Freedom of expression.
  • The poorest nations in the world.
  • The effect of feminism on Europe.
  • The impact of classical music on one’s brain.

Literature Research Paper Topics

  • The relevance of the US Literature class choices to the modern youth.
  • Examples of literature pieces that shaped whole cultures across the globe.
  • Feminism in literature.
  • The issue of the Holocaust in the world’s literature.
  • The first translations of the Bible.
  • Literature is known to be most effective in the struggle against illiteracy in different cultures.
  • The brightest images of Death in literature.
  • The history of slavery in Africa in world literature.
  • Romanticism in Spanish literature.
  • The moralism of the British literature of the 20th century.

College Research Paper Topics

  • Success stories of college dropouts.
  • The rarest phobias and fears people have.
  • The history of e-learning around the globe.
  • Can higher education grant a successful future career?
  • Should grades be banned from the educational system?
  • The use and harm of vaccination.
  • The new emerging specializations and professions of the 21st century.
  • The most effective teaching methods today.
  • The History of the Ivy League.
  • College re-organization for the better future of education.
  • Private vs. Public colleges in the USA: Pros and cons.

Persuasive Research Paper Topics

  • Antisemitism origins.
  • Sex education pushes the youth to involve in sexual relations too early.
  • The last days of newspapers in our media-controlled world.
  • The danger of the GMO.
  • Impact of Instagram on teenagers’ self-esteem.
  • Pros and cons of studying at a single-sex school.
  • Overpopulation management.
  • Deforestation: Are we digging our own grave this way?
  • People using cell phones while driving should be held criminally liable.
  • Paying children for good grades: Different perspectives on the issue.

Sports Research Paper Topics

  • The greatest athlete in the history of the world.
  • The history of the Olympic Games.
  • Why are cybersports considered sports?
  • The history of marathons and their use today.
  • Doping in sports.
  • The use of playing competitive sports.
  • The most dangerous sports from all over the world.
  • Should sports be used as a therapy in prisons?
  • Should student athletes be paid for playing sports?
  • The effect of physical activities on the human’s brain.

Criminal Justice Research Paper Topics

  • Prisoners falsely accused and then released should receive financial compensation from the state.
  • Sexual harassment problem in Europe and the USA.
  • Should corporate abuse be considered a criminal injustice case?
  • The death penalty in different countries.
  • Hate crime history in the USA.
  • Control over the brutal behavior of guardsmen at prisons.
  • Should mental issues affect the court judgment?
  • Sex slavery: Should people buying and selling sex slaves be sentenced to the death penalty?
  • Should the criminals be allowed to vote?
  • Two sides of the Mandatory Minimum sentencing.

Topics about Technology for the Research Paper

  • Will artificial intelligence substitute humans at a workplace?
  • Saving the Earth today with the aid of state-of-the-art technologies.
  • Self-driving cars development history.
  • The history of Virtual and Augmented realities.
  • Positive use of nuclear energy and the future.
  • How does the lie detector work? Is this a trustworthy technology?
  • The history of aviation in the world.

Medical Research Paper Topics

  • Why animal testing should be stopped.
  • The history of the Placebo treatment.
  • Euthanasia: What doctors from different countries think about it.
  • The use of vegetarianism: The myth or reality?
  • Mental breakdown: Causes and prevention.
  • The notion of mood in medicine.
  • Should marijuana be allowed for recreational purposes?
  • Should vaccination be mandatory?
  • The history of plague in Europe.
  • The most dangerous virus of today.

Ethics Research Paper Topics

  • Religion and morality: Are people with strong moral beliefs more moral than atheists?
  • Should teachers be allowed to carry weapons to school?
  • Prostitution across the globe.
  • Should recycling be made mandatory?
  • Paparazzi and the invasion of celebrities’ privacy.
  • Parents should monitor their kids’ Internet use.
  • Do laws generally patronize women and discriminate against men?
  • Adoption by single parents vs. adoption by a two-parent family today.
  • Countries that use child labor: Should we use their products?
  • Should breastfeeding in public be banned?

Tips on Writing a Research Paper

  • Write an outline. An outline will help you stay focused. Since this type of writing is quite lengthy, it is easy to lose track along the way. That is why crafting a detailed outline is in your best interest. It will serve as a roadmap or a blueprint of the whole project.
  • Start bright. You only have one chance to make a positive first impression. That is why you simply cannot afford writing a dull introduction. There are certain rules on how to start a research paper, and you’d better stick to the rules as described in our guide. A bright opening paragraph will ensure the genuine interest of your audience in what you have to say about the topic and will keep them engaged as you write.
  • Use immaculate grammar and spelling. Nothing kills a good paper like poor grammar or spelling. It distracts the reader from the main point and makes him stumble while reading. And if you’re worried that grammar and spelling checking will take up too much of your time, don’t worry: you can always use technologies like Grammarly to do the job for you in seconds.
  • Compose a compelling thesis statement. A thesis statement is the central point of your research paper. You need to insert it in the introduction and make sure that this central idea is exactly one sentence long. Make it loud and clear. However, given the length of this vital part of a research paper, don’t bore readers with too many unnecessary details. This means that you should mention what issue you will look into and why but don’t explain in which ways you will achieve this. Here is a complete guide on what is a thesis statement that will walk you through the process step by step. Enjoy!
  • Stay within the word count limits. This type of writing has a rather strict word count limit. And you need to stay within it. Tutors don’t have all the time in the world to read long pieces. If you can’t stay within word count limits, they’ll assume you didn’t spend enough time filtering the most vital information out of the research (even if you did). So, not to give them that false impression, don’t make it too short or too long. Make it just right. This is the case when the size matters!
  • Ask for help. After spending long hours crafting this paper, you are likely to miss some important points. The thing is that you know exactly what you wanted to say, and mistakes seem to be left unnoticed. Not to let them slip into your text, ask your peers, friends, or family to take a look at your writing. Their fresh perspective might be of much help to you!

tips on writing a research paper

We hope our research paper topics ideas will help you pick a theme you are genuinely interested in. We promise: conducting research and diving into the search can be a lot of fun as long as you choose an engaging subject.

Related posts: Argumentative essay topics | Compare&Contrast essay topics

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Research Topic Ideas

Getting started, 1. brainstorming for a topic, 2. read general background information, 3. focus your topic, more research help.

  • Area & Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Behavioral & Social Sciences
  • Business, Economics, & Management
  • Current Events and Controversial Issues
  • Education & Social Work
  • Health Sciences
  • Natural and Physical Sciences

This guide provides you with a list of topic ideas (by subject or academic discipline) which could be developed into a research paper or project. It is not an all-inclusive list, but a list developed over time with input from faculty and students.

It is intended to offer suggestions only.

This is NOT a guide to help you research a topic. It is only intended to provide ideas for a paper.

The ability to develop a good research topic is an important skill. An instructor may assign you a specific topic, but most often instructors require you to select your own topic of interest. When deciding on a topic, there are a few things that you will need to do:

  • Brainstorm for ideas.
  • Choose a topic that will enable you to read and understand the articles and books you find.
  • Ensure that the topic is manageable and that material is available.
  • Make a list of key words.
  • Be flexible. You may have to broaden or narrow your topic to fit your assignment or the sources you find.

Selecting a good topic may not be easy. It must be narrow and focused enough to be interesting, yet broad enough to find adequate information. Before selecting your final topic, make sure you know what your final project should look like. Each class or instructor will likely require a different format or style of research project.

Choose a topic that interests you. Use the following questions to help generate topic ideas.

  • Do you have a strong opinion on a current social or political controversy?
  • Did you read or see a news story recently that has piqued your interest or made you angry or anxious?
  • Do you have a personal issue, problem, or interest that you would like to know more about?
  • Is there an aspect of a class that you are interested in learning more about?

Write down any key words or concepts that may be of interest to you. These terms can be helpful in your searching and used to form a more focused research topic.

Be aware of overused ideas when deciding a topic. You may wish to avoid topics such as abortion, gun control, teen pregnancy, or suicide unless you feel you have a unique approach to the topic. Ask the instructor for ideas if you feel you are stuck or need additional guidance.

Sometimes using a  Concept Map  can help you come up with directions to take your research.

  • Topic Concept Map Download and print this PDF to create a concept map for your topic. Put your main topic in the middle circle and then put ideas related to your topic on the lines radiating from the circle.

Read a general encyclopedia article on the top two or three topics you are considering.

Reading a broad summary enables you to get an overview of the topic and see how your idea relates to broader, narrower, and related issues. It also provides a great source for finding words commonly used to describe the topic. These keywords may be very useful to your later research.

If you can't find an article on your topic, try using broader terms and ask for help from a librarian.

The databases listed below are good places to find general information. The library's print reference collection can also be useful and is located on the third floor of the library.

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Authoritative coverage of thousands of topics in all areas of study.

Encyclopaedia Britannica's latest article database (including hundreds of articles not found in the print edition), Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and Thesaurus, and the Britannica Book of the Year (1994-present), with thousands of web links selected by editors. Updated daily.

Fully indexed, cross-searchable database of over 400 dictionary, language reference, and subject reference works published by Oxford University Press. Includes subject reference works in the humanities, social sciences, and science--both "Quick Reference" titles (concise dictionaries, etc.) and larger "Reference Library" titles (multi-volume encyclopedias, etc.).

Covers anthropology, communication, education, geography, health, history, law, management, politics, psychology, and sociology.

Concise introductions to a diverse range of subject areas in the sciences, social sciences, and arts and humanities.

Keep it manageable and be flexible. If you start doing more research and not finding enough sources that support your thesis, you may need to adjust your topic.

A topic will be very difficult to research if it is too broad or narrow. One way to narrow a broad topic such as "the environment" is to limit your topic. Some common ways to limit a topic are:

  • by geographic area

Example: What environmental issues are most important in the Southwestern United States?

  • by time frame:

Example: What are the most prominent environmental issues of the last 10 years?

  • by discipline

Example: How does environmental awareness effect business practices today?

  • by population group

Example: What are the effects of air pollution on senior citizens?

Remember that a topic may be too difficult to research if it is too:

  • locally confined - Topics this specific may only be covered in local newspapers and not in scholarly articles.

Example: What sources of pollution affect the Genesee County water supply?

  • recent - If a topic is quite recent, books or journal articles may not be available, but newspaper or magazine articles may. Also, websites related to the topic may or may not be available.
  • broadly interdisciplinary - You could be overwhelmed with superficial information.

Example: How can the environment contribute to the culture, politics and society of the Western United States?

  • popular - You will only find very popular articles about some topics such as sports figures and high-profile celebrities and musicians.

Putting your topic in the form of a question will help you focus on what type of information you want to collect.

If you have any difficulties or questions with focusing your topic, discuss the topic with your instructor, or with a librarian.

For more help with the research help, please see our Research Help Guides:

  • Research Process by Liz Svoboda Last Updated Apr 26, 2024 7864 views this year
  • Primary Sources for Historical Research: A Library Guide by Reference Librarians Last Updated Mar 28, 2024 77 views this year
  • Understanding Journals: Peer-Reviewed, Scholarly, & Popular by Liz Svoboda Last Updated Jan 10, 2024 1346 views this year
  • Identifying Information Sources by Liz Svoboda Last Updated Mar 13, 2024 1956 views this year
  • Next: Area & Interdisciplinary Studies >>
  • Last Updated: Mar 1, 2024 1:06 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.umflint.edu/topics

Selecting a Research Topic: Overview

  • Refine your topic
  • Background information & facts
  • Writing help

Here are some resources to refer to when selecting a topic and preparing to write a paper:

  • MIT Writing and Communication Center "Providing free professional advice about all types of writing and speaking to all members of the MIT community."
  • Search Our Collections Find books about writing. Search by subject for: english language grammar; report writing handbooks; technical writing handbooks
  • Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation Online version of the book that provides examples and tips on grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and other writing rules.
  • Select a topic

Choosing an interesting research topic is your first challenge. Here are some tips:

  • Choose a topic that you are interested in! The research process is more relevant if you care about your topic.
  • If your topic is too broad, you will find too much information and not be able to focus.
  • Background reading can help you choose and limit the scope of your topic. 
  • Review the guidelines on topic selection outlined in your assignment.  Ask your professor or TA for suggestions.
  • Refer to lecture notes and required texts to refresh your knowledge of the course and assignment.
  • Talk about research ideas with a friend.  S/he may be able to help focus your topic by discussing issues that didn't occur to you at first.
  • WHY did you choose the topic?  What interests you about it?  Do you have an opinion about the issues involved?
  • WHO are the information providers on this topic?  Who might publish information about it?  Who is affected by the topic?  Do you know of organizations or institutions affiliated with the topic?
  • WHAT are the major questions for this topic?  Is there a debate about the topic?  Are there a range of issues and viewpoints to consider?
  • WHERE is your topic important: at the local, national or international level?  Are there specific places affected by the topic?
  • WHEN is/was your topic important?  Is it a current event or an historical issue?  Do you want to compare your topic by time periods?

Table of contents

  • Broaden your topic
  • Information Navigator home
  • Sources for facts - general
  • Sources for facts - specific subjects

Start here for help

Ask Us Ask a question, make an appointment, give feedback, or visit us.

  • Next: Refine your topic >>
  • Last Updated: Jul 30, 2021 2:50 PM
  • URL: https://libguides.mit.edu/select-topic

Spartanburg Community College Library

  • Spartanburg Community College Library
  • SCC Research Guides
  • Choosing a Research Topic
  • What Makes a Good Research Topic?

