help with phd research proposal

How to Write a PhD Research Proposal

  • Applying to a PhD
  • A research proposal summarises your intended research.
  • Your research proposal is used to confirm you understand the topic, and that the university has the expertise to support your study.
  • The length of a research proposal varies. It is usually specified by either the programme requirements or the supervisor upon request. 1500 to 3500 words is common.
  • The typical research proposal structure consists of: Title, Abstract, Background and Rationale, Research Aims and Objectives, Research Design and Methodology, Timetable, and a Bibliography.

What is a Research Proposal?

A research proposal is a supporting document that may be required when applying to a research degree. It summarises your intended research by outlining what your research questions are, why they’re important to your field and what knowledge gaps surround your topic. It also outlines your research in terms of your aims, methods and proposed timetable .

What Is It Used for and Why Is It Important?

A research proposal will be used to:

  • Confirm whether you understand the topic and can communicate complex ideas.
  • Confirm whether the university has adequate expertise to support you in your research topic.
  • Apply for funding or research grants to external bodies.

How Long Should a PhD Research Proposal Be?

Some universities will specify a word count all students will need to adhere to. You will typically find these in the description of the PhD listing. If they haven’t stated a word count limit, you should contact the potential supervisor to clarify whether there are any requirements. If not, aim for 1500 to 3500 words (3 to 7 pages).

Your title should indicate clearly what your research question is. It needs to be simple and to the point; if the reader needs to read further into your proposal to understand your question, your working title isn’t clear enough.

Directly below your title, state the topic your research question relates to. Whether you include this information at the top of your proposal or insert a dedicated title page is your choice and will come down to personal preference.

2. Abstract

If your research proposal is over 2000 words, consider providing an abstract. Your abstract should summarise your question, why it’s important to your field and how you intend to answer it; in other words, explain your research context.

Only include crucial information in this section – 250 words should be sufficient to get across your main points.

3. Background & Rationale

First, specify which subject area your research problem falls in. This will help set the context of your study and will help the reader anticipate the direction of your proposed research.

Following this, include a literature review . A literature review summarises the existing knowledge which surrounds your research topic. This should include a discussion of the theories, models and bodies of text which directly relate to your research problem. As well as discussing the information available, discuss those which aren’t. In other words, identify what the current gaps in knowledge are and discuss how this will influence your research. Your aim here is to convince the potential supervisor and funding providers of why your intended research is worth investing time and money into.

Last, discuss the key debates and developments currently at the centre of your research area.

4. Research Aims & Objectives

Identify the aims and objectives of your research. The aims are the problems your project intends to solve; the objectives are the measurable steps and outcomes required to achieve the aim.

In outlining your aims and objectives, you will need to explain why your proposed research is worth exploring. Consider these aspects:

  • Will your research solve a problem?
  • Will your research address a current gap in knowledge?
  • Will your research have any social or practical benefits?

If you fail to address the above questions, it’s unlikely they will accept your proposal – all PhD research projects must show originality and value to be considered.

5. Research Design and Methodology

The following structure is recommended when discussing your research design:

  • Sample/Population – Discuss your sample size, target populations, specimen types etc.
  • Methods – What research methods have you considered, how did you evaluate them and how did you decide on your chosen one?
  • Data Collection – How are you going to collect and validate your data? Are there any limitations?
  • Data Analysis – How are you going to interpret your results and obtain a meaningful conclusion from them?
  • Ethical Considerations – Are there any potential implications associated with your research approach? This could either be to research participants or to your field as a whole on the outcome of your findings (i.e. if you’re researching a particularly controversial area). How are you going to monitor for these implications and what types of preventive steps will you need to put into place?

6. Timetable

PhD Project Plan - PhD research proposal

We’ve outlined the various stages of a PhD and the approximate duration of a PhD programme which you can refer to when designing your own research study.

7. Bibliography

Plagiarism is taken seriously across all academic levels, but even more so for doctorates. Therefore, ensure you reference the existing literature you have used in writing your PhD proposal. Besides this, try to adopt the same referencing style as the University you’re applying to uses. You can easily find this information in the PhD Thesis formatting guidelines published on the University’s website.

Finding a PhD has never been this easy – search for a PhD by keyword, location or academic area of interest.

Questions & Answers

Here are answers to some of the most common questions we’re asked about the Research Proposal:

Can You Change a Research Proposal?

Yes, your PhD research proposal outlines the start of your project only. It’s well accepted that the direction of your research will develop with time, therefore, you can revise it at later dates.

Can the Potential Supervisor Review My Draft Proposal?

Whether the potential supervisor will review your draft will depend on the individual. However, it is highly advisable that you at least attempt to discuss your draft with them. Even if they can’t review it, they may provide you with useful information regarding their department’s expertise which could help shape your PhD proposal. For example, you may amend your methodology should you come to learn that their laboratory is better equipped for an alternative method.

How Should I Structure and Format My Proposal?

Ensure you follow the same order as the headings given above. This is the most logical structure and will be the order your proposed supervisor will expect.

Most universities don’t provide formatting requirements for research proposals on the basis that they are a supporting document only, however, we recommend that you follow the same format they require for their PhD thesis submissions. This will give your reader familiarity and their guidelines should be readily available on their website.

Last, try to have someone within the same academic field or discipline area to review your proposal. The key is to confirm that they understand the importance of your work and how you intend to execute it. If they don’t, it’s likely a sign you need to rewrite some of your sections to be more coherent.

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How to write a research proposal

What is a research proposal.

A research proposal should present your idea or question and expected outcomes with clarity and definition – the what.

It should also make a case for why your question is significant and what value it will bring to your discipline – the why. 

What it shouldn't do is answer the question – that's what your research will do.

Why is it important?

Research proposals are significant because Another reason why it formally outlines your intended research. Which means you need to provide details on how you will go about your research, including:

  • your approach and methodology
  • timeline and feasibility
  • all other considerations needed to progress your research, such as resources.

Think of it as a tool that will help you clarify your idea and make conducting your research easier.

How long should it be?

Usually no more than 2000 words, but check the requirements of your degree, and your supervisor or research coordinator.

Presenting your idea clearly and concisely demonstrates that you can write this way – an attribute of a potential research candidate that is valued by assessors.

What should it include?

Project title.

Your title should clearly indicate what your proposed research is about.

Research supervisor

State the name, department and faculty or school of the academic who has agreed to supervise you. Rest assured, your research supervisor will work with you to refine your research proposal ahead of submission to ensure it meets the needs of your discipline.

Proposed mode of research

Describe your proposed mode of research. Which may be closely linked to your discipline, and is where you will describe the style or format of your research, e.g. data, field research, composition, written work, social performance and mixed media etc. 

This is not required for research in the sciences, but your research supervisor will be able to guide you on discipline-specific requirements.

Aims and objectives

What are you trying to achieve with your research? What is the purpose? This section should reference why you're applying for a research degree. Are you addressing a gap in the current research? Do you want to look at a theory more closely and test it out? Is there something you're trying to prove or disprove? To help you clarify this, think about the potential outcome of your research if you were successful – that is your aim. Make sure that this is a focused statement.

Your objectives will be your aim broken down – the steps to achieving the intended outcome. They are the smaller proof points that will underpin your research's purpose. Be logical in the order of how you present these so that each succeeds the previous, i.e. if you need to achieve 'a' before 'b' before 'c', then make sure you order your objectives a, b, c.

A concise summary of what your research is about. It outlines the key aspects of what you will investigate as well as the expected outcomes. It briefly covers the what, why and how of your research. 

A good way to evaluate if you have written a strong synopsis, is to get somebody to read it without reading the rest of your research proposal. Would they know what your research is about?

Now that you have your question clarified, it is time to explain the why. Here, you need to demonstrate an understanding of the current research climate in your area of interest.

Providing context around your research topic through a literature review will show the assessor that you understand current dialogue around your research, and what is published.

Demonstrate you have a strong understanding of the key topics, significant studies and notable researchers in your area of research and how these have contributed to the current landscape.

Expected research contribution

In this section, you should consider the following:

  • Why is your research question or hypothesis worth asking?
  • How is the current research lacking or falling short?
  • What impact will your research have on the discipline?
  • Will you be extending an area of knowledge, applying it to new contexts, solving a problem, testing a theory, or challenging an existing one?
  • Establish why your research is important by convincing your audience there is a gap.
  • What will be the outcome of your research contribution?
  • Demonstrate both your current level of knowledge and how the pursuit of your question or hypothesis will create a new understanding and generate new information.
  • Show how your research is innovative and original.

Draw links between your research and the faculty or school you are applying at, and explain why you have chosen your supervisor, and what research have they or their school done to reinforce and support your own work. Cite these reasons to demonstrate how your research will benefit and contribute to the current body of knowledge.

Proposed methodology

Provide an overview of the methodology and techniques you will use to conduct your research. Cover what materials and equipment you will use, what theoretical frameworks will you draw on, and how will you collect data.

Highlight why you have chosen this particular methodology, but also why others may not have been as suitable. You need to demonstrate that you have put thought into your approach and why it's the most appropriate way to carry out your research. 

It should also highlight potential limitations you anticipate, feasibility within time and other constraints, ethical considerations and how you will address these, as well as general resources.

A work plan is a critical component of your research proposal because it indicates the feasibility of completion within the timeframe and supports you in achieving your objectives throughout your degree.

Consider the milestones you aim to achieve at each stage of your research. A PhD or master's degree by research can take two to four years of full-time study to complete. It might be helpful to offer year one in detail and the following years in broader terms. Ultimately you have to show that your research is likely to be both original and finished – and that you understand the time involved.

Provide details of the resources you will need to carry out your research project. Consider equipment, fieldwork expenses, travel and a proposed budget, to indicate how realistic your research proposal is in terms of financial requirements and whether any adjustments are needed.

Bibliography

Provide a list of references that you've made throughout your research proposal. 

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How to write a successful research proposal

As the competition for PhD places is incredibly fierce, your research proposal can have a strong bearing on the success of your application - so discover how to make the best impression

What is a research proposal?

Research proposals are used to persuade potential supervisors and funders that your work is worthy of their support. These documents setting out your proposed research that will result in a Doctoral thesis are typically between 1,500 and 3,000 words in length.

Your PhD research proposal must passionately articulate what you want to research and why, convey your understanding of existing literature, and clearly define at least one research question that could lead to new or original knowledge and how you propose to answer it.

Professor Leigh Wilson, director of the graduate school at the University of Westminster, explains that while the research proposal is about work that hasn't been done yet, what prospective supervisors and funders are focusing on just as strongly is evidence of what you've done - how well you know existing literature in the area, including very recent publications and debates, and how clearly you've seen what's missing from this and so what your research can do that's new. Giving a strong sense of this background or frame for the proposed work is crucial.

'Although it's tempting to make large claims and propose research that sweeps across time and space, narrower, more focused research is much more convincing,' she adds. 'To be thorough and rigorous in the way that academic work needs to be, even something as long as a PhD thesis can only cover a fairly narrow topic. Depth not breadth is called for.'

The structure of your research proposal is therefore important to achieving this goal, yet it should still retain sufficient flexibility to comfortably accommodate any changes you need to make as your PhD progresses.

Layout and formats vary, so it's advisable to consult your potential PhD supervisor before you begin. Here's what to bear in mind when writing a research proposal.

Your provisional title should be around ten words in length, and clearly and accurately indicate your area of study and/or proposed approach. It should be catchy, informative and interesting.

The title page should also include personal information, such as your name, academic title, date of birth, nationality and contact details.

Aims and objectives

This is a short summary of your project. Your aims should be two or three broad statements that emphasise what you ultimately want to achieve, complemented by several focused, feasible and measurable objectives - the steps that you'll take to answer each of your research questions. This involves clearly and briefly outlining:

  • how your research addresses a gap in, or builds upon, existing knowledge
  • how your research links to the department that you're applying to
  • the academic, cultural, political and/or social significance of your research questions.

Literature review

This section of your PhD proposal discusses the most important theories, models and texts that surround and influence your research questions, conveying your understanding and awareness of the key issues and debates.

It should focus on the theoretical and practical knowledge gaps that your work aims to address, as this ultimately justifies and provides the motivation for your project.

Methodology

Here, you're expected to outline how you'll answer each of your research questions. A strong, well-written methodology is crucial, but especially so if your project involves extensive collection and significant analysis of primary data.

In disciplines such as humanities the research proposal methodology identifies the data collection and analytical techniques available to you, before justifying the ones you'll use in greater detail. You'll also define the population that you're intending to examine.

You should also show that you're aware of the limitations of your research, qualifying the parameters that you plan to introduce. Remember, it's more impressive to do a fantastic job of exploring a narrower topic than a decent job of exploring a wider one.

Concluding or following on from your methodology, your timetable should identify how long you'll need to complete each step - perhaps using bi-weekly or monthly timeslots. This helps the reader to evaluate the feasibility of your project and shows that you've considered how you'll go about putting the PhD proposal into practice.

Bibliography

Finally, you'll provide a list of the most significant texts, plus any attachments such as your academic CV . Demonstrate your skills in critical reflection by selecting only those resources that are most appropriate.

Final checks

Before submitting this document along with your PhD application, you'll need to ensure that you've adhered to the research proposal format. This means that:

  • every page is numbered
  • it's professional, interesting and informative
  • the research proposal has been proofread by both an experienced academic (to confirm that it conforms to academic standards) and a layman (to correct any grammatical or spelling errors)
  • it has a contents page
  • you've used a clear and easy-to-read structure, with appropriate headings.

