Digital Commons @ University of South Florida

  • USF Research
  • USF Libraries

Digital Commons @ USF > College of Engineering > Mechanical Engineering > Theses and Dissertations

Mechanical Engineering Theses and Dissertations

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

Metachronal Locomotion: Swimming, Scaling, and Schooling , Kuvvat Garayev

A Human-in-the-Loop Robot Grasping System with Grasp Quality Refinement , Tian Tan

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Health Effects of Oil Spills and Dispersal of Oil Droplets and Zooplankton by Langmuir Cells , Sanjib Gurung

Estimating the As-Placed Grout Volume of Auger Cast Piles , Tristen Mee

Hybrid RANS-LES Hemolytic Power Law Modeling of the FDA Blood Pump , Joseph Tarriela

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Dynamic Loading Directed Neural Stem Cell Differentiation , Abdullah Revaha Akdemir

An Investigation of Cross-links on Crystallization and Degradation in a Novel, PhotoCross-linkable Poly (Lactic Acid) System , Nicholas Baksh

A Framework to Aid Decision Making for Smart Manufacturing Technologies in Small-and Medium-Sized Enterprises , Purvee Bhatia

Formation of Gas Jets and Vortex Rings from Bursting Bubbles: Visualization, Kinematics, and Fluid Dynamics , Ali A. Dasouqi

Development of Carbon and Silicon Carbide Based Microelectrode Implantable Neural Interfaces , Chenyin Feng

Sulfate Optimization in the Cement-Slag Blended System Based on Calorimetry and Strength Studies , Mustafa Fincan

Interrelation of Thermal Stimulation with Haptic Perception, Emotion, and Memory , Mehdi Hojatmadani

Modeling the Ambient Conditions of a Manufacturing Environment Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) , Yang Liu

Flow Visualization and Aerosol Characterization of Respiratory Jets Exhaled from a Mannequin Simulator , Sindhu Reddy Mutra

A Constitutive-Based Deep Learning Model for the Identification of Active Contraction Parameters of the Left Ventricular Myocardium , Igor Augusto Paschoalotte Nobrega

Sensible/Latent Hybrid Thermal Energy Storage for the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle , Kelly Osterman

Evaluating the Performance of Devices Engineering to Quantify the FARS Test , Harsh Patel

Event-Triggered Control Architectures for Scheduling Information Exchange in Uncertain and Multiagent Systems , Stefan Ristevski

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Experimental Investigation of Liquid Height Estimation and Simulation Verification of Bolt Tension Quantification Using Surface Acoustic Waves , Hani Alhazmi

Investigation of Navigation Systems for Size, Cost, and Mass Constrained Satellites , Omar Awad

Simulation and Verification of Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage , Marwan Mosubah Belaed

Control of a Human Arm Robotic Unit Using Augmented Reality and Optimized Kinematics , Carlo Canezo

Manipulation and Patterning of Mammalian Cells Using Vibrations and Acoustic Forces , Joel Cooper

Stable Adaptive Control Systems in the Presence of Unmodeled and Actuator Dynamics , Kadriye Merve Dogan

The Design and Development of a Wrist-Hand Orthosis , Amber Gatto

ROBOAT - Rescue Operations Bot Operating in All Terrains , Akshay Gulhane

Mitigation of Electromigration in Metal Interconnects Passivated by Ångstrom-Thin 2D Materials , Yunjo Jeong

Swimming of Pelagic Snails: Kinematics and Fluid Dynamics , Ferhat Karakas

Functional Gait Asymmetries Achieved Through Modeling and Understanding the Interaction of Multiple Gait Modulations , Fatemeh Rasouli

Distributed Control of Multiagent Systems under Heterogeneity , Selahattin Burak Sarsilmaz

Design and Implementation of Intuitive Human-robot Teleoperation Interfaces , Lei Wu

Laser Micropatterning Effects on Corrosion Resistance of Pure Magnesium Surfaces , Yahya Efe Yayoglu

Theses/Dissertations from 2019 2019

Synthesis and Characterization of Molybdenum Disulfide/Conducting Polymer Nanocomposite Materials for Supercapacitor Applications , Turki S. Alamro

Design of Shape-Morphing Structures Consisting of Bistable Compliant Mechanisms , Rami Alfattani

Low Temperature Multi Effects Desalination-Mechanical Vapor Compression Powered by Supercritical Organic Rankine Cycle , Eydhah Almatrafi

Experimental Results of a Model Reference Adaptive Control Approach on an Interconnected Uncertain Dynamical System , Kemberly Cespedes

Modeling of Buildings with Electrochromic Windows and Thermochromic Roofs , Hua-Ting Kao

Design and Testing of Experimental Langmuir Turbulence Facilities , Zongze Li

Solar Thermal Geothermal Hybrid System With a Bottoming Supercritical Organic Rankine Cycle , Francesca Moloney

Design and Testing of a Reciprocating Wind Harvester , Ahmet Topcuoglu

Distributed Spatiotemporal Control and Dynamic Information Fusion for Multiagent Systems , Dzung Minh Duc Tran

Controlled Wetting Using Ultrasonic Vibration , Matthew A. Trapuzzano

On Distributed Control of Multiagent Systems under Adverse Conditions , Emre Yildirim

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

Synthesis and Characterization of Alpha-Hematite Nanomaterials for Water-Splitting Applications , Hussein Alrobei

Control of Uncertain Dynamical Systems with Spatial and Temporal Constraints , Ehsan Arabi

Simulation and Optimization of a Sheathless Size-Based Acoustic Particle Separator , Shivaraman Asoda

Simulation of Radiation Flux from Thermal Fluid in Origami Tubes , Robert R. Bebeau

Toward Verifiable Adaptive Control Systems: High-Performance and Robust Architectures , Benjamin Charles Gruenwald

Developing Motion Platform Dynamics for Studying Biomechanical Responses During Exercise for Human Spaceflight Applications , Kaitlin Lostroscio

Design and Testing of a Linear Compliant Mechanism with Adjustable Force Output , William Niemeier

Investigation of Thermal History in Large Area Projection Sintering, an Additive Manufacturing Technology , Justin Nussbaum

Acoustic Source Localization with a VTOL sUAV Deployable Module , Kory Olney

Defect Detection in Additive Manufacturing Utilizing Long Pulse Thermography , James Pierce

Design and Testing of a Passive Prosthetic Ankle Foot Optimized to Mimic an Able-Bodied Gait , Millicent Schlafly

Simulation of Turbulent Air Jet Impingement for Commercial Cooking Applications , Shantanu S. Shevade

Materials and Methods to Fabricate Porous Structures Using Additive Manufacturing Techniques , Mohsen Ziaee

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

Large Area Sintering Test Platform Design and Preliminary Study on Cross Sectional Resolution , Christopher J. Gardiner

Enhanced Visible Light Photocatalytic Remediation of Organics in Water Using Zinc Oxide and Titanium Oxide Nanostructures , Srikanth Gunti

Heat Flux Modeling of Asymmetrically Heated and Cooled Thermal Stimuli , Matthew Hardy

Simulation of Hemiparetic Function Using a Knee Orthosis with Variable Impedance and a Proprioception Interference Apparatus , Christina-Anne Kathleen Lahiff

Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Molybdenum Oxide Nanomaterials , Michael S. McCrory

Effects of Microstructure and Alloy Concentration on the Corrosion and Tribocorrosion Resistance of Al-Mn and WE43 Mg Alloys , Hesham Y. Saleh Mraied

Novel Transducer Calibration and Simulation Verification of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Channels on Acoustic Microfluidic Devices , Scott T. Padilla

Force Compensation and Recreation Accuracy in Humans , Benjamin Rigsby

Experimental Evaluation of Cooling Effectiveness and Water Conservation in a Poultry House Using Flow Blurring ® Atomizers , Rafael M. Rodriguez

Media Velocity Considerations in Pleated Air Filtration , Frederik Carl Schousboe

Orthoplanar Spring Based Compliant Force/Torque Sensor for Robot Force Control , Jerry West

Experimental Study of High-Temperature Range Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage , Chatura Wickramaratne

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

Al/Ti Nanostructured Multilayers: from Mechanical, Tribological, to Corrosion Properties , Sina Izadi

Molybdenum Disulfide-Conducting Polymer Composite Structures for Electrochemical Biosensor Applications , Hongxiang Jia

Waterproofing Shape-Changing Mechanisms Using Origami Engineering; Also a Mechanical Property Evaluation Approach for Rapid Prototyping , Andrew Jason Katz

Hydrogen Effects on X80 Steel Mechanical Properties Measured by Tensile and Impact Testing , Xuan Li

Application and Analysis of Asymmetrical Hot and Cold Stimuli , Ahmad Manasrah

Droplet-based Mechanical Actuator Utilizing Electrowetting Effect , Qi Ni

Experimental and Computational Study on Fracture Mechanics of Multilayered Structures , Hai Thanh Tran

Designing the Haptic Interface for Morse Code , Michael Walker

Optimization and Characterization of Integrated Microfluidic Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors and Transducers , Tao Wang

Corrosion Characteristics of Magnesium under Varying Surface Roughness Conditions , Yahya Efe Yayoglu

Theses/Dissertations from 2015 2015

Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) Emissions, Human Energy, and Cultural Perceptions Associated with Traditional and Improved Methods of Shea Butter Processing in Ghana, West Africa , Emily Adams

Experimental Investigation of Encapsulated Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage , Tanvir E. Alam

Design Of Shape Morphing Structures Using Bistable Elements , Ahmad Alqasimi

Heat Transfer Analysis of Slot Jet Impingement onto Roughened Surfaces , Rashid Ali Alshatti

Systems Approach to Producing Electrospun Polyvinylidene Difluoride Fiber Webs with Controlled Fiber Structure and Functionality , Brian D. Bell

Self-Assembly Kinetics of Microscale Components: A Parametric Evaluation , Jose Miguel Carballo

Measuring Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Mechanical Properties Using Flat Punch Nanoindentation Focusing on Obtaining Full Contact , Federico De Paoli

A Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Flow Induced Noise In Hydraulic Counterbalance Valves , Mutasim Mohamed Elsheikh

An Experimental Study on Passive Dynamic Walking , Philip Andrew Hatzitheodorou

Use of Anaerobic Adhesive for Prevailing Torque Locking Feature on Threaded Product , Alan Hernandez

Viability of Bismuth as a Green Substitute for Lead in Jacketed .357 Magnum Revolver Bullets , Joel A. Jenkins

A Planar Pseudo-Rigid-Body Model for Cantilevers Experiencing Combined Endpoint Forces and Uniformly Distributed Loads Acting in Parallel , Philip James Logan

Kinematic Control of Redundant Mobile Manipulators , Mustafa Mashali

Passive Symmetry in Dynamic Systems and Walking , Haris Muratagic

Mechanical Properties of Laser-Sintered-Nylon Diamond Lattices , Clayton Neff

Design, Fabrication and Analysis of a Paver Machine Push Bar Mechanism , Mahendra Palnati

Synthesis, Characterization, and Electrochemical Properties of Polyaniline Thin Films , Soukaina Rami

A Technical and Economic Comparative Analysis of Sensible and Latent Heat Packed Bed Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants , Jamie Trahan

Use of FDM Components for Ion Beam and Vacuum Applications , Eric Miguel Tridas

The Development of an Adaptive Driving Simulator , Sarah Marie Tudor

Dual 7-Degree-of-Freedom Robotic Arm Remote Teleoperation Using Haptic Devices , Yu-Cheng Wang

Ductility and Use of Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel Aerospace Fasteners , Jarrod Talbott Whittaker

Advanced Search

  • Email Notifications and RSS
  • All Collections
  • USF Faculty Publications
  • Open Access Journals
  • Conferences and Events
  • Theses and Dissertations
  • Textbooks Collection

Useful Links

  • Rights Information
  • SelectedWorks
  • Submit Research

Home | About | Help | My Account | Accessibility Statement | Language and Diversity Statements

Privacy Copyright

ScholarWorks@UMass Amherst

Home > Engineering > MIE > MIE_DISS

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Dissertations Collection

Dissertations from 2024 2024.

Soft Magnetic Sensing on a Compliant Surface and Contact Mechanics Approximations at the Interface , Julio Aparicio, Mechanical Engineering

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS AND REDUCED ORDER MODELING OF MULTI-PHYSICS BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS , Suyue Han, Mechanical Engineering

Continuous Future Joint Kinematics Prediction Based on Surface Electromyography Using Neural Networks and Hybrid Approaches for Reduced-Latency Control , Soumitra Sitole and Soumitra Sitole, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2023 2023

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE VORTEX-INDUCED VIBRATION RESPONSE OF A FLEXIBLY-MOUNTED RIGID CYLINDER IN THE SHEAR-THINNING AND INERTIAL-VISCOELASTIC FLOW REGIMES , Pieter Boersma, Mechanical Engineering

MICRO AND NANO R2R EMBOSSING OF EXTRUDED POLYMERS , Raymond S. Frenkel, Mechanical Engineering

Surface Engineering and Microfabrication of PDMS-Based Devices for Women’s Health Applications , Jamar Hawkins, Mechanical Engineering

ULTRA-HIGH STRAIN RATE MECHANICAL STUDY OF METALS IN THE COLD-SPRAY PROCESS THROUGH LASER-INDUCED PROJECTILE IMPACT TEST , Swetaparna Mohanty, Mechanical Engineering

Additive Manufacturing of Multicomponent Metal Alloys , Shahryar Mooraj, Mechanical Engineering

ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE NANOLAMELLAR EUTECTIC HIGH-ENTROPY ALLOYS , Jie Ren, Mechanical Engineering

HEAT TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF LATENT HEAT THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE , Kedar Prashant Shete, Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Mechanical and Biochemical Gradients to Control Cell Behaviors , Feiyu Yang, Mechanical Engineering

MONITORING AND CONTROL OF THE ROLL-TO-ROLL MICROCONTACT PRINTING PROCESS THROUGH NEURAL NETWORK AND REAL-TIME SENSING , Jingyang Yan, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2022 2022

SOLIDIFICATION EXPERIMENTS AND MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELS IN ELECTROMAGNETIC LEVITATION , Gwendolyn Bracker, Mechanical Engineering

Moving Polygon Methods for Incompressible Fluid Dynamics , Chris Chartrand, Mechanical Engineering

The Influence of Flow Mechanotransduction on Endothelial Cells in the Lymphatic Valve Sinus , Joshua Daniel Hall, Mechanical Engineering

Characterizing Mechanical Regulation of Bone Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells , Boyuan Liu, Mechanical Engineering

COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF INTERNAL FLOW, NEAR NOZZLE AND EXTERNAL SPRAY OF A GDI INJECTOR UNDER FLASH-BOILING CONDITIONS , Chinmoy krushna Mohapatra, Mechanical Engineering

Biomechanical Regulation of Cell Rearrangement and Fate Patterning Under Geometrical Confinement , Tianfa Xie, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2021 2021

SURFACE ENHANCED RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY (SERS) AS AN APPROACH FOR THE EMERGING LIQUID BIOPSY DIAGNOSTICS , Nariman Banaei, Mechanical Engineering

The Modeling and Control of Highly Flexible Continuous Structures Interacting with Fluids , Todd Currier, Mechanical Engineering

Design and Biomechanical Evaluation of a Clutch-Based Energy Storage and Release Assistive Knee Brace , Ericber Jimenez Francisco, Mechanical Engineering

Simulating the Effects of Floating Platforms, Tilted Rotors, and Breaking Waves for Offshore Wind Turbines , Hannah Johlas, Mechanical Engineering

NUMERICAL MODELING OF ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS , Peetak P. Mitra, Mechanical Engineering

A Generalized Method for Predictive Simulation-Based Lower Limb Prosthesis Design , Mark Price, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2020 2020

ROUGH AIRFOIL SIMULATION FOR WIND TURBINE APPLICATIONS , Nathaniel B. deVelder, Mechanical Engineering

Experimental Study of Viscoelastic Fluid-Structure Interactions , Anita Anup Dey, Mechanical Engineering

Considerations for the Design Optimization of Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Blades , Evan M. Gaertner, Mechanical Engineering

NONLINEAR MODELS FOR SYNTHETIC MOORING LINES UNDER EXTREME OCEAN CONDITIONS: AN AQUACULTURE CASE STUDY , Nhu Nguyen, Mechanical Engineering

Surface Driven Flows : Liquid Bridges, Drops and Marangoni Propulsion , Samrat Sur, Mechanical Engineering

