After 35 Years, ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ Will Stop Haunting Broadway

Due to declining ticket sales, Broadway’s longest-running show will close this winter

Ella Feldman

Daily Correspondent

Signage at The 34th Anniversary Performance of Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Phantom of The Opera" on Broadway at The Majestic Theater on January 26, 2022.

This winter, the Phantom will haunt the Paris Opera House for the last time.

A Broadway fixture since 1988, The Phantom of the Opera will conclude its run on February 18, 2023. The gothic musical, which tells the story of a masked composer who haunts an opera house and becomes infatuated with a young, beautiful soprano, became Broadway’s longest-running show in 2006. It will close with a record 13,925 performances.

Throughout the course of its Broadway run, Phantom has sold 19.8 million tickets and grossed $1.3 billion. However, ticket sales began to fall during the pandemic. As an emblem of Broadway, the musical holds massive appeal for international travelers, producer Cameron Mackintosh tells the  New York Times ’ Michael Paulson. Many local fans, on the other hand, have already seen the show during its 35-year run. Meanwhile, production costs—which were already extravagant to begin with—have risen as a result of inflation.

Yet Phantom remains a sensation: Its upcoming Broadway closure has prompted ticket sales to skyrocket, bringing in $2 million within 24 hours of the announcement.

“You don’t want to run a great show into the ground,” Mackintosh, who has also produced Cats and Les Misérables , tells the Times . “It’s always been one of my mantras throughout my long career: There’s an art to closing a show, as well as opening one.”

Curtain call at The 34th Anniversary Performance of Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Phantom of The Opera" on Broadway at The Majestic Theater on January 26, 2022.

The Phantom of the Opera is based on Gaston Leroux ’s 1910  French novel of the same name. Andrew Lloyd Webber , the acclaimed composer behind the music of  Jesus Christ Superstar ,  Evita ,  Cats and  School of Rock , wrote the music, which includes iconic numbers like “ All I Ask of You ” and “ The Music of the Night .” 

In 1986, the show debuted in London’s  West End , and it opened at Broadway’s  Majestic Theatre two years later. In 1988, the show won  seven Tony Awards , including Best Musical. Harold Prince won for his directing, and performers Michael Crawford (the Phantom) and Judy Kaye (Carlotta Guidicelli) won in the Best Actor and Best Featured Actress categories. In 2004, Joel Schumacher directed a  film adaptation of Phantom .

The pandemic hit Broadway hard, with all of its theaters closing their doors for more than 18 months. Some mainstays—including  Chicago ,  Hamilton ,  The Lion King and  Wicked —have pulled off a successful comeback. Others, like Phantom , have not fared as well. 

“I’m both sad and celebrating,” Mackintosh tells the Times. “It’s an extraordinary achievement, one of the greatest successes of all time. What is there not to celebrate about that?”

After Phantom closes in February, Chicago is in line to become the  longest-running active Broadway show , having debuted its performance in 1996. The Lion King , which opened in 1997, is a close second; Wicked (2003) and  The Book of Mormon (2011) follow.

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Ella Feldman | READ MORE

Ella Malena Feldman is a writer and editor based in Washington, D.C. She examines art, culture and gender in her work, which has appeared in Washington City Paper , DCist and the Austin American-Statesman .

'The Phantom of the Opera' Closes on Broadway After 35 Years

The final curtain came down Sunday on New York’s production of “The Phantom of the Opera,” ending Broadway’s longest-running show with thunderous standing ovations, champagne toasts and gold and silver confetti

'The Phantom of the Opera' Closes on Broadway After 35 Years

Charles Sykes

Charles Sykes

"The Phantom of the Opera" cast appear at the curtain call following the final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

NEW YORK (AP) — The final curtain came down Sunday on New York's production of “The Phantom of the Opera,” ending Broadway’s longest-running show with thunderous standing ovations, champagne toasts and gold and silver confetti bursting from its famous chandelier.

It was show No. 13,981 at the Majestic Theatre and it ended with a reprise of “The Music of the Night” performed by the current cast, previous actors in the show — including original star Sarah Brightman — and crew members in street clothes.

Andrew Lloyd Webber took to the stage last in a black suit and black tie and dedicated the final show to his son, Nick, who died last month after a protracted battle with gastric cancer and pneumonia. He was 43.

“When he was a little boy, he heard some of this music,” Lloyd Webber said. Brightman, holding his hand, agreed: “When Andrew was writing it, he was right there. So his son is with us. Nick, we love you very much.”

Producer Cameron Mackintosh gave some in the crowd hope they would see the Phantom again, and perhaps sooner than they think.

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is phantom closing on broadway

“The one question I keep getting asked again and again — will the Phantom return? Having been a producer for over 55 years, I've seen all the great musicals return, and ‘Phantom’ is one of the greatest,” he said. “So it's only a matter of time.”

The musical — a fixture on Broadway since opening on Jan. 26, 1988 — has weathered recessions, war, terrorism and cultural shifts. But the prolonged pandemic may have been the last straw: It's a costly musical to sustain, with elaborate sets and costumes as well as a large cast and orchestra. The curtain call Sunday showed how out of step “Phantom” is with the rest of Broadway but also how glorious a big, splashy musical can be.

“If there ever was a bang, we’re going out with a bang. It’s going to be a great night,” said John Riddle just before dashing inside to play Raoul for the final time.

Based on a novel by Gaston Leroux, “Phantom” tells the story of a deformed composer who haunts the Paris Opera House and falls madly in love with an innocent young soprano, Christine. Webber’s lavish songs include “Masquerade,” ″Angel of Music” and ″All I Ask of You."

In addition to Riddle, the New York production said goodbye with Emilie Kouatchou as Christine and Laird Mackintosh stepping in for Ben Crawford as the Phantom. Crawford was unable to sing because of a bacterial infection but was cheered at the curtain call, stepping to the side of the stage. The Phantom waved him over to stand beside him, Riddle and Kouatchou.

There was a video presentation of many of the actors who had played key roles in the show over the years, and the orchestra seats were crowded with Christines, Raouls and Phantoms. The late director Hal Prince, choreographer Gillian Lynne and set and costume designer Maria Björnson were also honored.

Lin-Manuel Miranda attended, as did Glenn Close, who performed in two separate Broadway productions of Lloyd Webber's “Sunset Boulevard.” Free champagne was offered at intermission and flutes of it were handed out onstage at the curtain call.

Riddle first saw “The Phantom of the Opera” in Toronto as a 4-year-old child. “It was the first musical I ever saw. I didn't know what a musical was,” he said. “Now, 30-some odd years later, I'm closing the show on Broadway. So it's incredible.”

Kouatchou, who became the first Black woman in the role in New York, didn't think the show would ever stop. “I was like, ‘OK, I’m going to do my run, ‘Phantom' is going to continue on and they'll be more Christines of color,' ” she said. “But this is it.”

The first production opened in London in 1986 and since then the show has been seen by more than 145 million people in 183 cities and performed in 17 languages over 70,000 performances. On Broadway alone, it has grossed more than $1.3 billion.

When “Phantom" opened in New York, “Die Hard” was in movie theaters, Adele was born, and floppy discs were at the cutting edge of technology. A postage stamp cost 25 cents, and the year's most popular songs were “Roll With It” by Steve Winwood, “Faith” by George Michael and Rick Astley's “Never Gonna Give You Up.”

Critics were positive, with the New York Post calling it “a piece of impeccably crafted musical theater,” the Daily News describing it as “spectacular entertainment,” and The New York Times saying it “wants nothing more than to shower the audience with fantasy and fun.”

Lloyd Webber's other musicals include “Cats,” “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “Evita,” “Sunset Boulevard” and “School of Rock.” The closing of “Phantom” means the composer is left with one show on Broadway, the critically mauled “Bad Cinderella.”

The closing of “Phantom,” originally scheduled for February, was pushed to mid-April after a flood of revived interest and ticket sales that pushed weekly grosses past $3 million. The closing means the longest-running show crown now goes to “Chicago,” which started in 1996. “The Lion King” is next, having begun performances in 1997.

Broadway took a pounding during the pandemic , with all theaters closed for more than 18 months. Some of the most popular shows — “Hamilton,” “The Lion King” and “Wicked” — rebounded well, but other shows have struggled.

Breaking even usually requires a steady stream of tourists, especially for “Phantom,” and visitors to the city haven't returned to pre-pandemic levels. The pandemic also pushed up expenses for all shows, including routine COVID-19 testing and safety officers on staff. The Phantom became a poster boy for Broadway's return — after all, he is partially masked.

Fans can always catch the Phantom elsewhere. The flagship London production celebrated its 36th anniversary in October, and there are productions in Japan, Greece, Australia, Sweden, Italy, South Korea and the Czech Republic. One is about to open in Bucharest, and another will open in Vienna in 2024.

Kouatchou, who walked the red carpet before the final show in a hot pink clinging gown with a sweetheart neckline and a cut out, said the bitterness was undercut by the big send-off. Most Broadway shows that close slink into the darkness uncelebrated.

“It kind of sweetens it, right?” she said. “We get to celebrate at the end of this. We get to all come together and drink and laugh and talk about the show and all the highs and lows. It's ending on a big note.”

Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

Copyright 2023 The  Associated Press . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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A poster advertising The Phantom of the Opera.

The Phantom of the Opera to close on Broadway after 35 years

Broadway’s longest-running musical never fully recovered from the pandemic shutdown and will close next February

The Phantom of the Opera, Broadway’s longest-running show, is scheduled to close in February 2023.