Research proposal examples

To get a better idea of how your PhD proposal may look, some universities have provided examples of research proposals for specific subjects:

  • The Open University - Social Policy and Criminology
  • University of Sheffield - Sociological Studies
  • University of Sussex
  • University of York - Politics

Find out more

  • Explore PhD studentships .
  • For tips on writing a thesis, see 7 steps to writing a dissertation .
  • Read more about PhD study .

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How to write a PhD proposal

How to write a good PhD proposal

Study tips Published 3 Mar, 2022  ·  5-minute read

Want to make sure your research degree starts smoothly? We spoke with 2 PhD candidates about overcoming this initial hurdle. Here’s their advice for how to write a good PhD proposal.

Writing your research proposal is an integral part of commencing a PhD with many schools and institutes, so it can feel rather intimidating. After all, how you come up with your PhD proposal could be the difference between your supervisor getting on board or giving your project a miss.

Let’s explore how to make a PhD research proposal with UQ candidates Chelsea Janke and Sarah Kendall. 

Look at PhD proposal examples

Chelsea Janke quote

Look at other PhD proposals that have been successful. Ask current students if you can look at theirs.

Nobody’s asking you to reinvent the wheel when it comes to writing your PhD proposal – leave that for your actual thesis. For now, while you’re just working out how to write a PhD proposal, examples are a great starting point.

Chelsea knows this step is easier if you’ve got a friend who is already doing a PhD, but there are other ways to find a good example or template.

“Look at other PhD proposals that have been successful,” she says.

“Ask current students if you can look at theirs.”

“If you don’t know anyone doing their PhD, look online to get an idea of how they should be structured.”

What makes this tricky is that proposals can vary greatly by field and disciplinary norms, so you should check with your proposed supervisor to see if they have a specific format or list of criteria to follow. Part of writing a good PhD proposal is submitting it in a style that's familiar to the people who will read and (hopefully) become excited by it and want to bring you into their research area.

Here are some of the key factors to consider when structuring your proposal:

  • meeting the expected word count (this can range from a 1-page maximum to a 3,000-word minimum depending on your supervisor and research area)
  • making your bibliography as detailed as necessary
  • outlining the research questions you’ll be trying to solve/answer
  • discussing the impact your research could have on your field
  • conducting preliminary analysis of existing research on the topic
  • documenting details of the methods and data sources you’ll use in your research
  • introducing your supervisor(s)  and how their experience relates to your project.

Please note this isn't a universal list of things you need in your PhD research proposal. Depending on your supervisor's requirements, some of these items may be unnecessary or there may be other inclusions not listed here.

Ask your planned supervisor for advice

Alright, here’s the thing. If sending your research proposal is your first point of contact with your prospective supervisor, you’ve jumped the gun a little.

You should have at least one researcher partially on board with your project before delving too deep into your proposal. This ensures you’re not potentially spending time and effort on an idea that no one has any appetite for. Plus, it unlocks a helpful guide who can assist with your proposal.

PhD research isn’t like Shark Tank – you’re allowed to confer with academics and secure their support before you pitch your thesis to them. Discover how to choose the right PhD supervisor for you.

For a time-efficient strategy, Chelsea recommends you approach your potential supervisor(s) and find out if:

  • they have time to supervise you
  • they have any funds to help pay for your research (even with a stipend scholarship , your research activities may require extra money)
  • their research interests align with yours (you’ll ideally discover a mutual ground where you both benefit from the project).

“The best way to approach would be to send an email briefly outlining who you are, your background, and what your research interests are,” says Chelsea.

“Once you’ve spoken to a potential supervisor, then you can start drafting a proposal and you can even ask for their input.”

Chelsea's approach here works well with some academics, but keep in mind that other supervisors will want to see a research proposal straight away. If you're not sure of your proposed supervisor's preferences, you may like to cover both bases with an introductory email that has a draft of your research proposal attached.

Sarah agrees that your prospective supervisor is your most valuable resource for understanding how to write a research proposal for a PhD application.

“My biggest tip for writing a research proposal is to ask your proposed supervisor for help,” says Sarah.

“Or if this isn’t possible, ask another academic who has had experience writing research proposals.”

“They’ll be able to tell you what to include or what you need to improve on.”

Find the 'why' and focus on it

Sarah Kendall quote

One of the key aspects of your research proposal is emphasising why your project is important and should be funded.

Your PhD proposal should include your major question, your planned methods, the sources you’ll cite, and plenty of other nitty gritty details. But perhaps the most important element of your proposal is its purpose – the reason you want to do this research and why the results will be meaningful.

In Sarah’s opinion, highlighting the 'why' of your project is vital for your research proposal.

“From my perspective, one of the key aspects of your research proposal is emphasising why your project is important and should be funded,” she says.

“Not only does this impact whether your application is likely to be successful, but it could also impact your likelihood of getting a scholarship .”

Imagine you only had 60 seconds to explain your planned research to someone. Would you prefer they remember how your project could change the world, or the statistical models you’ll be using to do it? (Of course, you’ve got 2,000 words rather than 60 seconds, so do make sure to include those little details as well – just put the why stuff first.)

Proofread your proposal, then proof it again

As a PhD candidate, your attention to detail is going to be integral to your success. Start practising it now by making sure your research proposal is perfect.

Chelsea and Sarah both acknowledge that clarity and writing quality should never be overlooked in a PhD proposal. This starts with double-checking that the questions of your thesis are obvious and unambiguous, followed by revising the rest of your proposal.

“Make sure your research questions are really clear,” says Sarah.

“Ensure all the writing is clear and grammatically correct,” adds Chelsea.

“A supervisor is not going to be overly keen on a prospective student if their writing is poor.”

It might sound harsh, but it’s fair. So, proofread your proposal multiple times – including after you get it back from your supervisor with any feedback and notes. When you think you’ve got the final, FINAL draft saved, sleep on it and read it one more time the next morning.

Still feeling a little overwhelmed by your research proposal? Stay motivated with these reasons why a PhD is worth the effort .

Want to learn more from Chelsea and Sarah? Easy:

  • Read about Chelsea’s award-winning PhD thesis on keeping crops healthy.
  • Read Sarah’s series on becoming a law academic .

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School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies

How to write a phd research proposal.

In order to help you with your application, the information below aims to give some guidance on how a typical research proposal might look.

Your research proposal is a concise statement (up to 3,000 words) of the rationale for your research proposal, the research questions to be answered and how you propose to address them. We know that during the early stages of your PhD you are likely to refine your thinking and methodology in discussion with your supervisors.

However, we want to see that you can construct a fairly rigorous, high quality research proposal.

We use your research proposal to help us decide whether you would be a suitable candidate to study at PhD level. We therefore assess your proposal on its quality, originality, and coherence. It also helps us to decide if your research interests match those of academics in the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies (SPAIS) and whether they would be able to provide suitably qualified supervision for your proposed research.

Format of the research proposal

Your proposal should include the following:

Title. A short, indicative title is best.

Abstract. This is a succinct summary of your research proposal (approximately 200-300 words) that will present a condensed outline, enabling the reader to get a very quick overview of your proposed project, lines of inquiry and possible outcomes. An abstract is often written last, after you have written the proposal and are able to summarise it effectively.

Rationale for the research project. This might include a description of the question/debate/phenomenon of interest; an explanation of why the topic is of interest to you; and an outline of the reasons why the topic should be of interest to research and/ or practice (the 'so what?' question).

Aims and initial research question. What are the aims and objectives of the research? State clearly the puzzle you are addressing, and the research question that you intend to pursue. It is acceptable to have multiple research questions, but it is a good idea to clarify which is the main research question. If you have hypotheses, discuss them here. A research proposal can and should make a positive and persuasive first impression and demonstrate your potential to become a good researcher. In particular, you need to demonstrate that you can think critically and analytically as well as communicate your ideas clearly.

Research context for your proposed project. Provide a short introduction to your area of interest with a succinct, selective and critical review of the relevant literature. Demonstrate that you understand the theoretical underpinnings and main debates and issues in your research area and how your proposed research will make an original and necessary contribution to this. You need to demonstrate how your proposed research will fill a gap in existing knowledge.

Intended methodology. Outline how you plan to conduct the research and the data sources that you will use. We do not expect you to have planned a very detailed methodology at this stage, but you need to provide an overview of how you will conduct your research (qualitative and/or quantitative methods) and why this methodology is suited for your proposed study. You need to be convincing about the appropriateness and feasibility of the approaches you are suggesting, and reflective about problems you might encounter (including ethical and data protection issues) in collecting and analysing your data.

Expected outcomes and impact. How do you think the research might add to existing knowledge; what might it enable organisations or interested parties to do differently? Increasingly in academia (and this is particularly so for ESRC-funded studentships), PhD students are being asked to consider how their research might contribute to both academic impact and/or economic and societal impact. (This is well explained on the ESRC website if you would like to find out more.) Please consider broader collaborations and partnerships (academic and non-academic) that will support your research. Collaborative activity can lead to a better understanding of the ways in which academic research can translate into practice and it can help to inform and improve the quality of your research and its impact.

Timetable. What is your initial estimation of the timetable of the dissertation? When will each of the key stages start and finish (refining proposal; literature review; developing research methods; fieldwork; analysis; writing the draft; final submission). There are likely to overlaps between the stages.

Why Bristol? Why – specifically – do you want to study for your PhD at Bristol ? How would you fit into the School's  research themes and research culture . You do not need to identify supervisors at the application stage although it can be helpful if you do.

Bibliography. Do make sure that you cite what you see as the key readings in the field. This does not have to be comprehensive but you are illustrating the range of sources you might use in your research.

We expect your research proposal to be clear, concise and grammatically correct. Prior to submitting your research proposal, please make sure that you have addressed the following issues:

  • Have you included a clear summary of what the proposed research is about and why it is significant?
  • Have you clearly identified what your proposed research will add to our understanding of theory, knowledge or research design?
  • Does it state what contributions it will make to policy and/or practice?
  • Does the proposal clearly explain how you will do the research?
  • Is the language clear and easy to understand by someone who is not an expert in the field?
  • Is the grammar and spelling correct?
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  • Writing a research proposal for a PhD application

How to write a research proposal for a PhD application

What is a research proposal.

A research proposal gives details of the direction of your future research, usually based on a research question and a chapter-by-chapter approach to answering it.

For PhD applications, this proposal will be assessed to see:

  • whether the project is likely to be completed within three years of full-time research
  • whether it can be effectively supervised at the university
  • whether you are competent and keen enough to complete it.

There may be other factors affecting whether you get a place at the University of Brighton:

  • whether the project fits a growing or established research priority of the university
  • how the proposal fits with a current cohort and the research environment

A successful proposal will leave the panel in no doubt on these, and you should prepare to show the strength of your idea and demonstrate your suitability.

Within the proposal, you should take the opportunity to clearly outline your research idea; your research methodology and critical approaches; your experience in this field of research where you can; and how your work will be offering an original contribution to knowledge, theories and/or practice. 

Find more details about a PhD in your discipline at the University of Brighton

How to get a prospective supervisor's help with your proposal

The strongest proposals are often ones that have been written jointly between a prospective student and prospective supervisor.

As Professor Pollen states in our film, supervisors have an understanding of the language used in proposals and the skillsets that asessors will want to see -- whether for a university position or a funding application.

To develop a strong proposal, we recommend you  work with a possible supervisor  at the University of Brighton who can help shape your project for feasibility and suitability within our institution. This person may then become your lead supervisor.

Please enable targeting cookies in order to view this video content on our website, or you can watch the video on YouTube .

What journey leads to a PhD application?  This film was made by the University of Brighton for UKRI and features University of Brighton students and academics as well as those from other partner universities.

Finding a PhD theme and understanding the university research environment

You may be responding to an advertised call for a particular project that has already achieved funding. Alternatively, you may want to propose a personally developed project. 

If you are responding to a call then the advertisement will have clear guidance as to what research experience and interest a candidate will need. This should help you structure your PhD research proposal.

If you are proposing a personally developed project then it should be carefully written to show the viability within the university's current research environment and a specific supervisory possibility at the university.

Some applicants have found our repository of theses helpful for the development and refinement of their research idea. You can find over 1000 theses completed at the University of Brighton over the past 40 years at our repository of successful PhD student theses . 

Our research database has useful leads to potential supervisory staff and a strong idea of the university's current research priorities online:

  • Explore our PhD disciplinary programme search tools including free search and A-Z 
  • Explore our research centres (COREs)  or our research groups (REGs) 
  • Visit our research database of staff, projects and organisational units.

Once you have identified a potential lead researcher of a research project most aligned to yours, do not hesitate to email them.

Explain who you are, your motivation to do a PhD in their field of study and with them. They will let you know if they are interested in your project and would be interested in potentially supervising your PhD. If they cannot commit, they may be able to help you identify another researcher who could be available and interested.

By liaising with a suitable supervisor, your proposal will benefit from expert help and be channelled towards the appropriate disciplinary environment.

If you are in doubt about whether we can offer the appropriate supervision, please contact the  Doctoral College .

Find out more about your opportunities for a PHD on our FAQ page

What should a research proposal contain?

A research proposal should include the following:

1. Indicative title of the topic area

This should accurately reflect what it is that you want to study and the central issues that you are going to address.

It may be useful to present this in the format of a statement (perhaps a quote) and a question, separated by a colon. For example: '"The tantalising future of research": how are research proposals developed and assessed?'