THE EFFECT OF OXYGEN ON PROPERTIES OF ZIRCONIUM METAL , Jie ZHAO, Mechanical Engineering

RESISTIVE SWITCHING CHARACTERISTICS OF NANOSTRUCTURED AND SOLUTION-PROCESSED COMPLEX OXIDE ASSEMBLIES , Zimu Zhou, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2019 2019

Flow-induced oscillations in floating offshore wind turbines , Daniel Carlson, Mechanical Engineering

Cold Spray Deposition of Polymers – Characterization and Optimization , Zahra Khalkhali, Mechanical Engineering

THERMODYNAMIC AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF SEVERAL HYBRID MULTIGENERATION CYCLES AND WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS DRIVEN BY CONCENTRATED SOLAR TOWER , Kasra Mohammadi, Mechanical Engineering

PREDICTIVE SIMULATION OF HUMAN MOVEMENT AND APPLICATIONS TO ASSISTIVE DEVICE DESIGN AND CONTROL , Vinh Nguyen, Mechanical Engineering

STRUCTURAL CONTROL OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES USING PASSIVE AND SEMI-ACTIVE CONTROL , Semyung Park, Mechanical Engineering

A Study on Homogeneous Sheared Stably Stratified Turbulence , Gavin Portwood, Mechanical Engineering

Residual Stress Models for Large Eddy Simulation of Stratified Turbulent Flows , Felipe Augusto Ventura de Bragança Alves, Mechanical Engineering

QUANTITATIVE PROBING OF VACANCIES AND IONS DYNAMICS IN ELECTROACTIVE OXIDE MATERIALS , Jiaxin Zhu, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2018 2018

SUPPORTING ENGINEERING DESIGN OF ADDITIVELY MANUFACTURED MEDICAL DEVICES WITH KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT THROUGH ONTOLOGIES , Thomas Hagedorn, Mechanical Engineering

Turbulent mixers for protein folding experiments , Venkatesh Inguva, Mechanical Engineering

AEROELASTIC SIMULATION OF WIND TURBINES USING FREE VORTEX METHODS AND STRATEGIES FOR ACCELERATING THE COMPUTATION , Shujian Liu, Mechanical Engineering

Performance and economic analysis of hybrid microhydro systems , Ram Poudel, Mechanical Engineering

Computational Exploration of Flash-Boiling Internal Flow and Near-Nozzle Spray , Sampath K. Rachakonda, Mechanical Engineering

PROBING LOCAL VACANCY-DRIVEN RESISTIVE SWITCHING IN METAL OXIDE NANOSTRUCTURES , Jiaying Wang, Mechanical Engineering

MODEL-BASED PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS FOR ADDITIVE AND SMART MANUFACTURING , Zhuo Yang, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2017 2017

The rheology and roll-to-roll processing of shear-thickening particle dispersions , Sunilkumar Khandavalli, Mechanical Engineering

Bio-based Wind Turbine Blades: Renewable Energy Meets Sustainable Materials for Clean, Green Power , Rachel Koh, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2016 2016

Eulerian CFD Modeling of Multiphase Internal Injector Flow and External Sprays , Eli T. Baldwin, Mechanical Engineering

Simulating the Hydrodynamics of Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Platforms in a Finite Volume Framework , Maija Benitz, Mechanical Engineering

Reduced order fluid-structure interaction models for thin shells with non-zero Gaussian curvatures to understand the response of aneurysms to flow , Gary Han Chang, Mechanical Engineering

Wind Farm Wake Modeling and Analysis of Wake Impacts in a Wind Farm , Yujia Hao, Mechanical Engineering

Multi-Classifier Fusion Strategy for Activity and Intent Recognition of Torso Movements , Abhijit Kadrolkar, Mechanical Engineering

Dynamic Wetting and Drag Reduction on Superhydrophobic and Liquid-Infused Surfaces , Jeong-Hyun Kim, Mechanical Engineering

Automatic Development and Adaptation of Concise Nonlinear Models for System Identification , William G. La Cava, Mechanical Engineering

A Lower Limb Prosthesis with Active Alignment for Reduced Limb Loading , Andrew LaPre, Mechanical Engineering

A Computational Study of Non-Newtonian Droplet Dynamics , Kyle G. Mooney, Mechanical Engineering

Theoretical Modeling, Experimental Observation, and Reliability Analysis of Flow-induced Oscillations in Offshore Wind Turbine Blades , Pariya Pourazarm, Mechanical Engineering

Design Load Analysis of Two Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Concepts , Gordon M. Stewart, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2015 2015

Wind Power Capacity Value Metrics and Variability: A Study in New England , Frederick W. Letson, Mechanical Engineering

Vortex-Induced Vibration of Structures with Broken Symmetry , Banafsheh Seyedaghazadeh, Mechanical Engineering

A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY ON EXTENSION OF NON-CONTACT MODULATION CALORIMETRY , Xiao Ye, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2014 2014

Sustainability-Based Product Design in a Decision Support Semantic Framework , Douglas Eddy, Mechanical Engineering

Structural, Electronic and Catalytic Properties of Graphene-supported Platinum Nanoclusters , Ioanna Fampiou, Mechanical Engineering

OPERATIONAL PLANNING IN COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS , Hariharan Gopalakrishnan, Mechanical Engineering

Methods of Engine Degradation Assessment in the Time-Scale Domain , Jeffrey Charles Simmons, Mechanical Engineering

Lightweight, High-Temperature Radiator for In-Space Nuclear-Electric Power and Propulsion , Briana N. Tomboulian, Mechanical Engineering

SIMULATION AND MODELING OF THE DECAY OF ANISOTROPIC TURBULENCE , Christopher J. Zusi, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2013 2013

Effect of Total Awake Time on Drivers' Performance and Evaluation of Training Intervention to Mitigate Effects of Total Awake Time on Drivers' Performance , Abd Malek Abdul Hamid, Mechanical Engineering

Tooth Cusp Radius of Curvature as a Dietary Correlate in Primates , Michael Anthony Berthaume, Mechanical Engineering

Techno-Economic Feasibility Study of Ammonia Plants Powered by Offshore Wind , Eric R. Morgan, Mechanical Engineering

Multiphase Flows with Digital and Traditional Microfluidics , Michael Andrew Nilsson, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2012 2012

A Study on Small Scale Intermittency Using Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulence , Saba Almalkie, Mechanical Engineering

Acceleration of CFD and Data Analysis Using Graphics Processors , Ali Khajeh Saeed, Mechanical Engineering

The oriented-eddy collision model , Michael B. Martell

The Oriented-Eddy Collision Model , Michael Bernard Martell Jr., Mechanical Engineering

Morphology and Development of Droplet Deformation Under Flow Within Microfluidic Devices , Molly Katlin Mulligan, Mechanical Engineering

The Aerodynamics and Near Wake of an Offshore Floating Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine , Thomas Sebastian, Mechanical Engineering

Modeling the life span of red blood cells , Rajiv Prakash Shrestha

Modeling and planning distributed energy systems online , Kai Wu

Dissertations from 2011 2011

The Parameter Signature Isolation Method and Applications , James Richard McCusker, Mechanical Engineering

A Numerical Study of Droplet Formation and Behavior using Interface Tracking Methods , Sandeep Menon, Mechanical Engineering

Modeling of Flash Boiling Flows in Injectors with Gasoline-Ethanol Fuel Blends , Kshitij Deepak Neroorkar, Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Modeling, Analysis and Optimal Design of Custom Foot Orthotic , Lieselle Enid Trinidad, Mechanical Engineering

Understanding combat related pyschological difficulties in veterans: The role of context based morality , Ramila Usoof

Dissertations from 2010 2010

A comprehensive study of the extensional rheology of complex fluids , Manojkumar Chellamuthu

Modeling of Thermal Non-Equilibrium in Superheated Injector Flows , Shivasubramanian Gopalakrishnan, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2009 2009

A Pressure-Temperature Dual Sensing Methodology For Injection Molding Monitoring , Zhaoyan Fan, Mechanical Engineering

A pressure-temperature dual sensing methodology for injection molding monitoring , Zhaoyan Fan

An integrated multidisciplinary approach to the design of therapeutic devices for people with mental illness and pervasive developmental disorders , Brian A Mullen

Unsteady dynamics of wind turbine wake, oscillating bubble and falling card , Kapil Varshney

Semantic Methods for Intelligent Distributed Design Environments , Paul W. Witherell, Mechanical Engineering

Dissertations from 2008 2008

Numerical analysis of mixing in variable density turbulent flows , Adel E Alshayji

Self-diagnostic thermal protection systems for future spacecraft , Alaina B Hanlon

Hybrid elastic network model for macromolecular dynamics , Yunho Jang

The streamlined site assessment methodology: A new approach for wind energy site assessment , Matthew A Lackner

Laminar flow control with ultrahydrophobic surfaces , Jia Ou

Multi-Time Scale Modeling strategy for bearing life prognosis , Shuangwen Sheng

Dissertations from 2007 2007

Managing multi-agent risk and system uncertainty using options-based decision policies , Daniel R Ball

Offshore wind farm layout optimization , Christopher Neil Elkinton

Advanced Search

  • Notify me via email or RSS
  • Collections
  • Disciplines

Author Corner

  • Login for Faculty Authors
  • Faculty Author Gallery
  • Expert Gallery
  • University Libraries
  • Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Webpage
  • UMass Amherst

This page is sponsored by the University Libraries.

© 2009 University of Massachusetts Amherst • Site Policies

Privacy Copyright

UKnowledge

UKnowledge > College of Engineering > Mechanical Engineering > Theses & Dissertations

Theses and Dissertations--Mechanical Engineering

Theses/dissertations from 2024 2024.

The Determination of Darcy Permeabilities and Slip Parameters in Porous Thermal Protection Media via Pressure-Driven Steady Flows at Varying Levels of Thermal Decomposition , John Ryan O'Nan

Theses/Dissertations from 2023 2023

Utilization of Uncrewed Aircraft Systems Towards Investigating the Structure of the Atmospheric Surface Layer , Loiy Al-Ghussain

MECHANICAL ENERGY HARVESTER FOR POWERING RFID SYSTEMS COMPONENTS: MODELING, ANALYSIS, OPTIMIZATION AND DESIGN , Alireza Babaei

Impact of spallation and internal radiation on fibrous ablative materials , Raghava Sai Chaitanya Davuluri

ANISOTROPIC MATERIAL BEHAVIOR OF 3D PRINTED FIBER COMPOSITES , Jordan Garcia

Stratospheric Glider Measurements of Atmospheric Parameters , Anisa Haghighi

Attrition Study of Copper-Supplemented Iron-Based Oxygen Carrier for Chemical Looping Combustion , Neng Huang

MACHINE LEARNING FOR ADVANCING AUTOMATION AND QUALITY CONTROL IN ROBOTIC WELDING , Joseph Kershaw

A computational fluid dynamic analysis of oxyacetylene combustion flow for use in material response boundary conditions , Craig Meade

MULTISCALE MODELING OF CARDIAC GROWTH AND BAROREFLEX CONTROL , Hossein Sharifi

Precision Meteorological Prediction Employing A Data-Driven, Adaptive, Real-Time (DART) Approach , Sujit Sinha

Parallel Real Time RRT*: An RRT* Based Path Planning Process , David Yackzan

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

IN-SITU CHARACTERIZATION OF SURFACE QUALITY IN γ-TiAl AEROSPACE ALLOY MACHINING , David Adeniji

NUMERICAL AND SCALING STUDY ON APPLICATION OF INKJET TECHNOLOGY TO AUTOMOTIVE COATING , Masoud Arabghahestani Dr.

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF ROUGHNESS AND BLOWING EFFECTS OVER ABLATOR-LIKE SURFACES , Colby Borchetta

Energy and Economic Modeling of Stillage Dewatering Processes in Kentucky Bourbon Distilleries , William Brennan

Peridynamic Material Correspondence Models: Bond-Associated and Higher-Order Formulations , WaiLam Chan

A Decoupled Engineering Methodology for Accurate Prediction of Ablative Surface Boundary Conditions in Thermal Protection Systems , Justin Cooper

QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR TOTAL LIFECYCLE RISK LIKELIHOOD AND IMPACT ASSESSMENT IN SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT DESIGN DECISION MAKING , Christian Enyoghasi

Numerical Investigation of an Oxyacetylene Torch With Regards to an Ablative Material , Luke Fortner

Formation Control with Collision Avoidance for Fixed-Wing Unmanned Air Vehicles With Speed Constraints , Christopher Heintz

Radiative Conductivity Estimation Using Direct Approach For Fibrous Materials , Mohammad Khaleel

Modeling Human Control Behavior in Command-following Tasks , Sajad Koushkbaghi

Formation Control with Bounded Controls and Collision Avoidance: Theory and Application to Quadrotor Unmanned Air Vehicles , Zachary S. Lippay

Small-Satellite Attitude Control Using Sinusoidal Actuator Motion: Experiments on the International Space Station , K. Ryan Lush

Page 1 of 14

Advanced Search

  • Notify me via email or RSS

Browse by Author

  • Collections
  • Disciplines

Author Corner

  • Submit Research

New Title Here

Below. --> connect.

  • Law Library
  • Special Collections
  • Copyright Resource Center
  • Graduate School
  • Scholars@UK

Logo of Kentucky Research Commons

  • We’d like your feedback

Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement

Privacy Copyright

University of Kentucky ®

An Equal Opportunity University Accreditation Directory Email Privacy Policy Accessibility Disclosures

Banner

Mechanical Engineering: Find Theses and Dissertations

  • Starting Point
  • Find Reference Sources
  • Find Books and ebooks
  • Find Journals
  • Find Articles
  • Find Facts & Formulas
  • Find Properties of Materials
  • Find Patents and Trademarks
  • Find Technical Reports
  • Find Theses and Dissertations
  • Find Conferences
  • Track a Citation
  • Writing & Citing
  • Associations and Societies
  • Guidance for Authors of ASME Literature

About Theses and Dissertations

A dissertation or thesis is a document submitted in support of candidature for a degree or professional qualification presenting the author's research and findings.  (International Standard ISO 7144: Documentation — Presentation of theses and similar documents ).

For most universities in the U.S., dissertation is the term for the required submission for the PhD, and thesis refers only to the master's degree requirement.

Other Universities

T he best source to find theses is ProQuest Dissertations & Thesis Global .  Policies regarding theses and dissertation collections largely vary between universities.  So check the library website of the university of interest.

Carnegie Mellon University

Carnegie Mellon theses are now ONLINE and can be searched through the ProQuest database Dissertations & Theses @ Carnegie Mellon University that enables access to citations and abstracts of all dissertations and theses, as well as the fulltext in PDF format.  Scroll down and select Dissertations & Theses, then do a regular search. Print versions are also available in the libraries collection.

The Carnegie Mellon Library catalog , uses the term THESIS to denote both masters' theses and dissertations.  However, the number of master's theses is limited.  Within the libraries, theses are located in designated areas and are shelved in alphabetical order by the author's last name.  The catalog treats theses and dissertations like books and they can be borrowed as such.  Theses may be in print, microfiche, or microform.

  • In the catalog use the Advanced Search :  search by author, title, or keyword limiting to type THESIS.
  • For a list of theses from a specific department, use Advanced Search to combine a keyword search for the name of the department with location THESES.  E.g., search for "Dept. of Computer Science" with THESES as the location.
  • For a reasonably complete list of theses at Carnegie Mellon, use Advanced Search to search Carnegie Mellon University Dissertations in the Subject line.  

Other Countries

Center for Research Libraries:  Foreign Doctoral Dissertations CRL has more than 800,000 cataloged foreign doctoral dissertations from more than 90 countries and over 1200 institutions.

  • << Previous: Find Technical Reports
  • Next: Find Conferences >>
  • Last Updated: May 23, 2024 2:18 PM
  • URL: https://guides.library.cmu.edu/meng

BYU ScholarsArchive

BYU ScholarsArchive

Home > Engineering > Mechanical Engineering > Theses and Dissertations

Mechanical Engineering Theses and Dissertations

Theses/dissertations from 2024 2024.