The musical – a fixture on Broadway since 1988, weathering recessions, war and cultural shifts – will play its final performance on Broadway on 18 February, a spokesperson said on Friday. The closure will come less than a month after its 35th anniversary. It will conclude with an eye-popping 13,925 performances.

Box office grosses have fluctuated since the show reopened after the pandemic – going as high as over $1m (£870,000) a week but also dropping to about $850,000. Last week, it hit $867,997.

Based on a novel by Gaston Leroux, Phantom of the Opera tells the story of a disfigured composer who haunts the Paris opera house and falls madly in love with an innocent young soprano, Christine. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s lavish songs include Masquerade, Angel of Music, All I Ask of You and The Music of the Night.

“As a producer you dream that a show will run for ever. Indeed, my production of Andrew’s Cats proudly declared for decades ‘Now and Forever.’ Yet ‘Phantom’ has surpassed that show’s extraordinary Broadway run. But all shows do finally close,” producer Cameron Mackintosh said in a statement.

The first production opened in London in 1986 and since then the show has been seen by more than 145 million people in 183 cities and performed in 17 languages over 70,000 performances. On Broadway alone, the musical has played more than 13,500 performances to 19 million people at the Majestic theatre.

The closing of Phantom would mean the longest running show crown would go to Chicago, which started in 1996. The Lion King is next, having begun performances in 1997.

The pandemic took its toll on Broadway with theatres closed for more than 18 months. Some of the most popular shows – Hamilton, The Lion King and Wicked – have rebounded well, but other shows have struggled. Breaking even usually requires a steady stream of tourists, but visitors to the city have not returned to pre-pandemic levels .

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'The Phantom of the Opera,' Broadway's longest-running show, will close next year

The Associated Press

is phantom closing on broadway

A poster advertising "The Phantom of the Opera" is displayed on the shuttered Majestic Theatre in New York on March 12, 2020. Broadway's longest-running show is scheduled to close in February 2023. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

A poster advertising "The Phantom of the Opera" is displayed on the shuttered Majestic Theatre in New York on March 12, 2020. Broadway's longest-running show is scheduled to close in February 2023.

NEW YORK — "The Phantom of the Opera" — Broadway's longest-running show — is scheduled to close in February 2023, the biggest victim yet of the post-pandemic softening in theater attendance in New York.

The musical — a fixture on Broadway since 1988, weathering recessions, war and cultural shifts — will play its final performance on Broadway on Feb. 18, a spokesperson told The Associated Press on Friday. The closing will come less than a month after its 35th anniversary.

25 Years Strong, 'Phantom Of The Opera' Kills And Kills Again

25 Years Strong, 'Phantom Of The Opera' Kills And Kills Again

It is a costly musical to sustain, with elaborate sets and costumes as well as a large cast and orchestra. Box office grosses have fluctuated since the show reopened after the pandemic — going as high as over $1 million a week but also dropping to around $850,000. Last week, it hit $867,997 and producers may have seen the writing on the wall.

Based on a novel by Gaston Leroux, "Phantom" tells the story of a deformed composer who haunts the Paris Opera House and falls madly in love with an innocent young soprano, Christine. Andrew Lloyd Webber 's lavish songs include "Masquerade," ″Angel of Music," ″All I Ask of You" and "The Music of the Night."

Photos: The Golden Age of Broadway is celebrated in a new online exhibit

Photos: The Golden Age of Broadway is celebrated in a new online exhibit

The first production opened in London in 1986 and since then the show has been seen by more than 145 million people in 183 cities and performed in 17 languages over 70,000 performances. On Broadway alone, the musical has played more than 13,500 performances to 19 million people at The Majestic Theatre.

The closing of "Phantom" would mean the longest running show crown would go to "Chicago," which started in 1996. "The Lion King" is next, having begun performances in 1997.

Published 8 years after her death, Mary Rodgers' memoir is a true tell-all book

Published 8 years after her death, Mary Rodgers' memoir is a true tell-all book

Broadway took a pounding during the pandemic, with all theaters closed for more than 18 months. Breaking even usually requires a steady stream of tourists, especially to "Phantom."

The closure was first reported Friday by the New York Post.

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'The Phantom of the Opera' Closes on Broadway After 35 Years

  • Associated Press

"The Phantom of the Opera" cast appear at the curtain call following the final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on April 16, 2023, in New York.

The final curtain came down Sunday on New York's production of “The Phantom of the Opera,” ending Broadway’s longest-running show with thunderous standing ovations, champagne toasts and gold and silver confetti bursting from its famous chandelier.

It was show No. 13,981 at the Majestic Theatre and it ended with a reprise of “The Music of the Night” performed by the current cast, previous actors in the show — including original star Sarah Brightman — and crew members in street clothes.

Andrew Lloyd Webber took to the stage last in a black suit and black tie and dedicated the final show to his son, Nick, who died last month after a protracted battle with gastric cancer and pneumonia. He was 43.

“When he was a little boy, he heard some of this music,” Lloyd Webber said. Brightman, holding his hand, agreed: “When Andrew was writing it, he was right there. So his son is with us. Nick, we love you very much.”

Sarah Brightman and Andrew Lloyd Webber appear at the curtain call for "The Phantom of the Opera" following the final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on April 16, 2023, in New York.

Producer Cameron Mackintosh gave some in the crowd hope they would see the Phantom again, and perhaps sooner than they think.

“The one question I keep getting asked again and again — will the Phantom return? Having been a producer for over 55 years, I've seen all the great musicals return, and ‘Phantom’ is one of the greatest,” he said. “So it's only a matter of time.”

The musical — a fixture on Broadway since opening on January 26, 1988 — has weathered recessions, war, terrorism and cultural shifts. But the prolonged pandemic may have been the last straw: It's a costly musical to sustain, with elaborate sets and costumes as well as a large cast and orchestra. The curtain call Sunday showed how out of step “Phantom” is with the rest of Broadway but also how glorious a big, splashy musical can be.

“If there ever was a bang, we’re going out with a bang. It’s going to be a great night,” said John Riddle just before dashing inside to play Raoul for the final time.

"The Phantom of the Opera" cast appear at the curtain call following the final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on April 16, 2023, in New York.

Based on a novel by Gaston Leroux, “Phantom” tells the story of a deformed composer who haunts the Paris Opera House and falls madly in love with an innocent young soprano, Christine. Webber’s lavish songs include “Masquerade,” ″Angel of Music” and ″All I Ask of You."

In addition to Riddle, the New York production said goodbye with Emilie Kouatchou as Christine and Laird Mackintosh stepping in for Ben Crawford as the Phantom. Crawford was unable to sing because of a bacterial infection but was cheered at the curtain call, stepping to the side of the stage. The Phantom waved him over to stand beside him, Riddle and Kouatchou.

There was a video presentation of many of the actors who had played key roles in the show over the years, and the orchestra seats were crowded with Christines, Raouls and Phantoms. The late director Hal Prince, choreographer Gillian Lynne and set and costume designer Maria Björnson were also honored.

Lin-Manuel Miranda attended, as did Glenn Close, who performed in two separate Broadway productions of Lloyd Webber's “Sunset Boulevard.” Free champagne was offered at intermission and flutes of it were handed out onstage at the curtain call.

Cast and crew members take a final bow as confetti is released after the final performance of the Phantom of the Opera, which closes after 35 years on Broadway, in New York, April 16, 2023.

Riddle first saw “The Phantom of the Opera” in Toronto as a 4-year-old child. “It was the first musical I ever saw. I didn't know what a musical was,” he said. “Now, 30-some odd years later, I'm closing the show on Broadway. So it's incredible.”

Kouatchou, who became the first Black woman in the role in New York, didn't think the show would ever stop. “I was like, ‘OK, I’m going to do my run, ‘Phantom’ is going to continue on and they'll be more Christines of color,’” she said. “But this is it.”

Emilie Kouatchou who performs as Christine Daae takes a final bow as confetti is released after the final performance of the Phantom of the Opera, which closes after 35 years on Broadway, in New York, April 16, 2023.

The first production opened in London in 1986 and since then the show has been seen by more than 145 million people in 183 cities and performed in 17 languages over 70,000 performances. On Broadway alone, it has grossed more than $1.3 billion.

When “Phantom" opened in New York, “Die Hard” was in movie theaters, Adele was born, and floppy discs were at the cutting edge of technology. A postage stamp cost 25 cents, and the year's most popular songs were “Roll With It” by Steve Winwood, “Faith” by George Michael and Rick Astley's “Never Gonna Give You Up.”

Critics were positive, with the New York Post calling it “a piece of impeccably crafted musical theater,” the Daily News describing it as “spectacular entertainment,” and The New York Times saying it “wants nothing more than to shower the audience with fantasy and fun.”

Lloyd Webber's other musicals include “Cats,” “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “Evita,” “Sunset Boulevard” and “School of Rock.” The closing of “Phantom” means the composer is left with one show on Broadway, the critically mauled “Bad Cinderella.”

The closing of “Phantom,” originally scheduled for February, was pushed to mid-April after a flood of revived interest and ticket sales that pushed weekly grosses past $3 million. The closing means the longest-running show crown now goes to “Chicago,” which started in 1996. “The Lion King” is next, having begun performances in 1997.

People gather outside the Majestic Theatre after the final performance of the Phantom of the Opera, which closes after 35 years on Broadway, in New York, April 16, 2023.

Broadway took a pounding during the pandemic, with all theaters closed for more than 18 months. Some of the most popular shows — “Hamilton,” “The Lion King” and “Wicked” — rebounded well, but other shows have struggled.