2. Context / rationale / why is this study important? (300 – 500 words)

Introduce your specific area of study. You should identify the theoretical context within which your research will be developed by discussing the discipline(s) and or field/s of study relevant to your research.

This means outlining the key theoretical area(s) you will draw upon to enable you to find out what it is that you want to know (for example, how it is underpinned from methods in the social sciences; arts and humanities; life, health and physical sciences).

What we are looking for here is an indication that you understand and have done some research into the wider theoretical context.

Developing the context is just one part of this section; you are building a case / rationale for the study area. Why is this study important, which theoretical areas support this? Can you identify any gaps in current understanding that help you build the case for this research study?

For example, this section might take the form of: a series of statements on the current landmark areas of thought; a recognition of what has not yet been done thoroughly enough or where there is territory for research between these landmark studies; and where your study will fill the gaps you have identified.

3. Literature review (approximately 700 – 900 words)

Here you are demonstrating that you are aware of what has been and what is currently being written about your topic.

It will certainly include the up-to-date and relevant past landmark academic literature. It may also include other evidence of current thought and attitude, for example, government documents or media coverage. Practice-led PhD studies may make reference to innovation and trends in industry or professional practice.

We are looking for you to make links between this body of literature and your proposed area of study. This will support the ways you have identified gaps in the current global knowledge-base. A PhD thesis arises from original research leading to new knowledge or a significant contribution to existing knowledge. If, at this stage, you have some thoughts on how your research is likely to contribute to knowledge then include details in your proposal.

This section should include citations which are compiled into a reference list at the end of the document (see point 7).

4. The research questions or hypotheses (approximately 200 words)

Having told us what you want to study and why, and then illustrated these ideas with reference to a body of literature, the next task is to distil your ideas into a tentative set of research questions, hypotheses, aims and objectives (as per the underpinning discipline requires) that are manageable and achievable within a normal PhD timeframe (see 6 below). There are typically between three and ten questions/aims of this kind.

5. Research approach/ methodologies / methods (approximately 400 words)

There will be many research approaches open to you. In your proposal, suggest the methodological approach that you might take and make a reasoned case as to why the research questions you have posed are best addressed by this approach.

You might also suggest what methods you would use to generate data that can help you address your research questions.

6. Timescale/research planning (approximately 200 words)

A full-time PhD should take three years to complete, although you may require more time to acquire the relevant skills prior to commencing your research. Part-time study will take longer (up to five - six years). Within this timeframe, you will need to demonstrate your awareness of time management and planning, for example the length of time for primary research/ fieldwork.

7. Reference list 

You should include a reference list of all the sources that you referred to in the text using a recognised referencing style appropriate to your discipline (for example Harvard or Vancouver for Sciences).

Evidence of thorough background reading might include between ten and twenty citations at this point. They should demonstrate to an expert that you are knowledgeable of the landmark work in your field.

There are a number of books widely available that may help in preparing your research proposal (as well as in completing your research degree), here are a couple to point you in the right direction:

Bell, J (2010, 5th edn) Doing Your Research Project: A Guide for First-time Researchers in Education & Social Science , Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Baxter, L, Hughes, C and Tight, M (2007, 3rd edn) How to Research , Buckingham: Open University Press.

a man at a desk writing

Research proposals in practice-led and professionally-based disciplines

The University of Brighton prides itself on the quality of its research in areas that intersect with professional practices and direct impact through in-the-field relationships with co-producers.

We are very supportive of doctoral projects that bring positive results from these methodolgies and practices.

Some of the subject areas that have supported personal practice as research include: design, art, architecture, media production and creative writing, with successful approaches including autoethnographic methods and public participation or site-specific interventions. 

Some of the areas that have benefited from significant professional practice and industry relationship-focused research have included: engineering, nursing, business administration and teaching. 

The research proposal will still need to demonstrate your capability as a researcher with a project that is workable and fits with the university's interests and capacities. 

You should, however, adapt your proposal to demonstrate the value that your practice can bring to the research. This should be in tandem with a clear understanding of the relationship between practice and research.

A clear competence in practice should be evidenced, but do be aware that your proposal will be judged on its research and the new knowledge that is developed and shared, rather than the quality of practice in and of itself.

Personal practices, experiences and data gained through professional relationships may form part of a standard PhD thesis and proposal as description of work and resulting data. You will only be appyling for a practice-led component to be taken into account if this will form a significant part of the representation and examination of the knowledge-base. In such cases, the thesis is signficantly shorter.

Some pitfalls in the applications for practice-led or practice-focused research include:

  • An imbalance between the practical and theoretical elements
  • Too arbitrary a divide between the practice and theory
  • Using practice to simply provide personal illustrations of established theories or concepts
  • Insufficient sense of how the research knowledge will be held and disseminated
  • Insufficiently contained scope for a three-year project – for example, where the practice is described as a life-long investigation – with no clarity on an end-point
  • A project that could be better or similarly tackled through a standard PhD in terms of efficient response to the research questions. For example where the practice element might be represented as data or results instead of examined practice.

Your potential supervisor will be able to advise where a proposal will include significant elements beyond the traditional thesis. For further information, please contact the Doctoral College .

Hand gripping toothbrush designed with two flexible handles designed to be squeezed as help for rheumatoid arthritis sufferers

A set of designed objects submitted as part of a practice-led PhD project in medical therapeutic design, by Dr Tom Ainsworth, who went on to become a teacher, researcher and supervisor at the University of Brighton.

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Moray House School of Education and Sport

Writing your PhD research proposal

Find guidance on how to write your PhD research proposal and a template form for you to use to submit your research proposal.

By asking you for an outline  research proposal we hope to get a good picture of your research interests and your understanding of what such research is likely to entail.

The University's application form is designed to enable you to give an overview of your academic experience and qualifications for study at postgraduate level. Your outline research proposal then gives us an idea of the kind of research you want to undertake. This, together with information from your referees, will help us assess whether the Moray House School of Education and Sport would be the appropriate place for you to pursue your research interests.

At  the application stage you are unlikely to be in a position to provide a comprehensive research proposal; the detailed shaping up of a research plan would be done in conjunction with your supervisors(s). But it is important for us to appreciate what you are hoping to investigate, how you envisage carrying out the research, and what the results might be expected to contribute to current knowledge and understanding in the relevant academic field(s) of study. In writing your proposal, please indicate any prior academic or employment experience relevant to your planned research.

In your research proposal, please also ensure that you clearly identify the Moray House research cluster your proposal falls under, as well as two to three staff members  with expertise in this area. We also encourage you to contact potential supervisors within your area of proposed research prior to submitting your application in order to gauge their interest and availability.

How to write your research proposal

The description of your proposed research should consist of 4-5 typed A4 sheets. It can take whatever form seems best, but should include some information about the following:

  • The general area within which you wish to conduct research, and why (you might find it helpful to explain what stimulated your interest in your chosen research field, and any study or research in the area that you have already undertaken)
  • The kind of research questions that you would hope to address, and why (in explaining what is likely to be the main focus of your research, it may be helpful to indicate, for example, why these issues are of particular concern and the way in which they relate to existing literature)
  • The sources of information and type of research methods you plan to use (for example, how you plan to collect your data, which sources you will be targeting and how you will access these data sources).

In addition to the above, please include any comments you are able to make concerning:

  • The approach that you will take to analysing your research data
  • The general timetable you would follow for carrying out and writing up your research
  • Any plans you may have for undertaking fieldwork away from Edinburgh
  • Any problems that might be anticipated in carrying out your proposed research

Please note: This guidance applies to all candidates, except those applying to conduct PhD research as part of a larger, already established research project (for example, in the Institute for Sport, Physical Education & Health Sciences).

In this case, you should provide a two- to three-page description of a research project that you have already undertaken, as a means of complementing information given in the application form. If you are in any doubt as to what is appropriate please contact us:

Contact us by email: Education@[email protected]

All doctoral proposals submitted as part of an application will be run through plagiarism detection software.

Template form for your research proposal

All applicants for a PhD or MSc by Research are required to submit a research proposal as part of their application. Applicants  must   use the template form below for their research proposal. This research proposal should then be submitted online as part of your application. Please use Calibri size 11 font size and do not change the paragraph spacing (single, with 6pt after each paragraph) or the page margins.

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help with phd research proposal

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Writing your research proposal

A doctoral research degree is the highest academic qualification that a student can achieve. The guidance provided in these articles will help you apply for one of the two main types of research degree offered by The Open University.

A traditional PhD, a Doctor of Philosophy, usually studied full-time, prepares candidates for a career in Higher Education.    

A Professional Doctorate is usually studied part-time by mid- to late-career professionals. While it may lead to a career in Higher Education, it aims to improve and develop professional practice.  

We offer two Professional Doctorates:  

  • A Doctorate in Education, the EdD and
  • a Doctorate in Health and Social Care, the DHSC.

  Achieving a doctorate, whether a PhD, EdD or DHSC confers the title Dr.  

Why write a Research Proposal?  

To be accepted onto a PhD / Professional Doctorate (PD) programme in the Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) at The Open University, you are required to submit a research proposal. Your proposal will  outline the research project you would like to pursue if you’re offered a place.  

When reviewing your proposal, there are three broad considerations that those responsible for admission onto the programme will bear in mind:    

1.     Is this PhD / PD research proposal worthwhile?

2.     Is this PhD / PD candidate capable of completing a doctorate at this university?

3.     Is this PhD / PD research proposal feasible?  

Writing activity: in your notebook, outline your response to each of the questions below based on how you would persuade someone with responsibility for admission onto a doctoral programme to offer you a place:

  • What is your proposed research about & why is it worthy of three or more years of your time to study?
  • What skills, knowledge and experience do you bring to this research – If you are considering a PhD, evidence of your suitability will be located in your academic record for the Prof Doc your academic record will need to be complemented by professional experience.
  • Can you map out the different stages of your project, and how you will complete it studying i) full-time for three years ii) part-time for four years.

The first sections of the proposal - the introduction, the research question and the context are aimed at addressing considerations one and two.  

Your Introduction

Your Introduction will provide a clear and succinct summary of your proposal. It will include a title, research aims and research question(s), all of which allows your reader to understand immediately what the research is about and what it is intended to accomplish. We recommend that you have one main research question with two or three sub research questions. Sub research questions are usually implied by, or embedded within, your main research question.  

Please introduce your research proposal by completing the following sentences in your notebook: I am interested in the subject of ………………. because ……………… The issue that I see as needing investigation is ………………. because ………………. Therefore, my proposed research will answer or explore [add one main research question and two sub research questions] …... I am particularly well suited to researching this issue because ………………. So in this proposal I will ………………. Completing these prompts may feel challenging at this stage and you are encouraged to return to these notes as you work through this page.

Research questions are central to your study. While we are used to asking and answering questions on a daily basis, the research question is quite specific. As well as identifying an issue about which your enthusiasm will last for anything from 3 – 8 years, you also need a question that offers the right scope, is clear and allows for a meaningful answer.  

Research questions matter. They are like the compass you use to find your way through a complicated terrain towards a specific destination. 

A good research proposal centres around a good research question. Your question will determine all other aspects of your research – from the literature you engage with, the methodology you adopt and ultimately, the contribution your research makes to the existing understanding of a subject. How you ask your question, or the kinds of question you ask, matters because there is a direct connection between question and method.  

You may be inclined to think in simplistic terms about methods as either quantitative or qualitative. We will discuss methodology in more detail in section three. At this point, it is more helpful to think of your methods in terms of the kinds of data you aim to generate. Mostly, this falls into two broad categories, qualitative and quantitative (sometimes these can be mixed). Many academics question this distinction and suggest the methodology categories are better understood as unstructured or structured.  

For example, let’s imagine you are asking a group of people about their sugary snack preferences.  

You may choose to interview people and transcribe what they say are their motivations, feelings and experiences about a particular sugary snack choice. You are most likely to do this with a small group of people as it is time consuming to analyse interview data.  

Alternatively, you may choose to question a number of people at some distance to yourself via a questionnaire, asking higher level questions about the choices they make and why.

quantitative methods versus qualitative methods - shows 10% of people getting a cat instead of a dog v why they got a cat.

Once you have a question that you are comfortable with, the rest of your proposal is devoted to explaining, exploring and elaborating your research question. It is probable that your question will change through the course of your study.  

At this early stage it sets a broad direction for what to do next: but you are not bound to it if your understanding of your subject develops, your question may need to change to reflect that deeper understanding. This is one of the few sections where there is a significant difference between what is asked from PhD candidates in contrast to what is asked from those intending to study a PD. There are three broad contexts for your research proposal.  

If you are considering a PD, the first context for your proposal is professional:

This context is of particular interest to anyone intending to apply for the professional doctorate. It is, however, also relevant if you are applying for a PhD with a subject focus on education, health, social care, languages and linguistics and related fields of study.  

You need to ensure your reader has a full understanding of your professional context and how your research question emerges from that context. This might involve exploring the specific institution within which your professionalism is grounded – a school or a care home.  It might also involve thinking beyond your institution, drawing in discussion of national policy, international trends, or professional commitments. There may be several different contexts that shape your research proposal. These must be fully explored and explained.  

Postgraduate researcher talks about research questions, context and why it mattered

The second context for your proposal is you and your life:

Your research proposal must be based on a subject about which you are enthused and have some degree of knowledge. This enthusiasm is best conveyed by introducing your motivations for wanting to undertake the research.  Here you can explore questions such as – what particular problem, dilemma, concern or conundrum your proposal will explore – from a personal perspective. Why does this excite you? Why would this matter to anyone other than you, or anyone who is outside of your specific institution i.e. your school, your care home.  