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Before diving into how to choose a research topic, it is important to think about what are some elements of a good research topic. Of course, this will depend specifically on your research project, but a good research topic will always:

  • Relate to the assignment itself. Even when you have a choice for your research topic, you still want to make sure your chosen topic lines up with your class assignment sheet.
  • A topic that is too broad will give you too many sources, and it will be hard to focus your research.
  • A topic that is too narrow will not give you enough sources, if you can find any sources at all.
  • Is debatable. This is important if you are researching a topic that you will have to argue a position for. Good topics have more than one side to the issue and cannot be resolved with a simple yes or no.
  • Should be interesting to you! It's more fun to do research on a topic that you are interested in as opposed to one you are not interested in.

Remember, it is common and normal if your research topic changes as you start brainstorming and doing some background research on your topic.

Start with a General Idea

As an example, let's say you were writing a paper about issues relating to college students 

  • << Previous: Choosing a Research Topic
  • Next: 1. Concept Mapping >>
  • 1. Concept Mapping
  • 2. Background Research
  • 3. Narrow Your Topic / Thesis Statements

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  • Last Updated: May 8, 2024 9:31 AM
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Start your research

Picking a good topic, step 1: choose a topic.

The first step in doing research is choosing a good topic. A good research topic should be focused and clear and not something that can be answered by a Google search.

For example, instead of asking "Why is social media harmful?" you could ask, "How is interacting with social media, like TikTok and Twitter, impacting the mental health of college students?"

In choosing a research topic, you should pick something that you are interested in and something that fits the assignment you are doing.

Something else here than explains the stuff.

Watch: Choosing a research topic

Choosing a research paper topic tutorial video. 4 minutes.

  • Find ideas and language on a topic using online tools and techniques
  • Use techniques like mind mapping, the 5W’s, and freeform writing to narrow a large topic
  • Tutorial: Choosing a research paper topic
  • << Previous: Home
  • Next: Searching Effectively >>

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150 Research Paper Topics

150 Research Paper Topics

Whether you’re in high school or college, there will come a time when you’ll be required to write a research paper. For many students, writing a research paper can be a challenging task.

Writing the research paper might seem like it’s the hardest part of the entire paper, but for many students, it’s picking out what topic to write about.

If you’re having a difficult time figuring out what topic to write your research paper about, we’ve compiled a list of 150 topics for you to choose from!

How to Choose a Topic for a Research Paper

  • Pick a few areas or topics that you’re interested in and narrow it down to the topic that you like the best. You’ll be able to put together an insightful paper if you’re interested in the topic you chose.
  • Make sure you have enough references for your topic. Doing a quick search will help you see if your topic is discussed enough for you to do research.
  • Make sure your topic fits within your teacher’s guidelines. Your teacher may have set restrictions on certain topics or even requirements that they may want in your paper.

Health Topics

  • How can lifestyle habits influence overall health?
  • How does breastfeeding improve the infant’s health?
  • Reasons why the flu virus is different from year to year.
  • Different types of stem cells and their usage.
  • Sleep disorders’ impact on the overall health condition.
  • The healthiest diet does not exist.
  • Stop smoking to improve mental health.
  • Why are carbs bad for people who are insulin resistant?
  • Why is the skin on a face more sensitive to breakouts and touch than on any other part of the body?
  • Low carbohydrate vs. low-fat diets.

Science Topics

  • How has the earth’s climate changed in the past few decades?
  • What are the pros and cons of fracking?
  • Should the US rely on nuclear energy more?
  • How are black holes created?
  • Why is “dark matter” important?
  • Is global warming a hoax? Is it being exaggerated?
  • What are the main sources of marine pollution?
  • Endangered species – How can we preserve them?
  • What did you do to make the world a better place?
  • What have NASA’s biggest successes and failures been?

Psychology Topics

  • What Are Psychological Effects of Technology Addiction?
  • What Causes Eating Disorders?
  • How Do Certain People Become Leaders?
  • How Important Is Love for the Child’s Development?
  • How Does Lack of Sleep Affect Our Mental Health?
  • Insomnia and its Effects on Human Health.
  • Physical and Mental Violence on Children and Domestic Abuse.
  • How dangerous are eating disorders?
  • Post-traumatic stress syndrome.
  • What causes depression?

Ethics Topics

  • How and why have divorce rates changed over time?
  • Should physician-assisted suicide be legal?
  • How has stem cell research impacted the medical field?
  • How can human trafficking be reduced in the United States/world?
  • Importance of following ethics in psychological research.

Social Media Topics

  • Are social networks making us lonely and unsociable?
  • How to protect children online?
  • Is there such a thing as social media addiction?
  • Who are world-famous influencers on social media?
  • Does social media affect our relationships?
  • Are teens who spend more time on social media more likely to suffer anxiety and/or depression?
  • Has social media made people more or less connected?
  • How does social media influence interpersonal communication?
  • How can one defend privacy issues on Facebook and other social media?
  • Impacts of social media on youth.

Legal Issues Topics

  • Should marijuana be legalized at the national level?
  • Should there be a law preventing cyber-bullying?
  • What can be done to improve family law?
  • What countries have the worst legal systems?
  • What countries have the best legal systems?
  • What are the main flaws of the legal system in the USA?
  • Does police brutality contribute to the onset of hate crimes?
  • Why should the minimum legal drinking age be kept at eighteen years?
  • Does drug legalization contribute to the increased crime rate?
  • How do torrenting sites influence creativity and copyright?

Technology Topics

  • Do smartphones increase or decrease workplace productivity?
  • What are the most effective ways to use technology in the classroom?
  • How is Google search affecting our intelligence?
  • What are some advances in technology related to medicine?
  • Can everything be solar powered?
  • How is text messaging affecting teen literacy?
  • How can technology help in preventing terrorist attacks?

Government Topics

  • Several states have legalized recreational marijuana. What positive and negative impacts have they experienced as a result?
  • Has the increase in US airport security made passengers safer?
  • Should the federal government be allowed to regulate information on the internet?
  • Should the United States of America reform its Immigration policies?
  • Which prison reforms have proven most effective?

Education Topics

  • Do students from wealthier backgrounds score higher on standardized tests?
  • How does giving each student access to an iPad or laptop affect their studies?
  • Do children who attend preschool do better in school later on?
  • What impact does mandatory physical education classes have on students’ health?
  • Which methods are most effective at reducing bullying in schools?
  • How does college debt affect future life choices of students?
  • E-Learning at home VS traditional education.
  • The Effectiveness and Flaws of the No Child Left Behind Act.
  • General tests and their effectiveness in various institutions.
  • How to encourage students to study what they are passionate about?

Business Topics

  • How has business etiquette changed in the past few years?
  • Features that define a true business leader.
  • Things that make young startups fail during the first couple of years.
  • Does franchising make it easier to run a business?
  • Pros & cons of outsourcing services.

Sports Topics

  • Importance of physical exercise in school.
  • Is cheerleading a sport?
  • Do sports influence an individual’s emotional well-being?
  • Safest exercises for students with disabilities.
  • Collaboration on a sports field. What is the most effective communication strategy among sports team members?
  • Differences in the Italian Renaissance and Northern Renaissance.
  • Impacts famous artists had on the world.
  • The art of Ancient Egypt.
  • Censorship in art.
  • Analyze the impact a famous artist had on the world.

Entertainment Topics

  • Are violent video games really to blame for problems in children’s behavior?
  • Are beauty contests making beauty standards even more unachievable?
  • Are modern media gradually replacing newspapers?
  • Reasons why we cannot do without the mass media.
  • Compare and contrast the benefits of mass media to society.
  • How have shows like “Project Runway” influenced fashion? Have they motivated people to become more creative and personal in what they wear?
  • Are newspapers going extinct?
  • Do TV shows impose unreal moral standards?
  • Women competing against men: is it really fair?
  • How fake moral standards are imposed by television

Current Events Topics

  • Analyze the history of the relationship between the United States and North Korea.
  • What factors contributed to the current decline in the rate of unemployment?
  • What have been the impacts of states which have increased their minimum wage?
  • How do US immigration laws compare to immigration laws of other countries?
  • How have the US’s immigration laws changed in the past few years/decades?
  • Is the U.S. economy becoming stronger or weaker?
  • Is there a better way to fight the war against drugs internationally?
  • Can Bitcoin really become the currency of the future in America?
  • Preventing police brutality: history and what citizens can do.
  • History of the electoral college system of voting.

History Topics

  • What events led to the fall of the Roman Empire?
  • Was the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki necessary?
  • What were the causes of the Civil War?
  • How did Abraham Lincoln’s assassination impact the country and reconstruction after the Civil War?
  • Which factors contributed to the colonies winning the American Revolution?
  • What caused Hitler’s rise to power?
  • Discuss how a specific invention impacted history.
  • What Factors Caused the Stock Market Crash in 1929?
  • What Were the Social Consequences of the Vietnam War?
  • What Is the Role of Women in the Military?

Physics and Astronomy Topics

  • What Is Pluto if It’s not a Planet?
  • Can We Determine How Old the Universe Is?
  • What Are Dark Holes?
  • Could People Survive on Mars?
  • Is Space Exploration Really Necessary?
  • Can We Prevent a Large Comet from Striking the Earth?
  • What are the physics behind the creation of rainbows?
  • The importance of robots in industries.
  • The evolution of the self-driving car and its impact on the economy.
  • The role of physics in the healthcare industry.

Animals Topics

  • Do animals express love?
  • Is animal testing a kind of animal cruelty?
  • Should environments be protected if endangered species live there?
  • How have humans bred domestic animals to be different from their original wild counterparts?
  • What is the current genetic and fossil evidence that chickens, dogs, and other domestic animals were much different even a few hundred years ago?

Medical Topics

  • The use of medical marijuana: pros and cons
  • Is it safe for children to be vegetarians?
  • How the society views on vaccines change
  • Can pharmaceutical companies advertise prescription drugs directly to buyers?
  • The role of doctors in the growing nation’s drug addiction
  • How many treatments to Autism are there?
  • How is ageism impacting mental health and addictions?
  • What are the pros and cons of antipsychotics?
  • Should alternative medicine be legalized?
  • Is the relationship between the FDA and the pharmaceutical industry a good one?

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National University Library

Research Process

  • Brainstorming
  • Explore Google This link opens in a new window
  • Explore Web Resources
  • Explore Background Information
  • Explore Books
  • Explore Scholarly Articles
  • Narrowing a Topic
  • Primary and Secondary Resources
  • Academic, Popular & Trade Publications
  • Scholarly and Peer-Reviewed Journals
  • Grey Literature
  • Clinical Trials
  • Evidence Based Treatment
  • Scholarly Research
  • Database Research Log
  • Search Limits
  • Keyword Searching
  • Boolean Operators
  • Phrase Searching
  • Truncation & Wildcard Symbols
  • Proximity Searching
  • Field Codes
  • Subject Terms and Database Thesauri
  • Reading a Scientific Article
  • Website Evaluation
  • Article Keywords and Subject Terms
  • Cited References
  • Citing Articles
  • Related Results
  • Search Within Publication
  • Database Alerts & RSS Feeds
  • Personal Database Accounts
  • Persistent URLs
  • Literature Gap and Future Research
  • Web of Knowledge
  • Annual Reviews
  • Systematic Reviews & Meta-Analyses
  • Finding Seminal Works
  • Exhausting the Literature
  • Finding Dissertations
  • Researching Theoretical Frameworks
  • Research Methodology & Design
  • Tests and Measurements
  • Organizing Research & Citations This link opens in a new window
  • Scholarly Publication
  • Learn the Library This link opens in a new window

Finding a Research Topic

Which step of the research process takes the most time?

A. Finding a topic B. Researching a topic C. Both

How did you answer the above question? Do you spend most of your efforts actually researching a topic, or do you spend a lot of time and energy finding a topic? Ideally, you’ll want to spend fairly equal amounts of effort on both. Finding an appropriate and manageable topic can sometimes be just as hard as researching a topic.

A good research topic will have a body of related research which is accessible and manageable. Identifying a topic with these characteristics at the beginning  of the research process will ultimately save you time.

Finding a research topic that is interesting, relevant, feasible, and worthy of your time may take substantial effort so you should be prepared to invest your time accordingly. Considering your options, doing some background work on each option, and ultimately settling on a topic that is manageable will spare you many of the frustrations that come from attempting research on a topic that, for whatever reason, may not be appropriate.

Remember that as you are searching for a research topic you will need to be able to find enough information about your topic(s) in a book or scholarly journal. If you can only find information about your topic(s) in current event sources (newspapers, magazines, etc.) then the topic might be too new to have a large body of published scholarly information. If this is the case, you may want to reconsider the topic(s).

So how do you find a research topic? Unfortunately there’s no directory of topics that you pick and choose from, but there are a few relatively easy techniques that you can use to find a relevant and manageable topic. A good starting point may be to view the Library's Resources for Finding a Research Topic Workshop below.

The sub-pages in this section (on the left-hand menu) offer various tips for where and how to locate resources to develop your research topic. And for additional information on selecting a research topic, see the resources below.

  • Defining a Topic - SAGE Research Methods
  • Develop My Research Idea - Academic Writer Note: You MUST create an Academic Writer account AND start a paper in order to access this tool. Once you have done so, open a paper and click Research Lab Book in the left navigation menu.
  • The Process for Developing Questions - ASC Guide

Resources for Finding a Research Topic Workshop

This workshop will introduce you to library resources which can be used to locate potential topics for a research paper or dissertation. This workshop explores websites, reference books, and scholarly articles, as well as review criteria to consider when selecting a topic.