Breaking even usually requires a steady stream of tourists, especially for “Phantom,” and visitors to the city haven't returned to pre-pandemic levels. The pandemic also pushed up expenses for all shows, including routine COVID-19 testing and safety officers on staff. The Phantom became a poster boy for Broadway's return — after all, he is partially masked.

Fans can always catch the Phantom elsewhere. The flagship London production celebrated its 36th anniversary in October, and there are productions in Japan, Greece, Australia, Sweden, Italy, South Korea and the Czech Republic. One is about to open in Bucharest, and another will open in Vienna in 2024.

Andrew Lloyd Webber and the cast of "The Phantom of the Opera" appear at the curtain call following the final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on April 16, 2023, in New York.

Kouatchou, who walked the red carpet before the final show in a hot pink clinging gown with a sweetheart neckline and a cut out, said the bitterness was undercut by the big send-off. Most Broadway shows that close slink into the darkness uncelebrated.

“It kind of sweetens it, right?” she said. “We get to celebrate at the end of this. We get to all come together and drink and laugh and talk about the show and all the highs and lows. It's ending on a big note.”

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Anthem for Charles III's Coronation Written by Lloyd Webber 

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‘The Phantom of the Opera’ closes on Broadway after 35 years

Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber dedicated the final Broadway performance of “The Phantom of the Opera” to his late son Nick, as the curtain fell on the long-running musical. (April 17)

“The Phantom of the Opera” cast appear at the curtain call following the final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

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Andrew Lloyd Webber and the cast of “The Phantom of the Opera” appear at the curtain call following the final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Glenn Close attends “The Phantom of the Opera” final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Lin-Manuel Miranda attends “The Phantom of the Opera,” final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Former cast member Meghan Picerno attends “The Phantom of the Opera,” final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Theatergoers attend “The Phantom of the Opera,” final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

A fan dressed as the Phantom watches arrivals for “The Phantom of the Opera,” final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

A costumed ticket holder attends “The Phantom of the Opera,” final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Sarah Brightman attends “The Phantom of the Opera,” final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Sarah Brightman and Andrew Lloyd Webber appear at the curtain call for “The Phantom of the Opera” following the final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

The chandelier is lowered during “The Phantom of the Opera” curtain call following the final Broadway performance at the Majestic Theatre on Sunday, April 16, 2023, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

is phantom closing on broadway

NEW YORK (AP) — The final curtain came down Sunday on New York’s production of “The Phantom of the Opera,” ending Broadway’s longest-running show with thunderous standing ovations, champagne toasts and gold and silver confetti bursting from its famous chandelier.

It was show No. 13,981 at the Majestic Theatre and it ended with a reprise of “The Music of the Night” performed by the current cast, previous actors in the show — including original star Sarah Brightman — and crew members in street clothes.

Andrew Lloyd Webber took to the stage last in a black suit and black tie and dedicated the final show to his son, Nick, who died last month after a protracted battle with gastric cancer and pneumonia. He was 43.

“When he was a little boy, he heard some of this music,” Lloyd Webber said. Brightman, holding his hand, agreed: “When Andrew was writing it, he was right there. So his son is with us. Nick, we love you very much.”

CORRECTS GERWIG'S CREDIT TO DIRECTOR AND CO-WRITER - This image released by CBS shows director and co-writer Greta Gerwig, left, and actor Margot Robbie accepting the award for best cinematic and box office achievement for the film "Barbie" during the 81st Annual Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Sunday, Jan. 7, 2024. (Sonja Flemming/CBS via AP)

Producer Cameron Mackintosh gave some in the crowd hope they would see the Phantom again, and perhaps sooner than they think.

“The one question I keep getting asked again and again — will the Phantom return? Having been a producer for over 55 years, I’ve seen all the great musicals return, and ‘Phantom’ is one of the greatest,” he said. “So it’s only a matter of time.”

The musical — a fixture on Broadway since opening on Jan. 26, 1988 — has weathered recessions, war, terrorism and cultural shifts. But the prolonged pandemic may have been the last straw: It’s a costly musical to sustain, with elaborate sets and costumes as well as a large cast and orchestra. The curtain call Sunday showed how out of step “Phantom” is with the rest of Broadway but also how glorious a big, splashy musical can be.

“If there ever was a bang, we’re going out with a bang. It’s going to be a great night,” said John Riddle just before dashing inside to play Raoul for the final time.

Based on a novel by Gaston Leroux, “Phantom” tells the story of a deformed composer who haunts the Paris Opera House and falls madly in love with an innocent young soprano, Christine. Webber’s lavish songs include “Masquerade,” ″Angel of Music” and ″All I Ask of You.”

In addition to Riddle, the New York production said goodbye with Emilie Kouatchou as Christine and Laird Mackintosh stepping in for Ben Crawford as the Phantom. Crawford was unable to sing because of a bacterial infection but was cheered at the curtain call, stepping to the side of the stage. The Phantom waved him over to stand beside him, Riddle and Kouatchou.

There was a video presentation of many of the actors who had played key roles in the show over the years, and the orchestra seats were crowded with Christines, Raouls and Phantoms. The late director Hal Prince, choreographer Gillian Lynne and set and costume designer Maria Björnson were also honored.

Lin-Manuel Miranda attended, as did Glenn Close, who performed in two separate Broadway productions of Lloyd Webber’s “Sunset Boulevard.” Free champagne was offered at intermission and flutes of it were handed out onstage at the curtain call.

Riddle first saw “The Phantom of the Opera” in Toronto as a 4-year-old child. “It was the first musical I ever saw. I didn’t know what a musical was,” he said. “Now, 30-some odd years later, I’m closing the show on Broadway. So it’s incredible.”

Kouatchou, who became the first Black woman in the role in New York, didn’t think the show would ever stop. “I was like, ‘OK, I’m going to do my run, ‘Phantom’ is going to continue on and they’ll be more Christines of color,’ ” she said. “But this is it.”

The first production opened in London in 1986 and since then the show has been seen by more than 145 million people in 183 cities and performed in 17 languages over 70,000 performances. On Broadway alone, it has grossed more than $1.3 billion.

When “Phantom” opened in New York, “Die Hard” was in movie theaters, Adele was born, and floppy discs were at the cutting edge of technology. A postage stamp cost 25 cents, and the year’s most popular songs were “Roll With It” by Steve Winwood, “Faith” by George Michael and Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up.”

Critics were positive, with the New York Post calling it “a piece of impeccably crafted musical theater,” the Daily News describing it as “spectacular entertainment,” and The New York Times saying it “wants nothing more than to shower the audience with fantasy and fun.”

Lloyd Webber’s other musicals include “Cats,” “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “Evita,” “Sunset Boulevard” and “School of Rock.” The closing of “Phantom” means the composer is left with one show on Broadway, the critically mauled “Bad Cinderella.”

The closing of “Phantom,” originally scheduled for February, was pushed to mid-April after a flood of revived interest and ticket sales that pushed weekly grosses past $3 million. The closing means the longest-running show crown now goes to “Chicago,” which started in 1996. “The Lion King” is next, having begun performances in 1997.

Broadway took a pounding during the pandemic , with all theaters closed for more than 18 months. Some of the most popular shows — “Hamilton,” “The Lion King” and “Wicked” — rebounded well, but other shows have struggled.

Breaking even usually requires a steady stream of tourists, especially for “Phantom,” and visitors to the city haven’t returned to pre-pandemic levels. The pandemic also pushed up expenses for all shows, including routine COVID-19 testing and safety officers on staff. The Phantom became a poster boy for Broadway’s return — after all, he is partially masked.

Fans can always catch the Phantom elsewhere. The flagship London production celebrated its 36th anniversary in October, and there are productions in Japan, Greece, Australia, Sweden, Italy, South Korea and the Czech Republic. One is about to open in Bucharest, and another will open in Vienna in 2024.

Kouatchou, who walked the red carpet before the final show in a hot pink clinging gown with a sweetheart neckline and a cut out, said the bitterness was undercut by the big send-off. Most Broadway shows that close slink into the darkness uncelebrated.

“It kind of sweetens it, right?” she said. “We get to celebrate at the end of this. We get to all come together and drink and laugh and talk about the show and all the highs and lows. It’s ending on a big note.”

Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

Mark Kennedy

'The Phantom of the Opera' closing on Broadway after 35 years

The show confirmed the "sad" news with a message on its website.

The chandelier will fall for the last time on Andrew Lloyd Webber's "The Phantom of the Opera" next year.

The longest-running musical in Broadway's history, a feat it achieved in 2006, will play its final performance at the Majestic Theatre on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2023, a message on the show's website reads.

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"The Phantom of the Opera" will celebrate its 35th anniversary in January, just weeks before the show closes.

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The iconic musical lives on in London, where it still plays at Her Majesty's Theatre. The West End version opened in 1986.

"The Phantom of the Opera" tells the story of a facially deformed and masked figure living in the bowels of the The Paris Opera House who becomes obsessed with and composes music for a young soprano named Christine Daaé, with whom he has fallen in love. Originating the characters of Phantom and Christine, in both the West End and Broadway shows, were Michael Crawford and Sarah Brightman, respectively.

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The musical, best known for songs like "Think of Me," "The Music of the Night" and "All I Ask of You," was nominated for 10 Tony Awards in 1988. It won seven: best musical, best performance by a leading actor in a musical (for Crawford), best performance by a featured actress in a musical (for Judy Kaye), best direction of a musical (for Harold Prince), best scenic design, best costume design and best lighting design.

A film adaptation of "The Phantom of the Opera" was released in 2004, directed by Joel Schumacher and starring Gerard Butler as the Phantom and Emmy Rossum as Christine.

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Actors portraying the Phantom of the Opera show.