It may be helpful here to introduce your positionality . That is, let your reader know where you stand in relation to your proposed study. You are invited to offer a discussion of how you are situated in relation to the study being undertaken and how your situation influences your approach to the study.  

The third context for your doctoral proposal is the literature:

All research is grounded in the literature surrounding your subject. A legitimate research question emerges from an identified contribution your work has the potential to make to the extant knowledge on your chosen subject. We usually refer to this as finding a gap in the literature. This context is explored in more detail in the second article.

You can search for material that will help with your literature review and your research methodology using The Open University’s Open Access Research repository  and other open access literature.

Before moving to the next article ‘Defining your Research Methodology’, you might like to explore more about postgraduate study with these links:  

  • Professional Doctorate Hub  
  • What is a Professional Doctorate? 
  • Are you ready to study for a Professional Doctorate? 
  • The impact of a Professional Doctorate

Applying to study for a PhD in psychology

  • Succeeding in postgraduate study - OpenLearn - Open University
  • Are you ready for postgraduate study? - OpenLearn - Open University
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  • Engaging with postgraduate research: education, childhood & youth - OpenLearn - Open University

We want you to do more than just read this series of articles. Our purpose is to help you draft a research proposal. With this in mind, please have a pen and paper (or your laptop and a notebook) close by and pause to read and take notes, or engage with the activities we suggest. You will not have authored your research proposal at the end of these articles, but you will have detailed notes and ideas to help you begin your first draft.

More articles from the research proposal collection

Defining your research methodology

Defining your research methodology

Your research methodology is the approach you will take to guide your research process and explain why you use particular methods. This article explains more.

Level: 1 Introductory

Addressing ethical issues in your research proposal

Addressing ethical issues in your research proposal

This article explores the ethical issues that may arise in your proposed study during your doctoral research degree.

Writing your proposal and preparing for your interview

Writing your proposal and preparing for your interview

The final article looks at writing your research proposal - from the introduction through to citations and referencing - as well as preparing for your interview.

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This free course, Are you ready for postgraduate study, will help you to become familiar with the requirements and demands of postgraduate study and ensure you are ready to develop the skills and confidence to pursue your learning further.

Succeeding in postgraduate study

Succeeding in postgraduate study

This free course, Succeeding in postgraduate study, will help you to become familiar with the requirements and demands of postgraduate study and to develop the skills and confidence to pursue your learning further.

Applying to study for a PhD in psychology

This free OpenLearn course is for psychology students and graduates who are interested in PhD study at some future point. Even if you have met PhD students and heard about their projects, it is likely that you have only a vague idea of what PhD study entails. This course is intended to give you more information.

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Research Method

Home » How To Write A Research Proposal – Step-by-Step [Template]

How To Write A Research Proposal – Step-by-Step [Template]

Table of Contents

How To Write a Research Proposal

How To Write a Research Proposal

Writing a Research proposal involves several steps to ensure a well-structured and comprehensive document. Here is an explanation of each step:

1. Title and Abstract

  • Choose a concise and descriptive title that reflects the essence of your research.
  • Write an abstract summarizing your research question, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes. It should provide a brief overview of your proposal.

2. Introduction:

  • Provide an introduction to your research topic, highlighting its significance and relevance.
  • Clearly state the research problem or question you aim to address.
  • Discuss the background and context of the study, including previous research in the field.

3. Research Objectives

  • Outline the specific objectives or aims of your research. These objectives should be clear, achievable, and aligned with the research problem.

4. Literature Review:

  • Conduct a comprehensive review of relevant literature and studies related to your research topic.
  • Summarize key findings, identify gaps, and highlight how your research will contribute to the existing knowledge.

5. Methodology:

  • Describe the research design and methodology you plan to employ to address your research objectives.
  • Explain the data collection methods, instruments, and analysis techniques you will use.
  • Justify why the chosen methods are appropriate and suitable for your research.

6. Timeline:

  • Create a timeline or schedule that outlines the major milestones and activities of your research project.
  • Break down the research process into smaller tasks and estimate the time required for each task.

7. Resources:

  • Identify the resources needed for your research, such as access to specific databases, equipment, or funding.
  • Explain how you will acquire or utilize these resources to carry out your research effectively.

8. Ethical Considerations:

  • Discuss any ethical issues that may arise during your research and explain how you plan to address them.
  • If your research involves human subjects, explain how you will ensure their informed consent and privacy.

9. Expected Outcomes and Significance:

  • Clearly state the expected outcomes or results of your research.
  • Highlight the potential impact and significance of your research in advancing knowledge or addressing practical issues.

10. References:

  • Provide a list of all the references cited in your proposal, following a consistent citation style (e.g., APA, MLA).

11. Appendices:

  • Include any additional supporting materials, such as survey questionnaires, interview guides, or data analysis plans.

Research Proposal Format

The format of a research proposal may vary depending on the specific requirements of the institution or funding agency. However, the following is a commonly used format for a research proposal:

1. Title Page:

  • Include the title of your research proposal, your name, your affiliation or institution, and the date.

2. Abstract:

  • Provide a brief summary of your research proposal, highlighting the research problem, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes.

3. Introduction:

  • Introduce the research topic and provide background information.
  • State the research problem or question you aim to address.
  • Explain the significance and relevance of the research.
  • Review relevant literature and studies related to your research topic.
  • Summarize key findings and identify gaps in the existing knowledge.
  • Explain how your research will contribute to filling those gaps.

5. Research Objectives:

  • Clearly state the specific objectives or aims of your research.
  • Ensure that the objectives are clear, focused, and aligned with the research problem.

6. Methodology:

  • Describe the research design and methodology you plan to use.
  • Explain the data collection methods, instruments, and analysis techniques.
  • Justify why the chosen methods are appropriate for your research.

7. Timeline:

8. Resources:

  • Explain how you will acquire or utilize these resources effectively.

9. Ethical Considerations:

  • If applicable, explain how you will ensure informed consent and protect the privacy of research participants.

10. Expected Outcomes and Significance:

11. References:

12. Appendices:

Research Proposal Template

Here’s a template for a research proposal:

1. Introduction:

2. Literature Review:

3. Research Objectives:

4. Methodology:

5. Timeline:

6. Resources:

7. Ethical Considerations:

8. Expected Outcomes and Significance:

9. References:

10. Appendices:

Research Proposal Sample

Title: The Impact of Online Education on Student Learning Outcomes: A Comparative Study

1. Introduction

Online education has gained significant prominence in recent years, especially due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This research proposal aims to investigate the impact of online education on student learning outcomes by comparing them with traditional face-to-face instruction. The study will explore various aspects of online education, such as instructional methods, student engagement, and academic performance, to provide insights into the effectiveness of online learning.

2. Objectives

The main objectives of this research are as follows:

  • To compare student learning outcomes between online and traditional face-to-face education.
  • To examine the factors influencing student engagement in online learning environments.
  • To assess the effectiveness of different instructional methods employed in online education.
  • To identify challenges and opportunities associated with online education and suggest recommendations for improvement.

3. Methodology

3.1 Study Design

This research will utilize a mixed-methods approach to gather both quantitative and qualitative data. The study will include the following components:

3.2 Participants

The research will involve undergraduate students from two universities, one offering online education and the other providing face-to-face instruction. A total of 500 students (250 from each university) will be selected randomly to participate in the study.

3.3 Data Collection

The research will employ the following data collection methods:

  • Quantitative: Pre- and post-assessments will be conducted to measure students’ learning outcomes. Data on student demographics and academic performance will also be collected from university records.
  • Qualitative: Focus group discussions and individual interviews will be conducted with students to gather their perceptions and experiences regarding online education.

3.4 Data Analysis

Quantitative data will be analyzed using statistical software, employing descriptive statistics, t-tests, and regression analysis. Qualitative data will be transcribed, coded, and analyzed thematically to identify recurring patterns and themes.

4. Ethical Considerations

The study will adhere to ethical guidelines, ensuring the privacy and confidentiality of participants. Informed consent will be obtained, and participants will have the right to withdraw from the study at any time.

5. Significance and Expected Outcomes

This research will contribute to the existing literature by providing empirical evidence on the impact of online education on student learning outcomes. The findings will help educational institutions and policymakers make informed decisions about incorporating online learning methods and improving the quality of online education. Moreover, the study will identify potential challenges and opportunities related to online education and offer recommendations for enhancing student engagement and overall learning outcomes.

6. Timeline

The proposed research will be conducted over a period of 12 months, including data collection, analysis, and report writing.

The estimated budget for this research includes expenses related to data collection, software licenses, participant compensation, and research assistance. A detailed budget breakdown will be provided in the final research plan.

8. Conclusion

This research proposal aims to investigate the impact of online education on student learning outcomes through a comparative study with traditional face-to-face instruction. By exploring various dimensions of online education, this research will provide valuable insights into the effectiveness and challenges associated with online learning. The findings will contribute to the ongoing discourse on educational practices and help shape future strategies for maximizing student learning outcomes in online education settings.

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  • Dissertation

What Is a Dissertation? | Guide, Examples, & Template

Structure of a Dissertation

A dissertation is a long-form piece of academic writing based on original research conducted by you. It is usually submitted as the final step in order to finish a PhD program.

Your dissertation is probably the longest piece of writing you’ve ever completed. It requires solid research, writing, and analysis skills, and it can be intimidating to know where to begin.

Your department likely has guidelines related to how your dissertation should be structured. When in doubt, consult with your supervisor.

You can also download our full dissertation template in the format of your choice below. The template includes a ready-made table of contents with notes on what to include in each chapter, easily adaptable to your department’s requirements.

Download Word template Download Google Docs template

  • In the US, a dissertation generally refers to the collection of research you conducted to obtain a PhD.
  • In other countries (such as the UK), a dissertation often refers to the research you conduct to obtain your bachelor’s or master’s degree.

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Table of contents

Dissertation committee and prospectus process, how to write and structure a dissertation, acknowledgements or preface, list of figures and tables, list of abbreviations, introduction, literature review, methodology, reference list, proofreading and editing, defending your dissertation, free checklist and lecture slides.

When you’ve finished your coursework, as well as any comprehensive exams or other requirements, you advance to “ABD” (All But Dissertation) status. This means you’ve completed everything except your dissertation.

Prior to starting to write, you must form your committee and write your prospectus or proposal . Your committee comprises your adviser and a few other faculty members. They can be from your own department, or, if your work is more interdisciplinary, from other departments. Your committee will guide you through the dissertation process, and ultimately decide whether you pass your dissertation defense and receive your PhD.

Your prospectus is a formal document presented to your committee, usually orally in a defense, outlining your research aims and objectives and showing why your topic is relevant . After passing your prospectus defense, you’re ready to start your research and writing.

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The structure of your dissertation depends on a variety of factors, such as your discipline, topic, and approach. Dissertations in the humanities are often structured more like a long essay , building an overall argument to support a central thesis , with chapters organized around different themes or case studies.

However, hard science and social science dissertations typically include a review of existing works, a methodology section, an analysis of your original research, and a presentation of your results , presented in different chapters.

Dissertation examples

We’ve compiled a list of dissertation examples to help you get started.

  • Example dissertation #1: Heat, Wildfire and Energy Demand: An Examination of Residential Buildings and Community Equity (a dissertation by C. A. Antonopoulos about the impact of extreme heat and wildfire on residential buildings and occupant exposure risks).
  • Example dissertation #2: Exploring Income Volatility and Financial Health Among Middle-Income Households (a dissertation by M. Addo about income volatility and declining economic security among middle-income households).
  • Example dissertation #3: The Use of Mindfulness Meditation to Increase the Efficacy of Mirror Visual Feedback for Reducing Phantom Limb Pain in Amputees (a dissertation by N. S. Mills about the effect of mindfulness-based interventions on the relationship between mirror visual feedback and the pain level in amputees with phantom limb pain).

The very first page of your document contains your dissertation title, your name, department, institution, degree program, and submission date. Sometimes it also includes your student number, your supervisor’s name, and the university’s logo.

Read more about title pages

The acknowledgements section is usually optional and gives space for you to thank everyone who helped you in writing your dissertation. This might include your supervisors, participants in your research, and friends or family who supported you. In some cases, your acknowledgements are part of a preface.

Read more about acknowledgements Read more about prefaces

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

The abstract is a short summary of your dissertation, usually about 150 to 300 words long. Though this may seem very short, it’s one of the most important parts of your dissertation, because it introduces your work to your audience.

Your abstract should:

  • State your main topic and the aims of your research
  • Describe your methods
  • Summarize your main results
  • State your conclusions

Read more about abstracts

The table of contents lists all of your chapters, along with corresponding subheadings and page numbers. This gives your reader an overview of your structure and helps them easily navigate your document.

Remember to include all main parts of your dissertation in your table of contents, even the appendices. It’s easy to generate a table automatically in Word if you used heading styles. Generally speaking, you only include level 2 and level 3 headings, not every subheading you included in your finished work.

Read more about tables of contents

While not usually mandatory, it’s nice to include a list of figures and tables to help guide your reader if you have used a lot of these in your dissertation. It’s easy to generate one of these in Word using the Insert Caption feature.

Read more about lists of figures and tables

Similarly, if you have used a lot of abbreviations (especially industry-specific ones) in your dissertation, you can include them in an alphabetized list of abbreviations so that the reader can easily look up their meanings.