  • Resources for Finding a Research Topic Workshop Outline

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How to Select a Research Topic: A Step-by-Step Guide (2021)

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by  Antony W

September 15, 2021

how to select a research topic

Learning how to select a research topic can be the difference between failing your assignment and writing a comprehensive research paper. That’s why in this guide we’ll teach you how to select a research topic step-by-step.

You don’t need this guide if your professor has already given you a list of topics to consider for your assignment . You can skip to our guide on how to write a research paper .

If they have left it up to you to choose a topic to investigate, which they must approve before you start working on your research study, we suggest that you read the process shared in this post.

Choosing a topic after finding your research problem is important because:

  • The topic guides your research and gives you a mean to not only arrive at other interesting topics but also direct you to discover new knowledge
  • The topic you choose will govern what you say and ensures you keep a logical flow of information.

Picking a topic for a research paper can be challenging and sometimes intimidating, but it’s not impossible. In the following section, we show you how to choose the best research topic that your instructor can approve after the first review.

How to Select a Research Topic 

Below are four steps to follow to find the most suitable topic for your research paper assignment:

Step 1: Consider a Topic that Interests You 

what to put in a research topic

If your professor has asked you to choose a topic for your research paper, it means you can choose just about any subject to focus on in your area of study. A significant first step to take is to consider topics that interest you.

An interesting topic should meet two very important conditions.

First, it should be concise. The topic you choose should not be too broad or two narrow. Rather, it should be something focused on a specific issue. Second, the topic should allow you to find enough sources to cite in the research stage of your assignment.

The best way to determine if the research topic is interesting is to do some free writing for about 10 minutes. As you free write, think about the number of questions that people ask about the topic and try to consider why they’re important. These questions are important because they will make the research stage easier for you.

You’ll probably have a long list of interesting topics to consider for your research assignment. That’s a good first step because it means your options aren’t limited. However, you need to narrow down to only one topic for the assignment, so it’s time to start brainstorming.

Step 2: Brainstorm Your Topics 

what to put in a research topic

You aren’t doing research at this stage yet. You are only trying to make considerations to determine which topic will suit your research assignment.

The brainstorming stage isn’t difficult at all. It should take only a couple of hours or a few days depending on how you approach.

We recommend talking to your professor, classmates, and friends about the topics that you’ve picked and ask for their opinion. Expect mixed opinions from this audience and then consider the topics that make the most sense. Note what topics picked their interest the most and put them on top of the list.

You’ll end up removing some topics from your initial list after brainstorming, and that’s completely fine. The goal here is to end up with a topic that interests you as well as your readers.

Step 3: Define Your Topics 

what to put in a research topic

Check once again to make sure that your topic is a subject that you can easily define. You want to make sure the topic isn’t too broad or too narrow.

Often, a broad topic presents overwhelming amount of information, which makes it difficult to write a comprehensive research paper. A narrow topic, on the other hand, means you’ll find very little information, and therefore it can be difficult to do your assignment.

The length of the research paper, as stated in the assignment brief, should guide your topic selection.

Narrow down your list to topics that are:

  • Broad enough to allows you to find enough scholarly articles and journals for reference
  • Narrow enough to fit within the expected word count and the scope of the research

Topics that meet these two conditions should be easy to work on as they easily fit within the constraints of the research assignment.

Step 4: Read Background Information of Selected Topics  

what to put in a research topic

You probably have two or three topics by the time you get to this step. Now it’s time to read the background information on the topics to decide which topic to work on.

This step is important because it gives you a clear overview of the topic, enabling you to see how it relates to broader, narrower, and related concepts. Preliminary research also helps you to find keywords commonly used to describe the topic, which may be useful in further research.

It’s important to note how easy or difficult it is to find information on the topic.

Look at different sources of information to be sure you can find enough references for the topic. Such periodic indexes scan journals, newspaper articles, and magazines to find the information you’re looking for. You can even use web search engines. Google and Bing are currently that best options to consider because they make it easy for searchers to find relevant information on scholarly topics.

If you’re having a hard time to find references for a topic that you’ve so far considered for your research paper, skip it and go to the next one. Doing so will go a long way to ensure you have the right topic to work on from start to finish.

Get Research Paper Writing Help 

If you’ve found your research topic but you feel so stuck that you can’t proceed with the assignment without some assistance, we are here to help. With our research paper writing service ,  we can help you handle the assignment within the shortest time possible.

We will research your topic, develop a research question, outline the project, and help you with writing. We also get you involved in the process, allowing you to track the progress of your order until the delivery stage.

About the author 

Antony W is a professional writer and coach at Help for Assessment. He spends countless hours every day researching and writing great content filled with expert advice on how to write engaging essays, research papers, and assignments.

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Home » Research Topics – Ideas and Examples

Research Topics – Ideas and Examples

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Research Topic

Research Topic

Definition:

Research topic is a specific subject or area of interest that a researcher wants to investigate or explore in-depth through research. It is the overarching theme or question that guides a research project and helps to focus the research activities towards a clear objective.

How to Choose Research Topic

You can Choose a Research Topic by following the below guide:

Identify your Interests

One of the most important factors to consider when choosing a research topic is your personal interest. This is because you will be spending a considerable amount of time researching and writing about the topic, so it’s essential that you are genuinely interested and passionate about it. Start by brainstorming a list of potential research topics based on your interests, hobbies, or areas of expertise. You can also consider the courses that you’ve enjoyed the most or the topics that have stood out to you in your readings.

Review the Literature

Before deciding on a research topic, you need to understand what has already been written about it. Conducting a preliminary review of the existing literature in your field can help you identify gaps in knowledge, inconsistencies in findings, or unanswered questions that you can explore further. You can do this by reading academic articles, books, and other relevant sources in your field. Make notes of the themes or topics that emerge and use this information to guide your research question.

Consult with your Advisor

Your academic advisor or a mentor in your field can provide you with valuable insights and guidance on choosing a research topic. They can help you identify areas of interest, suggest potential research questions, and provide feedback on the feasibility of your research proposal. They can also direct you towards relevant literature and resources that can help you develop your research further.

Consider the Scope and Feasibility

The research topic you choose should be manageable within the time and resource constraints of your project. Be mindful of the scope of your research and ensure that you are not trying to tackle a topic that is too broad or too narrow. If your topic is too broad, you may find it challenging to conduct a comprehensive analysis, while if it’s too narrow, you may struggle to find enough material to support your research.

Brainstorm with Peers

Discussing potential research topics with your peers or colleagues can help you generate new ideas and perspectives. They may have insights or expertise that you haven’t considered, and their feedback can help you refine your research question. You can also join academic groups or attend conferences in your field to network with other researchers and get inspiration for your research.

Consider the Relevance

Choose a research topic that is relevant to your field of study and has the potential to contribute to the existing knowledge. You can consider the latest trends and emerging issues in your field to identify topics that are both relevant and interesting. Conducting research on a topic that is timely and relevant can also increase the likelihood of getting published or presenting your research at conferences.

Keep an Open Mind

While it’s essential to choose a research topic that aligns with your interests and expertise, you should also be open to exploring new ideas or topics that may be outside of your comfort zone. Consider researching a topic that challenges your assumptions or introduces new perspectives that you haven’t considered before. You may discover new insights or perspectives that can enrich your research and contribute to your growth as a researcher.

Components of Research Topic

A research topic typically consists of several components that help to define and clarify the subject matter of the research project. These components include:

  • Research problem or question: This is the central issue or inquiry that the research seeks to address. It should be well-defined and focused, with clear boundaries that limit the scope of the research.
  • Background and context: This component provides the necessary background information and context for the research topic. It explains why the research problem or question is important, relevant, and timely. It may also include a literature review that summarizes the existing research on the topic.
  • Objectives or goals : This component outlines the specific objectives or goals that the research seeks to achieve. It should be clear and concise, and should align with the research problem or question.
  • Methodology : This component describes the research methods and techniques that will be used to collect and analyze data. It should be detailed enough to provide a clear understanding of how the research will be conducted, including the sampling method, data collection tools, and statistical analyses.
  • Significance or contribution : This component explains the significance or contribution of the research topic. It should demonstrate how the research will add to the existing knowledge in the field, and how it will benefit practitioners, policymakers, or society at large.
  • Limitations: This component outlines the limitations of the research, including any potential biases, assumptions, or constraints. It should be transparent and honest about the potential shortcomings of the research, and how these limitations will be addressed.
  • Expected outcomes or findings : This component provides an overview of the expected outcomes or findings of the research project. It should be realistic and based on the research objectives and methodology.

Purpose of Research Topic

The purpose of a research topic is to identify a specific area of inquiry that the researcher wants to explore and investigate. A research topic is typically a broad area of interest that requires further exploration and refinement through the research process. It provides a clear focus and direction for the research project, and helps to define the research questions and objectives. A well-defined research topic also helps to ensure that the research is relevant and useful, and can contribute to the existing body of knowledge in the field. Ultimately, the purpose of a research topic is to generate new insights, knowledge, and understanding about a particular phenomenon, issue, or problem.

Characteristics of Research Topic

some common characteristics of a well-defined research topic include:

  • Relevance : A research topic should be relevant and significant to the field of study and address a current issue, problem, or gap in knowledge.
  • Specificity : A research topic should be specific enough to allow for a focused investigation and clear understanding of the research question.
  • Feasibility : A research topic should be feasible, meaning it should be possible to carry out the research within the given constraints of time, resources, and expertise.
  • Novelty : A research topic should add to the existing body of knowledge by introducing new ideas, concepts, or theories.
  • Clarity : A research topic should be clearly articulated and easy to understand, both for the researcher and for potential readers of the research.
  • Importance : A research topic should be important and have practical implications for the field or society as a whole.
  • Significance : A research topic should be significant and have the potential to generate new insights and understanding in the field.

Examples of Research Topics

Here are some examples of research topics that are currently relevant and in-demand in various fields:

  • The impact of social media on mental health: With the rise of social media use, this topic has gained significant attention in recent years. Researchers could investigate how social media affects self-esteem, body image, and other mental health concerns.
  • The use of artificial intelligence in healthcare: As healthcare becomes increasingly digitalized, researchers could explore the use of AI algorithms to predict and prevent disease, optimize treatment plans, and improve patient outcomes.
  • Renewable energy and sustainable development: As the world seeks to reduce its carbon footprint, researchers could investigate the potential of renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power, and how these technologies can be integrated into existing infrastructure.
  • The impact of workplace diversity and inclusion on employee productivity: With an increasing focus on diversity and inclusion in the workplace, researchers could investigate how these factors affect employee morale, productivity, and retention.
  • Cybersecurity and data privacy: As data breaches and cyber attacks become more common, researchers could explore new methods of protecting sensitive information and preventing malicious attacks.
  • T he impact of mindfulness and meditation on stress reduction: As stress-related health issues become more prevalent, researchers could investigate the effectiveness of mindfulness and meditation practices on reducing stress and improving overall well-being.

Research Topics Ideas

Here are some Research Topics Ideas from different fields:

  • The impact of social media on mental health and well-being.
  • The effectiveness of various teaching methods in improving academic performance in high schools.
  • The role of AI and machine learning in healthcare: current applications and future potentials.
  • The impact of climate change on wildlife habitats and conservation efforts.
  • The effects of video game violence on aggressive behavior in young adults.
  • The effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction techniques in reducing anxiety and depression.
  • The impact of technology on human relationships and social interactions.
  • The role of exercise in promoting physical and mental health in older adults.
  • The causes and consequences of income inequality in developed and developing countries.
  • The effects of cultural diversity in the workplace on job satisfaction and productivity.
  • The impact of remote work on employee productivity and work-life balance.
  • The relationship between sleep patterns and cognitive functioning.
  • The effectiveness of online learning versus traditional classroom learning.
  • The role of government policies in promoting renewable energy adoption.
  • The effects of childhood trauma on mental health in adulthood.
  • The impact of social media on political participation and civic engagement.
  • The effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in treating anxiety disorders.
  • The relationship between nutrition and cognitive functioning.
  • The impact of gentrification on urban communities.
  • The effects of music on mood and emotional regulation.
  • The impact of microplastics on marine ecosystems and food webs.
  • The role of artificial intelligence in detecting and preventing cyberattacks.
  • The effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions in managing chronic pain.
  • The relationship between personality traits and job satisfaction.
  • The effects of social isolation on mental and physical health in older adults.
  • The impact of cultural and linguistic diversity on healthcare access and outcomes.
  • The effectiveness of psychotherapy in treating depression and anxiety in adolescents.
  • The relationship between exercise and cognitive aging.
  • The effects of social media on body image and self-esteem.
  • The role of corporate social responsibility in promoting sustainable business practices.
  • The impact of mindfulness meditation on attention and focus in children.
  • The relationship between political polarization and media consumption habits.
  • The effects of urbanization on mental health and well-being.
  • The role of social support in managing chronic illness.
  • The impact of social media on romantic relationships and dating behaviors.
  • The effectiveness of behavioral interventions in promoting physical activity in sedentary adults.
  • The relationship between sleep quality and immune function.
  • The effects of workplace diversity and inclusion programs on employee retention.
  • The impact of climate change on global food security.
  • The role of music therapy in improving communication and social skills in individuals with autism spectrum disorder.
  • The impact of cultural values on the development of mental health stigma.
  • The effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction techniques in reducing burnout in healthcare professionals.
  • The relationship between social media use and body dissatisfaction among adolescents.
  • The effects of nature exposure on cognitive functioning and well-being.
  • The role of peer mentoring in promoting academic success in underrepresented student populations.
  • The impact of neighborhood characteristics on physical activity and obesity.
  • The effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation interventions in improving cognitive functioning in individuals with traumatic brain injury.
  • The relationship between organizational culture and employee job satisfaction.
  • The effects of cultural immersion experiences on intercultural competence development.
  • The role of assistive technology in promoting independence and quality of life for individuals with disabilities.
  • The impact of workplace design on employee productivity and well-being.
  • The impact of digital technologies on the music industry and artist revenues.
  • The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in treating insomnia.
  • The relationship between social media use and body weight perception among young adults.
  • The effects of green spaces on mental health and well-being in urban areas.
  • The role of mindfulness-based interventions in reducing substance use disorders.
  • The impact of workplace bullying on employee turnover and job satisfaction.
  • The effectiveness of animal-assisted therapy in treating mental health disorders.
  • The relationship between teacher-student relationships and academic achievement.
  • The effects of social support on resilience in individuals experiencing adversity.
  • The role of cognitive aging in driving safety and mobility.
  • The effectiveness of psychotherapy in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
  • The relationship between social media use and sleep quality.
  • The effects of cultural competency training on healthcare providers’ attitudes and behaviors towards diverse patient populations.
  • The role of exercise in preventing chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
  • The impact of the gig economy on job security and worker rights.
  • The effectiveness of art therapy in promoting emotional regulation and coping skills in children and adolescents.
  • The relationship between parenting styles and child academic achievement.
  • The effects of social comparison on well-being and self-esteem.
  • The role of nutrition in promoting healthy aging and longevity.
  • The impact of gender diversity in leadership on organizational performance.
  • The effectiveness of family-based interventions in treating eating disorders.
  • The relationship between social media use and perceived loneliness among older adults.
  • The effects of mindfulness-based interventions on pain management in chronic pain patients.
  • The role of physical activity in preventing and treating depression.
  • The impact of cultural differences on communication and conflict resolution in international business.
  • The effectiveness of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) in treating anxiety disorders.
  • The relationship between student engagement and academic success in higher education.
  • The effects of discrimination on mental health outcomes in minority populations.
  • The role of virtual reality in enhancing learning experiences.
  • The impact of social media influencers on consumer behavior and brand loyalty.
  • The effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in treating chronic pain.
  • The relationship between social media use and body image dissatisfaction among men.
  • The effects of exposure to nature on cognitive functioning and creativity.
  • The role of spirituality in coping with illness and disability.
  • The impact of automation on employment and job displacement.
  • The effectiveness of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) in treating borderline personality disorder.
  • The relationship between teacher-student relationships and school attendance.
  • The effects of mindfulness-based interventions on workplace stress and burnout.
  • The role of exercise in promoting cognitive functioning and brain health in older adults.
  • The impact of diversity and inclusion initiatives on organizational innovation and creativity.
  • The effectiveness of cognitive remediation therapy in treating schizophrenia.
  • The relationship between social media use and body dissatisfaction among women.
  • The effects of exposure to natural light on mood and sleep quality.
  • The role of spirituality in enhancing well-being and resilience in military personnel.
  • The impact of artificial intelligence on job training and skill development.
  • The effectiveness of interpersonal therapy (IPT) in treating depression.
  • The relationship between parental involvement and academic achievement among low-income students.
  • The effects of mindfulness-based interventions on emotional regulation and coping skills in trauma survivors.
  • The role of nutrition in preventing and treating mental health disorders.

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55 Research Paper Topics to Jumpstart Your Writing

JBirdwellBranson

The research paper is one of the most tried and true assignments in high school or college. It's your teacher's opportunity to see how well you can research, convey, and organize that research, and assemble everything into one five-paragraph (or maybe 15-page) paper.

Before you get started on your paper, you'll need to have a comprehensive understanding of what your teacher expects out of your completed assignment, as well as a really great topic that you can spend a lot of time researching. However, with several classes filled with many students, your teachers have likely seen the same topics over and over (and over) again. Here are some research paper topics that are guaranteed to keep your interest (and theirs). Borrow one of these ideas or get inspiration from this list, which is broken down by subject category.

Social issues research paper topics

Social issues are always going to exist, unfortunately. But the more we learn about what they are, how we can solve them, and how to prevent them, the better off we'll be. Here are a few social issues topics to think about and to do research on.

  • Many children are diagnosed with ADD or ADHD and are subsequently put on medication, but some advocate that children are overly medicated and that we should instead have more patience for those who can't sit still or have minor behavioral issues. How should this issue be approached?
  • The homeless population in the United States is more than 1.5 million people. What are the conditions that lead to someone's being homeless? Are there ways to combat it?
  • Girls who have been in the foster care system are more likely to be human trafficked. Why is this? What can be done?
  • Someone who grows up in poverty is more likely to live in poverty all their life. Why is that? How can someone escape poverty?
  • Opioid addiction is a huge issue in the United States right now. What led to the widespread abuse of opioid drugs? What is being done to solve this problem?
  • Sexual assault is a hot button issue on college campuses. How widespread is sexual assault on college campuses and what is being done to stop it?
  • Each year, 1.2 million students drop out of high school. What is causing them to drop out? What can be done to combat the dropout rate?
  • Many terminally-ill patients in America are advocating for assisted suicide. What countries already allow this, and what are the pros and the cons?
  • Performance artists in public places such as beach boardwalks have their activities regulated by some local governments. Why is this? What are the pros and the cons?
  • TV shows such as "Hoarders" have shed light on people who collect tremendous amounts of items, trash, and/or animals in their house. How are these people being helped? What causes hoarding problems?

Political research paper topics

The events in politics may always be changing, but the nature of politics remains the same. There's always a lot to discuss and a lot to learn, making for a very interesting research topic for your paper. Here are a few ideas to get you thinking.

  • North Korea has recently ramped up its nuclear program. What are some ramifications of this?
  • There has been a large political divide in the country for the past few years. What factors led to the large division?
  • What is the AHCA? How is it different from the ACA?
  • The U.S. recently pulled out of the Paris Climate Agreement. What is the Paris Climate Agreement and what is America's history of involvement with it?
  • Confederate monuments are being torn down after the events in Charlottesville. Write about the history of one confederate monument that's been torn down. When was it built? What were the circumstances of it being constructed?
  • Some feel that religious liberties have been threatened in the United States for several years. Why do they feel this way? What is the history of religious liberties in this country?
  • Much of the news in the last couple of years has been the rise of populism. What is the definition of populism? How does it affect the political climate?
  • Many parents are choosing not to vaccinate their children because they have read that there is a link between vaccines and autism. Should parents have to vaccinate their children to guarantee herd immunity for all children? Even though the evidence points out that vaccines do not cause autism, why do parents still insist? How have certain celebrities contributed to this issue by being vocal on this topic?
  • Many people in "Middle America" don't feel that their viewpoints are adequately expressed in the national media. Why do they feel this way? How does this affect national discourse?

Historical research paper topics

Many of us learn a lot about the Revolutionary War or the Civil War in our classrooms, but often there's not enough time to explore everything that you might be interested in. Here are a few off-the-beaten-path research paper topics that will be sure to capture your attention as well as your instructor's.

  • What caused the market crash of 2008? How are we still recovering?
  • There were several all black towns in the United States in the early 20th century. What led to the establishment of these cities?
  • Who were the Freedom Riders?
  • What were the Tulsa Race Riots?
  • What was Female Hysteria in the Victorian era?
  • There are a lot of conspiracy theories surrounding Kennedy's assassination. Research about one in depth and discuss how the theory came about.
  • What was the Korean War over? How does it affect society today?
  • What was the Vietnam War over? How does it affect society today?
  • What was the Space Race? Who were the major players and why did it matter so much who got to the moon first?
  • Why did a lot of protesters and "hippies" gather at Haight-Ashbury in the 1960s? Write about the history of this notable neighborhood in San Francisco.
  • What were Jim Crow laws? How do they still affect society today?
  • When was Affirmative Action enacted? How does it still affect society today?
  • What was the Reconstructive era? How does it still affect the South today?
  • What was Watergate? Who were the major players and what was the result? How did it affect the country?
  • What was the Equal Rights Amendment? Why was it not ratified?
  • What was Prohibition? What were the circumstances and why did it finally end?
  • Who was the first woman to hold political office in the United States?
  • Eleanor Roosevelt was a very notable First Lady. Who was she and why was she so important?
  • What was the case Loving v. Virginia? Who did it involve and what was it about?

Environmental research paper topics

There are many things to learn and research on about the world around us. Whether it's how we can combat climate change or research alternative fuels, it's important to know the answers for a healthy global environment for our future children and grandchildren. Here are a few ideas for environmental research paper topics.

  • What is global warming? What can we do to minimize the effects of it?
  • Some people say that certain global warming studies are funded by industries that have a vested interest in the issue, such as solar energy companies. How are they funded and conducted? Should the research be conducted by impartial parties?
  • The polar ice caps are melting. What does this mean for our environment?
  • There are many endangered species throughout the world. Pick one to write about and write about conservation efforts being made.
  • What are alternative fuels? Should we use them or not? Write about the pros and the cons.
  • What are some ways you could individually reduce your carbon footprint?
  • What countries are leading the globe on combating climate change? What steps are they taking to lead the way?
  • What is deforestation and how does it affect the environment?
  • Many coral reefs are disappearing. Why is that and what kind of actions are scientists taking?
  • What are sinkholes? Why do they occur?

Film, literature, and art research paper topics

Film, literature, and art are part of what defines a culture. It's not surprising then that there is much to explore when you are thinking about these topics. Here are a few interesting paper topics that pertain to film, literature, and art.

  • Look at a list of classic films. Pick one and write about why it was so influential.
  • In the year 2017 it's still quite rare to find a female film director. Pick a favorite female film director and discuss what unique perspectives she adds to film and culture.
  • There's more of a push to ignore the traditional "canon" of literature because it features a lot of white, male writers. What do this mean and what do you think of it?
  • Female artists are highly underrepresented in art museums throughout the world. Is it just that there aren't many female artists traditionally? What are some efforts being made to include more female artists?
  • Some people feel that Hollywood is hypocritical in embracing director Roman Polanski. What makes them feel this way? What events made him a controversial figure?
  • Read a banned book and research on why the book was banned. What were the circumstances?
  • They say poetry is a dying art. What do you think? Is poetry still alive and well?

After you've chosen a topic, be sure to get a second opinion

Choosing an interesting research paper topic is often half the battle. Once you get a topic nailed down that you're really fascinated by, it's a lot easier to research and write about it.

After you've written all of the content of your research paper, it's always important to get someone to look over your paper and ensure that it's error-free and makes sense to the reader. If you have any questions, be sure to reach out to your instructor or a parent for advice. Finally, if you want to ensure that your paper doesn't contain any spelling or grammar mistakes, you should consider hiring a professional editor such as one from ServiceScape to take a look at your paper. A professional can help you spot an error that you may have missed and help you achieve clean, easy-to-read copy that is guaranteed to impress.

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Creating a Successful Research Topic Statement (PSY)

In this tutorial, we will identify what makes for a successful research topic.

Most research topics start out as a general and often vague idea that a researcher has an interest in investigating.

Inexperienced researchers, including most doctoral learners, frequently think of topics that are quite interesting, but not narrowly enough focused for a dissertation.

This tutorial will guide you through a set of steps designed to help you come up with a topic, first of all, and secondly to focus it more tightly so that you can begin a meaningful and successful search of the existing literature to discover whether your topic is actually researchable.

This tutorial's primary objective is to prepare you to create a successful research topic that may become the topic of your dissertation. To do that, we'll work through the following issues:

  • First, what are the characteristics of a well-formed research topic?
  • Second, how are research topics evaluated?
  • Third, how can the key concepts and the population be narrowed and focused so that they are researchable?
  • Fourth, how can the relationship among concepts be named so that the appropriate methodological literature can be accessed in the literature review?

Obviously, in Track 1 you are at the beginning of your studies toward the doctorate, and perhaps your dissertation is far from your thoughts. We are starting the process now, however, because our experience has been that when learners wait to start searching for their topics, it often creates a serious problem for them when they actually start the dissertation. That problem can take many forms, but the most common one is that they have not had sufficient time (and training) in exhaustively searching the relevant literature to discover whether the topic they are interested in is even viable—and without a good topic statement, a good literature search is impossible. So let's begin.

What Is a Research Topic?

A research topic is an area of interest to a researcher that is first of all, researchable. It is focused narrowly enough that its key concepts are quite plain and well integrated. It is a topic or subject that can be found in the existing literature of the researcher's field, which shows that it is of some interest or importance to that field, and has some important characteristics.

Characteristics of a Well-formed Research Topic

The first mark of a well-formed topic is that it clearly states the key concepts to be investigated. Sometimes, only one concept is named—those studies often turn out to be qualitative, but not always. More often, two or more key concepts are named. Next, it identifies the relationship or relationships among those concepts that the researcher intends to explore. Obviously, if only one concept was named, there won't be a relationship, but in that case a word like "describes" or "experiences" will give a clue to the kind of information desired. Third, a research topic specifies the population of interest to be investigated. Finally, a research topic is just a phrase. That is, it is not a full sentence with a verb. However, the well-formed topic statement will embed the actual topic in a complete sentence. Let's look at some examples.