'Phantom of the Opera' is closing on Broadway

Broadway's longest-running show will stick around a bit longer with the last performance on April 16, 2023.

Rossilynne Skena Culgan

The Broadway show The Phantom of the Opera  will soon close after 35 years, but the curtain will stay open a bit longer than expected. The closure date was originally set for Valentine's Week 2023, but now the theater plans to delay the closing until April 16, 2023 because ticket sales are booming, the New York Times reported today .

As Broadway’s longest-running show, Phantom has delighted audiences with more than 13,500 performances since it opened on January 26, 1988. Before it closes, it’ll celebrate its 35th anniversary. The show has played at the resplendent Majestic Theater since the beginning of its run.

'As much a part of the city landscape as the Empire State Building'

"As much a part of the city landscape as the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, the blockbuster phenomenon has long been a New York City landmark," the show wrote in its closure news release. "Widely considered one of the most beautiful and spectacular productions in history, the musical set the bar with its lavish sets and costumes, large cast and Broadway’s largest orchestra—a perfect match for its sumptuous score and classic love story."

The closure announcement says that leaders decided the right time to close Phantom would be after its 35th birthday; the  New York Post , which broke news of the closing on Friday, said the show has struggled since the pandemic and is losing "some $1 million a month."

But now, as the Times reported, Phantom 's ticket sales are once again thriving: Last week, the show grossed $2.2 million bolstered by Thanksgiving travelers. 

During Phantom 's run, it shattered every possible record, surpassing the nearly 18-year run of Cats , grossing $1.3 billion, sharing the show with 19.5 million people, and serving as the largest single generator of income and jobs in Broadway and U.S. theatrical history. Phantom made a major impact outside of New York City, too. It inspired theaters and opera houses to stage the show, and it still runs around the world.

Actors portraying the Phantom of the Opera show.

Get tickets

Phantom  currently plays Monday and Wednesday through Saturday at 8pm, Sunday at 5pm with matinees on Thursday and Saturday at 2pm. Beginning January 2, 2023, the musical will return to its original playing schedule: Monday through Saturday at 8pm with matinees Wednesday and Saturday at 2pm. To order tickets and for holiday schedules, click here .

'One of the first musicals to shake my soul into loving theatre'

News of the closure set Twitter abuzz with reactions like ... 

What does the Biden administration plan on doing about the Phantom of the Opera closing rumors — Andrew (@andrewgirmann) September 16, 2022
I don't want a world where The Simpsons outlives The Phantom of the Opera on Broadway — Tee Moe Tay Shall O May (@joelevard) September 16, 2022
In all seriously, I know we all joke about Phantom of the Opera, but that was one of the first musicals to shake my soul into loving theatre as much as I do. So…yeah if it closes, and as SOON as we got a Black Christine??…I’d be sad. — Virginia Vass (@virginia_vass) September 16, 2022
NY POST: A source tells us The Phantom of the Opera will close this year THE SOURCE: pic.twitter.com/Rk91bZjwqn — Zach Raffio (@zachraffio) September 16, 2022  

Actors portraying the Phantom of the Opera show.

About the show

Just in case you're not familiar with the show, here's a  review from our theater critic :

"More than three decades into its Broadway run,  Andrew Lloyd Webber's  The Phantom of the Opera   continues to draw tourists to its candlelit lair.  The plot, borrowed from a 1910 potboiler by Gaston Leroux, tells of Christine Daaé, a naïve young soprano whose secretive voice teacher turns out to be a deformed musical genius who lives beneath the Paris Opera House. (Although the Phantom is serial killer, extortionist, kidnapper and probable rapist, Christine and audiences are mysteriously drawn to him. Who doesn’t love a bad boy?)

"While the epic synth-rock chords of the title song may ground  Phantom  in the 1980s, the show’s Puccini-inflected airs are far grander than most of what one hears elsewhere on Broadway. And although there may not be much depth to the musical’s story (by Lloyd Webber and Richard Stilgoe) or lyrics (mostly by Charles Hart), the production—directed by Hal Prince—has been carefully maintained and refurbished over the years, and remains a marvel of sumptuous surfaces."

  • Rossilynne Skena Culgan Things to Do Editor
  • Adam Feldman Theater and Dance Editor, Time Out USA

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Watch CBS News

"Phantom of the Opera" to close on Broadway in early 2023, ending 35-year run

Updated on: September 16, 2022 / 7:06 PM EDT / CBS/AP

Following an unparalleled 35-year run, the New York production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Phantom of the Opera," Broadway's longest-running show, will end in early 2023, producers confirmed Friday.

The show's final performance will be held on Feb. 18, 2023, producers Cameron Mackintosh and The Really Useful Group said in a news release.

"As a British producer who has been lucky enough to have been producing in New York for over 40 consecutive years, it has been an unparalleled honour to have presented the longest-running musical in Broadway's history, Andrew Lloyd Webber's 'The Phantom of the Opera,'" Mackintosh said in a statement. "That this legendary show has thrilled New York for nearly 35 phenomenal years is quite astounding to me." 

Since it opened at the Majestic Theatre on Jan. 26, 1988, Broadway's "Phantom" has been performed over 13,500 times for 19.5 million people and grossed $1.3 billion, according to producers. It has won seven Tony Awards, including best musical. Producers said the show has been Broadway's largest generator of jobs in Broadway and U.S. theatrical history, employing approximately 6,500 people during its run. 

Worldwide, it has also been performed in front of an estimated 145 million people in 41 countries, and in 17 languages, producers said. 

Though the Broadway iteration will be closing its doors, the show will still continue in other locations. 

is phantom closing on broadway

The novel "The Phantom of the Opera," written by French writer Gaston Laroux, was published in 1909. The character was first brought to the big screen in a 1925 silent film.  

On its 25th anniversary on Broadway, Webber, the show's composer, recalled to CBS News reading Laroux's novel.

"I remember finding the book in New York and reading it one afternoon and thinking, 'It's not the same as I remember it,'" Webber told CBS News in 2013. "It's not a sort of funny thing, with somebody coming out and saying, 'Boo' from behind a chandelier. It's actually about a romance."

When the show first opened in New York in 1988, it had already been a hit for two years in London. Still, not all the critics took to it kindly. One reviewer in the New York Times called it, "psychologically lightweight."

It has been a costly musical to sustain, with elaborate sets and costumes as well as a large cast and orchestra. Box office grosses have fluctuated since the show reopened after the pandemic — going as high as over $1 million a week but also dropping to around $850,000. Last week, it hit $867,997 — and producers may have seen the writing on the wall.

"Phantom" tells the story of a deformed composer who haunts the Paris Opera House and falls madly in love with an innocent young soprano, Christine. Andrew Lloyd Webber's lavish songs include "Masquerade," ″Angel of Music," ″All I Ask of You" and "The Music of the Night."

The closing of "Phantom" would mean the longest still-running show crown would go to "Chicago," which started in 1996. "The Lion King" is next, having begun performances in 1997.

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It’s over now, the music of the night.

“The Phantom of the Opera,” Broadway’s longest-running show, will close this winter, multiple sources told The Post. 

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical plans to play through the holidays, and then cap off its storied run on Feb. 18. Sources told The Post there will be a large bash to celebrate its 35th anniversary.

“Phantom,” sources said, has struggled to recover since it reopened in October 2021 following the pandemic closure, and is losing some $1 million a month. 

Since its opening night on Jan. 26, 1988, the show, produced by Cameron Mackintosh and Lloyd Webber’s Really Useful Group, has played 13,733 performances over nearly 35 years. 

Broadway’s second-longest-running show, the revival of John Kander and Fred Ebb’s “Chicago,” is well behind in the race, having been running 25 years and playing 10,090 performances.

Lloyd Webber’s lush songs (with lyrics by Charles Hart and Richard Stilgoe), Harold Prince’s innovative staging, Gillian Lynne’s balletic choreography and the lavish set and costume designs by Maria Björnson are seared into the minds of generations of theatergoers.

"Phantom of the Opera" has been playing on Broadway for nearly 35 years.

“Phantom” first opened on Broadway with its original London stars, Michael Crawford as the masked romantic and Sarah Brightman as his beloved soprano Christine. The production won seven Tony Awards, including Best Actor for Crawford and Best Musical.

Ben Crawford currently plays the Phantom and Emilie Kouatchou is Christine Daaé.

A flop movie version , starring Gerard Butler and Emmy Rossum, was released in 2004.

Lloyd Webber also put on an unsuccessful sequel , called “Love Never Dies,” in London in 2010 that toured but never made it to Broadway.

John Riddle plays Raoul, Ben Crawford plays the Phantom and Emilie Kouatchou plays Christine in "The Phantom of the Opera" on Broadway.

“Phantom” continues to play in London at Her Majesty’s Theatre — soon to be renamed His Majesty’s Theatre following the death of Queen Elizabeth II — and recently had some of its original staging revised.

That could be a clue to the musical’s future. While this “Phantom” will close for good in February, it would not be shocking to see it return in a much cheaper iteration in a few years. Mackintosh pulled the same maneuver with London’s “Les Mis é rables” at what’s now the Sondheim Theatre. New director, slimmer set, more projections.

For now, the Shubert Organization will be pleased. The Majestic Theatre, the best musical house on Broadway, has finally been freed up after nearly four decades. The right show could be grossing $3 million a week there, rather than $1 million from “Phantom.”

Maria Bjornson's designs are seared into the minds of millions.

In fact, Shubert chair Bob Wankel wanted the Majestic for the upcoming musical “Some Like It Hot,” but was reluctant to give “Phantom” the boot. The theater that new show is currently going into, the Shubert, has about 350 fewer seats.