Read more about lists of abbreviations

In addition to the list of abbreviations, if you find yourself using a lot of highly specialized terms that you worry will not be familiar to your reader, consider including a glossary. Here, alphabetize the terms and include a brief description or definition.

Read more about glossaries

The introduction serves to set up your dissertation’s topic, purpose, and relevance. It tells the reader what to expect in the rest of your dissertation. The introduction should:

  • Establish your research topic , giving the background information needed to contextualize your work
  • Narrow down the focus and define the scope of your research
  • Discuss the state of existing research on the topic, showing your work’s relevance to a broader problem or debate
  • Clearly state your research questions and objectives
  • Outline the flow of the rest of your work

Everything in the introduction should be clear, engaging, and relevant. By the end, the reader should understand the what, why, and how of your research.

Read more about introductions

A formative part of your research is your literature review . This helps you gain a thorough understanding of the academic work that already exists on your topic.

Literature reviews encompass:

  • Finding relevant sources (e.g., books and journal articles)
  • Assessing the credibility of your sources
  • Critically analyzing and evaluating each source
  • Drawing connections between them (e.g., themes, patterns, conflicts, or gaps) to strengthen your overall point

A literature review is not merely a summary of existing sources. Your literature review should have a coherent structure and argument that leads to a clear justification for your own research. It may aim to:

  • Address a gap in the literature or build on existing knowledge
  • Take a new theoretical or methodological approach to your topic
  • Propose a solution to an unresolved problem or advance one side of a theoretical debate

Read more about literature reviews

Theoretical framework

Your literature review can often form the basis for your theoretical framework. Here, you define and analyze the key theories, concepts, and models that frame your research.

Read more about theoretical frameworks

Your methodology chapter describes how you conducted your research, allowing your reader to critically assess its credibility. Your methodology section should accurately report what you did, as well as convince your reader that this was the best way to answer your research question.

A methodology section should generally include:

  • The overall research approach ( quantitative vs. qualitative ) and research methods (e.g., a longitudinal study )
  • Your data collection methods (e.g., interviews or a controlled experiment )
  • Details of where, when, and with whom the research took place
  • Any tools and materials you used (e.g., computer programs, lab equipment)
  • Your data analysis methods (e.g., statistical analysis , discourse analysis )
  • An evaluation or justification of your methods

Read more about methodology sections

Your results section should highlight what your methodology discovered. You can structure this section around sub-questions, hypotheses , or themes, but avoid including any subjective or speculative interpretation here.

Your results section should:

  • Concisely state each relevant result together with relevant descriptive statistics (e.g., mean , standard deviation ) and inferential statistics (e.g., test statistics , p values )
  • Briefly state how the result relates to the question or whether the hypothesis was supported
  • Report all results that are relevant to your research questions , including any that did not meet your expectations.

Additional data (including raw numbers, full questionnaires, or interview transcripts) can be included as an appendix. You can include tables and figures, but only if they help the reader better understand your results. Read more about results sections

Your discussion section is your opportunity to explore the meaning and implications of your results in relation to your research question. Here, interpret your results in detail, discussing whether they met your expectations and how well they fit with the framework that you built in earlier chapters. Refer back to relevant source material to show how your results fit within existing research in your field.

Some guiding questions include:

  • What do your results mean?
  • Why do your results matter?
  • What limitations do the results have?

If any of the results were unexpected, offer explanations for why this might be. It’s a good idea to consider alternative interpretations of your data.

Read more about discussion sections

Your dissertation’s conclusion should concisely answer your main research question, leaving your reader with a clear understanding of your central argument and emphasizing what your research has contributed to the field.

In some disciplines, the conclusion is just a short section preceding the discussion section, but in other contexts, it is the final chapter of your work. Here, you wrap up your dissertation with a final reflection on what you found, with recommendations for future research and concluding remarks.

It’s important to leave the reader with a clear impression of why your research matters. What have you added to what was already known? Why is your research necessary for the future of your field?

Read more about conclusions

It is crucial to include a reference list or list of works cited with the full details of all the sources that you used, in order to avoid plagiarism. Be sure to choose one citation style and follow it consistently throughout your dissertation. Each style has strict and specific formatting requirements.

Common styles include MLA , Chicago , and APA , but which style you use is often set by your department or your field.

Create APA citations Create MLA citations

Your dissertation should contain only essential information that directly contributes to answering your research question. Documents such as interview transcripts or survey questions can be added as appendices, rather than adding them to the main body.

Read more about appendices

Making sure that all of your sections are in the right place is only the first step to a well-written dissertation. Don’t forget to leave plenty of time for editing and proofreading, as grammar mistakes and sloppy spelling errors can really negatively impact your work.

Dissertations can take up to five years to write, so you will definitely want to make sure that everything is perfect before submitting. You may want to consider using a professional dissertation editing service , AI proofreader or grammar checker to make sure your final project is perfect prior to submitting.

After your written dissertation is approved, your committee will schedule a defense. Similarly to defending your prospectus, dissertation defenses are oral presentations of your work. You’ll present your dissertation, and your committee will ask you questions. Many departments allow family members, friends, and other people who are interested to join as well.

After your defense, your committee will meet, and then inform you whether you have passed. Keep in mind that defenses are usually just a formality; most committees will have resolved any serious issues with your work with you far prior to your defense, giving you ample time to fix any problems.

As you write your dissertation, you can use this simple checklist to make sure you’ve included all the essentials.

Checklist: Dissertation

My title page includes all information required by my university.

I have included acknowledgements thanking those who helped me.

My abstract provides a concise summary of the dissertation, giving the reader a clear idea of my key results or arguments.

I have created a table of contents to help the reader navigate my dissertation. It includes all chapter titles, but excludes the title page, acknowledgements, and abstract.

My introduction leads into my topic in an engaging way and shows the relevance of my research.

My introduction clearly defines the focus of my research, stating my research questions and research objectives .

My introduction includes an overview of the dissertation’s structure (reading guide).

I have conducted a literature review in which I (1) critically engage with sources, evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of existing research, (2) discuss patterns, themes, and debates in the literature, and (3) address a gap or show how my research contributes to existing research.

I have clearly outlined the theoretical framework of my research, explaining the theories and models that support my approach.

I have thoroughly described my methodology , explaining how I collected data and analyzed data.

I have concisely and objectively reported all relevant results .

I have (1) evaluated and interpreted the meaning of the results and (2) acknowledged any important limitations of the results in my discussion .

I have clearly stated the answer to my main research question in the conclusion .

I have clearly explained the implications of my conclusion, emphasizing what new insight my research has contributed.

I have provided relevant recommendations for further research or practice.

If relevant, I have included appendices with supplemental information.

I have included an in-text citation every time I use words, ideas, or information from a source.

I have listed every source in a reference list at the end of my dissertation.

I have consistently followed the rules of my chosen citation style .

I have followed all formatting guidelines provided by my university.

Congratulations!

The end is in sight—your dissertation is nearly ready to submit! Make sure it's perfectly polished with the help of a Scribbr editor.

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PhD Research Proposal Sample

phd research proposal example

PhD Research Proposal Sample for Your Inspiration

One of the toughest things to do when it comes to completing a voluminous and challenging PhD research project is the proposal. The thing about the PhD research proposal is that you have to encapsulate everything that you want to accomplish, communicate in a concise way what you want to do, the resources that it will require, and finally you have to convince the reader of the viability and necessity of the project. It isn’t easy to know where to begin with something like this, but with the help of a PhD research proposal example from our professional PhD writing service , it’s easier than ever! We’ve got a wide range of samples made by doctoral proposal writer that you can take advantage of to learn all the ins and outs of crafting the highest quality proposal. No matter what the subject or specifications of your proposal are, our professional example research proposal is here to provide you with the help that you need!

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If you need some help with PhD investigation, you may use these samples for writing. Another smart solution is to pick a sample research proposal with comments from an expert. Such samples are just to give you some idea about writing the research proposal. However, if you are still confused or facing some time constraints to write PhD proposal, we are here to help you. Our team of experts has vast experience and expertise to write a perfect research proposal for your needs. Moreover, we can help you choose the most relevant research proposal topics , write a paper from scratch, or improve the existing one. No matter what your subject is, we have the subject specialist on every subject, who have years of experience of writing research proposals. We ensure fresh and unique work, which is 100% plagiarism free. Each student is special to us, and we ensure your personal and work details will be kept secret. We can also help you to meet your short deadlines. With the lightning-fast experts on the board, our PhD proposal writing service accepts even last-minute tasks, delivering high-quality outcomes on time or even earlier, leaving enough time for revisions and comments from your supervisor. Get your PhD research proposal without any hassle, contact us Now!

Look Through Our Well-Written PhD Research Proposal Sample

The dynamics of hyperinflation and stabilization policies – the case of zimbabwe.

The dynamics of hyperinflation and stabilization policies

The running of the country can be viewed commercially as a business enterprise by the economists. The business needs to be run in equilibrium; a balance between supply and demand must be stricken if the entrepreneur or the owner of the enterprise is to enjoy any benefits accrued by running a business. In the case of a country, it should be governed in a way that that the prices of goods and services are kept in control.  The stakeholders must not let the prices escalate beyond the ability of a typical citizen. Similarly, the release of cash into the economy should be maintained so that the flow of money is monitored and controlled, hence preserving the value of that particular currency.

This proposal will dig into inflation and find out how inflation has affected economies of a country, in particular, Zimbabwe and the ways to stabilize this condition. The dynamics of hyperinflation will also be looked into in detail to bring out the real picture and the damages it causes to an economy. The proposal will also focus on the causes of inflation in Zimbabwe and the how the theories of hyperinflation have applied in this context. The proposal will also look at the quantity theory of money and how it is associated with hyperinflation.

Introduction

Hyperinflation can be defined as a situation where the prices of goods and services escalate beyond control that the concept of inflation is an understatement. Economically, hyperinflation can be defined to occur when the total inflation over a period of three years is equivalent or exceeds 100%. Countries in hyperinflation usually experience rapid erosion of the real value of local currency prompting the population to hold a relatively stable foreign currency.

Hyperinflation makes the prices of goods and services in an economy to rise rapidly since the value of the local currency loses the real value quickly. Zimbabwe has experienced hyperinflation since 2001 with inflation rates over a whopping 100%.  However, as from 2006, inflation in Zimbabwe has risen to an uncontrollable 1500% annually. It should be observed that Zimbabwe was the only country that was experiencing hyperinflation and the first in the 21st century to have hyperinflation. Inflation in Zimbabwe has been perceived in two ways. First, the private sector speculation which the Zimbabwean authorities argue that the private sector rises up the prices intentionally to maximize profits on to pile pressure on the economy through ruthless price increments.

Secondly, the authorities also believe that the withdrawal of aids and the international economic sanctions have led to an economic decline from the year 2000. This perception has the explanation that the printing and minting of excess money by the government is usually tailored to bridge the gap between the government revenue and the actual receipts. This proposal to examine these concepts in depth.

Literature review

In this section, the Cagan (1956) hyperinflation model will be examined, where he assessed the statistical connection between cash and changes in price by conducting instances of hyperinflation in six different countries across Europe. According to Cagan, the demand for money balances declined with increase in inflation, assuming inflation played a significant role in determining hyperinflation.

Milton Friedman bases his view of hyperinflation in quantity theory of money. This theory states that the relationship between money and the price level is directly proportional.  This relationship implies that inflation will increase with an increase in money supply and the continued trend will lead to hyperinflation. In Zimbabwe, the supply of money and the prices of goods and services increased in tandem, as per the quantity theory of money because people opted to use the available cash immediately, rather than to wait on the depreciating cash. This, in turn, led to the increase of velocity as well as an increase of money through the printing of new currency, hence the exponential increase in prices of goods and services in Zimbabwe.

Methodology

This proposal will seek to clarify the mechanisms through which money, the setting of price behavior and the requirements of government revenue collaborate in Zimbabwe, to examine the explanations put forth by the authorities about the hyperinflation in Zimbabwe. To achieve this goal, the proposal will look at various models and tests that will lead to the understanding of the hyperinflation.

Granger causality test

In general, it is obvious that money engenders the rate of inflation, but the reverse could also be claimed to be true. It can be said that hyperinflation has self-perpetuating tendencies, due to the fact that the rise in prices of goods and services results in the rise in demand for nominal cash. Thus, causation develops from inflation to supply of money. This test investigates the amount of the existing value of money and premium is a utilizable component in the prediction of inflation.

Theoretical model

This model provides the classical quantity theory of money which believes that institutional factors determine the rate of money circulation. The economy is assumed to be or close to the real GDP.  In this case, the growth of money does not have an effect in the real GDP. This implies that holding both variables constant, the growth rate of money is directly proportional to the rate of inflation. Inflation reduces money demand due to an increase in the opportunity cost of holding money. Hyperinflation in Zimbabwe increased the parallel market premium and consequently, a change in the parallel market premium affected the velocity of cash in the circulation. The data used here was derived from various sources including the website of the RBZ.

The inflation data and money supply were collected from RBZ while parallel exchange rate was collected from Carmen M. Reinhart, a Harvard Kennedy School Professor of the International Financial System. The methodology in this paper employs heavily the ARDL co-integration approach for investigating the relationship between the inflation and its determinants.  ARDL was used because it has several advantages over other models of co-integration. ARDL can be used with time series data, can also be employed in a general-to-specific modeling by including insufficient numbers to lags for the data generating and error correction model (ECM) can be derived using ARDL co-integration model.