Some Examples of Topic Statements

Here are a few topic statements that eventually lead to successful dissertations:

  • Elementary age students' needs for family-based counseling services.
  • Indigenous people's responses to encounters with law enforcement.
  • Impact of mother's death on daughters in poor, middle class, and wealthy families.
  • The relationship between assignment strategies to prevent burnout used by managers of first responders and the occurrence of burnout.
  • Employees' productivity as a function of their managers' management styles.
  • Strategies used by mainstream classroom teachers to manage children with behavior problems who do not receive special education.

You can see immediately that all six examples, taken from the four schools in Capella University, are phrases, not complete sentences. So far, so good. The first mark of a successful topic statement is that it identifies the key concepts to be investigated, right? Let's see how the examples do that.

Evaluating the Form of the Examples: Key Concepts

In the first example, we seem to have two key concepts: "needs" and "family-based counseling services." Are they stated clearly? Probably not clearly enough: what is meant by "needs" and "family-based counseling services" is not immediately transparent. This topic will need some work, but most topics start out this way.

Let's try another: Indigenous people’s responses to encounters with law enforcement. Here, there seem to be two key concepts: "responses" and "encounters with law enforcement." These concepts are quite broad and will have to be narrowed considerably to support a researchable topic, but they provide a good start.

Let's do one more: Employees' productivity as a function of their managers' management styles.

Here, there are two key concepts, right? Productivity and management styles.

Evaluating the Form of Topics: Relationship(s) among the Key Concepts

The second mark of a successful topic is that it identifies any relationship to be investigated between or among the key concepts. Let's look at the third example to see about this.

This topic meets our criterion of being a phrase. It seems to state at least two concepts (but with multiple levels): "death" and "socio-economic status of daughters." What about the relationship? Well, it is captured in that word "impact."

An "impact" in research jargon means the effect that one concept—death—has on another concept, in this case, the daughters. One can, in fact, replace the word impact with the word effect without changing the meaning at all. So the topic is proposing a cause-and-effect kind of relationship.

Let's look at another example: The relationship between assignment strategies to prevent burnout used by managers of first responders and the occurrence of burnout

This seems complicated, but it really isn't. First, let's check the key concepts: "Assignment strategies to prevent burnout" would seem to be one key concept, and "occurrence of burnout" would be the other. These are reasonably clear, or probably would be to someone in the human resources or management worlds. No doubt they will be further clarified as the researcher works on the topic's wording. But what about the relationship? It is in the word "relationship," obviously. And in research jargon, a "relationship" between A and B is a particular kind of relationship, called a correlation.

Now, play with the other topics to see if you can identify the relationship—if any.

Evaluating the Form of Topics: Target Population

The third sign of a successful topic is that it names the target population, the group of people or organizations or groups that the researcher is interested in. Let's evaluate some of our examples on this point.

  • Elementary age students' needs for family-based counseling services : The population here is stated: Students of elementary school age.
  • Indigenous people's responses to encounters with law enforcement: Here as well, the population is indigenous people.
  • Impact of mother's death on daughters in poor, middle class, and wealthy families: The population is daughters in three socio-economic groups.
  • The relationship between assignment strategies to prevent burnout used by managers of first responders and the occurrence of burnout: You determine who the population is in this one.

Is It Managers or Is It First Responders?

The population is managers of first responders. Or is it? The awkward wording of the topic makes this a bit hard to digest. The burnout occurs in the first responders, so maybe they are the population. But the first responders' managers are the ones using the management strategies, so are they the population?

Well, the two key concepts are management strategies (used by managers) and rate of burnout (in first responders), so the researcher will have to get information from both groups of people, so both are the target population: first responders and their managers.

Take a minute and try to figure out the rest of our examples.

Summing Up the Characteristics of a Successful Topic

We've seen in action the three chief marks of a successful research topic.

  • The topic states the key concepts to be investigated.
  • It states what relationship between or among the concepts will be explored. Remember, if there is only one concept (which often is the case in qualitative studies), there won't be a relationship. But if there are two or more key concepts, look for the relationship between or among them.
  • The successful topic names the population of interest for the study.

A well-formed research topic will have these characteristics, but simply having them is not sufficient. The elements also need to be well-focused and narrowed down to a point where the research becomes feasible. Let's take a look at a simple method for doing this.

Narrowing the Focus

Take a look at this grid. You'll see that one of our topics has been broken out into the first column. The population is first—indigenous people—followed by two concepts: responses and law enforcement. Now look at the central column, labeled "Narrower term." Notice how the very broad population has been narrowed. Similarly, "law enforcement" has been narrowed to police (there are many other types of law enforcement, such as FBI, Homeland Security, TSA, Customs and Immigration, sheriff's departments, and so on). Similarly, there are many kinds of behaviors and experiences that could be considered "responses," but the researcher is most interested in emotional responses. Now move to the third column. Can you see how each term is being narrowed yet again?

If we restated the topic now, after having narrowed it down a bit, it would look like this: Cherokee Indians' tolerance for stress when meeting traffic officers.

Let's work through another example, this time using the topic "Employees' productivity as a function of their managers' management styles."

You can see the key terms lined up in the first column. The other two columns are blank.

What would you ask yourself, if this were your topic, in order to narrow this down?

Questions to Ask for Narrowing a Topic

There are many questions you can ask yourself when you are narrowing your topic. A good opener is "So what do I really want to know about the concept?"

Another quite good question is to ask about your real interest or passion is about the concept or the population.

You can also find helpful terms by performing controlled vocabulary searches in library databases. You can find a nice tutorial on that method of searching in the Capella library at but whatever you ask yourself, keep your focus on what you truly most want to know and care about regarding the concept.

Now, let's get back to our example.

When the researcher asked herself what sort of employees and managers she was actually interested in, she realized it was service employees and managers. The more she pondered, and was helped by a quick check of the literature in her specialization, she realized that she was most interested in call center personnel. Then she tackled productivity . From her courses in management measurement, she knew that one way to think about productivity was days at work. But that seemed too dependent on factors outside the manager-employee relationship. She wanted a more fine-grained way to look at productivity, so she narrowed it to a specific measure, calls completed times minutes per call.

Then she took on management styl e. Knowing that there are many types, her first attempt at focusing this term was authoritarian style. That didn't satisfy her, and when she looked again at her topic, she realized that that word "function" was important. It implied to her that she was really interested in knowing how different management styles related to different degrees of productivity. At first, she put together a list of known management styles, but that felt intimidating. She decided to narrow it down to just two: authoritarian vs. flexible management style.

After all this, her topic now looked like this: Productivity as measured by calls completed times minutes per call in call center employees supervised by authoritarian managers compared to productivity in call center employees supervised by flexible managers.

She knew the wording was clunky and would need to be crafted better, but she had a much more focused topic. So far, we've been looking at two things about good research topics: what they should contain (concepts, relationships, and population), and how to narrow each element. In these narrowing exercises, we've focused on the concepts and the population. Now, let's turn our attention to the relationship . This is a very important element, because it offers an important clue about the nature of the study that might ensue.

Evaluating the Relationship Named in the Topic

Research asks all kinds of questions, and the relationship named in the research topic clues us into what kind of question the ensuing study will likely ask. Here are some questions you might ask in order to choose the right word to describe the relationship you're looking for.

What do you envision really doing?

  • Looking at comparisons between variables or groups of people?
  • Looking at relationships between two or more concepts?
  • Looking at effects of one or more concept on another concept or group?
  • Looking at outcomes of some process or treatment or condition?
  • Looking at experiences?
  • Developing a theory to explain some phenomenon?

For each of these (and there are other sorts of questions you can ask yourself), specific words can specify the relationship. Let's look at them.

If your topic compares two or more things compared with or some similar phrase indicates the relationship you want to know about. For instance, student retention rates in large urban school districts compared with small rural districts.

If your interest is about relationships between two or more concepts, try using words like relationship, in relation to, or other similar constructions. Here's an example: the frequency of church attendance in relation to socioeconomic status.

Suppose your interest is to see if one thing has an effect on something else. In that case, you can use that word, effect, or other words such as influence, impact, cause, predict, and the like. For example, the influence of tax policy on employment patterns in Midwestern communities.

An outcome is another version of a cause-and-effect relationship, specifically when you are interested in the final condition after some kind of process. For instance, the outcome of a training program. That word is excellent to use for the relationship, as in the outcome of training program A as measured by employee comprehension of corporate policies.

Are you interested in describing a certain experience, such as falling in love or being laid off work or having a baby or starting a new company? Having experiences is a very subjective thing, and the actual experience is a single thing—not one of a few variables. So there is no relationship to specify in such a topic, but the only way to learn about people's experiences is to ask them to describe them. So, words like descriptions of, accounts of, reports of, and the like can be very helpful. For instance, men's descriptions of their spiritual transformations when recovering from alcoholism.

Okay, we've covered the basics of how to craft a well-formed research topic. We've seen the marks of a good topic. They are:

  • The key concepts are clearly stated and well-focused so that they can be profitably found in the literature.
  • Second, the relationship, if any, between or among them is clearly stated. Even if there is no relationship, what you're really looking for (descriptions? accounts? reports?) can be seen in the wording.
  • Third, the people you want to study, your population, is clearly stated and narrowed down to a workable point. You have all these points covered in a single phrase, and if after narrowing it down that phrase is awkward, you will work on crafting it into a more graceful form.

In a minute, you'll get to work crafting your own research topic, but first I want to show you why we emphasize the importance of narrowing and focusing the key concepts, relationships, and populations.

What Do You Do With the Research Topic?

The research topic is step 1 in the sequential process of research design. Once you have your topic in hand, step 2 is to take it to the library and begin searching for existing research and theory on the topic. Here's where your key concepts need to be well-defined and narrowly focused. You will be looking for all the existing research on those key concepts when you start.

At first, you'll investigate each of your key concepts individually, to find out what the existing literature has to say about them in and of themselves. Later, after you have developed a good working knowledge of the background concepts, you'll dig deeper into research linking the key concepts together.

At the third level, you'll follow the "breadcrumbs" all the way back to the earliest studies on your topic so that you will, ultimately, master that literature fully.

So your topic statement is the foundation. It organizes your various literature reviews. Searching on the key concepts (translated into various key words) will help you organize the content of your study.

Searching on the existing methodological literature about the relationship named in your topic will prepare you for your methodological decisions in later steps of research design.

There is an old Chinese proverb found in the I Ching and many other places: “Patience in the beginning brings success.” If you are careful and attentive, and work patiently to write your research topic, then rewrite it, then rewrite it again and again, you will have a solid foundation on which to start building your literature review. The topic is your beginning.

Remain patient and steady, and you will succeed.

Doc. reference: phd_t1_u04s1_mpsuccess.html

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How to Research a Topic

Last Updated: January 10, 2024 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Christopher Taylor, PhD and by wikiHow staff writer, Jennifer Mueller, JD . Christopher Taylor is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of English at Austin Community College in Texas. He received his PhD in English Literature and Medieval Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014. There are 14 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 293,976 times.

With so much information potentially available at your fingertips, having a research assignment can be daunting. However, if you approach your research methodically, you'll be able to answer any research question in a thoughtful and comprehensive way. Develop a research question that is narrow enough to be addressed within the scope of your paper, then use keywords to find sources that have the information you need. Once you've found several sources, you'll be ready to organize your information into a logical report that adequately answers your question. [1] X Research source

Developing Your Topic

Step 1 Read through your assignment instructions carefully.

  • If you don't understand any aspect of the assignment, don't be afraid to ask your instructor directly. It's better to get an explanation about something than to assume you know what it means and later find out your assumption was incorrect.

Step 2 Brainstorm some topics that interest you and fall within the assignment's parameters.

  • For example, suppose your instructor assigned a research paper about a "public health concern." You might make a list that included such public health concerns as teenage vaping, anti-vaxxers, and drunk driving.
  • From your list, choose one area in particular that you want to look at. This is where you'll start your research. For the purposes of this example, assume you chose to research vaping among teenagers.

Step 3 Look up general information about the topic.

  • If you're doing a general internet search on your topic and not getting back many strong results, there may not be enough information out there for you to research that topic. This is typically rare, though, unless you've started off with a topic that's too narrow. For example, if you want to study vaping in your high school, you might not find enough sources. However, if you expanded your search to include all high schools in your state, you might have more luck.
  • If you're not very knowledgeable about your topic, look for a resource that will provide a general overview, so you can become more familiar with possible questions you could answer in your research paper.

Step 4 Decide on the question you want to answer through your research.

  • For example, if you wanted to look at teenagers and vaping, you might decide to ask "Are teenagers who vape more likely to smoke than teenagers who don't?"
  • How you frame your question also depends on the type of paper you're writing. For example, if you were writing a persuasive research essay, you would need to make a statement, and then back that statement up with research. For example, instead of asking if teenagers who vape are more likely to smoke than teenagers who don't, you might say "Teenagers who vape are more likely to start smoking."

Tip: Be versatile with your research question. Once you start more in-depth research, you may find that you have to adjust it or even change it entirely, and there's nothing wrong with that. It's just part of the process of learning through research.

Step 5 Seek knowledge about your specific question.

  • Look at the number of results you get, as well as the quality of the sources. You might also try an academic search engine, such as Google Scholar, to see how much academic material is out there on your chosen question.

Step 6 Refine your question...