Lloyd Webber may be back to Broadway soon enough. The terrifically fun London Palladium revival of his “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” has New York in its sights after it plays Toronto’s Princess of Wales Theatre this winter. 

And a revamped Broadway version of the composer’s musical “ Cinderella ” at the Imperial Theatre will be announced as soon as next week.

For now, though, it’s time to pack up the chandelier.

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"Phantom of the Opera" has been playing on Broadway for nearly 35 years.

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The Phantom of the Opera , Broadway's longest-running show, is closing

The beloved musical will play its final performance at the Majestic Theatre on Feb. 18, 2023.

After 35 years, the curtain is closing on the Broadway production of The Phantom of the Opera .

The Andrew Lloyd Webber musical, which holds the title of the longest-running show on the Great White Way, will take its final bow at the Majestic Theatre on Feb. 18, 2023. According to The New York Times , The Phantom of the Opera is the latest COVID casualty following a decline in audience attendance.

"The Cameron Mackintosh and The Really Useful Group's Broadway production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera , directed by Harold Prince — the longest-running show in Broadway history — is confirmed to play its final 5 months," representatives for the show said in a statement.

The show returned last September when the lights went up on Broadway after the pandemic forced all productions to shut down on March 12, 2020. Several shows like Ain't Too Proud , Jagged Little Pill , Waitress, and Thoughts of a Colored Man have since closed .

Per The Phantom of the Opera 's official website , "Tickets are currently on sale for performances through January 22nd, 2023, and we expect the final block of tickets to be placed on sale shortly."

After February, fans looking to see the musical live will have to travel to London, where the show will continue to run as it celebrates its 36th anniversary next month. The first Mandarin-language version of the show is also slated to open in China in 2023.

There's also the option of watching the 2004 film production directed by Joel Schumacher and starring Emmy Rossum, Gerard Butler, Patrick Wilson, and Minnie Driver. But if it's 33% score on Rotten Tomatoes is off-putting, you can opt for a filmed version of the stage show like the 25th Anniversary Celebration recorded at Royal Albert Hall.

Based on the 1910 French novel by Gaston Leroux, the beloved musical debuted in 1986 on London's West End. It premiered in New York in 1988, where it won seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical.

The current Broadway version is directed by Harold Prince and stars Emilie Kouatchou, Ben Crawford, and John Riddle.

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The Phantom of the Opera Delays Closing on Broadway

There's going to be more music of the night! The Phantom of the Opera , Broadway's longest-running show, is delaying  its closing . Originally announced to have its final performance at the Majestic Theatre on February 18, 2023, the musical will now close on April 16.  The Phantom of the Opera  will celebrate its 35th anniversary on January 26, 2023. The extension is due to the increased  demand for tickets since announcing its final performance. 

With a book by Richard Stilgoe and Andrew Lloyd Webber, music by Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Charles Hart,  The Phantom of the Opera  is based on the novel  Le Fantôme de L'Opéra  by Gaston Leroux. It follows a deformed composer who haunts the grand Paris Opera House. Sheltered from the outside world in an underground cavern, the lonely, romantic man tutors and composes operas for Christine, a young soprano. As Christine’s star rises, and a suitor from her past enters the picture, the Phantom grows mad, terrorizing the opera house owners and company with his murderous ways. Still, Christine finds herself drawn to the mystery man.

The cast of  Phantom  is led by  Ben Crawford  as Phantom,  Emilie Kouatchou  as Christine, Jason Forbach as Raoul, Nehal Joshi as Monsieur André,  Craig Bennett  as Monsieur Firmin,  Raquel Suarez Groen  as Carlotta Giudicelli, Maree Johnson as Madame Giry,  Carlton Moe  as Ubaldo Piangi and  Sara Esty  as Meg Giry. At certain performances, Julia Udine plays Christine.

The musical is the winner of seven 1988 Tony Awards, including Best Musical. It began previews on January 9, 1988 and opened on January 26 under the direction of Harold Prince with choreography by Gillian Lynne and music direction by David Caddick. 

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Phantom of the Opera

Broadway ‘s long-running The Phantom of the Opera , which has enjoyed a big box office upswing since announcing in September that it would close on February 18, won’t be making its exit quite so soon. Producer Cameron Mackintosh has given the show an eight-week extension, with a new closing date of April 16.

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Tickets for the final 10 weeks of the show’s run will go on sale tomorrow.

“For most of last year, we were losing every week,” Mackintosh recently told The New York Times. “There comes a point when you become theatrical wallpaper. People took it for granted that it’s going to run forever.”

The producer said there will be no further extensions. The show will end its Broadway run with a benefit performance on April 14, and a final performance before an audience including alumni and friends of the show. The Majestic Theatre will then be closed for major renovations after the Phantom ‘s 35-year run.

Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber said today, “I am delighted that, after such an incredible reaction from audiences, Phantom at The Majestic is extending. If only the theatre wasn’t closing for a major refurbishment, we’d be there for an awful lot longer. I would love to thank everyone who has made this extension possible, from our cast and crew, to our brilliant musicians and everyone at The Majestic Theatre.”

No update on whether the Majestic will undergo a name change with the refurbishment; TV and stage icon Carol Burnett recently launched a social media campaign to get the venue renamed for legendary producer and director Harold Prince, who directed Phantom.

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'The Phantom of the Opera' terrified me as a child. How I learned to love 'the music of the night.'

is phantom closing on broadway

" The Phantom of the Opera " closed April 16  on Broadway after a stunning 35-year-run . The musical – which follows the titular Phantom and his unrequited love (read: disturbing obsession) for ingenue opera singer Christine Daaé at a French opera house in the 1880s – is known for its soaring, synth-filled score, shocking special effects and melancholy drama.

But to me, it was known as the perfect ingredient for nightmares.

There's a scene in the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical, for example, where Christine looks in the mirror only to discover the Phantom is "there inside," after which he lures her to his underground lair. Yes, suspend your disbelief, etc. And don't get me started on the mask.

'Phantom of the Opera'  takes final Broadway bow with tears, chandeliers – and a vow to return soon

Confronting my 'Phantom of the Opera' fear

My parents took two friends and me to see the show for my 9th birthday in June 2001. They hoped seeing it in person would assuage my fears (even the commercial terrified me).

Reader, it only made things worse.

I couldn't go to the bathroom without wondering if the masked Phantom was waiting for me in the mirror to kidnap me. Every time I got out of the shower was like a horror movie, one jump scare away from my demise.

A friend of mine in elementary school loved "Phantom" so much and I hesitated even spending too much time with him for fear of getting too scared. Fear of fear itself, if you will.

This panic followed me into middle school, high school, college. I'm not sure why I couldn't shake it. The music? Beautiful. The costumes? Legendary. The story? Problematic, of course, but beside the point.

One day during a college break – I believe the summer, but what does time mean these days anyway – I found myself home alone. None of the lights were on in the house and suddenly I had an idea: What if I watched "The Phantom of the Opera?"

I realize this sounds like some kind of strange torture. Why would I put myself through something like that? Actively seek out my discomfort and sit in it, soak in it? 

The truth: Part of me always wanted to get over this, somehow, and maybe my subconscious just waited for an opportunity. Maybe more exposure to "Phantom" could finally help me listen to the music without checking behind my back every few seconds to make sure the Phantom wasn't hiding somewhere.

I put on the movie version starring Gerard Butler and Emmy Rossum. Is this a perfect adaptation? No, but it hits all the major beats, so to speak. To quote another musical, something "changed within me" that day. Sure, everything that scared me still scared me. But something else happened. I ... appreciated it. I loved it. I saw the Phantom's pain, Christine's internal conflict and marveled at the music. My fears evaporated slightly. Maybe this worked  after all.

'The Phantom of the Opera' and queerness

Is it worth unpacking what scared me in the first place?

If I were to slip on my therapy goggles – I have a master's degree in writing, not psychology, to be extra clear – maybe the Phantom scared me because I looked at a version of myself in the mirror. A queer allegory: Someone ashamed of who he was, someone who'd rather lurk in the shadows and pine for a life instead of living the one he had. Someone who knew, someday, he'd have to confront his sexuality and pass through a metaphorical mirror into the unknown.

Or I'm digging too hard and the whole hiding in mirrors and mask thing contributed to the bulk of the fear. Let's call it a little bit of both, shall we?

Now, I'm still a little scared. But I watch this 25th anniversary production of the show every few months and let myself take in the music, the majesty, the mayhem – and I only feel, like, 10% scared in my bathroom immediately after watching. I let myself hear the words of "The Music of The Night":

Close your eyes and surrender to your darkest dreams / Purge your thoughts of the life you knew before / Close your eyes, let your spirit start to soar! / And you'll live as you've never lived before

Thank you, Phantom. Consider my spirit soared.

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Inside Broadway’s Emotional Closing Night of ‘The Phantom of the Opera’

'Phantom of the Opera' Closing: Inside Broadway's Emotional Night

After 35 years — and a string of $3 million weeks at the box office fueled by the last-minute frenzy of “phans” — the 13,981th and final Broadway performance of “ The Phantom of the Opera ” was for phamily.

“Phantom of the Opera,” which has grossed more than $1.3 billion since opening in January of 1988, went out on a high note: Its finale was pushed back when the initial closing announcement drove people back to the theater and sent ticket sales skyrocketing. But the musical that had become a Broadway institution, with its lavish sets and large cast and crew, was expensive to keep up every week, and it eventually succumbed to waning enthusiasm and the lingering effects of the pandemic, including a slowdown in tourism. Lloyd Webber felt the Broadway run got a proper sendoff: “I don’t think any of us thought it would go out with the bang it has,” he said.