Theoretical/conceptual framework

Lagged change in the inflation and money supply growth are insignificant in the ARDL framework. Moreover, the ever-increasing prices are not unsustainable in the long-run; hence using the concept of long-run relations could give incorrect results. Zimbabwe had almost all her prices listed in foreign currencies which fully wrote off inflation inertia. In this case, an exchange rate is a useful tool for curbing inflation rates thereby making stabilization of hyperinflation less costly in comparison to moderate methods of dealing with hyperinflation. Through Ordinary Least Squares method, hyperinflation in Zimbabwe is said o have been caused by the rapid growth of paper money. The money demand model will seek to find out if this result is consistent. Additionally, a unit increase in the parallel market premium will result in an equivalent change in inflation.

High rates of interest will deter borrowing and foster saving, slowing the economy and hence disinflationary effects. The Treasury bill by the Zimbabwe government had turned the interest rates negative and this manipulation discouraged savings by the households. As per the Quantity Theory of money, hyperinflation in Zimbabwe could have been a monetary phenomenon and the only way to curb it would be to constrain the unnecessary money supply growth.

Research plan

Hyperinflation in Zimbabwe had severe adverse effects on the economy in regard to wealth, savings and deposits. Prices of essential goods and services became unreachable, especially to those on inflexible incomes. Countermeasures including price controls and foreign currencies ban to control the then escalating levels of inflation and the devaluation of the Zimbabwean currency were taken. Zimbabwe’s hyperinflation was at its peak when the government compelled the RBZ to issue banknotes of higher denominations, hence fuelling the rate of inflation. The Zimbabwean dollar value diminished at a faster rate and the RBZ could not keep up with the printing. This led to the abandonment of the Zimbabwean dollar in favor of the US dollar as well as the SA Rand.

This study aimed at finding the causes of hyperinflation in Zimbabwe by using the right econometric models. Its main aim is to find out if the growth of money has a positive effect on inflation. Additionally, it will be aimed at finding out whether the parallel market premium is directly proportional to the growth of inflation. Whether money supply is the primary driver of hyperinflation in Zimbabwe, the findings of the research will provide the answer.

Works cited

BBC News,. ‘Zimbabwe Abandons Its Currency’. N.p., 2014. Web. 29 Dec. 2014.

Cato Institute,. ‘Measurements of Zimbabwe’s Hyperinflation’. N.p., 2014. Web. 29 Dec. 2014.

Larochelle, C., J. Alwang, and N. Taruvinga. ‘Inter-Temporal Changes In Well-Being During Conditions Of Hyperinflation: Evidence From Zimbabwe’. Journal of African Economies 23.2 (2014): 225-256. Web.

McIndoe Calder, Tara. ‘Hyperinflation In Zimbabwe: Money Demand, Seigniorage And Aid Shocks’. SSRN Journal n. pag. Web.

Makochekanwa, A. ‘A Dynamic Enquiry Into The Causes Of Hyperinflation In Zimbabwe’. The University of Pretoria, Department of Economics (2007): n. pag. Print. Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe (RBZ),. ‘Bank Annual Reports From 2000-2008’. N.p., 2008. Web. 29 Dec. 2014

Sokic, Alexandre. ‘The Monetary Analysis Of Hyperinflation And The Appropriate Specification Of The Demand For Money’. German Economic Review 13.2 (2011): 142-160. Web.

Works, Anchor. ‘Data’. Carmenreinhart.com. N.p., 2014. Web. 29 Dec. 2014.

You can also take a look at our guide for writing an  interpretive thesis if you feel like you’re struggling to write on your own. So check it out! You can also find out more helpful examples of research proposals if you contact us.

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The expert team at Ph.D. Assistance is not just writers, but they are passionate researchers who will travel along with you, think from your experience, and explore possible research gaps for your Ph.D. research proposal. We ensure that you have a solid understanding of the background and previous research done by other researchers, which in turn would help the scholars to identify a research topic and provide materials for developing an appropriate argument with his/her supervisor. Our experts are chosen from international and top-ranked universities across the global countries like the US, UK, Australia, Russia, and India.

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Writing a research proposal is an important part of Ph.D. degree as it is an integral part of the Ph.D. application process. More importantly, in many international universities, the research proposal has been used to make decisions on whether to make acceptance offers onto the DBA/ Doctoral program. Therefore, the research proposal should be written in such a way where it must make a positive and powerful first impression about your potential to become a good researcher and should enable the university to examine whether you are a good ‘match’ for the mentors or supervisors and their areas of research expertise. However, writing such task is not easy and straightforward as it needs critical thinking and analysis and proper communication of your ideas. Apart from all these skills, the task also needs significant investment in terms of the amount of time and energy.

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Especially, scholars who do not have prior experience in academic research such as working in different industries and corporate will find hard to write a good research proposal. Similarly, scholars who have vast experience in teaching like professors and lecturers who wanted to pursue their Ph.D. degree may not find sufficient time to collect academic articles from various peer reviewed journals and read the articles.

Good Research Proposal for Ph.D. Scholars

  • What you contribute to your field of study?
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  • What is the theoretical framework for the study?
  • What are the research questions or research hypotheses?
  • Whether the study demands primary data? If needed, available?
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  • What will study design? The number to be targeted?
  • Does it demand pilot study?
  • Is the questionnaire already validated or need to develop a new one?
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What Services we render in context to research proposal development?

It becomes incumbent on our part to ascertain what type of research; the aspirant is going to initiate. It depends on the topic selected to develop good research proposal with the following attributes like:

  • What is the contribution to the field of study?
  • Whether, the study has been already conducted by any other researcher; if yes, where it has been conducted?
  • Whether the study demands primary data? If needed, is it available?
  • What will study design? What is the number of targeted respondents?
  • Is there any need of pilot study?
  • Is the questionnaire already validated or need to be developed a new one?
  • What are the expected end results / outcome of the study?
  • Is there any chance of developing the dissertation/ thesis within the time frame?

All these featuring in a research proposal will make an impact on the evaluators to get their nod of approval.

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While developing a research proposal, it becomes incumbent on our part to know what research method is going to be utilized. Is it qualitative, quantitative, or mixed or triangulation approach? As per the specific Ph.D. standard research methodology, our experts make an effort to write the Ph. D research proposal with the following things:

  • Overview of the Research: Introduction and background
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  • Review of Literature
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  • Time schedule of your research

The expertise will be selected from the field of study and apart from that PhD Assistance will allow research methodology and statistician in the team. In addition to the assistance in a Ph.D. research proposal, PhD Assistance also assists in presentation and Language.

Presentation

  • Sections and Headings
  • In-text citations
  • References list
  • Linking devices
  • Overused words
  • Variation and the use of pronouns

Spoken Vs. Written language

Well-Conceptualized & Precise Ph.D. Proposal Speaks about Your Research

To support our argument, we offer detailed references lists and bibliography.

Our Ph.D. Research Proposal service is exclusive

As we do not just provide topics, but the rather clear explanation and justification for the choice.

Brainstorm Your ideas

Plagiarism report, quality assurance, our ph.d. research writing, rewriting, mentoring help, we are committed to providing value for your money and time you invest with us, 0% plagiarism content.

We’re aware of the consequences of the plagiarism, therefore provide you 100% plagiarism free content. We ensure that our experts scan the works through online plagiarism tools as well as Turnitin or WriteCheck.

Originality

Every work is purely original as well as our premium researcher understand the value of grades in writing the one-off dissertation paper since they are passionate about doing the research. We offer only tailor-made Ph.D. dissertation writing services which are unique, and it gives you completeness and satisfaction for your money.

Reasonable cost

At Ph.D. help, we strive hard to provide the ultimate Ph.D. dissertation research methodology writing services with high-class quality at a reasonable cost compare to the globally available service provider. Our assistance is globally available who would work as per their currency charges and timings. Our pricing plan is constant irrespective of places, subjects, and universities as well as provide only same high-quality works to all the students.

100% Match with requirement

We help to match Your requirement 100% since our experienced writers upgraded with the topic and analyze well before working on the dissertation. In the each of the dissertation stages, we always check with you before we move to the next chapters. Further, our services purely follow your university-upgraded guidelines to ensure that dissertation meets the expected standards.

Meet Deadline

The committed timeline is our promise to our every client. We understand timeline that decides your future, and therefore our work is delivered as per the deadline committed. For minor changes, we guarantee delivery within 24 working hours and any major changes to dissertation chapters will be carried out within 48 working hours. We check all your emails with 30 minutes of working hours. We plan your complete dissertation within short time help you to save time for changes and updates.

Word Count Committed

Our experts can handle the maximum word counts in the Ph.D. dissertation writing that range from 8,000 -80,000 words. In additional, as per your university guidelines and requirement, we complete the Ph.D. research methodology that meets specific word counts since we completely understand the appointed universities committee members will reduce the credits if the word counts decrease. We count the words without adding Reference, Chart table, Table of Contents, Appendix, Bibliography and Interview responses.

Quality check

We undertake the rigorous quality check and assurance process at every step of your dissertation thereby you are assured to get the accurate output. Our experts check every time and verify the given requirement, so your final output meets the standard. We analyze and check your document based on the language, technical words, subject matter, referencing, formatting, plagiarism and overall.

Unlimited Revision

Every researcher has different points of view. Therefore, we offer unlimited revisions. Our team of Ph.D. experts respects the feedback provided by the guide or supervisor and provide sufficient changes to enhance your research work. The revision carried out at this stage is complementary*.

Latest referenced sources

Our dissertation writing projects are completely referenced with updated online sources, journal articles, research, textbooks, corporate document and other international and national regulatory documents. Our team of ultimate copyeditors exceptionally work for university specific referencing system since we understand the value of each credit.

PhD Mentors with adequate experience

Rely on our unique and affordable ph.d. dissertation mentoring services, as well as your order, you will also get the following..

Our Additional Features

Fully Referenced

All our academic mentoring, whether an essay, report, dissertation or any other form of academic writing that built on other thoughts and ideas, are acknowledged appropriately. This is necessary to the reader in identifying and finding the relevant sources. We ensure that the usage of references would be largely within the main body of your report while the introduction and the conclusion be largely based on the ideas. This is to ensure avoiding plagiarism. Acknowledgment is done in the text (i.e., in work) and subsequently linked to the full lists presented under the references lists section (end of your work of all sources you refer to).

Formatting & Referencing

The research report is formatted based on the recommended formatting guidelines. Since, there are many different guidelines available including APA, MLA, Harvard and therefore, we strictly follow the guideline given by the scholars. Based on the referencing style (e.g. APA, Harvard, MLA, Oxford), the report will be formatted. Further, we also format to ensure (1) to avoid plagiarism (2) to assign proper authority to a statement, (3) sentence structuring and finally adding a table of content, and Lists of Tables & Figures. Footnotes or endnotes are also being taken care by our formatting team.

Study Materials Sharing

We not only deliver the work that you ordered but also we take one step forward to ensure that you are aware of reference materials used in the research work. Every article whether a journal article, textbook, PhD dissertation, translated works, newspaper articles, dictionary, or web pages, lectures (usually includes speaker name, date, name and the location) encyclopaedia entries, legal or historical text, PDFs, PPTs, YouTube Videos, annual reports and many more– will be shared to the research scholar for future reference. On a special request, we also mark / highlight the articles that are most important for the student to read and understand. Additional reference materials will be shared via zipping file through Google drive or drop box so you can use it again during the viva or any other process.

Client Testimony

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I faced lot of issues for completing my research proposal work. Because I have no idea to write. So, I stressed a lot, my friend advised and to get help from phdassistance. The expert shared lot of information about my research proposal and it was helpful. Moreover, I completed my research proposal on time without any corrections. Thanks a lot phdassistance expert

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Unique research proposal delivered in advance. Phdassistance expert, thank for the accuracy and sufficient approach. I'm so happy I can rely on your writing service in any emergency. Thanks a lot. - Guadalupe
Working with PhD Assistance services on my PhD research proposal was an exceptional experience. They displayed a deep understanding of the research domain and provided valuable insights to refine my research objectives . Their ability to synthesize complex concepts and communicate them effectively was awe-inspiring . The research proposal they helped me develop was comprehensive, well-structured, and aligned with current academic standards. I highly recommend PhD Assistance services for anyone seeking guidance in crafting a compelling and rigorous research proposal. - Thanks, team- Mark , USA  
I am extremely grateful for the expert guidance and support I received from PhD Assistance in crafting my PhD research proposal. Their team helped me refine my research questions, develop a robust methodology, and structure my proposal effectively. Thanks to their assistance, my proposal was approved without any revisions. Highly recommended!

Order Process

Ordering your complete or part Ph.D. Dissertation process from Ph.D. Assistance is quick and easy. You need to follow the easy steps given below

Step 1. Complete the order form

You can provide as much information as you can about your project and the specific assistance that you require from us. It will help our research team to understand your requirements.

Step 4: Edit & Proofreading

After receiving the work from writers, we send the document to editing and proofreading department to ensure that the work is free of any grammatical or language errors. Where the content is minutely scrutinized by a qualified team of native English speakers and language editors. Whether it is UK OR the US English language, we ensure that the styles are not mixed. Following the proofreading and editing, the content undergoes a quality and plagiarism check. The quality check ensures that the content matches the requirement and is relevant whereas, plagiarism check ensures that the content is original.