Application of High-Deflection Strain Gauges to Characterize Spinal-Motion Phenotypes Among Patients with CLBP , Spencer Alan Baker

GPS-Denied Localization of Landing eVTOL Aircraft , Aaron C. Brown

Development of Deployable Arrays for Satellites through Origami-Pattern Design, Modeling, and Optimization , Nathan McKellar Coleman

Investigating Which Muscles are Most Responsible for Tremor Through Both Experimental Data and Simulation , Daniel Benjamin Free

Multiscale Characterization of Dislocation Development During Cyclic Bending Under Tension in Commercially Pure Titanium , Nathan R. Miller

Time-Dependent Strain-Resistance Relationships in Silicone Nanocomposite Sensors , Alex Mikal Wonnacott

Theses/Dissertations from 2023 2023

A Series of Improved and Novel Methods in Computer Vision Estimation , James J. Adams

Experimental Validation of a Vibration-Based Sound Power Method , Trent P. Bates

Detecting Lumbar Muscle Fatigue Using Nanocomposite Strain Gauges , Darci Ann Billmire

Heated Supersonic Jet Characteristics From Far-field Acoustical Measurements , Matthew Austin Christian

Cooperative Navigation of Autonomous Vehicles in Challenging Environments , Brendon Peter Forsgren

Heat Transfer to Rolling or Sliding Drops on Inclined Heated Superhydrophobic Surfaces , Joseph Merkley Furner

Lumbar Skin Strain Fields in the Context of Skin Adhered Wearables , Andrew Kent Gibbons

A Statistical Approach for Analyzing Expectations Alignment Between Design Teams and their Project Stakeholders , Matthew Christian Goodson

Interaction of Natural Convection and Real Gas Radiation Over a Vertical Flat Plate , Nathan Hale

Thermal Atomization of Impinging Drops on Superheated Superhydrophobic Surfaces , Eric Lee

An Inexpensive, 3D Printable, Arduino and BluRay-based, Confocal Laser and Fluorescent Scanning Thermal Microscope , Justin Loose

Gradient-Based Optimization of Highly Flexible Aeroelastic Structures , Taylor G. McDonnell

Dynamic Segmental Kinematics of the Lumbar Spine During Diagnostic Movements , Paul McMullin

Friction and Heat Transfer Modeling of the Tool and Workpiece Interface in Friction Stir Welding of AA 6061-T6 for Improved Simulation Accuracy , Ryan Melander

Designed for Better Control: Using Kinematic and Dynamic Metrics to Optimize Robot Manipulator Design , John R. Morrell

Numerical Evaluation of Forces Affecting Particle Motion in Time-Invariant Pressurized Jet Flow , Donald E. Peterson

Modeling the Influence of Vibration on Flow Through Embedded Microchannels , Joseph S. Seamons

Evaluating Effects of Urban Growth Within the Greater Salt Lake Area on Local Meteorological Conditions Using Urban Canopy Modeling , Corey L. Smithson

Soft Robot Configuration Estimation: Towards Load-Agnostic Soft-Bodied Proprioception , Christian Peter Sorensen

Perfusion Pressure-Flow Relationships in Synthetic Poroelastic Vocal Fold Models , Cooper B. Thacker

Methods for Designing Compact and Deployable Origami-Inspired Flat-Foldable Spacecraft Antennas and Other Systems , Collin Ryan Ynchausti

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Mechanisms for Improvement of Key Mechanical Properties in Polymer Powder Bed Fusion Processes , Clinton Spencer Abbott

Reformulated Vortex Particle Method and Meshless Large Eddy Simulation of Multirotor Aircraft , Eduardo J. Alvarez

Improving Ideation of User Actions Using a Novel Ideation Method , Thomas L. Ashworth

Temperature and Radiation Measurements in a Pressurized Oxy-Coal Reactor , Dustin Peter Badger

Midfoot Motion and Stiffness: Does Structure Predict Function? , Kirk Evans Bassett

The Effects of Various Inlet Distortion Profiles on Transonic Fan Performance , Andrew Michael Bedke

Optical Observation of Large Area Projection Sintering , Derek Black

Investigations into Pressure Profile and Pressure Control in Wrist-Worn Health Monitoring Devices , Roger McAllister Black

Selecting and Optimizing Origami-Based Patterns for Deployable Space Systems , Diana Stefania Bolanos

Developing an Accurate Simulation Model for Predicting Friction Stir Welding Processes in 2219 Aluminum Alloy , Kennen Brooks

An Augmented Reality Maintenance Assistant with Real-Time Quality Inspection on Handheld Mobile Devices , James Thomas Frandsen

Motion Analysis of Physical Human-Human Collaboration with Varying Modus , Seth Michael Freeman

Effects of Optical Configuration and Sampling Efficiency on the Response of Low-Cost Optical Particle Counters , Brady Scott Hales

Developing Ultra-High Resolution 3D Printing for Microfluidics , Kent Richard Hooper

Controlled Pre-Wetting of Spread Powder and Its Effects on Part Formation and Printing Parameters in Binder Jetting Additive Manufacturing , Colton G. Inkley

Enabling Successful Human-Robot Interaction Through Human-Human Co-Manipulation Analysis, Soft Robot Modeling, and Reliable Model Evolutionary Gain-Based Predictive Control (MEGa-PC) , Spencer W. Jensen

Demonstration of a Transient Hot Wire Measurement System Towards a Carbide-Based Sensor for Measuring the Thermal Conductivity of Molten Salts , Peter Charles Kasper

Measured Spectral, Directional Radiative Behavior of Corrugated Surfaces , Kyle S. Meaker

Modified Transient Hot-Wire Needle Probe for Experimentally Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Molten Salts , Brian N. Merritt

Parametric Models of Maize Stalk Morphology , Michael Alan Ottesen

A Formal Consideration of User Tactics During Product Evaluation in Early-Stage Product Development , Trenton Brady Owens

Airship Systems Design, Modeling, and Simulation for Social Impact , Daniel C. Richards

Sub-Grain Characterization of Slip Activity in BCC Tantalum , Tristan Kirby Russell

Tidally Generated Internal Waves from Dual-Ridge Topography , Ian Derik Sanderson

An Investigation into the Role of Geometrically Necessary Dislocations in Multi-Strain Path Deformation in Automotive Sheet Alloys , Rishabh Sharma

Methods for Engineers to Understand, Predict, and Influence the Social Impacts of Engineered Products , Phillip Douglas Stevenson

Principles for Using Remote Data Collection Devices and Deep Learning in Evaluating Social Impact Indicators of Engineered Products for Global Development , Bryan J. Stringham

Improvement of Ex Vivo Testing Methods for Spine Biomechanical Characterization , Aubrie Lisa Taylor

Gradient-Based Wind Farm Layout Optimization , Jared Joseph Thomas

Material Development Toward an Index-Matched Gadolinium-Based Heterogenous Capture-Gated Neutron Detector , Aaron J. Thorum

Optimization of a Smart Sensor Wearable Knee Sleeve for Measuring Skin Strain to Determine Joint Biomechanics , David Steven Wood

Multi-Material 3D-Printed Silicone Vocal Fold Models , Clayton Adam Young

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Laser Forming of Compliant Mechanisms and Flat-Foldable Furniture , Daniel Calvin Ames

Effects of Static and Dynamic Thermal Gradients in Gas Chromatography , Samuel Avila

Five Degree-of-Freedom Property Interpolation of Arbitrary Grain Boundaries via Voronoi Fundamental Zone Octonion Framework , Sterling Gregory Baird

Optimization of Solar-Coal Hybridization for Low Solar Augmentation , Aaron T. Bame

Characterizing Behaviors and Functions of Joints for Design of Origami-Based Mechanical Systems , Nathan Chandler Brown

Thermal Transport to Impinging Droplets on Superhydrophobic Surfaces , Jonathan C. Burnett

3D Permeability Characterization of Sheared Fiber Reinforcement for Liquid Composite Molding Process Simulation , Collin William Childs

The Impact of Inkjet Parameters and Environmental Conditions in Binder Jetting Additive Manufacturing , Trenton Miles Colton

Control of Post-Weld Fracture Toughness in Friction Stir Processed X-80 HSLA Steel , Nolan Tracy Crook

Sensitivity of Tremor Propagation to Model Parameters , Charles Paul Curtis Jr.

Feasibility and Impact of Liquid/Liquid-encased Dopants as Method of Composition Control in Laser Powder Bed Fusion , Taylor Matthew Davis

Design Validation of a Multi-Stage Gradually Deploying Stent , Dillon J. Despain

Analysis of Closed-Loop Digital Twin , Andrew Stuart Eyring

Completion and Initial Testing of a Pressurized Oxy-Coal Reactor , Scott Hunsaker Gardner

Method for Creating Subject-specific Models of the Wrist in both Degrees of Freedom Using Measured Muscle Excitations and Joint Torques , Blake Robert Harper

CEDAR: A Dimensionally Adaptive Flow Solver for Cylindrical Combustors , Ty R. Hosler

Modeling Current and Future Windblown Utah Dust Events Using CMAQ 5.3.1 , Zachary David Lawless

Acclimation of Contact Impedance and Wrist-Based Pulsatile Signal Measurements Through Electrical Bioimpedance , Diego A. Leon

Characterizing Bacterial Resistance and Microstructure-Related Properties of Carbon-Infiltrated Carbon Nanotube Surface Coatings with Applications in Medical Devices , Stephanie Renee Morco

Effects of Whole Body Vibration on Inhibitory Control Processes , Bennett Alan Mortensen

Exploration of Constant-Force Wristbands for a Wearable Health Device , Thomas Alexander Naylor

Effect of Ported Shroud Casing Treatment Modifications on Operational Range and Limits in a Centrifugal Compressor , Alexander A. Newell

Considering Social Impact when Engineering for Global Development , Hans Jorgen Ottosson

A New Method of Measuring Flow Stress for Improved Modeling of Friction Stir Welding , David John Prymak

Constrained Nonlinear Heuristic-Based MPC for Control of Robotic Systems with Uncertainty , Tyler James Quackenbush

A Study in Soft Robotics: Metrics, Models, Control, and Estimation , Levi Thomas Rupert

Development of an Origami Inspired Composite Deployable Structure Utilizing Compliant Joints as Surrogate Folds , Samuel Porter Smith

Development and Evaluation of an Improved Microbial Inactivation Model for Analyzing Continuous Flow UV-LED Air Treatment Systems , Cole Holtom Thatcher

Micromechanisms of Near-Yield Deformation in BCC Tantalum , Joshua Jr-Syan Tsai

Effects of Carbon-Infiltrated Carbon Nanotube Growth on the Biocompatibility of 316L Stainless Steel , Sterling Charles Voss

Active Thermography for Additive Manufacturing Processes , Nicholas Jay Wallace

System Identification of Postural Tremor in Wrist Flexion-Extension and Radial-Ulnar Deviation , Sydney Bryanna Ward

Effective Temperature Control for Industrial Friction Stir Technologies , Arnold David Wright

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Characterization of the Factors Influencing Retained Austenite Transformation in Q&P Steels , Derrik David Adams

Instructional Case Studies in the Field of Windfarm Optimization , N. Francesco Baker

LCM Permeability Characterization Over Mold Curvature , Benjamin Grant Betteridge

Linear and Nonlinear Dimensionality-Reduction-Based Surrogate Models for Real-Time Design Space Exploration of Structural Responses , Gregory David Bird

Electrochemical Sensors Enhanced by Convection and by 3D Arrays of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes , Benjamin James Brownlee

In Vivo Silicon Lance Array Transfection of Plant Cells , Taylor Andrew Brown

Real Time Design Space Exploration of Static and Vibratory Structural Responses in Turbomachinery Through Surrogate Modeling with Principal Components , Spencer Reese Bunnell

On Creases and Curved Links: Design Approaches for Predicting and Customizing Behaviors in Origami-Based and Developable Mechanisms , Jared J. Butler

Page 1 of 9

Advanced Search

  • Notify me via email or RSS

ScholarsArchive ISSN: 2572-4479

  • Collections
  • Disciplines
  • Scholarly Communication
  • Additional Collections
  • Academic Research Blog

Author Corner

Hosted by the.

  • Harold B. Lee Library

Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement

Privacy Copyright

  • Northeastern University
  • College of Engineering
  • Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
  • Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Theses and Dissertations
  • Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Master's Theses
  • Mechanical Engineering Master's Theses

Mechanical Engineering Master's Theses Collection

http://hdl.handle.net/2047/D20233324

3D design of mechanical metamaterial with negative Poisson's ratio

3D mineralization printing

3D printing battery by using cellulose nanofiber as rheology modifier and carbon resource

Active vibration control of a flexible plate system

Adaptive bone remodeling in the proximal head of femur

An adaptive controller design with a one-step delay for human machine interface systems

Adhesion in spherical contacts and in electrostatic actuation of a carbon nanotube

Adhesion measurement in photovoltaic solar systems using the blister test

Adhesion of an axisymmetric elastic body: ranges of validity of monomial approximations and a transition model.

Adhesion of cylindrical shells under the presence of surface forces

MS in Mechanical Engineering - Thesis Guidelines

Students may choose to pursue a thesis as part of their MS degree program, but only with the consent of a faculty advisor willing to supervise the thesis work. 

Preparation of a thesis representing an independent research work is a pivotal phase of this MS degree program. It provides the student with an opportunity to work on an open-ended problem, developing a particular solution that is not pre-determined and involving synthesis of knowledge and intellectual creativity. The thesis may involve an investigation that is fundamental in nature, or may be applied, incorporating theory, experimental testing and/or analytical modeling, and/or creative design. Through the thesis, candidates are expected to give evidence of competence in research and a sound understanding of the area of specialization involved. Students are also strongly encouraged to present their research at scientific conferences and publish the results of their thesis research in a peer-reviewed journal.

Students receive a grade of Y (incomplete) in these courses as long as the thesis in progress. Eventual thesis grades replace the incomplete grades upon formal completion of the thesis. In order to receive a grade of Y for ME-0296, students must submit a  thesis prospectus  that outlines the area of work, thesis goals, proposed approach and a review of relevant past work in the literature before the end of the first semester in which the student enrolls in ME-0296, typically the third semester of full-time study. An example of a recent MS thesis prospectus can be found in the Mechanical Engineering office.

The examining committee for MS candidates completing theses should be composed of three (3) members.

  • Thesis advisor (committee chair)
  • One technical expert outside of the ME department
  • A third member of the committee, often another faculty member in the ME department

The committee chair is normally a full-time, tenure-track faculty member. One committee member must be from outside the ME department. Thesis normally counts as 9 credits towards the MS degree requirements. However, a student, with the approval of his/her thesis advisor, has the option to complete a 6-credit thesis by submitting a petition form to the Department. This petition must be signed by the student and the thesis advisor and will become part of the student's academic record. With a 6-credit thesis, a student must complete an extra graduate-level course (for a total of 8 courses) to fulfill the 30-credit requirement for graduation. This option is not typically available to those intending to pursue a Ph.D. degree. 

Thesis Completion

The MS thesis is completed upon:

  • A successful oral defense (open to the community)
  • Submittal of an approved thesis to the Office of Graduate Studies

The student should consult the  Graduate Student Handbook  for specific dates and deadlines for this process in the graduation semester.