Predictably, the Sunday evening show ran long — blame a late start and an intermission extended to accommodate all the socializing and free-flowing champagne — and the crowd cheered for every beloved music cue and set-piece from chandelier to staircase. Inside the theater, where the dress code was “black tie or glamorous,” attendees got comfortable as the evening, which normally runs two hours and 30 minutes, stretched to nearly three hours for its final performance.

In a show-must-go-on surprise, the actor who usually played the Phantom, Ben Crawford, was unable to perform, so Laird Mackintosh ably stepped in to join Emilie Kouatchou as Christine and John Riddle as Raoul in the final performance. It’s hard to imagine a more receptive room, and sure enough, Kouatchou received a lengthy standing O in the middle of Act II for her rendition of “Wishing You Were Somehow Here Again.”

In a curtain speech, emotions ran high as Mackintosh paid tribute to the members of the original creative team who had died over the years, particularly director Harold Prince, choreographer Gillian Lynne and set designer Maria Björnson. He also brought out original cast members and the Majestic Theatre’s backstage crew for a bow before handing the mic over to Lloyd Webber, who offered a heartfelt tribute to his late son, Nicholas Lloyd Webber, who died March 25.

“I hope you won’t mind if I dedicate this performance to my son,” he said. “As Sarah knows, when he was a little boy, he heard some of this music.”

“Yes, he did,” agreed Brightman, standing beside him onstage. “When Andrew was writing it, he was right there. So his soul is with us. Nick, we love you very much.”

After the gold confetti (some of which may still be hanging from that iconic chandelier) and final bows, and with many members of the cast and crew still hugging, passing around flutes of champagne and taking selfies on stage, the masses moved on to the closing party at the Metropolitan Club, the ornate East Side venue that matched the gilded opulence of the “Phantom” set. Guests, including Sara Bareilles and Danny Burstein, were able to use coat check for their Playbill, decorated with a sticker to commemorate closing night.

Among the attendees was Jason Robert Brown, the Tony-winning composer whose musical “Parade” is now playing not far from “Phantom” in a critically hailed revival. “Parade” was originally directed by Prince, and Brown reminisced about seeing “Phantom” for the first time in 1996 when he’d begun to work with the director on his own musical.

“It’s very powerful being here,” Brown said during intermission. “I don’t feel very sad, because it feels like 35 years is something you shouldn’t be super sad about. But it’s definitely the end of an era in so many ways, and it feels like such a potent marker of that.”

And just because the Majestic’s marquee has dimmed on this production of “Phantom of the Opera” doesn’t mean the Angel of Music has forever left the Great White Way.

“The one question I keep getting asked again and again — will the Phantom return?” Mackintosh said from the stage of the Majestic. “Having been a producer for over 55 years, I’ve seen all the great musicals return, and ‘Phantom’ is one of the greatest. So it’s only a matter of time.”

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After 35 years and nearly 14,000 performances, Broadway’s beloved, longest-running show "The Phantom of the Opera" closed its curtain for the final time Sunday evening.

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"The Phantom of the Opera" opened at the Majestic Theatre on Broadway in January 1988.

It’s over now, the music of the night. 

On Sunday, “The Phantom of the Opera,” Broadway ’s longest-running show, closed its curtain and dropped its chandelier at the Majestic Theater for the final time in its current form. 

To celebrate the historic evening — more than 35 years and nearly 14,000 performances — the production hosted an invite-only red carpet and performance for former cast members, the creative team and other members of the “Phantom” family, aka the Phamily. 

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Sierra Boggess, a longtime Christine who played the role in The Las Vegas Spectacular, as well as at the Royal Albert Hall in London and at the Majestic Theatre on Broadway for both productions’ 25th anniversaries, sympathized with the disappointed “Phantom” fans, known as Phans. 

“We’re all in this together. We’re all feeling the same things,” she said, noting that she needed to grab some tissues to get through the emotional evening.” Thank God there’s so many Phans, so that we’re not alone, and we’re going to get through this. Thank God this music lives forever. It lives forever.”

On the carpet, a slew of Broadway’s finest, as well as celebrities, gushed about their love of the show, including Glenn Close, Lin-Manuel Miranda and Gayle King. “Downton Abbey” and “Mamma Mia” actress Lily James slunk in quietly.

Members of the closing cast gladly posed on the carpet, including some who were celebrating major milestones in their own right: Jeremy Stolle and Paul Schaefer, ensemble members and understudies to the two leading males, boasted 5,067 and 5,043 performances, respectively. Some ensemble members had graced the stage over 8,000 times. Maree Johnson, who played Madame Giry since 2017, celebrated what she believes to be her last run with the show — she also played Christine in two Australian productions in the ’90s and took a leave from Broadway in 2022 to play Giry at the outdoor Sydney Harbour production.

In true “Phantom” fashion, a last-minute surprise shocked the production. The show’s Phantom Ben Crawford, who has played the role since April 2018 boasting 1,054 performances, was on vocal rest per doctor’s orders, and was unable to perform during its closing. Laird Mackintosh, an understudy and on-and-off member of the cast since the ’90s, donned the mask in Crawford’s stead — who was in attendance to celebrate. 

“There’s five of us who cover the Phantom in the show right now, and it could have gone to any one of those guys,” Mackintosh said on the carpet. “I’m the lucky one that it’s come to today. It means the world to me.…It’s been a role that I have loved all my life. I’m deeply honored to be apart of this production, deeply melancholy that it’s closing, as we all are. It’s been such a spectacular home for us.”

While Sunday’s performance was invite-only, Saturday was for the ‘phans.’ After the final public performance, audience members refused to leave the theater for 30 minutes after the curtain closed, chanting “one more song.” 

After several minutes of chanting, members of the cast returned to the stage in their street clothes to greet the audience. Nehal Joshi, who played Monsieur André, one of the two managers, led the group singing “Happy Trails.”

“It was the craziest thing. I’ve never had a closing night where the audience refused to leave the theater. It’s about the love of this show. It’s about the undying affection for the ‘Phantom,’” he said, pointing to the crowds barricaded behind the red carpet, hoping to get a glimpse of the cast. 

During that performance, he aimed to reassure the lingering audience joking, “You know the Phantom’s pesky, who knows when he’ll be back.”

New York Sen. Chuck Schumer said, “It’ll be back. I betcha,” noting that it’s been a fixture of this city, as it endured some of the city’s toughest times, including 9/11 and the COVID-19 pandemic. 

One passerby on the street even noted to her young child that it would be back soon and she would take them to see the show on Broadway one day. 

The final performance was a reunion for many. Former cast members shouted across the theater to get the attention of a castmate they hadn’t seen in years. Throughout the performance, attendees clapped and screamed for their favorite characters and scenes. Some even noted at certain lines, ‘That was me!’ reminiscing about their time in the production, which grossed $1.3 billion, was seen by more than 20 million people and employed around 6,500 people.

During a closing presentation, which honored creatives who had passed including Hal Prince (director), Gillian Lynne (choreographer) and Maria Björnson (set and costume designer), the show’s composer Andrew Lloyd Webber took to the stage to say goodbye to the production.

“All I can say tonight is thank you to absolutely everybody who made this extraordinary run possible,” Lloyd Webber said, dedicating the final performance to his son Nick Lloyd Webber who recently passed away. “It’s just amazing really what has happened. In the last few months, I don’t think any of us thought ‘the Phantom’ would go out quite with the bang it has, and so maybe it may come back. You never know.”

“One question I keep being asked again and again and again: ‘Will “Phantom” return?’ Having been a producer for over 55 years, I’ve seen all the great musicals return,” said Sir Cameron Mackintosh, the musical’s producer. 

“’Phantom’ is one of the greatest, so it’s only a matter of time.”

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is phantom closing on broadway

InsideHook

Why the Best Original Broadway Musical in Years Is Closing

I visit New York City once or twice a year, and when I do, my main objective is to pack in as much theater as possible. That’s not hyperbole. During a trip in December 2022, my flight landed in Newark at 5:09 p.m. on a Friday. My wife and I rushed to our hotel downtown, tossed our bags in the room, hoofed it up to Times Square and made it to the TKTS booth, where you can get same-day discount tickets, in time to pick an 8 p.m. show. We settled on a musical called Kimberly Akimbo . What was it about? I wasn’t entirely sure, and I hadn’t heard a ton of buzz about it, but the reviews were great and it was highly recommended on a theater podcast I listen to.

When the curtain fell two and a half hours later, my wife and I looked at each other, laughed at the tears streaking both of our faces, then jumped to our feet with the rest of the audience. It was the kind of standing ovation that you dream about: not obligatory, as it’s woefully become in the modern theatrical landscape, a feeling of we’re all clapping because we paid $200 a ticket ; instead, it was applause (and whistling, and cheering) that felt truly spontaneous, joyous, real. 

Kimberly Akimbo was the best performance we saw during that three-show weekend (better than the heralded return of Lea Michele in Funny Girl ). Since then, every single person who has taken my recommendation and gone to see this little-musical-that-could has been similarly flabbergasted at the power of a show they had previously heard little to nothing about. Here’s the most recent review I got from someone, from this past December, in its full, unedited text form: “Dude we just saw Kimberly Akimbo and cried like babies the whole time it was so insanely good!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!” (Don’t blame me for the 17 exclamation marks — that’s just how strongly they felt.)