Step 7: We check against the requirement

Once your dissertation work is completed, we compare and cross verify the final documents like title, context, spelling error, language error, grammar, punctuation mistakes, wrong manuscript style and quality against the client's requirement. We look at each detail very keenly to ensure whether it is an exactly cited and align with your requirement.

Step 10: Request for amendment

If you required any changes done by your appointed committee or supervisor you can always come back to us and do not hesitate, we are ready to do unlimited revisions for the concept being committed. Comments can be shared through our official email at [email protected]

Step 13: Our researcher makes the changes

The document will be received from our writer or programmer, and once the work is finished, we’ll share you the complete work through email or you can download the order through CRM. If you are need of any changes or corrections in your document, you can contact us at any working hours without any hesitation. We are happy to incorporate the changes as per the initial commitment.

Step 2: Make payment for your specific mentoring requirement

You will be required to make the prescribed payment for the specific service you are opting for. The payment would vary per the type of research methodology and timelines. You are required to make the payment through our secure online payment system.

Step 5: Update process

We will provide complete updates with regards to the progress of your project. It will be a two-way process wherein you would also be required to update us about any changes or additional instructions that you might receive from your university or college from time to time.

Step 8: 100% Plagiarism Assurance

Once your dissertation underwent to the editing and proofreading process, your final document is checked for plagiarism with anti-plagiarism software tools before the delivery. Since we provide plagiarism reports, certificate to ensure the students not finding any issues in the future. Our high-quality research and streamlined process.

Step 11: We undertake free unlimited revisions

Another feature that is unique to Ph.D. Assistance is that we offer unlimited revisions that are totally free. In the rare instance that there is a variation between perceptions of the expert from those of the client, there is a scope for disagreement. In such instances, we are open to making changes to the research methodology as per the client’s requirement. Any additional inputs given by the client’s guide is also addressed by our experts. We ensure that every change as suggested by the client is incorporated till such time that the client is entirely satisfied.

Step 14: Amendment Request

In case after going through the project you feel the need to modify the executed research methodology, you can make a request for modification while highlighting the modifications required. Once we receive the request for modification, our experts will verify if the changes suggested are valid and work on it accordingly.

Step 3: Order confirmation communication

An official order confirmation communication will be sent to the email address specified by you at the time of the initial registration. We start the process within a couple of days* after your payment received.

Step 6: Assigning Subject Matter Expertise

Based on your requirement an expert who is most qualified and experienced in executing your research methodology will be assigned to you. The assigned expert will be responsible for extending complete assistance throughout the duration of the project. Experts at Ph.D. Assistance are carefully chosen through a rigorous recruitment process. Stringent recruitment norms ensure that only the right people with the right qualification and experience are selected. During the recruitment process, they are evaluated for their knowledge, critical thinking, language and ability to understand concepts. Thus, our team is an eclectic mix of Ph.D. holders, medical experts, engineers, management and financial wizards who not only have a strong grasp over their domain but they also have an inherent ability to execute research methodology assignments effortlessly while maintaining the quality.

Step 9: Free Appendices / Resources

We just not only deliver your work but take one step forward to ensure that you’re aware of reference materials used in the research work *. All reference materials will be shared via zipping file through Google drive or drop box to ensure you can make use of the same again during the viva voice or any other process.

Step 12: Download your Order

With the help of customized CRM, not only your interaction becomes easy. Now, it is a very simple process that you can download your order through our CRM and reminder will be sent through email & SMS. An additional copy will also be mailed. Our CRM is safe, secure and anti-virus enabled which keeps your documents in a highly secured manner.

Step 15: We value your Feedback to improve our services

Share your opinion and feedback through our official email id [email protected]

Our Subject Matter Expertise is second to none! So, Relax! Your Ph.D. Research project will be in Safe hands

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Budgeting, Cost Principles and Tools

Cost principles and guidance.

Project budgets should include all costs required to accomplish the objectives in the proposal or agreement. These costs are categorized as either direct or indirect costs.

All direct costs charged to sponsored projects awarded to The University of Texas must be allowable, allocable, necessary and reasonable for carrying out the objectives of the sponsored project as defined in Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200). To be consistent in managing direct costs, the University extends these requirements to both federal and nonfederal sponsors.

For details on direct costs, see the Code of Federal Regulations ( 200.413 ), which are also detailed in the University (HOP).

All costs charged to a sponsored project must be allowable, reasonable and allocable ( 2 CFR 200 Subpart E—Cost Principles ).

Allowable: A direct cost is allowable when it is necessary for the project and meets the criteria for reasonable and allocable costs outlined here in 200.403 .

Reasonable: A direct cost is reasonable when it does not exceed that which would be incurred by a prudent person, as defined in 200.404 .

Allocable: A cost is allocable to a particular award if the relative benefit of the goods or services can be assigned to that award. The cost must be incurred specifically for the award, and be charged to the award proportionally to the benefit the award received, as outlined in 200.405 .

For additional details, please see Select Items of Cost Guide (PDF) .

Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs are costs incurred for a common or joint purpose benefitting more than one cost objective, and not readily assignable to the cost objectives specifically benefited. These costs include building depreciation, equipment and capital improvement, utilities, custodial services, general administration, research administration, the libraries, accounting and purchasing. ( 200.414 ).

The University’s F&A rates are determined by an agreement with the federal government in accordance with the federal  Uniform Guidance . See the current  Cost Rate Agreement .

Organized Research – On-Campus Organized Research means all research and development activities that are separately budgeted and accounted for, including sponsored and University research activities and research training activities.

58.5% (MTDC) (14.5% ARL)

Instruction – On-Campus Instruction means the institution’s teaching and training activities (other than research training) whether offered for credit toward a degree or certificate or on a non-credit basis, and whether offered through regular academic departments or separate divisions, such as a summer school division or an extension division.

Other Sponsored Activities – On-Campus Other Sponsored Activities means programs and projects financed by federal and non-federal agencies and organizations which involve the performance of work other than instruction and organized research. Examples of such programs and projects are health service projects and community service programs, as well as symposia and conferences that do not meet the definition of  Instruction .

Off-Campus This rate is used when the project will take place off campus for at least 90 consecutive days  and  one of the following criteria is met:

  • The combined proposed effort of all involved UT personnel working off-campus is greater than the combined proposed effort of all involved UT personnel working on-campus. This includes unpaid contributed effort.
  • The budget includes leasing or renting an off-site facility as a direct cost, and the personnel paid from the grant and any equipment are located at that facility.
  • The total direct costs incurred off-campus exceeds the total direct costs incurred on-campus.

You must have OSP approval prior to using the off-campus rate. Requests to use the off-campus rate are due to OSP at least seven (7) business days before the proposal deadline.

The University of Texas at Austin will honor published (e.g. foundations or non-profits) or statutory (e.g. USDA, US Dept. of Education) limitations on recovery of indirect costs. The University also accepts the following rates from these prime sponsors without additional documentation:

  • Texas, Austin and Travis County Funding (excluding federal flow through) activities are 15% (TDC)
  • Non profit foundations without activities without published rates are 15% (TDC)
  • Clinical Trials for Industry (excluding federal flow through) are 38% (TDC)

All other exceptions to these F&A rates require a waiver, which is approved by the Vice President for Research, Scholarship and Creative Endeavors.

Waiver and reduction requests are submitted to OVPR through the Associate Dean for Research (ADR) or equivalent in the PI’s college or unit. Requests should include:

  • Detailed budget
  • Explanation for the request
  • Approval by the ADR
  • Draft commitment letter prepared for signature by OVPR if required by the sponsor

Requests for IDC adjustments must be routed by the ADR to OVPR for final review and approval at least 7 business days prior to the proposal submission deadline.

Please note:

  • OVPR does not judge the relative merit of submitted proposals; therefore, it will not waive or reduce F&A to make proposals more competitive.
  • OVPR does not grant F&A waivers or reductions for the sake of stretching a proposal’s budget; therefore, OVPR will not waive or reduce F&A to help a budget fit into an agency cost cap.

Subrecipients to The University of Texas at Austin should use the federally negotiated F&A agreements in effect at their institutions unless a published or statutory limitation from the prime sponsor applies. When no approved cost rate agreement exists and there is no sponsor-published policy, the University will accept the following F&A rates from these prime sponsors:

  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) subawards for foreign institutions of international organizations ( GPS 16.6 ;  45 CFR 75.414(c)(1)(i) ) are accepted at 8% (MTDC).
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) subawards for for-profit entities WITHOUT an established cost rate agreement (excluding SBIR/STTR) ( GPS 7.4 ;  45 CFR 75.414(c)(1)(ii) ) are not allowed. For-profit entities WITH a negotiated rate agreement should use their negotiated rates.
  • Any federal sponsor with a subaward for a non-federal entity (never having received a negotiated indirect cost rate) ( 2 CFR 200.414(f) ), will accept 10% (MTDC) de minimus.

Please note, the University does not negotiate indirect cost rates for subrecipients.

Base: The F&A rate is applied to a base of direct costs in order to determine the F&A Cost. The base can be calculated in one of the following ways:

  • Total Direct Costs (TDC)  =  TDC  means all direct costs included in the project budget. There are no exclusion or modifiers.
  • Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC)  =  MTDC  means all direct salaries and wages, applicable fringe benefits, materials and supplies, services, travel, and up to the first $25,000 of each subaward (regardless of the period of performance of the subawards under the award). MTDC excludes equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care, rental costs, tuition remission, scholarships and fellowships, participant support costs and the portion of each subaward in excess of $25,000. Other items may only be excluded when necessary to avoid a serious inequity in the distribution of indirect costs, and with the approval of the cognizant agency for indirect costs ( §200.1 ).

See the F&A Rate Decision Guide (PDF) for more information.

Participant Support vs. Participant Incentive

Per Uniform Guidance  2 CFR 200.1 , Participant Support is a direct cost for items such as stipends or subsistence allowances, travel allowances and registration fees paid to or on behalf of participants or trainees (but not employees) in connection with conference, or training projects. Participant Support Costs are exempt from F&A when using UT’s negotiated F&A rate.

Uniform Guidance  2 CFR 200.308(c)(5)  requires prior sponsor approval to transfer funds budgeted for participant support costs to other budget categories.

Participant Incentives are low value payments or items given to individuals to encourage them to participate in research. In order to be an incentive, the value of a payment or item must be minimal and should be provided to all participants in the research projects.

Paying individuals in exchange for their participation is a common and, in general, acceptable practice. Payment to individuals for their participation in studies is not considered a benefit and is not taken into account when IRB weighs the risks and benefits of the research. Payments can include compensation, gift certificates to participate in a survey, or petty cash “gifts” to encourage rural interviews.

UT Austin allows for use of  Tango Card  to compensate research participants. Tango Card is an online gift card service that enables researchers to allocate research compensation remotely.

Participant Incentives are part of the MTDC Base, and F&A should be calculated for funds budgeted in this expense category.

Any prior approval requirements to rebudget this expense category will be detailed in the sponsored award document.

Cost Sharing

Cost sharing is a commitment made by an institution to fund a portion of the total cost of a sponsored agreement. Find information on UT Austin’s cost sharing policies and procedures for reporting.

Fringe Rates and Guidelines

The term “fringe benefits” refers to non-wage expenses paid by an employer on behalf of their employees. These expenses include insurance premium sharing, employer matching, Social Security (OASI) and Medicare, Teacher Retirement System (TRS) and Optional Retirement Program (ORP) matching, as well as assessments for Unemployment Compensation Insurance (UCI), Workers’ Compensation Insurance (WCI), vacation and sick leave.

Fringe Rates

Fringe benefits are a direct cost to a sponsored project ( §200.431 ). They are budgeted as a percentage of the salaries and wages and shown as a separate entry in the budget. Fringe is charged on all payroll transactions processed in Workday (See a detailed list ).

The University’s fringe rates are negotiated with its cognizant agency (DHHS) and are part of the University’s  F&A Cost Rate Agreement .

The actual fringe benefit rate will be charged to the project when the expense is incurred, regardless of what rate is budgeted in the proposal. It may be necessary to rebudget during the project period to pay for actual fringe benefit costs.

Additional fringe benefit rate information can be found at UT Austin Payroll .

Projections for Planning Purposes

Fringe mitigation.

The transition to pooled fringe rates in FY19 may impact existing sponsored projects or previously submitted proposals. To mitigate grant/contract accounts (26- accounts) whose proposals were submitted prior to August 10, 2018 with fringe budgeted at less than the new rates, see Fringe Overdrafts Guidance .

Budget Revisions Requests

The transition to pooled fringes may impact existing awards. To that end, Post-Award will be enforcing fringe requirements on budget transfers in line with expected needs to support the new pooled fringe rates.

A budget transfer represents a deviation from the originally planned project and budget. The budget transfer may be sponsor-approved or allowed, but in either case the transfer composition of salary and fringe will need to meet the ongoing budget needs under pooled fringes.

This means, all budget transfers will need to carry a fringe-to-salary ratio of 30% (the percentage ratio may be updated annually dependent on the negotiated rate).

A budget transfer may increase or decrease only salary, only fringe or both. For questions, see Salary Cap Guidance .

To initiate a budget transfer, log into the Financial Resources Management System (FRMS) and Select the Transfers tab.

Person Months Calculator

A “person month” is the metric for expressing the effort (amount of time) personnel devote to a specific project. The effort is based on the type of appointment of the individual (Calendar, Academic or Summer).