Scholar Commons

Home > STUDENT_SCHOLAR > Engineering Master's Theses > MECH_MSTR

Mechanical Engineering Master's Theses

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

Self-Diffusion in Misoriented Aluminum (111) Substrates After Jump-To-Contact , Noah Kane Manuel

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

The Swimming of Slender Bodies at Low Reynolds Numbers in Newtonian and Complex Fluids , Ke Qin

The Effect of Particle Geometry on Squirming Through a Shear-Thinning Fluid , Brandon van Gogh

Low-Reynolds-Number Locomotion via Reinforcement Learning , Zonghao Zou

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Optimal Steering of Nonredundant CMG Configurations for Spacecraft Attitude Control , Victor Hakim

Predictive energy optimization model for grid-interactive residential buildings , Patrick J. McCurdy

Investigation of an Optimized Occupancy-Driven HVAC Control Strategy and Development of a Scalable House/Grid Simulation , Kaleb Pattawi

Feasibility Study of Serial Hybrid-Electric Systems in Small Aircraft , Kyle Rosenow

Attitude Tracking Control of Spacecraft with Reaction Wheel Disturbances via Takagi-Sugeno Fuzzy Model , Ying Si

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Shape Memory Alloy Actuator and Fluid Sampler Development for Extreme Environments , Rachel Stolzman

Theses/Dissertations from 2019 2019

Theoretical Investigation of Oxide Fracture during Ultrasonic Wedge Bonding , Bethany Hsu

Swarm-Based Techniques for Adaptive Navigation Primitives , Nathan Metzger

Development of Image Analysis Technique for Quantification of Recrystalization , Bersabe Morales

Generation and Analysis of Stop-Hole Geometries for Crack-Like Structures in Auxetic Materials , Max de Jesús Barillas Velásquez

Theses/Dissertations from 2018 2018

Measuring the Vortex-Shedding Frequency Behind Staggered Cylinders in Cross-Flow , Christopher Clark

Numerical Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth of Low Porosity Auxetic Materials using the Contour J-integral , Garivalde S. Dominguez

Crystal Misorietation and Defect Generation during Contact between Two Aluminum Substrates , Milad Khajehvand

Design of Metamaterials with Graduating Poisson's Ratio through Periodic Void Patterns , Xiaoming Liang

The Effect of Ultrasonic Power in Aluminum Wire Bonding Hardness Profiles , Matthew D. McKay

Effects of Flexibility and Non-Newtonian Rheology on Low-Reynolds-Number Locomotion , Kyle Mitchell Pietrzyk

Experimental Demonstration of Usable Power from Body Heat with Wristband Thermoelectric Energy Harvester , Thomas Chandler Watson

Theses/Dissertations from 2017 2017

Influence of Slippery Pacemaker Leads on Lead-Induced Venous Occlusion , Sagar Bhatia

Object Manipulation using a Multirobot Cluster with Force Sensing , Matthew H. Chin

Evaluation of heat available from calcium chloride desiccant hydration reaction for domestic heating in San Francisco, CA , Michael Giglio

Hybrid Fuzzy Logic and Extremum Seeking Attitude Control of Solar Sail Spacecraft , Nikolai Kalnin

Material Characterization of Intermetallic Compound Formation with Respect to Thermosonic Bonding Duration , Mahin Khan

Techniques for Adaptive Navigation of Multi-Robot Clusters , Robert McDonald

Computerized Heat Transfer Modeling for Solar Powered Water Purification System , Houtan Neynavaee

Development of Economic Water Usage Sensor and Cyber-Physical Systems Co-Simulation Platform for Home Energy Saving , Joe Singer

A Molecular Dynamics Study of Self-Diffusion Along a Screw Dislocaton Core in Face-Centered Cubic Crystals , Siavash Soltanibajestani

Modeling of Particle to Particle Interactions to Adjust Effective Medium Approach Calculations of Thermal Conductivity of Carbon Nanotube Composites , Stephanie Truong

Theses/Dissertations from 2016 2016

Fuzzy Attitude Control of Solar Sail , Joshua Baculi

Effects of the Fiber Distribution and Number of Nearby Fibers on the Thermal Conductivity for Aligned CNT-Silicon Oil Composites , Diana Grandio

Passive Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (PUReFC) for Energy Storage Applications , Sandeep Lele

An Algorithm for Calculating the Inverse Jacobian of Multirobot Systems in a Cluster Space Formulation , Christopher Jude Waight

Molecular Dynamics Study on the Grain Growth in Nanocrystalline Aluminum , Jielong Yin

Theses/Dissertations from 2013 2013

Navigation & control of an automated SWATH surface vessel for bathymetric mapping , Ketan Rasal

Investigation of thermal properties and latent heat reduction mechanisms in nanofluid phase change materials , Aitor Zabalegui

Theses/Dissertations from 2012 2012

CFD study on aerodynamic effects of a rear wing/spoiler on a passenger vehicle , Mustafa Cakir

Theses/Dissertations from 2011 2011

Cluster Space Gradient Contour Tracking for Mobile Multi-robot Systems , Thomas Adamek

Robot-Assisted Manipulation: Utilizing Communication of User Intent Through Tactile Sensing and Spatial Hand Tracking , Matt Ambauen

Attitude Dynamics and Passive Control of a Thrusting, Spinning Spacecraft with Fuel Sloshing , Farhad A. Goodarzi

Spectral Solution with a Subtraction Method to Improve Accuracy , Matthew Green

A Study of Gradient Climbing Technique Using Cluster Space Control of Multi-Robot Systems , Vincent Michael Howard

Model–Based Reasoning Applied to Biological Spacecraft Payloads for Anomaly Management , Giovanni Minelli

External Reforming SOFC Coupled with Biomass-to-Syngas Reactor , Amit Patel

Theses/Dissertations from 2010 2010

Size optimization of an off-grid hybrid renewable energy system for different amounts of resources and demands , Alvaro Zanon Alonso

Linear Optimal Control of Wind Turbines in Region III , Aliakbar Dabbaghmanesh

Dynamic Control Migration Between a Base Station and a Remote Robot , Adam Davis Westgate

  • Collections
  • Disciplines

Advanced Search

  • Notify me via email or RSS

Author Corner

  • Santa Clara University
  • University Library

Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement

Privacy Copyright

The Library wishes you a nice holiday break. Buildings will be closed from 12/23/22 to 12/31/22. For a full list of closing and opening times, please visit the library hours page.

  • Undergraduate Students
  • Graduate & Medical Students
  • Medical & Clinical Faculty
  • Visiting Scholars
  • Special Collections Researchers
  • Library Staff

Brown University Theses and Dissertations

Brown University Library archives dissertations in accordance with the Brown Graduate School policy .

For dissertations published prior to 2008, please consult the following Dissertation LibGuide

Active filters

Refine your results.

  • 87 Electrical Sciences and Computer Engineering
  • 380 Engineering
  • 52 Fluid, Thermal, and Chemical Processes
  • 47 Materials Science Engineering
  • 78 Mechanics of Solids
  • 17 Bachelors Thesis
  • 283 Doctoral Dissertation
  • 80 Masters Thesis
  • Show More...
  • 151 English
  • 5 2D Materials
  • 2 3D Reconstruction
  • 3 3D scanning
  • 4 3D vision
  • 2 AFM calibration
  • 2 Adiabatic Shear Band
  • 4 Adsorption
  • 4 Aerodynamics
  • 4 Analog CMOS integrated circuits
  • 2 Animal flight
  • 2 Antibacterial
  • 3 Applied mathematics
  • 2 Approximate Computing
  • 2 Atomic force microscopy
  • 2 Bats--Flight
  • 3 Biodegradation
  • 7 Biomechanics
  • 6 Biomedical engineering
  • 3 Biomedical materials
  • 2 Biomimicry
  • 2 Biophysics
  • 2 Blind source separation
  • 3 Brain-Computer Interface
  • 5 Carbon nanotubes
  • 2 Carbon, Activated
  • 3 Catalysis
  • 2 Cell adhesion
  • 3 Cell membranes
  • 2 Cells--Mechanical properties
  • 2 Chemical engineering
  • 2 Chemical kinetics
  • 2 Classification
  • 2 Combustion
  • 6 Composite materials
  • 2 Composite materials--Delamination
  • 2 Composite materials--Mechanical properties
  • 2 Computational chemistry
  • 6 Computational fluid dynamics
  • 2 Computational modeling
  • 13 Computer Vision
  • 2 Computer architecture
  • 2 Computer simulation
  • 10 Computer vision
  • 4 Constitutive Modeling
  • 3 Contaminant transport
  • 4 Deep Learning
  • 2 Deep learning (Machine learning)
  • 4 Density Functional Theory
  • 6 Diffusion
  • 3 Discrete element method
  • 2 Dislocations
  • 2 Dislocations in metals
  • 2 Drug Delivery
  • 4 Drug delivery systems
  • 2 Dynamic strain aging
  • 2 Elastomers
  • 3 Electrical engineering
  • 2 Electrocatalysis
  • 3 Electrochemistry
  • 2 Electrophoresis
  • 6 Embedded computer systems
  • 2 Energy consumption
  • 2 Energy harvesting
  • 10 Engineering
  • 2 Environmental engineering
  • 4 Experimental
  • 2 Experimental fluid mechanics
  • 9 Finite element method
  • 7 Fluid Dynamics
  • 11 Fluid mechanics
  • 2 Fluid-structure interaction
  • 3 Fluid-structure interaction--Mathematical models
  • 8 Fracture mechanics
  • 3 Geometry, Differential
  • 2 Grain boundaries
  • 4 Granular materials
  • 6 Graphene Oxide
  • 2 Graphene crinkle
  • 5 Heterogeneous catalysis
  • 2 High performance computing
  • 2 High temperatures
  • 2 Hydrofoils
  • 2 Image analysis
  • 2 Image processing
  • 2 Infrared detectors
  • 2 Instabilities
  • 2 Kirkendall effect
  • 4 Li-ion Batteries
  • 3 Liquid crystals
  • 10 Lithium ion batteries
  • 3 Low-Power Design
  • 10 Machine Learning
  • 3 Machine learning
  • 2 Magnesium
  • 4 Materials
  • 6 Materials science
  • 4 Materials--Mechanical properties
  • 2 Mathematical models
  • 3 Mechanical engineering
  • 4 Mechanics
  • 2 Membrane wings
  • 2 Membranes (Biology)
  • 2 Metals--Hydrogen embrittlement
  • 8 Microfluidics
  • 4 Microphone arrays
  • 4 Microstructure
  • 2 Mobile computing
  • 2 Molecular Dynamics Simulation
  • 5 Molecular dynamics
  • 2 Molecular dynamics--Computer simulation
  • 2 Multi-beam Optical Stress Sensor (MOSS)
  • 3 Multiscale modeling
  • 2 Nanodiamonds
  • 3 Nanoparticles
  • 2 Nanopores
  • 5 Nanostructured materials
  • 3 Nanotechnology
  • 4 Nanowires
  • 4 Neural networks (Computer science)
  • 2 Neurotechnology (Bioengineering)
  • 2 Nonlinear systems
  • 2 Particle Tracking Velocimetry
  • 2 Pattern perception
  • 4 Perfluorinated chemicals
  • 2 Perovskite
  • 2 Perovskite Solar Cells
  • 2 Phase diagrams
  • 2 Photonics
  • 2 Photovoltaic cells
  • 2 Piezoelectric devices
  • 3 Piezoelectric materials
  • 3 Piezoelectrics
  • 2 Plasmonic
  • 4 Plasticity
  • 3 Polymeric drug delivery systems
  • 2 Porous materials
  • 2 Power managment
  • 2 Prosthesis
  • 2 Recognition
  • 3 Residual stresses
  • 2 Ruga Mechanics
  • 2 Shock (Mechanics)
  • 2 Silicon anode
  • 2 Simulation
  • 5 Solid Electrolyte Interphase
  • 17 Solid Mechanics
  • 2 Spicule (Anatomy)
  • 3 Strains and stresses
  • 2 Superplasticity
  • 2 Surface tension
  • 2 Sustainable development
  • 2 Synchronization
  • 3 Taylor Dispersion
  • 3 Terahertz technology
  • 2 Thermal analysis
  • 2 Thermal barrier coatings
  • 5 Thermodynamics
  • 2 Thick films
  • 2 Thin film microstructure
  • 4 Thin film stress
  • 8 Thin films
  • 3 Vapor pressure
  • 3 Viscoelastic materials
  • 3 Viscoelasticity
  • 5 Visual Odometry
  • 3 dislocation
  • 3 graphene oxide
  • 3 multiview stereo
  • 4 nanomaterials

Items (1-20) out of 380 results

  • title (A-Z)
  • title (Z-A)
  • date (old to new)
  • date (new to old)
  • new to the BDR
  • 10 per page
  • 20 per page
  • 50 per page
  • 100 per page

3D Edge Sketch

Thumbnail for 3D Edge Sketch

3D/1D COMPUTED FRACTIONAL FLOW RESERVE COMPARISON IN CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

Thumbnail for 3D/1D COMPUTED FRACTIONAL …

A Continuous Probabilistic Scene Model for Aerial Imagery

Thumbnail for A Continuous Probabilistic …

A first-principles investigation of refractory alloy systems united by a common computational framework

Thumbnail for A first-principles investigation …

A flexible robotic system for complex structure assembly

Thumbnail for A flexible robotic …

A High-Speed Infrared Detection System for Transient and Localized Temperature Fields in Dynamically Loaded Solids

Thumbnail for A High-Speed Infrared …

A Mechanics Study on Surface Ruga Morphologies of Soft Materials

Thumbnail for A Mechanics Study …

A Method for Large Scale Implantation of 3D Microdevice Ensembles into the Brain

Thumbnail for A Method for …

A Mobile High-Performance Neural Processing Platform for Practical Intracortical Brain-Computer Interfaces

Thumbnail for A Mobile High-Performance …

A Neurotechnological Assessment Tool to Understand How Cognitive Deficits Influence Upper Extremity Motor Recovery After Stroke

Thumbnail for A Neurotechnological Assessment …

A Novel Approach to Super-Resolution 3D Scanning

Thumbnail for A Novel Approach …

A Phenomenological Investigation of Metal-Metal Contacts at the Nanoscale for RF MEMS Switch Applications

Thumbnail for A Phenomenological Investigation …

A Real-Time Large-Aperture Microphone-Array System: Implementation Strategies and Three Algorithms - Position Calibration, Talker Localization, and Speech Isolation

Thumbnail for A Real-Time Large-Aperture …

A Slow Crack Growth Model for High-Density Polyethylene under Thermal and Chemical Environment

Thumbnail for A Slow Crack …

A Study of Curvature Localization in Multilayer Graphene

Thumbnail for A Study of …

A study on the kinetics of the phase transformation in silicon anodes in lithium ion batteries

Thumbnail for A study on …

A Study on the Mechanical Properties of Solid Electrolyte Interphase in Lithium-Ion Batteries and their Influence on the Stability of Lithium Metal Anodes during Electrodeposition

Thumbnail for A Study on …

A Tunable Collagen Microfiber Platform for Engineered Cardiac Tissue

Thumbnail for A Tunable Collagen …

A Variational Mechanics Theory for Modeling the Evolution of Crack Networks in Composite Materials with Brittle Interfaces

Thumbnail for A Variational Mechanics …

Abstract of A biocompatible hydrogel system for active pH control

Thumbnail for Abstract of A …

University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Illinois Library Wordmark

Mechanical Science and Engineering Research Resources: Dissertations & Theses

  • Find Articles & Papers
  • High-Impact Journals
  • Standards & Technical Reports
  • Patents & Government Documents
  • E-Books & Reference

Dissertations & Theses

  • Additional Resources

Easy Search - Engineering

As part of the requirements for graduate level degrees, students must complete a thesis for a Master's degree and/or dissertation for a Ph.D. Dissertations and theses are submitted to the academic department and the Graduate College and are made available through the University Library. Since 2010, all theses and dissertations are electronically deposited into IDEALS, the Illinois Digital Environment for Access to Learning and Scholarship, the University's open repository of scholarly content.

ProQuest Dissertations is a comprehensive collection of citations to dissertations and theses worldwide from 1861 to the present day. Full text PDFs are available for many Ph.D. dissertations added since 1997 and some older graduate works.

  • IDEALS (UIUC Institutional Repository) Digital copies of theses, data sets, and publications by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign faculty and students.
  • ProQuest Dissertations and Theses PDF copies of dissertations and theses from U.S. universities.

Mechanical Science & Engineering Dissertations & Theses

  • Mechanical Science & Engineering Dissertations & Theses Search Interface

Print Dissertations & Theses

Prior to 2010, print format dissertations and theses were bound and cataloged separately for the Grainger Engineering Library. Prior to 1983, each thesis was shelved by a call number assigned by subject headings. To locate them, search the online catalog for the author’s last name, title word(s) if known, and “theses” and the year granted as subject term(s).

Mechanical Science and Engineering dissertations and theses granted from 1985 to 1999 were assigned Q.629.1Ta, followed by the 2-number year, followed by starting letters from the author’s last name. (Example: A 1991 thesis by M. Doyle would be Q.629.1Ta91D). Dissertations and theses granted from 2000 to present were assigned Q.629.1Tb, followed by the 2-number year, followed by starting letters from the author’s last name. (Example: A 2006 thesis by H. Dewey would be Q.629.1Tb06De).