Despite strong word of mouth, a glowing review from Jesse Green of The New York Times , and five Tony Awards (including Best Musical), it was announced last week that Kimberly Akimbo will play its final performance on April 28, after a year-and-a-half run of 612 regular performances . If you will be in New York City between now and then, and you haven’t seen this rare gem of a musical, you absolutely must get a ticket — not just because it’s an unexpected triumph that leaves so many theatergoers overwhelmed with emotion that mascara-smudged selfies are regularly reposted on the musical’s Instagram Stories, but because the show is part of a dying breed on Broadway. It’s not a movie adaptation, headlined by A-list stars, a jukebox show stuffed with pop songs or a tried-and-true revival. It’s an original musical with songs and a story you’ve never heard before, and it’s one of the best I’ve ever seen in my entire life.

If Stephen Sondheim Taught Us Anything, It’s That Mentors Matter

I called up Peter Filichia, a longtime theater critic, author and playwright whose reviews on the BroadwayRadio show “This Week on Broadway” influenced my decision to see Kimberly Akimbo , and asked if Tony Awards, rave reviews and word of mouth aren’t enough for a musical to survive on Broadway anymore. Do shows need a pop culture hook to survive? 

“Figures don’t lie. It’s obviously not enough,” Filichia said, talking about Kimberly Akimbo specifically. “I think you could bring 50 of your friends to any given performance and everybody would be happily accommodated. And let us not forget, it’s in the third-smallest Broadway theater. So as a result, it’s supply and demand: they have the supply of seats, but the demand just isn’t there to fill it.” 

Part of the problem could be that the elevator pitch for the musical isn’t exactly sizzling. The musical follows Kimberly Levaco (played by the singular Victoria Clark), a high schooler who looks like a grandmother because of a rare disease that causes her to age much faster than normal. She’s about to hit her 16th birthday, which also happens to be the normal life expectancy for someone with her condition. That neither stops her from trying to make friends at school (and succeeding with Seth Weetis, played by Justin Cooley , a nerd who loves anagrams, turning Kimberly’s name into “Cleverly Akimbo”), nor stops her family from continuing down their own destructive paths, including amoral Aunt Debra (the face-melting Bonnie Milligan) who wants to rope Kimberly and her friends into a check fraud scheme. But maybe that scheme will also help Kimmy live what life she has left to the fullest.

See what I mean? It’s not a one-liner like “It’s about the Founding Fathers, but they rap!” or “It’s like The Wizard of Oz , but about the Wicked Witch!” 

Filichia admits that the name “Kimberly Akimbo” isn’t doing the show any favors, either. “It is an odd title,” he said, “and I do believe that people would just gloss over it because it’s not a familiar title to them.” 

That seems to be the selling point of many Broadway shows these days: familiarity. Looking at the upcoming slate of musicals this spring, four are based on books or movies ( Days of Wine and Roses , The Notebook , Water for Elephants , The Outsiders ), two are jukebox musicals ( Hell’s Kitchen , Alicia Keys; The Heart of Rock and Roll , Huey Lewis and the News) and three are revivals ( The Wiz , The Who’s Tommy , Cabaret , the latter starring Eddie Redmayne). Only two are original musicals ( Suffs , Lempicka ). 

Looking backwards at the nine new musicals that debuted in the same season as Kimberly Akimbo , the only two that haven’t announced closing dates are & Juliet (a jukebox musical with no Tony Awards, but familiar songs like “Oops!…I Did It Again”) and A Beautiful Noise (a Neil Diamond jukebox musical without even a single Tony nomination). But as Filichia pointed out, despite the lack of accolades, the latter has something Kimberly does not: “ A Beautiful Noise actually has on its marquee as a selling point: ‘The songs that you know.’ That’s a direct quote.” 

“The point is: you don’t know what you’re getting when you’re dealing with an original score,” he added, “and that seems to be a liability today, for better or worse.” 

The problem here, if ticket buyers stick with the familiar instead of taking a chance on Kimberly Akimbo , is that they’ll miss a spunky, invigorating and deeply touching — sometimes all at the same time — score by Jeanine Tesori (“one of our most gifted composers,” Filichia added), paired with impossibly clever lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaire (who also wrote the book, as well as the original play on which this musical is based). They’ll also miss out on a story that has many of the tropes you expect from a high school and family saga — the struggle to fit in, the dysfunctional family, the disappointed mom, the deadbeat dad and the overprotective dad — but scatters and rearranges those tropes in such surprising ways that you’ll find yourself continuously caught off guard in the best possible way. There’s no need for the classic theater behavior of knowingly sighing or forcing a laugh to show that, yes, you understood the meaning of the moment. The songs here will pluck all the laughs and tears you have to give, whether you’re ready or not. 

In Jesse Green’s review in the Times , published in November of 2022, he didn’t have much hope for Kimberly Akimbo ’s staying power among the “tourist-bait extravaganzas,” but he also said the value of the musical cannot be judged “by how long it runs.” For a musical without a Josh Groban, Daniel Radcliffe or shoehorned Top 40 tune, 612 performances is nothing to sniff at. But Filichia said that, for those interested in taking my ticket-buying advice here, it’s best not to wait until April 28.

“I won’t be surprised if it even closes sooner, that they may get some sort of offer to close,” he said. The cutoff for eligibility for the Tony Awards is April 25, so productions looking to be considered for the 2023-2024 season are currently hunting for theaters they can quickly open in.

One of the lyrics that’s caught on from this musical, from the song “Great Adventure,” is “No one gets a second time around.” I can’t convince everyone reading this to spend their limited time (and money) always supporting original musicals that they know little to nothing about. If you want to see Marty McFly in a DeLorean on Broadway, go for it. If you want to see someone doing a Michael Jackson impersonation, be my guest. But at least see this one original musical before it’s gone. Once you do, I have a feeling you’ll be more open to the unfamiliar in the future.

And who knows? Maybe original musicals will eventually make a comeback on Broadway. Or maybe Kimberly Akimbo will simply get a splashy revival in 20 years. After all, by then it will have moved into the “revival” category, which seems like a safer bet.

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‘Kimberly Akimbo’ Will End Its Broadway Run in April

The Tony winner for best musical, about a high school girl with a rare genetic disorder and a criminally dysfunctional family, will begin a national tour in September.

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By Michael Paulson

“ Kimberly Akimbo ,” a quirky show that combined pathos and comedy to win last year’s Tony Award for best musical , will end its Broadway run in April, nearly 19 months after it began performances.

The show’s final performance will be April 28, at which point it is expected to have played 32 previews and 612 regular performances on Broadway.

Small and zany, “Kimberly Akimbo” was often overshadowed in a contemporary Broadway dominated by established titles, jukebox scores and celebrity performers. But it has outlasted most of the other productions from the 2022-23 season.

Set in a New Jersey suburb in 1999, the musical is about a high school girl with a rare genetic disorder, a criminally dysfunctional family and an anagram-loving friend.

Adapted from a play with the same title , “Kimberly Akimbo” opened in the fall of 2022 and is directed by Jessica Stone. It won five Tony Awards, including the prize for best book, by David Lindsay-Abaire (who also wrote the play); for best score, with music by Jeanine Tesori and lyrics by Lindsay-Abaire; for the leading performance by Victoria Clark , a 64-year-old actress who plays the adolescent protagonist; and for a featured performance by Bonnie Milligan, who plays an amoral aunt.

The musical began its life in 2021 with an Off Broadway run at the Atlantic Theater Company. The show has just nine characters, and, unusually, they have been played by the same actors throughout its life; all the actors plan to stay until the closing.

The show, with David Stone (“Wicked”) as its lead producer, was capitalized for $7 million, a modest budget for a Broadway musical today; it has not yet recouped those costs.

The Broadway run is to be followed by a national tour that is scheduled to begin in September at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts .

Michael Paulson is the theater reporter. He previously covered religion, and was part of the Boston Globe team whose coverage of clergy sexual abuse in the Catholic Church won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. More about Michael Paulson

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The 'phantom debt' of buy now, pay later is growing and will soon hit some Americans hard

  • Buy now, pay later plans gained popularity in 2023 as an alternative to high-interest credit cards.
  • The risk of these loans is high and many are now due following the holiday.
  • These debts could also become a burden for the economy but no one knows the true extent of its use.

Insider Today

One of the trendy ways to finance purchases is about to come back to haunt the US economy and no one knows how big of a problem it is.

Consumer spending kept the economy chugging along in the second half of 2023, and one of the key factors was the growth of installment plans, often called " buy now, pay later " (also known as BNPL). However, because of how these de facto loans are handled, they are being called "phantom debt," since no one knows just how pervasive they are or how much of an anchor they are on the American consumer .

In a report from Wells Fargo published in December, the company's economists found that buy now, pay later loans totaled $24.4 billion in 2021, or about 2.5% of the size of the US credit card market that year. That was a 1,000% increase compared to 2019, and that number could be much larger now.

The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia explained in 2022 that one of the reasons we know so little is that buy now, pay later companies often do not report to credit agencies.

"BNPL loans are not currently reported to any of the major credit reporting agencies, and the firms themselves are understandably reluctant to share proprietary data in a competitive environment," the Fed wrote.

If the debts snowball for too many consumers, these installment plans could also become a problem for the US economy.

Buy now, pay later use surged recently and those bills are now due

The use of buy now, pay later plans skyrocketed during the 2023 holiday season. According to Adobe , which tracks online sales, buy now, pay later plans use was up 47% on Black Friday and 43% on Cyber Monday.

Rather than make a purchase using credit cards, which are now burdened with record-high interest rates , you can use an installment plan that allows you to pay off the debt in a specific amount of time without accruing interest, often in eight weeks or four months.

However, the payments for many of those loans are now starting to be due.