Download UT’s Person Month Calculator Template

OSP Constituency List

UT’s Proposal Budget Template Download a five-year budget template to map out proposed project costs by category.

Grad Coach

🎙️ PODCAST: Writing A Research Proposal

4 Time-Saving Tips To Fast-Track Your Proposal

By: Derek Jansen (MBA) and Ethar Al-Saraf (Phd) | March 2024

Crafting a well-thought-out research proposal is essential for gaining approval and setting a clear path for your research endeavours. In this episode of the Grad Coach Podcast, we explore four cheat codes that can help you fast-track your research proposal development process.

Episode Summary

————————————-

1: Define the What, Why, and How Before You Start

Before delving into the writing process, it is essential to pin down the what, why, and how of your research proposal. Clearly articulating the topic, rationale, and methodology before jumping into writing can provide a solid foundation for your proposal. Understanding the boundaries and parameters of your research topic is crucial for setting the stage for a successful research project.

2: Align Your Golden Thread

Ensuring that your research aim, research questions, and research objectives are perfectly aligned creates a golden thread that ties your entire proposal together. This alignment is vital for maintaining coherence and logic throughout your research project. By focusing on the interconnection between these key elements, you can establish a strong foundation for your research proposal.

3: Create a Solid Outline Before You Start Writing

Drawing up a clear outline before starting the writing process can streamline your proposal development. An outline serves as a roadmap, guiding the structure and content of your proposal. By outlining the key sections and components of your proposal, you can ensure that your ideas flow cohesively and logically, making it easier to develop a comprehensive and well-organized document.

4: Emphasise Significance and Viability

Highlighting the significance and viability of your proposed research is critical for gaining approval and demonstrating the feasibility of your project. By clearly articulating the meaningful contribution your research will make to the field and ensuring that your proposed methods are practical and attainable, you can strengthen your proposal’s credibility and persuasiveness.

In conclusion, crafting a successful research proposal requires careful planning, thoughtful consideration, and strategic execution. By following these four cheat codes, you can enhance the quality and effectiveness of your research proposal, setting the stage for a successful research project. Remember, a well-crafted proposal not only conveys your research ideas but also showcases your expertise and commitment to advancing knowledge in your field.

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IIT Hyderabad Invites Applications For Interdisciplinary PhD Admissions, Check Details

Iit hyderabad phd admissions 2024-25: the enrollment to the program is based on the submission of research proposals by two faculty members from different departments..

IIT Hyderabad Invites Applications For Interdisciplinary PhD Admissions, Check Details

IIT Hyderabad PhD Admissions: Students can apply to a maximum of two interdisciplinary proposals.

The Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (IIT-Hyderabad), has invited applications from students with diverse academic backgrounds to pursue doctoral research in interdisciplinary areas. Interested and eligible individuals can submit their applications on the official website by April 11.

Research Verticals:

Artificial Intelligence, Computing, Communications & Networks Bioengineering & Healthcare Energy, Environment, Creative Design & Management Novel Materials & Computational Techniques Soft and Active Matter & Mechanics of Materials Eligibility Criteria:

Prospective candidates must meet one of the following qualifications:

  • Possession of a Master's degree (MA/ME/MTech) or its equivalent in any field.
  • Possession of a Bachelor's degree (BE/BTech) or its equivalent in any field along with a valid GATE Score.
  • Possession of a Master of Science (MSc) degree or its equivalent in any scientific discipline along with a valid GATE score.
  • Successful completion of one of the following national examinations: INSPIRE, Joint CSIR-UGC NET with JRF, DBT JRF.
Interdisciplinary PhD Positions at #IITH #IITHyderabad invites applications from talented individuals with diverse academic backgrounds to pursue doctoral research in Interdisciplinary areas For registration visit https://t.co/K66L5ytY1h For info. visit https://t.co/DZDLkRypOA pic.twitter.com/C2NQfeoWko — IIT Hyderabad (@IITHyderabad) April 2, 2024

Admission Process:

  • Admission to the program is based on the submission of research proposals by two faculty members from different departments.
  • Prospective students can apply to a maximum of two interdisciplinary proposals. Shortlisted candidates will undergo an interview conducted by the Interdisciplinary Admissions Committee.

Requirements:

  • Detailed information about qualifications can be accessed on the admissions page.
  • Each applicant can apply to a maximum of two research proposals, specifying the proposal number and indicating their order of preference.

The five-year-long program is designed to ensure scholars attain a comprehensive understanding of their chosen field. The Interdisciplinary PhD program provides a rigorous academic experience, equipping students for careers in research, academia, and beyond. Scholars will receive an annual research contingency fund of Rs 50,000.

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help with phd research proposal

IMAGES

  1. sections of a phd proposal

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  2. (PDF) PhD Research Proposal

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  3. How to write a successful research proposal

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  4. PhD Research Proposal Template by PhD Research Proposal

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  5. How to Write Your PhD Research Proposal

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  6. ️ Oxford phd proposal sample. Writing a Good PhD Proposal. 2019-02-25

    help with phd research proposal

VIDEO

  1. How to make a research proposal for Ph.D. / Research Grant by Prof. Mahima Kaushik II Important tips

  2. How To Write Your PhD Research Proposal

  3. PhD Research Proposal Vs PhD Final thesis :)

  4. Creating a research proposal

  5. How to survive the second year of PhD?

  6. How to write research proposal and prepare for PhD admission? #profdrrajasekaran

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Great PhD Research Proposal

    You'll need to write a research proposal if you're submitting your own project plan as part of a PhD application. A good PhD proposal outlines the scope and significance of your topic and explains how you plan to research it. It's helpful to think about the proposal like this: if the rest of your application explains your ability to do a PhD ...

  2. Research Proposal Example (PDF + Template)

    Detailed Walkthrough + Free Proposal Template. If you're getting started crafting your research proposal and are looking for a few examples of research proposals, you've come to the right place. In this video, we walk you through two successful (approved) research proposals, one for a Master's-level project, and one for a PhD-level ...

  3. PDF A Guide to Writing your PhD Proposal

    Writing a PhD research proposal: A 6‐step general guide for prospective PhD researchers Introduction This short guide is aimed at helping you to write a good research proposal. It is intended to help you to think about your proposed PhD research in a clear, structured and meaningful way.

  4. How to nail your PhD proposal and get accepted

    When writing your PhD proposal you need to show that your PhD is worth it, achievable, and that you have the ability to do it at your chosen university. With all of that in mind, let's take a closer look at each section of a standard PhD research proposal and the overall structure. 1. Front matter.

  5. How to Write a Research Proposal

    Research proposal length. The length of a research proposal can vary quite a bit. A bachelor's or master's thesis proposal can be just a few pages, while proposals for PhD dissertations or research funding are usually much longer and more detailed. Your supervisor can help you determine the best length for your work.

  6. How to Write a PhD Research Proposal

    1. Title. Your title should indicate clearly what your research question is. It needs to be simple and to the point; if the reader needs to read further into your proposal to understand your question, your working title isn't clear enough. Directly below your title, state the topic your research question relates to.

  7. How To Write A Research Proposal (With Examples)

    Make sure you can ask the critical what, who, and how questions of your research before you put pen to paper. Your research proposal should include (at least) 5 essential components : Title - provides the first taste of your research, in broad terms. Introduction - explains what you'll be researching in more detail.

  8. How to write a research proposal for a strong PhD application

    A research proposal should present your idea or question and expected outcomes with clarity and definition - the what. It should also make a case for why your question is significant and what value it will bring to your discipline - the why. What it shouldn't do is answer the question - that's what your research will do.

  9. What Is A Research Proposal? Examples + Template

    As a rough guide, a formal research proposal at Masters-level often ranges between 2000-3000 words, while a PhD-level proposal can be far more detailed, ranging from 5000-8000 words. In some cases, a rough outline of the topic is all that's needed, while in other cases, universities expect a very detailed proposal that essentially forms the ...

  10. How to write a successful research proposal

    Research proposals are used to persuade potential supervisors and funders that your work is worthy of their support. These documents setting out your proposed research that will result in a Doctoral thesis are typically between 1,500 and 3,000 words in length. Your PhD research proposal must passionately articulate what you want to research and ...

  11. How to Write a Successful PhD Research Proposal

    References: Do not forget to specify all the references at the end of the proposal. An obvious but very important point is the format of your research proposal. Make sure that the formatting of the document is consistent throughout and that the structure is clear. If possible, it can be a good idea to give the document to your academic tutor or ...

  12. How to write a good PhD proposal

    Chelsea and Sarah both acknowledge that clarity and writing quality should never be overlooked in a PhD proposal. This starts with double-checking that the questions of your thesis are obvious and unambiguous, followed by revising the rest of your proposal. "Make sure your research questions are really clear," says Sarah.

  13. How to Write a Dissertation or Thesis Proposal

    Dissertation proposals can be up to 25-30 pages in length. Note Sometimes, a research schedule or detailed budget may be necessary if you are pursuing funding for your work. Dissertation prospectus examples. Writing a proposal or prospectus can be a challenge, but we've compiled some examples for you to get your started.

  14. How to write a PhD research proposal

    In order to help you with your application, the information below aims to give some guidance on how a typical research proposal might look. Your research proposal is a concise statement (up to 3,000 words) of the rationale for your research proposal, the research questions to be answered and how you propose to address them.

  15. How to write a research proposal for a PhD application

    1. Indicative title of the topic area. This should accurately reflect what it is that you want to study and the central issues that you are going to address. It may be useful to present this in the format of a statement (perhaps a quote) and a question, separated by a colon.

  16. Writing your PhD research proposal

    All applicants for a PhD or MSc by Research are required to submit a research proposal as part of their application. Applicants must use the template form below for their research proposal. This research proposal should then be submitted online as part of your application. Please use Calibri size 11 font size and do not change the paragraph ...

  17. Writing your research proposal

    Is this PhD / PD research proposal worthwhile? 2. ... Our purpose is to help you draft a research proposal. With this in mind, please have a pen and paper (or your laptop and a notebook) close by and pause to read and take notes, or engage with the activities we suggest. You will not have authored your research proposal at the end of these ...

  18. 1:1 Research Proposal Help (Dissertations & Theses)

    A track record you can trust. 8,000,000+ students have enjoyed our public lessons and online courses, while 3000+ students have benefited from 1:1 Dissertation Coaching. The plethora of glowing reviews reflects our commitment. Chat with a friendly coach to see how we can fast-track your research proposal, today.

  19. How To Write A Research Proposal

    Here is an explanation of each step: 1. Title and Abstract. Choose a concise and descriptive title that reflects the essence of your research. Write an abstract summarizing your research question, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes. It should provide a brief overview of your proposal. 2.

  20. What Is a Dissertation?

    A dissertation is a long-form piece of academic writing based on original research conducted by you. It is usually submitted as the final step in order to finish a PhD program. Your dissertation is probably the longest piece of writing you've ever completed. It requires solid research, writing, and analysis skills, and it can be intimidating ...

  21. Well-Written PhD Research Proposal Sample

    The thing about the PhD research proposal is that you have to encapsulate everything that you want to accomplish, communicate in a concise way what you want to do, the resources that it will require, and finally you have to convince the reader of the viability and necessity of the project. It isn't easy to know where to begin with something ...

  22. PhD Proposal Help,Dissertation Proposal writing Service

    Research Proposal, a snapshot of the proposed dissertation. Ph.D. Assistance assists in framing out the Ph.D. research proposal as per the standard guidelines. We have assisted for UK, USA, Netherlands, Australia, UAE, Dubai, Kenya, Nigeria, China, Russia and many more countries. We are aware of the guidelines set by different universities and ...

  23. Budgeting, Cost Principles and Tools

    OVPR does not judge the relative merit of submitted proposals; therefore, it will not waive or reduce F&A to make proposals more competitive. OVPR does not grant F&A waivers or reductions for the sake of stretching a proposal's budget; therefore, OVPR will not waive or reduce F&A to help a budget fit into an agency cost cap.

  24. Seventh Call for Proposals for STEG PhD Research Grants

    Application to this call is now open. STEG invites applications to the Seventh call for proposals for PhD Research Grants. Applicants must be currently enrolled in a PhD programme to be eligible for this call and will require a letter of support from their PhD supervisor sent no later than two weeks after the deadline to the STEG Team at [email protected].

  25. Writing A Research Proposal: 4 Time-Saving Tips

    Crafting a well-thought-out research proposal is essential for gaining approval and setting a clear path for your research endeavours. In this episode of the Grad Coach Podcast, we explore four cheat codes that can help you fast-track your research proposal development process. Episode Summary ————————————-

  26. IIT Hyderabad Invites Applications For Interdisciplinary PhD admissions

    IIT Hyderabad PhD Admissions 2024-25: The enrollment to the program is based on the submission of research proposals by two faculty members from different departments.

  27. A light in the dark: Illuminating the biology of catastrophic pediatric

    For example, in research published in Nature Communications in 2016 from the St. Jude Neuroimaging laboratory and the laboratory of David Solecki, PhD, St. Jude Department of Developmental Neurobiology, it was possible to watch the interaction of specific proteins as a neuron crawled inward from its birthplace in the developing brain, thereby ...

  28. Send me an email using details in bio to get help with your research

    419 likes, 1 comments - drfred_phd on March 31, 2024: "Send me an email using details in bio to get help with your research proposal, thesis and dissertation writing. #phdstudent #phdlife #ph..." Send me an email using details in bio to get help with your research proposal, thesis and dissertation writing.