Mechanical Science and Engineering - Q. 621.8T

Subject Guide

Profile Photo

Ask a Librarian

  • << Previous: E-Books & Reference
  • Next: Additional Resources >>
  • Last Updated: Jun 16, 2023 9:35 AM
  • URL: https://guides.library.illinois.edu/mechse

M.S. in Mechanical Engineering (MSME)

To be unconditionally admitted to the M.S. thesis or non-thesis program, an applicant should have:

  • a Bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering or in a related field, preferably from an accredited engineering program.
  • a grade point average of at least 3.00 out of 4.00 on the last 60 semester credit hours attempted exclusive of grades received for activities such as seminars, physical education, industrial internships, etc. ( GPA Calculator )
  • an adequate score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Texas law prohibits the definition of minimum acceptable scores on the GRE. However, 160 to 163 is a typical average score on the Quantitative section across all degree programs for an admission class.
  • a minimum score of 6.5 on the IELTS or 79 on the internet-based TOEFL examination for students whose native language is not English.
  • three letters of recommendation attesting to the student’s capacity to perform in the classroom and (for applicants to the thesis program) in a research capacity. A minimum of two letters should be from tenure-track faculty members who have observed the academic performance of the applicant, and one can come from an engineering industry supervisor.
  • a statement of purpose that is consistent with the areas of instruction and (for applicants to the thesis program) the current research areas within the Department. The “Application for Financial Aid and Statement of Purpose” form available on the Application section of this website allows the applicant to specify areas of interest, and it lists issues to address in the statement of purpose.

Acceptance to the program is based on a competitive combination of academic background, GRE scores, and recommendation letters and Statement of Purpose. Domestic applicants who are not clearly competitive in all three areas may be admitted on a conditional basis at the discretion of the Director of Admissions. Nonimmigrant visa holders may not be admitted conditionally.

Program of Study for the M.S. Program with Thesis

The program requires completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours distributed as follows:

  • Nine hours of thesis credits (the first three for MECE 6399, the remaining for MECE 7399).
  • Three hours from the course MECE 6384 Methods of Applied Mathematics I.
  • Controls: MECE 6367 Control Systems Analysis and Design; MECE 6388: Optimal Control Theory; MECE 7361 System Identification.
  • Materials: MECE 6361 Mechanical Behavior of Materials; MECE 6363 Physical Metallurgy; MECE 6364: Phase Transform in Materials.
  • Mechanics: MECE 6377 Continuum Mechanics I; MECE 7397: Continuum Mechanics II.
  • Thermo-Fluids: MECE 6334 Convection Heat Transfer; MECE 6345 Fluid Dynamics I.
  • The remaining hours can be chosen from either MECE courses at 6000-level or above or a list of approved courses in the College of Engineering, the College of Natural Science and Mathematics, the Bauer College of Business, and the UH Law Center at 6000-level or above. If you choose non-MECE courses, no more than three hours from one academic unit (department or program) will be allowed. Click here  for the up-to-date list of approved courses.

If a graduate course is dual-listed with an undergraduate 5000-level section, the student must enroll in the graduate section . Approval of any course that falls outside of the description given here must be requested by petition to the Director of Graduate Studies. Approval must be received prior to enrollment in the course.

The graduation requirements for this program are a successfully defended thesis and at least a 3.00 grade point average over all courses. The Director of Graduate Studies must approve the composition of the thesis examining committee prior to the defense date. The committee consists of at least three tenure-track faculty members, with one member from outside the Department.

Defense Guidelines

Program of Study for the M.S. Program without Thesis

The program requires successful completion of 30 hours of course work distributed as follows:

  • Controls: MECE 6367 Control Systems Analysis and Design; MECE 6374: Nonlinear Control Systems.
  • Mechanics: MECE 6377 Continuum Mechanics I; MECE 7397 Advanced Mechanics of Solids.
  • Nine hours of elective courses from the MECE 6000-level or above, exclusive of graduate seminar (MECE 6111) and Graduate Project (MECE 6368).
  • The remaining hours can be chosen from either MECE courses at 6000-level or above or a list of approved courses in the College of Engineering, the College of Natural Science and Mathematics, the Bauer College of Business, and the UH Law Center at 6000-level or above. If you choose non-MECE courses, no more than three hours from one academic unit (department or program) will be allowed. Click here  for the up-to-date list of approved courses. Three hours can be satisfied by completing the directed-study Graduate Project course, MECE 6368. A statement of the intent of the directed study must be approved by petition to the Graduate Director prior to registration in MECE 6368. A report describing the results of the project must be filed with, and archived by, the instructor at the end of the course.

If a graduate course is dual-listed with an undergraduate 5000-level section, the student must enroll in the graduate section. Approval of any course that falls outside of the description given here must be requested by petition to the Director of Graduate Studies. Approval must be received prior to enrollment in the course. Non-thesis students should not enroll in research or thesis courses (6x98, 6399, 7399).

The graduation requirements for this program are at least a 3.00 grade point average over all courses, and separately, at least a 3.00 grade point average on all MECE courses, including MECE 6384. In calculating the grade point average on MECE courses, if a student receives a grade “C+” or lower on an MECE course, and repeats the course (or takes an equivalent course approved by the Director of Graduate Study) with a better grade, the lower grade is dropped in the calculation.

Thesis students should be advised of the following:

M.S. Thesis Option.  The Mechanical Engineering, MS thesis option requires the completion of 9 hours of thesis credits (MECE 6399, MECE 7399, and MECE 7399) Only one MECE 7399 course can be taken per semester, so please plan accordingly.  An S or U grade must be assigned to every thesis course until the thesis is successfully completed (defended and submitted).  A final letter grade via grade change request will be assigned to the required number of thesis hours once the student has successfully completed the thesis (defended and submitted).  In case a student registers for thesis hours over and above the nine hours that are required, these additional hours will remain as S or U on the student’s transcript.  This is a Graduate School directive and aimed at avoiding grade inflation.

  • Message from the Interim Chair
  • UH Calendar
  • Open Positions
  • Pathway Professor
  • Research Areas
  • Faculty Expertise
  • Laboratories & Facilities
  • Centers and Consortia
  • CTFM Seminars
  • Theses and Dissertations
  • Industrial Relations
  • Accreditation
  • Program Administration
  • Curriculum Flow Chart
  • Advising Information
  • Societies & Organizations
  • Capstone Design
  • Scholarships
  • Accelerated BS/MS
  • Degree Programs
  • Online Graduate Degrees
  • Non-Degree Certificate Programs
  • Graduate Courses
  • Degree Plans
  • Graduate Student Association
  • UH-Extend Online ME Graduate Programs
  • Online Programs at the Cullen College
  • Momentum Magazine

Home Page

  •   Create Account
  •   Login
  •   Home

Browsing/Searching: UR Research > Mechanical Engineering Department  >  Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. Theses

  • Browse Publications
  • Browse Authors/Contributors
  • Browse Sponsors

Viewing: 1 - 25 of 62

university thesis mechanical engineering

  • Help  | 
  • Contact Us  | 
  • About  | 
  • Privacy Policy

Current students

M.s. degree thesis requirements.

Thesis requirements apply to all students in the thesis option, including part-time and online students.

Thesis credits

Students in the thesis option need to register for a total of 12 thesis credits: ME 700.

Thesis supervisor and committee

To formally opt into the thesis track, students must complete the following three steps. There is no hard deadline by when these steps must be completed; however, students are recommended to enter the thesis track as soon as possible after enrolling in the MS program.

  • Identify their faculty supervisor
  • Identify at least two additional members of their thesis committee
  • Submit their thesis proposal , including their faculty supervisor's signature

The ME Department requires that students who plan to write a thesis have at least three committee members, including the faculty supervisor who serves as Committee Chair. These must be members of the graduate faculty. The Committee Chair must be from the Mechanical Engineering Department core faculty. Core faculty comprises Mechanical Engineering Faculty in all ranks with tenure or tenure-track appointments, and research, emeritus, and joint appointments. Faculty with adjunct and affiliate ranks are not included. The Department further requires that at least one committee member be core Mechanical Engineering faculty.

Alternatively, non-core faculty may act as Committee Chair, but in that case, the remaining members of the thesis committee must include at least two core faculty members. All M.S. thesis committees must include at least two core Mechanical Engineering faculty.

Thesis proposal

The thesis proposal should be submitted by the student, to the ME Graduate Adviser, as soon as possible after the student identifies their supervisor and before the student may begin registering for thesis credits (ME 700). The proposal should include:

  • Justification for conducting research
  • Approach and methodology
  • Schedule of work
  • Estimated cost

The ME Graduate Adviser will provide the thesis proposal to the ME Department Chair for review.  Students will be notified of the outcome of the review via a formal letter emailed to them on behalf of the Department Chair.  Students whose thesis proposals are approved must save their approval letter, as they must provide it when officially notifying the ME Department of their M.S. thesis presentation during their final quarter (see instructions below)

Thesis approval and presentation

During the student’s final quarter, they must request graduation from the Graduate School; have their written thesis approved by their committee; and make their M.S. thesis presentation (prior to the last day of class instruction) before an audience that includes their committee, other faculty, and invited guests.

Students are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with Graduate School policies about Submitting a Thesis/Dissertation during the beginning stages of research.

At least one week before their M.S. presentation, the student must formally notify the ME Department of their presentation by completing the M.S. Thesis Presentation Information web form and providing the following details:

  • Exact title
  • Date, time and room number of the presentation
  • Names and affiliations of the committee chair and additional committee members
  • Attach a copy of the thesis proposal approval letter sent to them on behalf of the Department Chair when their thesis proposal was approved

The morning of the presentation, the student must stop by the ME office to pick up their Master's Degree Graduation Committee Signature Form and Masters Supervisory Committee Approval Form. Both documents must be signed by the committee at the conclusion of the student's presentation or when the committee determines that the student's thesis is ready for submission to the Graduate School.

After their M.S. presentation, the student must return the signed  Committee Signature Form to the ME office.

By 11:59 p.m. on the last day of the quarter, students must submit a final, electronic copy of their thesis and Master's Supervisory Committee Approval Form to the Graduate School through the ETD administrator site.

Students who make their M.S. presentation but cannot submit their thesis by the deadline should consider applying for the Graduate Registration Waiver Fee  or registering for the following quarter.  Students should see the ME Graduate Adviser immediately to learn about their options in the case that they cannot submit their thesis by the deadline.

Scholar Commons

Home > USC Columbia > Engineering and Computing, College of > Mechanical Engineering > Mechanical Engineering Theses and Dissertations

Mechanical Engineering Theses and Dissertations

Theses/dissertations from 2023 2023.

Water Quality Monitoring and Mapping Using Rapidly Deployable Sensor Nodes , Mohamed Abdelwahab

Rapid Prediction of Phonon Density of States by Graph Neural Network and High-Throughput Screening of Candidate Substrates for Wide Bandgap Electronic Cooling , Mohammed Saif Ali Al-Fahdi

Wide View and Line Filter for Enhanced Image Gradient Computation and Edge Determination , Luke Bagan

Comprehensive Process Planning Optimization Framework for Automated Fiber Placement , Alex Ryan Brasington

Nondestructive Damage Detection and Stress Corrosion Crack Mitigation in Stainless Steel Plates , Andrew Philip Campbell

GPU-Enabled Genetic Algorithm Optimization and Path Planning of Robotic Arm for Minimizing Energy Consumption , Yichuan Cao

An Artificial Intelligence Approach to Fatigue Crack Length Estimation From Acoustic Emission Signals , Shane T. Ennis

Real-Time Product Structural Validation for Fused Filament Fabrication , Yanzhou Fu

A Globalized Optimization Schema for Automated Fiber Placement Processing Parameters , Matthew John Godbold

Development of System Pressure Drop Calculation Methods for Dilute Phase Pneumatic Conveying , Ross Daniel Gorman

Leveraging Automated Fiber Placement Computer Aided Process Planning Framework for Defect Validation and Dynamic Layup Strategies , Joshua Allen Halbritter

Spin Mediated Topological Black Hole in Acoustic Metamaterials Near Dirac-Like Cone Frequencies. , Mustahseen Mobashwer Indaleeb

Particle-Free High Spatial Resolution Velocimetry for Slip Flow Detection , Malhar Prasad Joshi

Acoustic-Emission Monitoring of Lap Joint Fatigue Cracks , Siddharth Kannan

Uncertainty Quantification and Constraint of Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms Based on Flow Reactor Experiments , Ana Victoria Kock

Studies of Damage Tolerance in Automated Fiber Placement Based Heterogeneous Meso-Architectured Carbon/ Epoxy Composite Laminates. , Karan Kodagali

Vision Controlled Autonomous Stakebot for Driving Stakes and Its Digital-Twin , Corey Lee Leydig

Synthesis and Characterization of Electrode Materials of Solid Oxide Cells for Energy Conversion and Storage , Haixia Li

Design of a Test Frame and Its Corresponding Test Methods for a Deployable Composite Boom , William Luther Montgomery

Elastic Sensing Skin for Monitoring of Concrete Structures , Emmanuel Abiodun Ogunniyi

Real-Time Edge Computing for Autonomous Systems , Junlin E. Ou

Development of Atomistic Machine Learning Approaches for Thermal Properties of Multi-Component Solids and Liquids , Alejandro David Rodriguez

Multidimensional Transport-Coupled Numerical Investigation of Non-premixed Low-Temperature Flame in Atmospheric and High-Pressure Systems , Sudipta Saha

An Autonomous Aerial Drone System for Water Fluorescence Mapping and Targeted Sampling , Kazi Ragib Ishraq Sanim

UAV-Deployable Sensing Network for Rapid Structural Health Monitoring , Joud Satme

Timing Deterministic Structural Model Updating Considering Impact and Fatigue Damage , Jason Michael Smith Jr.

Automated Fiber Placement Through Thickness Defect Stacking Optimization , Noah Christopher Swingle

Liquid Cooling System for a High Power, Medium Frequency, and Medium Voltage Isolated Power Converter , Hooman Taghavi

Material Development and Optimization of Solid Oxide Cells for Energy Conversion and Storage , Wanhua Wang

Experimental Observation of Sphere Symmetric Isolated Single Droplet Combustion in a Converging Channel , Mason Carrington Williams

Rational Design of Complex Oxides by Understanding Structure-Property Relationships for Energy Applications , Gene Yang

Theses/Dissertations from 2022 2022

Molten Salt Thermal Properties Database – Thermochemical Development and Thermodynamic Assessment of Various Molten Salt Systems , Johnathon Chandler Ard

High-Throughput Computation of Interfacial Thermal Management of Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors , Hao-Wen Chen

On the Influence of Afp-Induced Defects on Mechanical Behavior of Composite Laminates Under Fatigue Loading , Pierre Chevalier

Nondestructive Material Characterization Using a Fully Noncontact Ultrasonic Lamb Wave System for Thin Metals, Nuclear Cladding, and Composite Materials , Elsa Z. Compton

Shear Localization in the Metallic Nanolayered Composites , Shujing Dong

Uncrewed Aircraft Systems for Autonomous Infrastructure Inspection , Michail Kalaitzakis

Fabrication of Asymmetrical Hollow Fiber-Supported Thin Film Membranes, Stack Assembly, and Accelerated Long-Term Stability Test for Oxygen Production From Air , Myongjin Lee

Impacts of Preferential Vaporization of Multi-Component Liquid Fuels on Near-Limit Combustion Behaviors , Seungjae Lim

Fundamental Study of Multiphase Solid/Molten Carbonate Membranes for CO 2 Capture and Conversion , Xin Li

A Hybrid Experimental-Computational Study: Prediction of Flow Fields and Full-Field Pressure Distributions on Three-Tab Asphalt Roofing Shingles Subjected to Hurricane Velocity Winds , Troy A. Myers

Use of DIC Measurements With Finite Element Models For Direct Heterogeneous Material Property Determination and Wrinkle Formation During Automated Fiber Placement , Sreehari Rajan Kattil

Experimental Investigations of Yarn Pull-Out Behavior in Kevlar®: Influence of Applied Metallic Coatings and Effect of Dynamic Loading , Julie Ann Roark

Hybrid Theory-Machine Learning Methods for the Prediction of AFP Layup Quality , Christopher M. Sacco

Characterization of Nonequilibrium Plasma Discharge in High Water Vapor Concentration , Malik Mohammad Tahiyat

Advancement of New Solid-Oxide Iron-Air Battery (SOIAB) Operated on High-Temperature Oxide-Ion Chemistry , Qiming Tang

Towards Modeling of Induction Welding of Thermoplastic Laminates With a Mixed Finite Element Boundary Element Approach , Florentius Johannes van Zanten

Theses/Dissertations from 2021 2021

Experimental Investigation of Spray Cooling Integrated With a Modified Vapor Compression Refrigeration System Using Several Refrigerants , Nabeel Mukhlif Abdulrazzaq

Nano-Engineered High-Performance Copper-Water Heat Pipes , Ahmed A. Abdulshaheed

Anisotropic Wave Behavior in Isotropic Material With Orthogonal Surface Perturbation , Khaleda Akter

Preferential Vaporization Potential of Crude Oils and its Impact on Flame Flashback Behaviors , Ayuob Al wahaibi