  • For example, if you've selected teenagers who vape, the "who" would be teenagers. If a search of that topic yields too much information, you might scale it back by looking at a specific 5-year period (the "when") or only at teenagers in a specific state (the "where").
  • If you needed to broaden your question on the same topic, you may decide to look at teenagers and young adults under the age of 25, not just teenagers.

Finding Quality Sources

Step 1 Identify the types of sources you'll likely need.

  • 1- to 2-page paper: 2 to 3 webpages or short journal articles
  • 3- to 5-page paper: 4 to 8 journals or scholarly articles, webpages, or books
  • 5- to 10-page paper: 6 to 15 journals or scholarly articles, webpages, or books
  • 10- to 15-page paper: 12 to 20 journals or scholarly articles, webpages, or books

Step 2 Use topical keywords to find your initial sources.

  • For example, if you're researching the prevalence of vaping among teenagers, you might also include "adolescents" and "youth" as synonyms for teenagers, along with "tobacco use" or "e-cigarettes" as synonyms for vaping.
  • Take advantage of academic databases available online through your school in addition to the internet.

Tip: Get help from research librarians. They know the most efficient ways to find the information you need and may be able to help you access sources you didn't even know existed.

Step 3 Evaluate potential sources using the CRAAP method.

  • Currency : How recent is the information? When was the source last updated?
  • Reliability : Are there references for facts and data? Is the content mostly opinion?
  • Authority : Who is the creator of the content? Who is the publisher? Are they biased in any way? Does the creator have academic credentials in the field?
  • Accuracy : Has the content been peer-reviewed or edited by a third party? Is the information supported by evidence? Can you easily verify facts in another source?
  • Purpose/Perspective : Is the content intended to teach you something or to sell you something? Is the information presented biased?

Tip: If your source fails any prong of the CRAAP method, use extreme caution if you refer to it in your research paper. If it fails more than one prong, you're probably better off not using it.

Step 4 Mine reference lists to find additional sources you can use.

  • If an author mentions a particular source more than once, you definitely want to read that material.
  • The reference list typically contains enough information for you to find the source on your own. If you find that you can't access the source, for example because it's behind a paywall, talk to your school or a public librarian about it. They may be able to get you access.

Step 5 Take notes about each resource you find.

  • List the citation information for the source at the top of the card, then take notes in your words. Include the page numbers (if applicable) that you would use in your citation.
  • If you copy something directly from the source, put quote marks around those words and write the page number (if applicable) where that quote appears. You may also want to distinguish quotes even further, for example, by having quotes in a different color text than your words. This will help protect you against accidental plagiarism .

Organizing Your Information

Step 1 Create a spreadsheet with bibliographic information for all of your sources.

  • Include columns for the full citation and in-text citation for each of your sources. Provide a column for your notes and add them to your spreadsheet. If you have direct quotes, you might include a separate column for those quotes.
  • Many word-processing apps have citation features that will allow you to input a new source from a list, so you only have to type the citation once. With a spreadsheet, you can simply cut and paste.

Tip: Even if your word-processing app automatically formats your citation for you, it's good practice to create the citation yourself in your spreadsheet.

Step 2 Categorize your notes into groups of similar information.

  • For example, if you were writing a paper on teenagers and vaping, you may have notes related to the age teenagers started vaping, the reasons they started vaping, and their exposure to tobacco or nicotine before they started vaping.
  • If you used a digital note-taking app, you typically would categorize your notes by adding tags to them. Some notes may have more than one tag, depending on the information it covered.

Step 3 Order your categories in a way that answers your research question.

  • For example, suppose your research indicated that teenagers who vaped were more likely to switch to regular cigarettes if someone in their household smoked. The category covering teenage vapers' exposure to tobacco or nicotine before they started vaping would most likely be the first thing you talked about in your paper, assuming you wanted to put the strongest evidence first.

Step 4 Draft a basic outline for your paper based on your order of categories.

  • Unless your instructor has specific requirements for your outline, you can make it as detailed or as simple as you want. Some people prefer full sentences in their outlines, while others have sections with just a word or two.
  • Working through the outline methodically can help you identify information that you don't have yet that you need to support your thesis or answer your research question.

Step 5 Review your notes and adjust your research question as necessary.

  • Even at this late stage, don't be afraid to change your question to more accurately frame your research. Because of your research, you know a lot more about the topic than you did when you first wrote your question, so it's natural that you would see ways to improve it.

Step 6 Search for additional sources to fill holes in your research.

  • For example, when outlining your paper about teenagers and vaping, you may realize that you don't have any information on how teenagers access e-cigarettes and whether that access is legal or illegal. If you're writing a paper about teenagers vaping as a public health concern, this is information you would need to know.
  • It's also likely that as you formulated your outline, you discovered that you didn't need some sources you previously thought would be valuable. In that situation, you may need to seek more sources, especially if throwing out a source took you below the minimum number of sources required for your assignment.

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  • Start your research as soon as possible after you get your assignment. If you leave it to the last minute, you won't have time to properly research the topic. You may also find that you overlook important information or make mistakes because you're rushing to finish. Thanks Helpful 4 Not Helpful 0
  • Breaking the research process down into small chunks and accomplishing a little each day can help you manage your time. Plan on spending at least as much time researching as you spend writing, if not more. Thanks Helpful 4 Not Helpful 0

what to put in a research topic

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Write a Position Paper

  • ↑ https://libguides.uta.edu/researchprocess/organize
  • ↑ https://researchguides.ben.edu/topics
  • ↑ https://clark.libguides.com/brainstorming
  • ↑ https://libraries.indiana.edu/sites/default/files/Develop_a_Research_Question.pdf
  • ↑ https://www.nhcc.edu/student-resources/library/doinglibraryresearch/basic-steps-in-the-research-process
  • ↑ https://ggu.libguides.com/c.php?g=106905&p=694002
  • ↑ https://salve.libguides.com/c.php?g=434998&p=2963676
  • ↑ https://guides.lib.lsu.edu/ENG1001/CRAAP
  • ↑ https://libguides.sdstate.edu/c.php?g=842619&p=6053357
  • ↑ https://advice.writing.utoronto.ca/researching/notes-from-research/
  • ↑ https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/writingprocess/organizing
  • ↑ https://libguides.usc.edu/writingguide/outline
  • ↑ https://guides.lib.k-state.edu/c.php?g=181829&p=1197416
  • ↑ https://guides.lib.k-state.edu/c.php?g=181829&p=1196003

About This Article

Christopher Taylor, PhD

To research a topic, you should use scholarly articles, books, and authoritative webpages, since they'll offer the most reliable information. You can find good sources by searching for keywords related to your topic online or using an academic database. For example, if your topic is about saving wild tigers, you could include keywords like "conservation," "tigers," and "wildlife," in your searches. Once you find a source you want to use, double check that it's up to date and written by someone trustworthy before you use it. Additionally, make sure you keep track of all your sources, since you'll need to make a reference list that includes each source you used. For tips on how to come up with a research topic, keep reading! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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How to Write a Research Paper Introduction (with Examples)

How to Write a Research Paper Introduction (with Examples)

The research paper introduction section, along with the Title and Abstract, can be considered the face of any research paper. The following article is intended to guide you in organizing and writing the research paper introduction for a quality academic article or dissertation.

The research paper introduction aims to present the topic to the reader. A study will only be accepted for publishing if you can ascertain that the available literature cannot answer your research question. So it is important to ensure that you have read important studies on that particular topic, especially those within the last five to ten years, and that they are properly referenced in this section. 1 What should be included in the research paper introduction is decided by what you want to tell readers about the reason behind the research and how you plan to fill the knowledge gap. The best research paper introduction provides a systemic review of existing work and demonstrates additional work that needs to be done. It needs to be brief, captivating, and well-referenced; a well-drafted research paper introduction will help the researcher win half the battle.

The introduction for a research paper is where you set up your topic and approach for the reader. It has several key goals:

  • Present your research topic
  • Capture reader interest
  • Summarize existing research
  • Position your own approach
  • Define your specific research problem and problem statement
  • Highlight the novelty and contributions of the study
  • Give an overview of the paper’s structure

The research paper introduction can vary in size and structure depending on whether your paper presents the results of original empirical research or is a review paper. Some research paper introduction examples are only half a page while others are a few pages long. In many cases, the introduction will be shorter than all of the other sections of your paper; its length depends on the size of your paper as a whole.

  • Break through writer’s block. Write your research paper introduction with Paperpal Copilot

Table of Contents

What is the introduction for a research paper, why is the introduction important in a research paper, craft a compelling introduction section with paperpal. try now, 1. introduce the research topic:, 2. determine a research niche:, 3. place your research within the research niche:, craft accurate research paper introductions with paperpal. start writing now, frequently asked questions on research paper introduction, key points to remember.

The introduction in a research paper is placed at the beginning to guide the reader from a broad subject area to the specific topic that your research addresses. They present the following information to the reader

  • Scope: The topic covered in the research paper
  • Context: Background of your topic
  • Importance: Why your research matters in that particular area of research and the industry problem that can be targeted

The research paper introduction conveys a lot of information and can be considered an essential roadmap for the rest of your paper. A good introduction for a research paper is important for the following reasons:

  • It stimulates your reader’s interest: A good introduction section can make your readers want to read your paper by capturing their interest. It informs the reader what they are going to learn and helps determine if the topic is of interest to them.
  • It helps the reader understand the research background: Without a clear introduction, your readers may feel confused and even struggle when reading your paper. A good research paper introduction will prepare them for the in-depth research to come. It provides you the opportunity to engage with the readers and demonstrate your knowledge and authority on the specific topic.
  • It explains why your research paper is worth reading: Your introduction can convey a lot of information to your readers. It introduces the topic, why the topic is important, and how you plan to proceed with your research.
  • It helps guide the reader through the rest of the paper: The research paper introduction gives the reader a sense of the nature of the information that will support your arguments and the general organization of the paragraphs that will follow. It offers an overview of what to expect when reading the main body of your paper.

What are the parts of introduction in the research?

A good research paper introduction section should comprise three main elements: 2

  • What is known: This sets the stage for your research. It informs the readers of what is known on the subject.
  • What is lacking: This is aimed at justifying the reason for carrying out your research. This could involve investigating a new concept or method or building upon previous research.
  • What you aim to do: This part briefly states the objectives of your research and its major contributions. Your detailed hypothesis will also form a part of this section.

How to write a research paper introduction?

The first step in writing the research paper introduction is to inform the reader what your topic is and why it’s interesting or important. This is generally accomplished with a strong opening statement. The second step involves establishing the kinds of research that have been done and ending with limitations or gaps in the research that you intend to address. Finally, the research paper introduction clarifies how your own research fits in and what problem it addresses. If your research involved testing hypotheses, these should be stated along with your research question. The hypothesis should be presented in the past tense since it will have been tested by the time you are writing the research paper introduction.

The following key points, with examples, can guide you when writing the research paper introduction section:

  • Highlight the importance of the research field or topic
  • Describe the background of the topic
  • Present an overview of current research on the topic

Example: The inclusion of experiential and competency-based learning has benefitted electronics engineering education. Industry partnerships provide an excellent alternative for students wanting to engage in solving real-world challenges. Industry-academia participation has grown in recent years due to the need for skilled engineers with practical training and specialized expertise. However, from the educational perspective, many activities are needed to incorporate sustainable development goals into the university curricula and consolidate learning innovation in universities.

  • Reveal a gap in existing research or oppose an existing assumption
  • Formulate the research question

Example: There have been plausible efforts to integrate educational activities in higher education electronics engineering programs. However, very few studies have considered using educational research methods for performance evaluation of competency-based higher engineering education, with a focus on technical and or transversal skills. To remedy the current need for evaluating competencies in STEM fields and providing sustainable development goals in engineering education, in this study, a comparison was drawn between study groups without and with industry partners.

  • State the purpose of your study
  • Highlight the key characteristics of your study
  • Describe important results
  • Highlight the novelty of the study.
  • Offer a brief overview of the structure of the paper.

Example: The study evaluates the main competency needed in the applied electronics course, which is a fundamental core subject for many electronics engineering undergraduate programs. We compared two groups, without and with an industrial partner, that offered real-world projects to solve during the semester. This comparison can help determine significant differences in both groups in terms of developing subject competency and achieving sustainable development goals.

Write a Research Paper Introduction in Minutes with Paperpal

Paperpal Copilot is a generative AI-powered academic writing assistant. It’s trained on millions of published scholarly articles and over 20 years of STM experience. Paperpal Copilot helps authors write better and faster with:

  • Real-time writing suggestions
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With Paperpal Copilot, create a research paper introduction effortlessly. In this step-by-step guide, we’ll walk you through how Paperpal transforms your initial ideas into a polished and publication-ready introduction.

what to put in a research topic

How to use Paperpal to write the Introduction section

Step 1: Sign up on Paperpal and click on the Copilot feature, under this choose Outlines > Research Article > Introduction

Step 2: Add your unstructured notes or initial draft, whether in English or another language, to Paperpal, which is to be used as the base for your content.

Step 3: Fill in the specifics, such as your field of study, brief description or details you want to include, which will help the AI generate the outline for your Introduction.

Step 4: Use this outline and sentence suggestions to develop your content, adding citations where needed and modifying it to align with your specific research focus.

Step 5: Turn to Paperpal’s granular language checks to refine your content, tailor it to reflect your personal writing style, and ensure it effectively conveys your message.