If consumers blew past their budgets during the holidays and didn't make payments on their buy now, pay later plans, they could face late fees and interest rates in the neighborhood of 30%.

Installment loans can provide credit to some Americans who might not otherwise qualify. However, an August survey of 2,572 consumers conducted by financial news and data platform PYMNTS found that nearly 64% of high-income earners — defined by PYMNTS as those making at least $100,000 annually — had used installment plans in the previous 12 months . That was higher than the overall rate of 60%.

Of course, most consumers go into these transactions expecting to make all the payments on time. Indeed, the Fed's " 2022 Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking " found that 83% of respondents paid off their buy now, pay later programs on time.

But some people who pay off their loans are just delaying the thing they were avoiding. A  Social Science Research Network  study found that some consumers pay off their buy now, pay later plans with credit cards, which trade a 0% interest rate for rates often well above 20%.

While installment loans might be preferable for large-item necessities, these are not the most common purchases. According to PYMNTS' survey, 39.6% of respondents used buy now, pay later plans for clothing and accessories and 33.7% used them for groceries.

The 'phantom debt' could sneak up on the US economy

Wells Fargo economists Tim Quinlan and Shannon Seery Grein wrote that buy now, pay later programs could lead to an uptick in consumer debt because consumers may be more likely to take on additional debt if they know they spread out payments.

"And because no central repository exists for monitoring it, growth of this 'phantom debt' could imply total household debt levels are actually higher than traditional measures," the economists wrote.

According to Census and Economic Information Center data, household debt represented 64.1% of US GDP at the end of the third quarter in 2023.

Mark Luschini, chief investment strategist at the financial advisor firm Janney Montgomery Scott said on " Mornings With Maria Bartiromo" in December that the increased use of buy now, pay later programs might be a sign that the consumer is starting to crack. Luschini noted that these loans, when coupled with recent upticks in credit card delinquencies and accounts behind on payments, are a sign that some consumers — especially those with credit card debt and auto loans — are beginning to buckle under the pressures of the US economy .

While the Wells Fargo economists concluded that buy now, pay later may not be a huge problem yet, it is hard to be certain when an issue could occur.

"Our sense after surveying what limited data are available is that BNPL is not a major problem for consumer spending yet," they wrote. "But until there is a definitive measure for it, there is no way to know when this phantom debt could create substantial problems for the consumer and the broader economy."

Warren Buffett summed up the danger of buy now, pay later long before it even existed. While speaking with the US Government's Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission in 2010, he explained the pitfall of leverage or using borrowed money, even if your intentions are solid.

"If you don't have leverage, you don't get in trouble," Buffett said. "That's the only way a smart person can go broke, basically. And I've always said, 'If you're smart, you don't need it; and if you're dumb, you shouldn't be using it.'"

Buy now, pay later debt can be advantageous if used correctly. But it is still a debt.

is phantom closing on broadway

Watch: Despite the negative stigma, payday loans are not much different from credit cards

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  4. 'Phantom of the Opera,' Broadway's Longest-Running Show, to Close

    Sept. 16, 2022. "The Phantom of the Opera," the longest-running show in Broadway history and, for many, a symbol of musical theater, will drop its famous chandelier for the last time in ...

  5. 'The Phantom of the Opera' Closes on Broadway After 35 Years

    April 16, 2023, at 9:14 p.m. 'The Phantom of the Opera' Closes on Broadway After 35 Years. "The Phantom of the Opera" cast appear at the curtain call following the final Broadway performance at ...

  6. "The Phantom of the Opera" closes on Broadway after record 35 year run

    April 17, 2023 / 4:22 AM EDT / AP. The final curtain came down Sunday on New York's production of "The Phantom of the Opera," ending Broadway's longest-running show with thunderous standing ...

  7. 'Phantom of the Opera' to Delay Broadway Closing After Sales Spike

    But immediately after the closing was announced, ticket sales spiked. And last week, when Broadway was bolstered by Thanksgiving travelers, "Phantom" enjoyed its highest-grossing week ever: $2 ...

  8. The Phantom of the Opera to close on Broadway after 35 years

    Last modified on Sat 17 Sep 2022 04.45 EDT. The Phantom of the Opera, Broadway's longest-running show, is scheduled to close in February 2023. The musical - a fixture on Broadway since 1988 ...

  9. 'Phantom of the Opera' will close on Broadway in February after 35

    A poster advertising "The Phantom of the Opera" is displayed on the shuttered Majestic Theatre in New York on March 12, 2020. Broadway's longest-running show is scheduled to close in February 2023.

  10. 'The Phantom of the Opera' Closes on Broadway After 35 Years

    Cast and crew members take a final bow as confetti is released after the final performance of the Phantom of the Opera, which closes after 35 years on Broadway, in New York, April 16, 2023. Riddle ...

  11. 'The Phantom of the Opera' closes on Broadway after 35 years

    The closing of "Phantom" means the composer is left with one show on Broadway, the critically mauled "Bad Cinderella." The closing of "Phantom," originally scheduled for February, was pushed to mid-April after a flood of revived interest and ticket sales that pushed weekly grosses past $3 million.

  12. 'The Phantom of the Opera' closing on Broadway after 35 years

    Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images, FILE. The chandelier will fall for the last time on Andrew Lloyd Webber's "The Phantom of the Opera" next year. The longest-running musical in Broadway's history ...

  13. Broadway's 'Phantom of the Opera' is closing

    The Broadway show The Phantom of the Opera will soon close after 35 years, but the curtain will stay open a bit longer than expected. The closure date was originally set for Valentine's Week 2023 ...

  14. "Phantom of the Opera" to close on Broadway in early 2023, ending 35

    Since it opened at the Majestic Theatre on Jan. 26, 1988, Broadway's "Phantom" has had over 13,500 performances to 19.5 million people, producers said. ... The closing of "Phantom" would mean the ...

  15. 'Phantom of the Opera' superfans say goodbye to Broadway's ...

    Cast and crew take a bow as confetti is released after the final performance of the Phantom of the Opera, which closed after 35 years on Broadway, in New York City, on April 16. Caitlin Ochs ...

  16. 'Phantom of the Opera' to close after 35 years on Broadway: sources

    00:39. It's over now, the music of the night. "The Phantom of the Opera," Broadway's longest-running show, will close this winter, multiple sources told The Post. Andrew Lloyd Webber's ...

  17. The Phantom of the Opera set to close on Broadway

    The Phantom of the Opera, Broadway's longest-running show, is closing The beloved musical will play its final performance at the Majestic Theatre on Feb. 18, 2023. By Justine Browning

  18. The Phantom of the Opera Delays Closing on Broadway

    The Phantom of the Opera, Broadway's longest-running show, is delaying its closing. Originally announced to have its final performance at the Majestic Theatre on February 18, 2023, the musical ...

  19. 'The Phantom Of The Opera' Gets Two-Month Broadway Reprieve

    Broadway 's long-running The Phantom of the Opera, which has enjoyed a big box office upswing since announcing in September that it would close on February 18, won't be making its exit quite ...

  20. 'Phantom of the Opera' closing on Broadway: How I got over my fear

    "The Phantom of the Opera" closed April 16 on Broadway after a stunning 35-year-run. The musical - which follows the titular Phantom and his unrequited love (read: disturbing obsession) for ...

  21. With Cheers and Tears, 'Phantom of the Opera' Ends Record Broadway Run

    On Broadway "Phantom" was, obviously, enormously successful, playing to 20 million people and grossing $1.36 billion since its opening in January 1988. ... It closed on an unexpectedly high ...

  22. 'Phantom of the Opera' Closing: Inside Broadway's Emotional Night

    Inside Broadway's Emotional Closing Night of 'The Phantom of the Opera'. After 35 years — and a string of $3 million weeks at the box office fueled by the last-minute frenzy of "phans ...

  23. 'The Phantom of the Opera' Closes on Broadway After 35 Years

    The Phantom Takes His Final Bow. After 35 years and nearly 14,000 performances, Broadway's beloved, longest-running show "The Phantom of the Opera" closed its curtain for the final time Sunday ...

  24. Photos From 'the Phantom of the Opera' During 35-Year Run on Broadway

    Entertainment. 'The Phantom of the Opera' will close in 2023 after 35 years on Broadway. Here are 10 stunning photos from the show's historic run. Gabi Stevenson. "The Phantom of the Opera" will ...

  25. Why the Best Original Broadway Musical in Years Is Closing

    played by Justin Cooley. The Wizard of Oz. upcoming slate of musicals Days of Wine and Roses The Notebook Water for Elephants The Outsiders Hell's Kitchen The Heart of Rock and Roll The Wiz The ...

  26. 'Kimberly Akimbo' Will End Its Broadway Run in April

    Jan. 5, 2024. " Kimberly Akimbo ," a quirky show that combined pathos and comedy to win last year's Tony Award for best musical, will end its Broadway run in April, nearly 19 months after it ...

  27. The Shubert Archive on Instagram: "#OnThisDay in 2006 Phantom of the

    59 likes, 1 comments - theshubertarchive on January 9, 2024: "#OnThisDay in 2006 Phantom of the Opera held its 7,486th performance at the Majestic Theatre, bec..." The Shubert Archive on Instagram: "#OnThisDay in 2006 Phantom of the Opera held its 7,486th performance at the Majestic Theatre, becoming the longest running show on Broadway ...

  28. Buy Now Pay Later Phantom Debt Could Hurt Consumers, US Economy

    The 'phantom debt' of buy now, pay later is growing and will soon hit some Americans hard. BNPL plans can lower the burden of big purchases, but come with big risks. Buy now, pay later plans ...