Reduced Order Modeling Based on Hybrid Snapshot Simulation , Feng Bai

Leveraging Digital Transformation to Build the Technology Of Tomorrow Using Yesterday’s Equipment , Evan Barnett

A Multi Physics Integrated Solution for a High-pressure Stage Turbine Efficiency and Durability , Sanjay Chopra

Mechanical Strength of Sic Composite Tubing Under Uniaxial and Multiaxial Loading , Colton Corley

Purification of Uranium Tetrafluoride Using Ammonium Bifluoride , Kyle Robert Foster

Fabrication and Characterization of Micro/Nanostructured Ceramic Device for Energy Conversion , Yun Gan

An Acoustic Emission and Artificial Intelligence Approach to Structural Health Monitoring for Aerospace Application , Joseph Chandler Garrett

Optimizing Heat Pipes With Partially-Hybrid Mesh-Groove Wicking Structures and Its Capillary-Flowing Analysis by Simulation , Guanghan Huang

Nondestructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring of Manufacturing Flaws and Operational Damage in Composite Structures , Robin James

Prediction of Residual Stress and Distortion in Laser Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing , Bhanuprakash Sairam Kosaraju

Instrumentation and Experimentation Development for Robotic Systems , Tristan Kyzer

Enhanced Flow Boiling and Bubble Dynamics with HFE7100 & DI Water in Interconnected Microchannels , Jiaxuan Ma

Development of Acoustic Metamaterial Noise Barriers and Simultaneously Harvesting Energy Using Smart Materials , Fariha Mir

Development of a Rapid Compression and Expansion Machine To Characterize the Ignition Propensity of Multi-Component Liquid Fuels , Jonathan Joseph Morreale

Searching Extreme Mechanical Properties Using Active Machine Learning and Density Functional Theory , Joshua Ojih

Effect of Crystal Size on the Failure Mechanics Of Polymer Bonded Explosives , Chizoba Onwuka

Experimental Investigation of Single and Two-Phase Heat Transfer Performance in Microchannels with Surface Modifications and Multiple Inlet Restrictors , Saad Kadham Oudah

Separate Effects Tests for Studying Thermal Gradient Driven Cracking in UO 2 Pellets Undergoing Resistive Heating , Sobhan Patnaik

Effects of Overmolding Process Parameters on Bondzone Quality , Vivek Varma Penumetsa

An Investigation of the Ignition Propensities of Fuels Perturbed by Nitrogen Monoxide , Ackmer Robinson III

Multimodal Robotic Health in Future Factories Through IIot, Data Analytics, and Virtual Commissioning , Clint Saidy

Grafting Based Thermoplastic-Thermoset Bonding for Aerospace Structures , Saurabh Vaidya

Simulation-Based and Data-Driven Approaches to Industrial Digital Twinning Towards Autonomous Smart Manufacturing Systems , Kaishu Xia

Multi-Fidelity Surrogate and Reduced-Order Model-Based Microfluidic Concentration Gradient Generator Design , Haizhou Yang

Implementation of Stereo Digital Image Correlation for In-Plane Strain Measurements to Quantify the Anisotropic Behavior, Plastic Flow, and Strain Hardening of Extruded Aluminum Alloy , Farzana Yasmeen

Application of Digital Transformation in the Water Desalination Industry to Develop Smart Desalination Plants , Ibrahim Yousif

Theses/Dissertations from 2020 2020

Fundamental Understanding of Plasma Discharge Formation in Liquid and Multiphase Configurations Through Multiphysics Modeling , Ali Charchi Aghdam

Acoustic and Ultrasonic Beam Focusing Through Aberrative and Attenuative Layers , Hossain Ahmed

Kinetic and Multidimensional Transport Coupled Numerical Investigation of Nox Formation During Syngas and Natural Gas Combustion , Sheikh Farhan Ahmed

Efficient Design Optimization Methodology for Manufacturable Variable Stiffness Laminated Composite Structures , Mazen Albazzan

Design and Testing of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Plasma Reactor , Gregory Belk

Artificial Intelligence Approaches for Structural Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures , Kimberly A. Cardillo

Autonomous Drone-Based Sensor Package Deployment to the Underside of Structures , Sabrina Rose Carroll

Development of a CFD Model for the Drying of Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel , Nathaniel Cooper

Local Eigenvalue Modification Procedure for Real-Time Model Updating of Structures Experiencing High-Rate Dynamic Events , Claire Rae Drnek

Damage Evaluation of Rolling Element Bearings for Shipboard Machinery , Brenna Lyn Feirer

Automation of Process Planning for Automated Fiber Placement , Joshua A. Halbritter

Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Modeling and Experiments for Structural Health Monitoring and Non-Destructive Evaluation , Roshan Prakash Joseph

Lamb Wave Nondestructive Evaluation and Imaging on Plate-Like Structures , Zhaoyun Ma

Guided-Wave SHM and NDE of Composite Structures: Modeling and Experiments , Hanfei Mei

Effects of Material Characteristics and Equipment Configuration on Profilometry Scanning Results for Error Mitigation in Automated Fiber Placement , Jacob Ondeck

Steady-State and Transient Study of Flow Boiling in Microchannels With Microgrooves/Micronozzles , Congcong Ren

Strain Components in Friction Stir Extrusion , Megan Ryan

Design of Bio-Inspired Multifrequency Acoustic Sensors and Metamaterial Energy Harvesting Smart Structures , Mohammadsadegh Saadatzi

Influence of Dynamic Multiaxial Transverse Loading on Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene Single Fiber Failure , Frank David Thomas

The Manufacturing and Characterization of Pseudo-Woven Carbon Fiber Composite Architectures for Enhanced Damage Tolerance , Cyrus Vakili Rad

Tow-Path Characterization for Automated Fiber Placement , Roudy Wehbe

Exploration and Evaluation of Novel Cathode Materials for Intermediate-to-Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells , Chunyang Yang

Enhancing Single and Two-Phase Heat Transfer of Microgap Heat Sinks Using Nano-Structure Coatings , Yueyang Zhao

Advanced Search

  • Notify me via email or RSS
  • Collections
  • Disciplines

Submissions

  • Give us Feedback
  • University Libraries

Home | About | FAQ | My Account | Accessibility Statement

Privacy Copyright

  • Senior Thesis

For an A.B. degree, a research thesis is strongly encouraged but not required; a thesis is necessary to be considered for High or Highest Honors. Additionally, a thesis will be particularly useful for students interested in pursuing graduate engineering research. 

In the S.B. degree programs, every student completes a design thesis as part of the required senior capstone design course (ES 100hf). During the year-long course students design and prototype a solution to an engineering problem of their own choice.

The guide below provides an overview of the requirement for an A.B. thesis in Mechanical Engineering:

  • Engineering A.B. Thesis Guide

Some recent thesis examples across all of SEAS can be found on the Harvard DASH (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard) repository .

Mechanical Engineering Senior thesis examples:

  • Prototyped a mug to keep tea the perfect drinking temperature using a novel wax substrate for thermal control

Engineering A.B. Thesis Extensions and Late Submissions

Thesis extensions will only be granted in extraordinary circumstances, such as hospitalization or grave family emergency. An extension may only be granted by the DUS (who may consult with thesis advisor, resident dean, and readers). For joint concentrators, the other concentration should also support the extension. To request an extension, please email your ADUS or DUS, ideally several business days in advance. Please note that any extension must be able to fall within our normal grading, feedback, and degree recommendation deadline, so extensions of more than a few days are usually impossible.

Late submissions of thesis work will not be accepted. A thesis is required for joint concentrators, and a late submission will prevent a student from fulfilling this requirement. Please plan ahead and submit your thesis by the required deadline.

Senior Thesis Submission Information for A.B. Programs

Senior A.B. theses are submitted to SEAS and made accessible via the Harvard University Archives and optionally via  DASH  (Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard), Harvard's open-access repository for scholarly work.

In addition to submitting to the department and thesis advisors & readers, each SEAS senior thesis writer will use an online submission system to submit an electronic copy of their senior thesis to SEAS; this electronic copy will be kept at SEAS as a non-circulating backup. Please note that the thesis won't be published until close to or after the degree date. During this submission process, the student will also have the option to make the electronic copy publicly available via DASH.  Basic document information (e.g., author name, thesis title, degree date, abstract) will also be collected via the submission system; this document information will be available in  HOLLIS , the Harvard Library catalog, and DASH (though the thesis itself will be available in DASH only if the student opts to allow this). Students can also make code or data for senior thesis work available. They can do this by posting the data to the Harvard  Dataverse  or including the code as a supplementary file in the DASH repository when submitting their thesis in the SEAS online submission system.

Whether or not a student opts to make the thesis available through DASH, SEAS will provide an electronic record copy of the thesis to the Harvard University Archives. The Archives may make this record copy of the thesis accessible to researchers in the Archives reading room via a secure workstation or by providing a paper copy for use only in the reading room.  Per University policy , for a period of five years after the acceptance of a thesis, the Archives will require an author’s written permission before permitting researchers to create or request a copy of any thesis in whole or in part. Students who wish to place additional restrictions on the record copy in the Archives must contact the Archives  directly, independent of the online submission system. 

Students interested in commercializing ideas in their theses may wish to consult Dr. Fawwaz Habbal , Senior Lecturer on Applied Physics, about patent protection. See Harvard's policy for information about ownership of software written as part of academic work.

In Materials Science & Mechanical Engineering

  • Undergraduate Engineering at Harvard
  • Concentration Requirements
  • How to Declare
  • Who are my Advisors?
  • Sophomore Forum
  • ABET Information
  • Research for Course Credit (ES 91R)
  • AB/SM Information
  • Peer Concentration Advisors (PCA) Program
  • Student Organizations
  • How to Apply
  • PhD Timeline
  • PhD Model Program (Course Guidelines)
  • Qualifying Exam
  • Committee Meetings
  • Committee on Higher Degrees
  • Research Interest Comparison
  • Collaborations
  • Cross-Harvard Engagement
  • Clubs & Organizations
  • Centers & Initiatives
  • Alumni Stories
  • History of Engineering Mechanics

Student Guide

Master's Programme in Mechanical Engineering

Programme main page.

The master’s thesis is a 30-credit entity that also includes the maturity test and presentation of the thesis. The master's thesis is a piece of applied research and is written on a topic related to the advanced studies of the degree programme. The key goal of the master’s thesis is solving a problem relevant to the field of study based on existing scientific knowledge in compliance with the principles of responsible conduct of research.

Master's thesis process

You will find detailed information, instructions and deadlines related to the master's thesis process from this section. 

How to get started

  • Read thesis guidelines. You can find the pdf of versions of the guide in English and Finnish at the end of this page. 
  • Search for thesis topic. If you are planning to do your thesis for a company, more information:  Study and educational projects – contracts with organisations outside Aalto University | Aalto University
  • Discuss the thesis topic with the supervisor and ask for a written approval. The written approval can be either a screenshot of an email conversation (containing full topic of thesis) or a topic agreement form completed by the supervisor. You can find a template for the form at the end of this page. 
  • Submit the application for the thesis topic in eAge system . After you have supervisor's approval for thesis topic, you can apply thesis topic approval. You can find the deadlines to submitting thesis topic applications under Thesis deadlines.  The thesis topic, thesis language and the thesis supervisor and advisor(s) are approved by the degree programme committee. The thesis topic and the completed thesis cannot be approved at the same degree committee meeting. The approved topic is always valid for one year.

Writing the master's thesis

  • Attend the master’s thesis seminar, if one is organised by your programme. Participation is usually voluntary but recommended.
  • Get to know the thesis evaluation criteria. You can find the evaluation criteria and guidelines ( in English and Finnish ) at the end of this page.
  • Thesis template. You can use this template for the thesis:  Word Thesis template for all Aalto University schools .
  • Submit the completed thesis to the Turnitin system and to your supervisor. Turnitin is an online platform that reviews the thesis text for originality. Ask your supervisor about their Turnitin practices. For more information see:  Turnitin an originality checking and feedback software .
  • Prepare thesis presentation.  The thesis process also includes a final thesis presentation which is agreed with the supervisor. The presentation must be held at the latest when applying for the approval and evaluation of thesis.
  • Thesis abstract as a maturity test.  The thesis process involves demonstrating conversance with the field and the student's knowledge about the topic, which is done by completing a "maturity test".   

Thesis presentation and maturity test

As part of the thesis process, you are required to present the final thesis and write a maturity test. 

  • Thesis presentation . See the programme specific requirements and instructions for the thesis presentation. The presentation must be held at the latest when applying for the approval and evaluation of thesis.
  • Maturity test . The abstract of the thesis will serve as a maturity test. The maturity test aims to prove your expertise in the field and topic area of your thesis. Agree the completion of the maturity test with your thesis supervisor before applying for the approval of the thesis. The maturity test is graded either pass or fail. Note: If you have been educated in Finnish or Swedish and have not demonstrated language proficiency previously in a maturity test for a Bachelor's degree, you have to write the maturity test in the language in which you have been educated at the primary and secondary levels (Finnish or Swedish). For more information, please see  Maturity demonstration (in the language of education)  and contact the planning officer of your programme. 

Get your thesis approved

  • Once you have permission to publish from the supervisor, submit the thesis approval and evaluation application in eAge . 
  • Attach the completed, corrected and final version of the thesis to the application and make sure it is the correct PDF/A format . See Aalto University instructions for converting and checking the file format . The thesis file cannot be corrected or changed after the approved thesis has arrived in Aaltodoc publication archive.
  • Check the thesis deadlines and the processing dates in the table below. These deadlines are absolute, and no late applications will be processed. You will be notified via eAge once the thesis has been approved and evaluated by the degree committee meeting.

Thesis deadlines

*Deadline 31.7.2024 : If you are applying for MSc thesis approval and evaluation on deadline 31st of July, contact your thesis supervisor well before mid-June to agree on the schedules during summer holiday season. Also, check that your personal study plan is up-to-date. Contact your programme coordinator or planning officer in any unclear situations. **Deadline 31.12.2024 : Notice the holiday season. Contact your thesis supervisor well before Christmas (24.12.2024) .

Are you also graduating?

If you have completed all your studies and master's thesis is your final study attainment, you can submit a request for the degree certificate at Sisu at same time with your application for the approval of your master's thesis.

Before requesting the degree certificate, check that your personal study plan is up-to-date and accepted . Contact your programme coordinator or planning officer in any unclear situations. You can find the specific guidelines and timetables on programme's webpage, under "Graduating".

If you have any questions, please select the contact based on your programme: 

Advanced Energy Solutions, please select the contact based on your major:

Additional information

Aaltodoc publication archive.

Aaltodoc publication archive consists of full text materials produced in the university, such as theses, journal articles, conference publications and research materials produced by the schools of Aalto University.

publication platform training

Errors in approved theses are corrected on an errata page

Instructions on the use of errata page

Student Guide illustration, applications, instructions and guidelines

Turnitin - an aid for skilful writing and prevention of plagiarism

Feedback about the page

  • Published: 18.12.2022
  • Updated: 28.3.2024

Candidate Checklist Thesis - Mechanical Engineering - Purdue University

Purdue University

Candidate Checklist for THESIS MASTER’S DEGREE

It is your responsibility to make sure all degree requirements have been met, before filing for candidacy.  Registering for candidacy 3 times in a row attracts a fee of $200 from the Purdue Graduate School.

To help review if all degree requirements have been met, please check against the list below:

  • Cumulative GPA is at least 3.0
  • Minimum of 21 credits of graduate level coursework (500- and 600- level) that are technical and quantitative-in-content
  • Includes 3 credit hours from the Math (MA) department
  • Incudes another 3 credit hours from Math or an approved applied math course.
  • Does not include any independent study coursework
  • At least 9 credit hours of thesis research completed with “S”
  • Final Exam has been held, or will be held before the semester deadline, early enough to get completely approved before the deadline. (See the Final Exam page for more details).
  • Deposit date will be at least a day before the semester deadline.
  • If registering as CAND 991, are you registered for research in the candidate semester?
  • If registering as CAND 992 or 993, research registration took place in the semester before the candidate semester?

Will you be continuing on for a PhD? 

If yes, have you submitted the internal PhD application?   (Should be done before the semester ends, or otherwise you’ll need to apply through Slate and meet all application requirements.)  You will need to have a faculty advisor agree to support you before applying for the PhD program.