You can use the same process to develop each section of your article, and finally your research paper in half the time and without any of the stress.

The purpose of the research paper introduction is to introduce the reader to the problem definition, justify the need for the study, and describe the main theme of the study. The aim is to gain the reader’s attention by providing them with necessary background information and establishing the main purpose and direction of the research.

The length of the research paper introduction can vary across journals and disciplines. While there are no strict word limits for writing the research paper introduction, an ideal length would be one page, with a maximum of 400 words over 1-4 paragraphs. Generally, it is one of the shorter sections of the paper as the reader is assumed to have at least a reasonable knowledge about the topic. 2 For example, for a study evaluating the role of building design in ensuring fire safety, there is no need to discuss definitions and nature of fire in the introduction; you could start by commenting upon the existing practices for fire safety and how your study will add to the existing knowledge and practice.

When deciding what to include in the research paper introduction, the rest of the paper should also be considered. The aim is to introduce the reader smoothly to the topic and facilitate an easy read without much dependency on external sources. 3 Below is a list of elements you can include to prepare a research paper introduction outline and follow it when you are writing the research paper introduction. Topic introduction: This can include key definitions and a brief history of the topic. Research context and background: Offer the readers some general information and then narrow it down to specific aspects. Details of the research you conducted: A brief literature review can be included to support your arguments or line of thought. Rationale for the study: This establishes the relevance of your study and establishes its importance. Importance of your research: The main contributions are highlighted to help establish the novelty of your study Research hypothesis: Introduce your research question and propose an expected outcome. Organization of the paper: Include a short paragraph of 3-4 sentences that highlights your plan for the entire paper

Cite only works that are most relevant to your topic; as a general rule, you can include one to three. Note that readers want to see evidence of original thinking. So it is better to avoid using too many references as it does not leave much room for your personal standpoint to shine through. Citations in your research paper introduction support the key points, and the number of citations depend on the subject matter and the point discussed. If the research paper introduction is too long or overflowing with citations, it is better to cite a few review articles rather than the individual articles summarized in the review. A good point to remember when citing research papers in the introduction section is to include at least one-third of the references in the introduction.

The literature review plays a significant role in the research paper introduction section. A good literature review accomplishes the following: Introduces the topic – Establishes the study’s significance – Provides an overview of the relevant literature – Provides context for the study using literature – Identifies knowledge gaps However, remember to avoid making the following mistakes when writing a research paper introduction: Do not use studies from the literature review to aggressively support your research Avoid direct quoting Do not allow literature review to be the focus of this section. Instead, the literature review should only aid in setting a foundation for the manuscript.

Remember the following key points for writing a good research paper introduction: 4

  • Avoid stuffing too much general information: Avoid including what an average reader would know and include only that information related to the problem being addressed in the research paper introduction. For example, when describing a comparative study of non-traditional methods for mechanical design optimization, information related to the traditional methods and differences between traditional and non-traditional methods would not be relevant. In this case, the introduction for the research paper should begin with the state-of-the-art non-traditional methods and methods to evaluate the efficiency of newly developed algorithms.
  • Avoid packing too many references: Cite only the required works in your research paper introduction. The other works can be included in the discussion section to strengthen your findings.
  • Avoid extensive criticism of previous studies: Avoid being overly critical of earlier studies while setting the rationale for your study. A better place for this would be the Discussion section, where you can highlight the advantages of your method.
  • Avoid describing conclusions of the study: When writing a research paper introduction remember not to include the findings of your study. The aim is to let the readers know what question is being answered. The actual answer should only be given in the Results and Discussion section.

To summarize, the research paper introduction section should be brief yet informative. It should convince the reader the need to conduct the study and motivate him to read further. If you’re feeling stuck or unsure, choose trusted AI academic writing assistants like Paperpal to effortlessly craft your research paper introduction and other sections of your research article.

1. Jawaid, S. A., & Jawaid, M. (2019). How to write introduction and discussion. Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia, 13(Suppl 1), S18.

2. Dewan, P., & Gupta, P. (2016). Writing the title, abstract and introduction: Looks matter!. Indian pediatrics, 53, 235-241.

3. Cetin, S., & Hackam, D. J. (2005). An approach to the writing of a scientific Manuscript1. Journal of Surgical Research, 128(2), 165-167.

4. Bavdekar, S. B. (2015). Writing introduction: Laying the foundations of a research paper. Journal of the Association of Physicians of India, 63(7), 44-6.

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Get accurate academic translations, rewriting support, grammar checks, vocabulary suggestions, and generative AI assistance that delivers human precision at machine speed. Try for free or upgrade to Paperpal Prime starting at US$19 a month to access premium features, including consistency, plagiarism, and 30+ submission readiness checks to help you succeed.  

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How-To Geek

How to research a topic online.

Online research is a crucial skill, whether you're working on an academic paper, writing a blog post, or just trying to learn something new about your houseplants.

Quick Links

Organize your information early on, start broad and collect a lot of information, decide what's important, and narrow things down, optimize your google search, go further than google, double-check your research, what if you find conflicting information.

Online research is a crucial skill, whether you're working on an academic paper, writing a blog post, or just trying to learn something new about your houseplants. But it's not always easy when you're tackling a complicated or niche topic.

Organizing your information can help you save time, and it can save you from forgetting or misremembering anything that you've learned from your research. You should keep a link to every webpage that you visit from the start to the very end of your research. It's best to write down a little bit of information for each link so that you remember why you saved them and what kind of information that you could take from them. You should also save any PDF's or images related to your research because you can use them as valuable primary sources.

If you need to organize a lot of data across multiple devices, consider using a note-taking app like  Evernote , OneNote , or Google Keep . They're all great for keeping track of web pages, PDF's, photos, and whatever else you need for your big project.

If you're just trying to knock out a short essay or learn something about DIY woodworking, then you probably don't need to grab a dedicated note-taking app unless you already use one. You might find it easier to cut and paste web pages into a Word or Google Doc file and save any PDFs or images to your local or cloud storage drive. Just make sure that you keep your files organized  and take notes for all of your sources.

In the end, you'll probably only use a handful of the links that you save. But if you're publishing a blog post or writing an essay, you need to be able to double-check and cite all of your sources. Otherwise, you might end up creating a lot of extra work for yourself later.

When researching, it's tempting to dive straight into the first exciting thing that you find. But you should try to start as broad as possible. Otherwise, you might miss out on some fascinating pieces of information and end up with a poor understanding of your topic.

That's why you should try to find a lot of information on your topic, more than you think that you'll need. A good way to start broad is to search Google for general terms related to your topic. If you're researching the difference between sunflowers and tulips, then you should learn a bit of information about each flower before going deeper.

Of course, Wikipedia is also a fantastic place to begin your research. You can use Wikipedia to find a lot of general information on your topic, and you can use it to find related topics or primary sources that may be useful as you go deeper into your research.

Once you've collected a broad swath of data, you need to review everything and decide on what to focus. Don't just go for the first thing that sounds interesting to you. Try to find any new relationships between the different pieces of information that you've gathered.

Let's say that you're researching an author, like Mark Twain. You found in your broad research that he was in the Civil War and that some of his stories take place in the antebellum south. On their own, those two pieces of information are boring and hard to care about. But when you put them together, it's clear that there may be a tantalizing relationship that's worth some in-depth research.

It's okay to research a relationship that seems obvious or well-known, especially if you're writing a blog, doing personal research, or doing a rudimentary history paper. But if you want to find something unique, then you need to think about how to narrow your research.

Okay, you're ready to do some more in-depth research. Now what? If you're looking into something that's kind of unique, then you may have trouble finding some good search results on Google.

That's why you need to use some  Google Search Operators  to get the most out of your Google searches. There are a lot of search operators that you can use, and they're all pretty straightforward. But there are a few that are especially useful for doing online research.

If you need to look up exact phrases or names on Google, then you can put them in quotation marks. For example, if you search the phrase "mole people" on Google, then you'll only find pages that contain the word "mole" followed by the word "people."

"Mole people"

The idea of starting broad and then narrowing your search applies to searching the web, too.

For example, if your search for "mole people" include too many results related to New York, then you could use a minus sign to exclude those results. This is what it would look like:

"Mole people" -"New York"

Note that we also used quotation marks around "New York" in that search because we want the whole phrase excluded.

If you hit a point in your research where you can't find any new websites to visit, then you should try to switch up your Google search. Try using variations on the same search terms, and change which Search Operators you're using. Sometimes the slightest change in your search will give you wildly different results.

Sometimes Google's expertise won't be enough for you. If you're working on a full academic paper or writing a deep-dive blog post, then you may need to look through some magazines, academic papers, or old books. You know, "primary sources."

Some websites, like  Project Muse and JSTOR , are an excellent resource for periodicals, academic papers, and other primary sources. You can usually access them through your University or public library. There's also some free alternatives to these websites, like Google Scholar  and SSRN .

But if you're writing a deep-dive on dairy advertisements, then you're going to need to find some old catalogs, magazines, periodicals, and posters.  Google Books  is an excellent resource for this kind of material.

You can also use Wikipedia to find some primary sources. At the end of every Wikipedia article, there's a "References" table. This table tells you the sources for all of the information in the article. If you come across a juicy bit of information while reading a Wikipedia article, then there's usually a small number that links to the reference table.

It's good to look into all of these resources because they usually come up with different results for the same search. They also tend to have built-in advanced search functions, which are useful for topics that are unique or niche.

Once you've completed your research, you need to make sure that all of your information is accurate. You can save yourself a lot of heartbreak by double-checking all of your research before doing any writing.

Go and reread all of your sources, because there's a chance that you misinterpreted what they're saying. Of course, you're not the only person that can misread a source, so it's good to check any citations that you find on a website.

You should also consider how you used Google to research your topic. If you included any bias in your search terms, then there's a chance that the information that you gathered will reflect that bias. Try searching Google with a variety of search terms and  Google Search Operators .

There are also fact-checking websites that you can use to make sure that your information is accurate. Websites like  Factcheck.org  or Snopes  are pretty fantastic; just don't use them as your only fact-checking resource.

Sometimes you'll spend a lot of time double-checking all of your research, and you'll realize that things don't seem to line up. In this situation, it's tempting to stand behind some information that may not be entirely factual. After all, it's a lot easier to go along with inaccurate information than to redo your entire research process.

But you should never write or publish any information unless you're confident that it's accurate. If you run into conflicting information while researching a topic, go back to the drawing board or try to spin the pieces of contradictory information in your favor.

For example, if you find a lot of conflicting eyewitness accounts while researching the Titanic, then you can quickly turn those conflicting accounts into an exciting piece of information. You could even go back and do some in-depth research into who made those eyewitness accounts, and how they shaped the public's opinion on the sinking of the Titanic. Hey, that could be a book.

Image Credits: 13_Phunkod /Shutterstock, fizkes /Shutterstock

Frank T. McAndrew Ph.D.

How to Get Started on Your First Psychology Experiment

Acquiring even a little expertise in advance makes science research easier..

Updated May 16, 2024 | Reviewed by Ray Parker

  • Why Education Is Important
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  • Students often struggle at the beginning of research projects—knowing how to begin.
  • Research projects can sometimes be inspired by everyday life or personal concerns.
  • Becoming something of an "expert" on a topic in advance makes designing a study go more smoothly.

ARENA Creative/Shutterstock

One of the most rewarding and frustrating parts of my long career as a psychology professor at a small liberal arts college has been guiding students through the senior capstone research experience required near the end of their college years. Each psychology major must conduct an independent experiment in which they collect data to test a hypothesis, analyze the data, write a research paper, and present their results at a college poster session or at a professional conference.

The rewarding part of the process is clear: The students' pride at seeing their poster on display and maybe even getting their name on an article in a professional journal allows us professors to get a glimpse of students being happy and excited—for a change. I also derive great satisfaction from watching a student discover that he or she has an aptitude for research and perhaps start shifting their career plans accordingly.

The frustrating part comes at the beginning of the research process when students are attempting to find a topic to work on. There is a lot of floundering around as students get stuck by doing something that seems to make sense: They begin by trying to “think up a study.”

The problem is that even if the student's research interest is driven by some very personal topic that is deeply relevant to their own life, they simply do not yet know enough to know where to begin. They do not know what has already been done by others, nor do they know how researchers typically attack that topic.

Students also tend to think in terms of mission statements (I want to cure eating disorders) rather than in terms of research questions (Why are people of some ages or genders more susceptible to eating disorders than others?).

Needless to say, attempting to solve a serious, long-standing societal problem in a few weeks while conducting one’s first psychology experiment can be a showstopper.

Even a Little Bit of Expertise Can Go a Long Way

My usual approach to helping students get past this floundering stage is to tell them to try to avoid thinking up a study altogether. Instead, I tell them to conceive of their mission as becoming an “expert” on some topic that they find interesting. They begin by reading journal articles, writing summaries of these articles, and talking to me about them. As the student learns more about the topic, our conversations become more sophisticated and interesting. Researchable questions begin to emerge, and soon, the student is ready to start writing a literature review that will sharpen the focus of their research question.

In short, even a little bit of expertise on a subject makes it infinitely easier to craft an experiment on that topic because the research done by others provides a framework into which the student can fit his or her own work.

This was a lesson I learned early in my career when I was working on my own undergraduate capstone experience. Faced with the necessity of coming up with a research topic and lacking any urgent personal issues that I was trying to resolve, I fell back on what little psychological expertise I had already accumulated.