ME Graduate Office 516 Northwestern Ave. (4th floor of Wang Hall) West Lafayette, IN 47906 [email protected] (765) 494-5730 Virtual office hours available every Tues/Wed/Thurs

  • Skip to Content
  • Bulletin Home

MIT Bulletin

  • Schools >
  • School of Engineering >
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Around Campus
  • Academic Program
  • Administration
  • Arts at MIT
  • Campus Media
  • Fraternities, Sororities, and Independent Living Groups
  • Medical Services
  • Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center
  • Religious Organizations
  • Student Government
  • Work/​Life and Family Resources
  • Advising and Support
  • Digital Learning
  • Disability and Access Services
  • Information Systems and Technology
  • Student Financial Services
  • Writing and Communication Center
  • Major Course of Study
  • General Institute Requirements
  • Independent Activites Period
  • Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program
  • First-​Year Advising Seminars
  • Interphase EDGE/​x
  • Edgerton Center
  • Grading Options
  • Study at Other Universities
  • Internships Abroad
  • Career Advising and Professional Development
  • Teacher Licensure and Education
  • ROTC Programs
  • Financial Aid
  • Medical Requirements
  • Graduate Study at MIT
  • General Degree Requirements
  • Other Institutions
  • Registration
  • Term Regulations and Examination Policies
  • Academic Performance and Grades
  • Policies and Procedures
  • Privacy of Student Records
  • Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab
  • Art, Culture, and Technology Program
  • Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
  • Center for Archaeological Materials
  • Center for Bits and Atoms
  • Center for Clinical and Translational Research
  • Center for Collective Intelligence
  • Center for Computational Science and Engineering
  • Center for Constructive Communication
  • Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research
  • Center for Environmental Health Sciences
  • Center for Global Change Science
  • Center for International Studies
  • Center for Real Estate
  • Center for Transportation &​ Logistics
  • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
  • Concrete Sustainability Hub
  • D-​Lab
  • Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation
  • Division of Comparative Medicine
  • Haystack Observatory
  • Initiative on the Digital Economy
  • Institute for Medical Engineering and Science
  • Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies
  • Institute for Work and Employment Research
  • Internet Policy Research Initiative
  • Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change
  • Knight Science Journalism Program
  • Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research
  • Laboratory for Financial Engineering
  • Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems

Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity

  • Laboratory for Nuclear Science
  • Legatum Center for Development and Entrepreneurship
  • Lincoln Laboratory
  • Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship
  • Materials Research Laboratory
  • McGovern Institute for Brain Research
  • Microsystems Technology Laboratories
  • MIT Center for Art, Science &​ Technology
  • MIT Energy Initiative
  • MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative
  • MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research
  • MIT Media Lab
  • MIT Office of Innovation
  • MIT Open Learning
  • MIT Portugal Program
  • MIT Professional Education
  • MIT Sea Grant College Program
  • Nuclear Reactor Laboratory
  • Operations Research Center
  • Picower Institute for Learning and Memory
  • Plasma Science and Fusion Center
  • Research Laboratory of Electronics
  • Simons Center for the Social Brain
  • Singapore-​MIT Alliance for Research and Technology Centre
  • Sociotechnical Systems Research Center
  • Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research
  • Women's and Gender Studies Program
  • Architecture (Course 4)
  • Art and Design (Course 4-​B)
  • Art, Culture, and Technology (SM)
  • Media Arts and Sciences
  • Planning (Course 11)
  • Urban Science and Planning with Computer Science (Course 11-​6)
  • Aerospace Engineering (Course 16)
  • Engineering (Course 16-​ENG)
  • Biological Engineering (Course 20)
  • Chemical Engineering (Course 10)
  • Chemical-​Biological Engineering (Course 10-​B)
  • Chemical Engineering (Course 10-​C)
  • Engineering (Course 10-​ENG)
  • Engineering (Course 1-​ENG)
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6-​2)
  • Electrical Science and Engineering (Course 6-​1)
  • Computation and Cognition (Course 6-​9)
  • Computer Science and Engineering (Course 6-​3)
  • Computer Science and Molecular Biology (Course 6-​7)
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (MEng)
  • Computer Science and Molecular Biology (MEng)
  • Health Sciences and Technology
  • Archaeology and Materials (Course 3-​C)
  • Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3)
  • Materials Science and Engineering (Course 3-​A)
  • Materials Science and Engineering (PhD)
  • Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)
  • Mechanical and Ocean Engineering (Course 2-​OE)
  • Engineering (Course 2-​A)
  • Nuclear Science and Engineering (Course 22)
  • Engineering (Course 22-​ENG)
  • Anthropology (Course 21A)
  • Comparative Media Studies (CMS)
  • Writing (Course 21W)
  • Economics (Course 14-​1)
  • Mathematical Economics (Course 14-​2)
  • Data, Economics, and Design of Policy (MASc)
  • Economics (PhD)
  • Global Studies and Languages (Course 21G)
  • History (Course 21H)
  • Linguistics and Philosophy (Course 24-​2)
  • Philosophy (Course 24-​1)
  • Linguistics (SM)
  • Literature (Course 21L)
  • Music (Course 21M-​1)
  • Theater Arts (Course 21M-​2)
  • Political Science (Course 17)
  • Science, Technology, and Society/​Second Major (STS)
  • Business Analytics (Course 15-​2)
  • Finance (Course 15-​3)
  • Management (Course 15-​1)
  • Biology (Course 7)
  • Chemistry and Biology (Course 5-​7)
  • Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Course 9)
  • Chemistry (Course 5)
  • Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (Course 12)
  • Mathematics (Course 18)
  • Mathematics with Computer Science (Course 18-​C)
  • Physics (Course 8)
  • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  • Institute for Data, Systems, and Society
  • Chemistry and Biology
  • Climate System Science and Engineering
  • Computation and Cognition
  • Computer Science and Molecular Biology
  • Computer Science, Economics, and Data Science
  • Humanities and Engineering
  • Humanities and Science
  • Urban Science and Planning with Computer Science
  • African and African Diaspora Studies
  • American Studies
  • Ancient and Medieval Studies
  • Applied International Studies
  • Asian and Asian Diaspora Studies
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Energy Studies
  • Entrepreneurship and Innovation
  • Environment and Sustainability
  • Latin American and Latino/​a Studies
  • Middle Eastern Studies

Polymers and Soft Matter

  • Public Policy
  • Russian and Eurasian Studies
  • Statistics and Data Science
  • Women's and Gender Studies
  • Advanced Urbanism
  • Computational and Systems Biology

Computational Science and Engineering

  • Design and Management (IDM &​ SDM)
  • Joint Program with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Leaders for Global Operations

  • Microbiology
  • Music Technology and Computation
  • Operations Research
  • Real Estate Development
  • Social and Engineering Systems
  • Supply Chain Management

Technology and Policy

  • Transportation
  • School of Architecture and Planning
  • School of Engineering
  • Aeronautics and Astronautics Fields (PhD)
  • Artificial Intelligence and Decision Making (Course 6-​4)
  • Biological Engineering (PhD)
  • Nuclear Science and Engineering (PhD)
  • School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
  • Humanities (Course 21)
  • Humanities and Engineering (Course 21E)
  • Humanities and Science (Course 21S)
  • Sloan School of Management
  • School of Science
  • Brain and Cognitive Sciences (PhD)
  • Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences Fields (PhD)
  • Interdisciplinary Programs (SB)
  • Climate System Science and Engineering (Course 1-​12)
  • Computer Science, Economics, and Data Science (Course 6-​14)
  • Interdisciplinary Programs (Graduate)
  • Computation and Cognition (MEng)
  • Computational Science and Engineering (SM)
  • Computational Science and Engineering (PhD)
  • Computer Science, Economics, and Data Science (MEng)
  • Leaders for Global Operations (MBA/​SM and SM)
  • Music Technology and Computation (SM and MASc)
  • Real Estate Development (SM)
  • Statistics (PhD)
  • Supply Chain Management (MEng and MASc)
  • Technology and Policy (SM)
  • Transportation (SM)
  • Aeronautics and Astronautics (Course 16)
  • Aerospace Studies (AS)
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering (Course 1)
  • Comparative Media Studies /​ Writing (CMS)
  • Comparative Media Studies /​ Writing (Course 21W)
  • Computational and Systems Biology (CSB)
  • Computational Science and Engineering (CSE)
  • Concourse (CC)
  • Data, Systems, and Society (IDS)
  • Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (Course 12)
  • Economics (Course 14)
  • Edgerton Center (EC)
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Course 6)
  • Engineering Management (EM)
  • Experimental Study Group (ES)
  • Global Languages (Course 21G)
  • Health Sciences and Technology (HST)
  • Linguistics and Philosophy (Course 24)
  • Management (Course 15)
  • Media Arts and Sciences (MAS)
  • Military Science (MS)
  • Music and Theater Arts (Course 21M)
  • Naval Science (NS)
  • Science, Technology, and Society (STS)
  • Special Programs
  • Supply Chain Management (SCM)
  • Urban Studies and Planning (Course 11)
  • Women's and Gender Studies (WGS)

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering is concerned with the responsible development of products, processes, and power, at scales ranging from molecules to large and complex systems. Mechanical engineering principles and skills are involved at some stage during the conception, design, development, and manufacture of every human-made object with moving parts. Many innovations crucial to our future will have their roots in the world of mass, motion, forces, and energy—the world of mechanical engineers.

Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest and most versatile of the engineering professions. This is reflected in the portfolio of current activities in the Department of Mechanical Engineering (MechE), one that has widened rapidly in the past decade. Today, our faculty are involved in a wide range of projects, including designing tough hydrogels, using nanostructured surfaces for clean water and thermal management of microelectronics, developing efficient methods for robust design, the building of robotics for land and underwater exploration, creating optimization methods that autonomously generate decision-making strategies, developing driverless cars, inventing cost-effective photovoltaic cells, developing thermal and electrical energy storage systems, using acoustics to explore the ocean of one of Jupiter's moons, studying the biomimetics of swimming fish for underwater sensing applications, developing physiological models for metastatic cancers, inventing novel medical devices, exploring 3D printing of nanostructures and macrostructures, and developing coatings to create nonstick surfaces.

The department carries out its mission with a focus on the seven areas of excellence described below. Our education and research agendas are informed by these areas, and these are the areas in which we seek to impassion the best undergraduate and graduate students.

Area 1: Mechanics: Modeling, Experimentation, and Computation (MMEC). At the heart of mechanical engineering lies the ability to measure, describe, and model the physical world of materials and mechanisms. The MMEC area focuses on teaching the fundamental principles, essential skills, and scientific tools necessary for predicting thermo-mechanical phenomena and using such knowledge in rational engineering design. We provide students with the foundations in experimental, modeling, and computational skills needed to understand, exploit, and enhance the thermo-physical behavior of advanced engineering devices and systems, and to make lifelong creative contributions at the forefront of the mechanical sciences and beyond. Research in the MMEC area focuses on four key thrusts:

  • Computational mechanics
  • Fluid dynamics and transport
  • Mechanics of solid materials
  • Nonlinear dynamics

The fundamental engineering principles embodied in these topics can be applied over a vast range of force, time, and length scales, and applications of interest in the MMEC area span the spectrum from the nano/micro world to the geophysical domain. A Course 2-A track is offered in this area.

Area 2: Design, Manufacturing, and Product Development. Design, manufacturing, and product development is the complete set of activities needed to bring new devices and technologies to the marketplace. These activities span the entire product life-cycle, from the identification of a market opportunity or need, through design, testing, manufacture and distribution, and end of useful life. Our work includes everything from understanding the voice of the customer to finding new ways of processing materials to improving product performance and tracking product flow through a distribution network. A central component of this area is the design and construction of novel equipment, either for consumer products or for industrial uses. This spans scales from meters to microns, and involves mechanical, electronic and electromechanical devices. Many MechE students apply design, manufacturing, and product development skills and techniques to extracurricular design work for organizations and student activities such as Design that Matters, Formula SAE, Satellite Engineering Team, and the Solar Electric Vehicle Team. Some projects lead to flagship products for new companies. A Course 2-A track in product development is offered along with a unique Master of Engineering degree in manufacturing.

Area 3: Controls, Instrumentation, and Robotics. The mission in this area is to promote research and education for automating, monitoring, and manipulating systems. The focus is on system-level behavior that emerges primarily from interactions and cannot be explained from individual component behavior alone. We seek to identify fundamental principles and methodologies that enable systems to exhibit intelligent, goal-oriented behavior, and develop innovative instruments to monitor, manipulate, and control systems. The core competencies in which we seek to excel are:

  • Methodologies for understanding system behavior through physical modeling, identification, and estimation.
  • Technologies for sensors and sensor networks; actuators and energy transducers; and systems for monitoring, processing, and communicating information.
  • Fundamental theories and methodologies for analyzing, synthesizing, and controlling systems; learning and adapting to unknown environments; and effectively achieving task goals.

We seek to apply our core competencies to diverse areas of social, national, and global needs. These include health care, security, education, medical and security related imaging, space and ocean exploration, and autonomous systems in air, land, and underwater environments. We also offer a Course 2-A track in this area.

Area 4: Energy Science and Engineering. Energy is one of the most significant challenges facing humanity and is a central focus of mechanical engineering's contribution to society. Our research focuses on efficient and environmentally friendly energy conversion and utilization from fossil and renewable resources. Programs in the department cover many of the fundamental and technological aspects of energy, with applications to high performance combustion engines, batteries and fuel cells, thermoelectricity and photovoltaics, wind turbines, and efficient buildings. Work in very-low-temperature thermodynamics includes novel sub-Kelvin refrigeration. Efforts in high-temperature thermodynamics and its coupling with transport and chemistry include internal combustion engine analysis, design, and technology; control of combustion dynamics and emissions; thermoelectric energy conversion; low- and high-temperature fuel cells; and novel materials for rechargeable batteries and thermal energy storage. Work in heat and mass transport covers thermal control of electronics from manufacturing to end use; microscale and nanoscale transport phenomena; desalination and water purification; high heat flux engineering; and energy-efficient building technology. Work in renewable energy encompasses the design of offshore and floating wind turbines and tidal wave machines; and analysis and manufacturing of photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic devices. Energy storage, hybrid systems, fuel synthesis, and integration of energy systems are active research areas in the department. We also offer a Course 2-A track in energy.

Area 5: Ocean Science and Engineering. The oceans cover over 70 percent of the planet's surface and constitute a critical element in our quality of life, including the climate and the resources and food that we obtain from the sea. This area's objectives are to support the undergraduate and graduate programs in ocean engineering, including the naval construction program, the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Applied Oceanography and the Course 2-OE degree in mechanical and ocean engineering. It also serves as the focus point of ocean-related research and education at MIT. Major current research activities include marine robotics and navigation of underwater vehicles and smart sensors for ocean mapping and exploration; biomimetics to extract new understanding for the development of novel ocean systems studying marine animals; the study of the mechanics and fluid mechanics of systems for ultradeep ocean gas and oil extraction; ocean wave and offshore wind energy extraction; the free surface hydrodynamics of ocean-going vehicles; the development of advanced naval and commercial ships and submersibles, including the all-electric ship; the mechanics and crashworthiness of ocean ships and structures; ocean transportation systems; ocean acoustics for communication, detection, and mapping in the ocean; and adaptive sampling and multidisciplinary forecasting of the ocean behavior. The design of complex ocean systems permeates all these areas and provides the cohesive link for our research and teaching activities.

Area 6: Bioengineering. Engineering analysis, design, and synthesis are needed to understand biological processes and to harness them successfully for human use. Mechanical forces and structures play an essential role in governing the function of cells, tissues, and organs. Our research emphasizes integration of molecular-to-systems–level approaches to probe the behavior of natural biological systems, and to design and build new systems, ranging from analysis of gene regulatory networks to microfluidic assays for drug screening or new technologies for quantitative, high-throughput biomedical imaging. Emphasis is also placed on creating new physiological or disease models, including multicellular engineered living systems, using nano- and micro-fabrication as well as new biomaterials. Applications include understanding, diagnosing, and treating diseases such as atherosclerosis, osteoarthritis, spinal cord injury or liver failure; new tools for drug discovery and drug development; and tissue-engineered scaffolds and devices for in vivo regeneration of tissues and organs. Work also includes design and fabrication of new devices and tools for rehabilitation of stroke victims and for robotic surgery. We offer many elective subjects at the undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as a bioengineering track in Course 2-A.