In a previous psychology course, I had written a literature review on why some information fails to move from short-term memory into long-term memory. The journal articles that I had read for this paper relied primarily on laboratory studies with mice, and the debate that was going on between researchers who had produced different results in their labs revolved around subtle differences in the way that mice were released into the experimental apparatus in the studies.

Because I already had done some homework on this, I had a ready-made research question available: What if the experimental task was set up so that the researcher had no influence on how the mouse entered the apparatus at all? I was able to design a simple animal memory experiment that fit very nicely into the psychological literature that was already out there, and this prevented a lot of angst.

Please note that my undergraduate research project was guided by the “expertise” that I had already acquired rather than by a burning desire to solve some sort of personal or social problem. I guarantee that I had not been walking around as an undergraduate student worrying about why mice forget things, but I was nonetheless able to complete a fun and interesting study.

what to put in a research topic

My first experiment may not have changed the world, but it successfully launched my research career, and I fondly remember it as I work with my students 50 years later.

Frank T. McAndrew Ph.D.

Frank McAndrew, Ph.D., is the Cornelia H. Dudley Professor of Psychology at Knox College.

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Research Topics

Five research topics exploring the science of mental health.

what to put in a research topic

Mental wellbeing is increasingly recognized as an essential aspect of our overall health. It supports our ability to handle challenges, build strong relationships, and live more fulfilling lives. The World Health Organization (WHO) emphasizes the importance of mental health by acknowledging it as a fundamental human right.

This Mental Health Awareness Week, we highlight the remarkable work of scientists driving open research that helps everyone achieve better mental health.

Here are five Research Topics that study themes including how we adapt to a changing world, the impact of loneliness on our wellbeing, and the connection between our diet and mental health.

All articles are openly available to view and download.

1 | Community Series in Mental Health Promotion and Protection, volume II

40.300 views | 16 articles

There is no health without mental health. Thus, this Research Topic collects ideas and research related to strategies that promote mental health across all disciplines. The goal is to raise awareness about mental health promotion and protection to ensure its incorporation in national mental health policies.

This topic is of relevance given the mental health crisis being experienced across the world right now. A reality that has prompted the WHO to declare that health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social wellbeing.

View Research Topic

2 | Dietary and Metabolic Approaches for Mental Health Conditions

176.800 views | 11 articles

There is increased recognition that mental health disorders are, at least in part, a form of diet-related disease. For this reason, we focus attention on a Research Topic that examines the mechanistic interplay between dietary patterns and mental health conditions.

There is a clear consensus that the quality, quantity, and even timing of our human feeding patterns directly impact how brains function. But despite the epidemiological and mechanistic links between mental health and diet-related diseases, these two are often perceived as separate medical issues.

Even more urgent, public health messaging and clinical treatments for mental health conditions place relatively little emphasis on formulating nutrition to ease the underlying drivers of mental health conditions.

3 | Comparing Mental Health Cross-Culturally

94.000 views | 15 articles

Although mental health has been widely discussed in later years, how mental health is perceived across different cultures remains to be examined. This Research Topic addresses this gap and deepens our knowledge of mental health by comparing positive and negative psychological constructs cross-culturally.

The definition and understanding of mental health remain to be refined, partially because of a lack of cross-cultural perspectives on mental health. Also, due to the rapid internationalization taking place in the world today, a culturally aware understanding of, and interventions for mental health problems are essential.

4 | Adaption to Change and Coping Strategies: New Resources for Mental Health

85.000 views | 29 articles

In this Research Topic, scientists study a wider range of variables involved in change and adaptation. They examine changes of any type or magnitude whenever the lack of adaptive response diminishes our development and well-being.

Today’s society is characterized by change, and sometimes, the constant changes are difficult to assimilate. This may be why feelings of frustration and defenselessness appear in the face of the impossibility of responding adequately to the requirements of a changing society.

Therefore, society must develop an updated notion of the processes inherent to changing developmental environments, personal skills, resources, and strategies. This know-how is crucial for achieving and maintaining balanced mental health.

5 | Mental Health Equity

29.900 views | 10 articles

The goal of this Research Topic is to move beyond a synthesis of what is already known about mental health in the context of health equity. Rather, the focus here is on transformative solutions, recommendations, and applied research that have real world implications on policy, practice, and future scholarship.

Attention in the field to upstream factors and the role of social and structural determinants of health in influencing health outcomes, combined with an influx of innovation –particularly the digitalization of healthcare—presents a unique opportunity to solve pressing issues in mental health through a health equity lens.

The topic is opportune because factors such as structural racism and climate change have disproportionately negatively impacted marginalized communities across the world, including Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC), LGBTQ+, people with disabilities, and transition-age youth and young adults. As a result, existing disparities in mental health have exacerbated.

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IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Research Question in 2024: Types, Steps, and Examples

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  2. 250+ Best Research Paper Topics Ideas that Inspire

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  3. How to Choose Good Research Topics for Your Research Paper

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  4. Research Topics

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  5. 🌱 Research on the topic. Research Title Generator: Make a Topic or

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  6. The Research Process

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  2. Introduction to Research and how to choose a research topic

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  5. Formulating a Research Topic

  6. Choosing the Best Research Topic

COMMENTS

  1. 1000+ Research Topics & Research Title Examples For Students

    A research topic is the subject of a research project or study - for example, a dissertation or thesis. A research topic typically takes the form of a problem to be solved, or a question to be answered. ... Simply put, a key difference between a research topic and a research problem is scope; the research topic provides an umbrella under ...

  2. 113 Great Research Paper Topics

    113 Great Research Paper Topics. One of the hardest parts of writing a research paper can be just finding a good topic to write about. Fortunately we've done the hard work for you and have compiled a list of 113 interesting research paper topics. They've been organized into ten categories and cover a wide range of subjects so you can easily ...

  3. Your Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing a Thesis Research Topic.

    Choose a topic that you're interested in. First things first: double-check with your teachers or supervisor if there are any constraints on your research topic. Once your parameters are clear, it's time to identify what lights you up — after all, you're going to be spending a lot of time thinking about it.

  4. The Ultimate Research Topic Mega List (1000+ Research Topics)

    Simply put, this mega list of research topic ideas will help stimulate your thinking and fast-track the topic ideation process. The list provides 1000+ topic ideas across 25 research areas, including: Accounting & finance. Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning.

  5. How To Choose A Research Topic

    To recap, the "Big 5" assessment criteria include: Topic originality and novelty. Value and significance. Access to data and equipment. Time requirements. Ethical compliance. Be sure to grab a copy of our free research topic evaluator sheet here to fast-track your topic selection process.

  6. How to Develop a Research Topic or Question: Simple Guide

    3. Start broad and narrow your focus. Once you have a general topic that interests you, begin by reading widely about it. Write down the ideas, information, and sources that interest you the most. Then, review your notes to start refining your topic into a precise, narrow research focus. [3]

  7. 127 Best Research Paper Topics (2023 Update) HandMadeWriting

    High School Research Paper Topics. School uniform: The good, the bad, and the ugly. The effect of sexual acts displays on TV. The American Dream of Generation X and the Millennials. Biggest cults existing today in the world. Learning disabilities: Their nature, causes, and solutions.

  8. Picking a Topic

    The ability to develop a good research topic is an important skill. An instructor may assign you a specific topic, but most often instructors require you to select your own topic of interest. ... Put your main topic in the middle circle and then put ideas related to your topic on the lines radiating from the circle. 2. Read General Background ...

  9. Overview

    Select a topic. Choosing an interesting research topic is your first challenge. Here are some tips: Choose a topic that you are interested in! The research process is more relevant if you care about your topic. Narrow your topic to something manageable. If your topic is too broad, you will find too much information and not be able to focus.

  10. A Beginner's Guide to Starting the Research Process

    Step 1: Choose your topic. First you have to come up with some ideas. Your thesis or dissertation topic can start out very broad. Think about the general area or field you're interested in—maybe you already have specific research interests based on classes you've taken, or maybe you had to consider your topic when applying to graduate school and writing a statement of purpose.

  11. Choosing a Research Topic

    Before diving into how to choose a research topic, it is important to think about what are some elements of a good research topic. Of course, this will depend specifically on your research project, but a good research topic will always: Relate to the assignment itself. Even when you have a choice for your research topic, you still want to make ...

  12. How to Choose a Dissertation Topic

    Step 1: Check the requirements. Step 2: Choose a broad field of research. Step 3: Look for books and articles. Step 4: Find a niche. Step 5: Consider the type of research. Step 6: Determine the relevance. Step 7: Make sure it's plausible. Step 8: Get your topic approved. Other interesting articles.

  13. Research Guides: Start your research: Picking a Good Topic

    The first step in doing research is choosing a good topic. A good research topic should be focused and clear and not something that can be answered by a Google search. For example, instead of asking "Why is social media harmful?" you could ask, "How is interacting with social media, like TikTok and Twitter, impacting the mental health of ...

  14. How to Write a Research Paper

    Develop a thesis statement. Create a research paper outline. Write a first draft of the research paper. Write the introduction. Write a compelling body of text. Write the conclusion. The second draft. The revision process. Research paper checklist.

  15. 150 Research Paper Topics

    How to Choose a Topic for a Research Paper. Pick a few areas or topics that you're interested in and narrow it down to the topic that you like the best. You'll be able to put together an insightful paper if you're interested in the topic you chose. Make sure you have enough references for your topic. Doing a quick search will help you see ...

  16. LibGuides: Research Process: Finding a Research Topic

    Defining a Topic - SAGE Research Methods. Develop My Research Idea - Academic Writer. Note: You MUST create an Academic Writer account AND start a paper in order to access this tool. Once you have done so, open a paper and click Research Lab Book in the left navigation menu. The Process for Developing Questions - ASC Guide.

  17. How to Select a Research Topic: A Step-by-Step Guide (2021)

    Step 2: Brainstorm Your Topics. You aren't doing research at this stage yet. You are only trying to make considerations to determine which topic will suit your research assignment. The brainstorming stage isn't difficult at all. It should take only a couple of hours or a few days depending on how you approach.

  18. Research Topics

    Research Topic. Definition: Research topic is a specific subject or area of interest that a researcher wants to investigate or explore in-depth through research. It is the overarching theme or question that guides a research project and helps to focus the research activities towards a clear objective.

  19. 55 Research Paper Topics to Jumpstart Your Writing

    The research paper is one of the most tried and true assignments in high school or college. It's your teacher's opportunity to see how well you can research, convey, and organize that research, and assemble everything into one five-paragraph (or maybe 15-page) paper. Before you get started on your paper, you'll need to have a comprehensive understanding of what your teacher expects out of your ...

  20. Creating a Successful Research Topic Statement (PSY)

    At first, she put together a list of known management styles, but that felt intimidating. She decided to narrow it down to just two: authoritarian vs. flexible management style. ... The research topic is step 1 in the sequential process of research design. Once you have your topic in hand, step 2 is to take it to the library and begin searching ...

  21. How to Research a Topic (with Pictures)

    3. Look up general information about the topic. Once you've got an idea for a more narrow topic you want to focus on, do an online search to see generally what information is out there about it. At this point, pay attention to the amount of information available and the issues raised by some of that information.

  22. How to Write a Research Paper Introduction (with Examples)

    1. Introduce the research topic: Highlight the importance of the research field or topic; Describe the background of the topic; Present an overview of current research on the topic; Example: The inclusion of experiential and competency-based learning has benefitted electronics engineering education. Industry partnerships provide an excellent ...

  23. How to Research a Topic Online

    Some websites, like Project Muse and JSTOR, are an excellent resource for periodicals, academic papers, and other primary sources. You can usually access them through your University or public library. There's also some free alternatives to these websites, like Google Scholar and SSRN . But if you're writing a deep-dive on dairy advertisements ...

  24. How to Get Started on Your First Psychology Experiment

    The frustrating part comes at the beginning of the research process when students are attempting to find a topic to work on. There is a lot of floundering around as students get stuck by doing ...

  25. Five Research Topics exploring the science of mental health

    This Mental Health Awareness Week, we highlight the remarkable work of scientists driving open research that helps everyone achieve better mental health. Here are five Research Topics that study themes including how we adapt to a changing world, the impact of loneliness on our wellbeing, and the connection between our diet and mental health.

  26. Writing a Research Paper Introduction

    Table of contents. Step 1: Introduce your topic. Step 2: Describe the background. Step 3: Establish your research problem. Step 4: Specify your objective (s) Step 5: Map out your paper. Research paper introduction examples. Frequently asked questions about the research paper introduction.

  27. How to Start a Presentation: 12 Ways to Keep Your Audience Hooked

    1 Make a provocative statement. "I want to discuss with you this afternoonwhy you're going to fail to have a great career." One surefire way to get your audience's attention is to make a provocative statement that creates interest and a keen desire to know more about what you have to say. The presentation above, for example, does just that by ...

  28. How to Write a Research Proposal

    A research plan helps you, the researcher, organize your thoughts. On the other hand, a dissertation proposal or research proposal aims to convince others (e.g., a supervisor, a funding body, or a dissertation committee) that your research topic is relevant and worthy of being conducted.

  29. How to write a discussion text

    Set them the challenge of writing their own discussion piece on a topic using all the techniques outlined by Leah. You could also use the detailed explanation of writing in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd ...

  30. US set to impose 100% tariff on Chinese electric vehicle imports

    The stories that matter on money and politics in the race for the White House. The Biden administration plans to raise tariffs on Chinese electric vehicle imports from 25 per cent to 100 per cent ...