Area 7: Nano/Micro Science and Technology. The miniaturization of devices and systems of ever-increasing complexity has been a fascinating and productive engineering endeavor during the past few decades. Near and long term, this trend will be amplified as physical understanding of the nano world expands, and widespread commercial demand drives the application of manufacturing to micro- and nanosystems. Micro- and nanotechnology can have tremendous impact on a wide range of mechanical systems. Examples include microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices and products that are already deployed as automobile airbag sensors, smart phone parts, and for drug delivery; stronger and lighter nanostructured materials now used in airplanes and automobiles; and nanostructured energy conversion devices that significantly improve the efficiency of renewable energy systems. Research in this area cuts across mechanical engineering and other disciplines. Examples include sensors and actuators; micro-fluidics, heat transfer, and energy conversion at the micro- and nanoscales; optical and biological micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS); engineered nanomaterials; atomic scale precision engineering; and the nano-phoptonics in measurement, sensing, and systems design. Students interested in micro/nano technology are encouraged to explore the Course 2-A nanoengineering track.

In order to prepare the mechanical engineers of the future, the department has developed undergraduate and graduate educational programs of the depth and breadth necessary to address the diverse and rapidly changing technological challenges that society faces. Our educational programs combine the rigor of academic study with the excitement and creativity inherent to innovation and research.

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (Course 2)

Bachelor of science in engineering (course 2-a), bachelor of science in mechanical and ocean engineering (course 2-oe), minor in mechanical engineering, undergraduate study.

The Department of Mechanical Engineering (MechE) offers three programs of undergraduate study. The first of these, the traditional program that leads to the bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, is a more structured program that prepares students for a broad range of career choices in the field of mechanical engineering. The second program leads to a bachelor's degree in engineering and is intended for students whose career objectives require greater flexibility. It allows them to combine the essential elements of the traditional mechanical engineering program with study in another, complementary field. The third program, in mechanical and ocean engineering, is also a structured program for students interested in mechanical engineering as it applies to the engineering aspects of ocean science, exploration, and utilization, and of marine transportation.

All of the educational programs in the department prepare students for professional practice in an era of rapidly advancing technology. They combine a strong base in the engineering sciences (mechanics, materials, fluid and thermal sciences, systems and control) with project-based laboratory and design experiences. All strive to develop independence, creative talent, and leadership, as well as the capability for continuing professional growth.

The program in mechanical engineering provides a broad intellectual foundation in the field of mechanical engineering. The program develops the relevant engineering fundamentals, includes various experiences in their application, and introduces the important methods and techniques of engineering practice.

The educational objectives of the program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering are that:

Within a few years of graduation, a majority of our graduates will have completed or be progressing through top graduate programs; advancing in leadership tracks in industry, non-profit organizations, or the public sector; or pursuing entrepreneurial ventures. In these roles they will: (1) apply a deep working knowledge or technical fundamentals in areas related to mechanical, electromechanical, and thermal systems to address needs of the customer and society; (2) develop innovative technologies and find solutions to engineering problems; (3) communicate effectively as members of multidisciplinary teams; (4) be sensitive to professional and societal contexts and committed to ethical action; (5) lead in the conception, design, and implementation of new products, processes, services, and systems.

Students are urged to contact the MechE Undergraduate Office as soon as they have decided to enter mechanical engineering so that a faculty advisor may be assigned. Students, together with their faculty advisors, plan a program that best utilizes the departmental electives and the 48 units of unrestricted electives available in the Course 2 degree program.

This program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)  as a mechanical engineering degree.

Course 2-A is designed for students whose academic and career goals demand greater breadth and flexibility than are allowed under the mechanical engineering program, Course 2. To a large extent, the 2-A program allows students an opportunity to tailor a curriculum to their own needs, starting from a solid mechanical engineering base. The program combines a rigorous grounding in core mechanical engineering topics with an individualized course of study focused on a second area that the student designs with the help and approval of the 2-A faculty advisor. The program leads to the degree Bachelor of Science in Engineering.

This program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET as an engineering degree.

The educational objectives of the program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering are that:

A significant part of the 2-A curriculum consists of electives chosen by the student to provide in-depth study of a field of the student's choosing. A wide variety of popular concentrations are possible in which well-selected academic subjects complement a foundation in mechanical engineering and general Institute requirements. Some examples of potential concentrations include robotics, engineering management, product development, biomedical engineering and pre-medicine, energy conversion engineering, sustainable development, architecture and building technology, and any of the seven departmental focus areas mentioned above. The MechE faculty have developed specific recommendations in some of these areas; details are available from the MechE Undergraduate Office and on the departmental website.

Concentrations are not limited to those listed above. Students are encouraged to design and propose technically oriented concentrations that reflect their own needs and those of society.

The student's overall program must contain a total of at least one and one-half years of engineering content (150 units) appropriate to the student's field of study. The required core and second-level subjects include approximately 78 units of engineering topics. The self-designed concentration must include at least 72 more units of engineering topics. While engineering topics are usually covered through engineering subjects, subjects outside the School of Engineering may provide material essential to the engineering program of some concentrations. For example, management subjects usually form an essential part of an engineering management concentration. In all cases, the relationship of concentration subjects to the particular theme of the concentration must be obvious.

To pursue the 2-A degree, students must submit the online 2-A enrollment form no later than Add Date of their second term in the program.

This program is intended for students who are interested in combining a firm foundation in mechanical engineering with a specialization in ocean engineering. The program includes engineering aspects of the ocean sciences, ocean exploration, and utilization of the oceans for transportation, defense, and extracting resources. Theory, experiment, and computation of ocean systems and flows are covered in a number of subjects, complementing a rigorous mechanical engineering program; a hands-on capstone design class allows students to master the design of advanced marine systems, including autonomous underwater vehicles and smart sensors.

This program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET in both mechanical engineering and ocean engineering.

The educational objectives of the program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Mechanical and Ocean Engineering are that within a few years of graduation, a majority of our graduates will have completed or be progressing through top graduate programs; advancing in leadership tracks in industry, non-profit organizations, or the public sector; or pursuing entrepreneurial ventures. In these roles they will: (1) apply a deep working knowledge or technical fundamentals in areas related to mechanical, electromechanical, and thermal systems to address needs of the customer and society; (2) develop innovative technologies and find solutions to engineering problems; (3) communicate effectively as members of multidisciplinary teams; (4) be sensitive to professional and societal contexts and committed to ethical action; (5) lead in the conception, design, and implementation of new products, processes, services, and systems.

Graduates have exciting opportunities in offshore industries, naval architecture, the oceanographic industry, the Navy or government, or for further study in graduate school.

Students pursuing a minor in the department must complete a total of six 12-unit subjects in the Mechanical Engineering Department program. At least three of the subjects must be selected from among the required subjects for the Course 2 and Course 2-OE degree programs, which are listed below. In addition, two subjects may be selected from restricted electives in those programs. 

Further information on undergraduate programs may be obtained from the MechE Undergraduate Office , Room 1-110, 617-253-230.

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Master of science in ocean engineering/master of science in naval architecture and marine engineering/master of science in oceanographic engineering, master of engineering in advanced manufacturing and design, mechanical engineer's degree, naval engineer's degree—program in naval construction and engineering, doctor of philosophy and doctor of science, graduate study.

The Department of Mechanical Engineering (MechE) provides opportunities for graduate work leading to the following degrees: Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, Master of Science in Ocean Engineering, Master of Science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, Master of Science in Oceanographic Engineering, Master of Engineering in Manufacturing, degree of Mechanical Engineer, degree of Naval Engineer, and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) or Doctor of Science (ScD), which differ in name only.

The Master of Engineering in Manufacturing degree is a 12-month professional degree intended to prepare students for technical leadership in the manufacturing industries.

The Mechanical Engineer's and Naval Engineer's degrees offer preparation for a career in advanced engineering practice through a program of advanced coursework that goes well beyond the master's level. These degrees are not a stepping stone to the PhD.

The Doctor of Philosophy (or Science), the highest academic degree offered, is awarded upon the completion of a program of advanced study and significant original research, design, or development.

Admission Requirements for Graduate Study

Applications to the mechanical engineering graduate program are accepted from persons who have completed, or will have completed by the time they arrive, a bachelor's degree if they are applying for a master's degree, or a master's degree if they are applying for a PhD. Most incoming students have a degree in mechanical engineering or ocean engineering, or some related branch of engineering. The department's admission criteria are not specific, however, and capable students with backgrounds in different branches of engineering or in science may gain entry. Nevertheless, to qualify for a graduate degree, the candidate is expected to have had at least an undergraduate-level exposure to the core subject areas in mechanical engineering (applied mechanics, dynamics, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, materials, control systems, and design) and to be familiar with basic electrical circuits and electromagnetic field theory.

Applications for September entry are due on December 15 of the previous year and decisions are reported in March. International students applying from abroad may be admitted, but they will be allowed to register only if they have full financial support for the first year.

All applicants to the graduate program in mechanical engineering must submit the GRE test results. International students whose native language is not English are required to take either the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam and receive a minimum score of 7 or the TOEFL exam with a minimum acceptable score of 577 (PBT), 233 (CBT) or 100 (iBT).

Early Admission to Master's Degree Programs in Mechanical Engineering

At the end of the junior year, extraordinarily qualified students in the Department of Mechanical Engineering will be invited to apply for early admission to the graduate program. Students who are admitted will then be able to enroll in core graduate subjects during the senior year and to find a faculty advisor who is willing to start and supervise research for the master's thesis while the student is still in the senior year. With the consent of the faculty advisor, the student may also use a portion of the work conducted towards the master's thesis in the senior undergraduate year to satisfy the requirements of the bachelor's thesis.

Writing Ability Requirement

The Mechanical Engineering Department requires that all incoming graduate students demonstrate satisfactory English writing ability, or successfully complete appropriate training in writing. This requirement reflects the faculty's conviction that writing is an essential skill for all engineers. All incoming graduate students, native as well as international, must take the departmental writing ability test, which is administered online in June. Depending on the results, a student will either pass or be required to take a short course during the Independent Activities Period (IAP) in January.

To qualify for the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, a student must complete at least 72 credits of coursework, not including thesis. Of these, at least 48 must be graduate subjects (refer to the Guide to Graduate Study [PDF] on the MechE website). The remainder of the 72 units may include advanced undergraduate subjects that are not requirements in the undergraduate mechanical engineering curriculum.

At least three of the graduate subjects must be taken in mechanical engineering sciences (refer to the Guide to Graduate Study [PDF] on the MechE website). Students must take at least one graduate mathematics subject (12 units) offered by the MIT Mathematics Department. For the Master of Science in Oceanographic Engineering, see also the requirements listed in the Joint Program with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Finally, a thesis is required. The thesis is an original work of research, development, or design, performed under the supervision of a faculty or research staff member, and is a major part of any graduate program in the Mechanical Engineering Department. A master's student usually spends as much time on thesis work as on coursework. A master's degree usually takes about one and one-half to two years to complete.

The requirements for each of these three degrees are that the student takes 72 credit units of graduate subjects and complete a thesis.

At least three of the subjects must be chosen from a prescribed list of ocean engineering subjects (refer to the Guide to Graduate Study [PDF] on the MechE website). Students must also take at least one graduate mathematics subject (12 units) offered by MIT's Mathematics Department. For the Master of Science in Oceanographic Engineering, see also the requirements listed under the Joint Program with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

The required thesis is an original work of research, development, or design, conducted under the supervision of a faculty or senior research staff member. The thesis usually takes between one and two years to complete.

The Master of Engineering in Advanced Manufacturing and Design is a 12-month professional degree in mechanical engineering that is intended to prepare the student to assume a role of technical leadership in the manufacturing industries. The degree is aimed at practitioners who will use this knowledge to become leaders in existing, as well emerging, manufacturing companies. To qualify for this degree, a student must complete a highly integrated set of subjects and projects that cover the process, product, system, and business aspects of manufacturing, totaling 90 units, plus complete a group-based thesis project with a manufacturing industry. While centered in engineering and firmly grounded in the engineering sciences, this degree program considers the entire enterprise of manufacturing. Students will gain both a broad understanding of the many facets of manufacturing and a knowledge of manufacturing fundamentals from which to build new technologies and businesses. The admission process is identical to that of the Master of Science degree, with the exception that two additional essay questions are required.

Learners who earn an MITx Principles of Manufacturing MicroMasters Credential may apply to the Advanced Manufacturing and Design program and, upon acceptance, would be credited 48 units of advanced standing credit (equivalent to approximately one-third of the full degree program and one semester on campus).

The Mechanical Engineer's degree provides an opportunity for further study beyond the master's level for those who wish to enter engineering practice rather than research. This degree emphasizes breadth of knowledge in mechanical engineering and its economic and social implications, and is quite distinct from the PhD, which emphasizes depth and originality of research.

The engineer's degree requires a broad program of advanced coursework in mechanical engineering totaling at least 162 credit units (typically about 14 subjects), including those taken during the master's degree program. The engineer's degree program is centered around the application of engineering principles to advanced engineering problems and includes a Mechanical Engineering examination and an applications-oriented thesis, which may be an extension of a suitable master's thesis. An engineer's degree typically requires at least one year of study beyond the master's degree.

The Naval Construction and Engineering (NVE) program provides US Navy and US Coast Guard officers, foreign naval officers, and civilian students interested in ships and ship design a broad graduate-level education for a career as a naval engineer.

The program leads to the Naval Engineer's degree, which requires a higher level of professional competence and broader range of knowledge than is required for the degree of Master of Science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering or Ocean Engineering. Subjects in the areas of economics, industrial management, and public policy and law, and at least 12 units of comprehensive design are required, in addition to an in-depth curriculum that includes naval architecture, hydrodynamics, ship structures, materials science, and power and propulsion. The program is appropriate for naval officers and civilians who plan to participate in the design and construction of naval ships, as well as those interested in commercial ship design.

For students working toward a simultaneous Naval Engineer's degree and a master's degree, a single thesis is generally acceptable, provided it is appropriate to the specifications of both degrees, demonstrating an educational maturity expected of the Naval Engineer's degree.

The highest academic degree is the Doctor of Science, or Doctor of Philosophy (the two differ only in name). This degree is awarded upon the completion of a program of advanced study, and the performance of significant original research, design, or development. Doctoral degrees are offered in all areas represented by the department's faculty.

Students become candidates for the doctorate by passing the doctoral qualifying examinations. The doctoral program includes a major program of advanced study in the student's principal area of interest, and a minor program of study in a different field. The MechE Graduate Office should be consulted about the deadline for passing the qualifying exam.

The principal component of the program is the thesis. The thesis is a major, original work that makes a significant research, development, or design contribution in its field. The thesis and the program of study are done under a faculty supervisor and a doctoral committee selected by the student and his or her supervisor, and perhaps other interested faculty members. The committee makes an annual examination of the candidate's progress and makes a final recommendation for a public defense of the work. The doctoral program typically requires three years of work beyond the master's degree, although this time is strongly topic dependent.

Interdisciplinary Programs

Graduate students registered in the Department of Mechanical Engineering may elect to participate in interdisciplinary programs of study.

The  Master of Science in Computational Science and Engineering (CSE SM)  is an interdisciplinary program for students interested in the development, analysis, and application of computational approaches to science and engineering. The curriculum is designed with a common core serving all science and engineering disciplines and an elective component focusing on specific disciplinary topics. Students may pursue the CSE SM as a standalone degree or as leading to the CSE PhD program described below.

The Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in Computational Science and Engineering (CSE PhD) allows students to specialize at the doctoral level in a computation-related field of their choice through focused coursework and a thesis through one of the participating host departments in the School of Engineering or School of Science. The program is administered jointly by the Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE) and the host departments; the emphasis of thesis research activities is the development of new computational methods and/or the innovative application of computational techniques to important problems in engineering and science.

For more information, see the program descriptions under Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs.

Joint Program with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

The Joint Program with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI)  is intended for students whose primary career objective is oceanography or oceanographic engineering. Students divide their academic and research efforts between the campuses of MIT and WHOI. Joint Program students are assigned an MIT faculty member as academic advisor; thesis research may be supervised by MIT or WHOI faculty. While in residence at MIT, students follow a program similar to that of other students in their home department. The program is described in more detail under Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs.

The 24-month Leaders for Global Operations (LGO)  program  combines graduate degrees in engineering and management for those with previous postgraduate work experience and strong undergraduate degrees in a technical field . During the two-year program, students complete a six-month internship  at one of LGO's partner companies, where  they conduct  research that  forms the basis of a dual-degree thesis. Students finish the program with two MIT degrees: an MBA (or SM in management) and an SM from one of seven engineering programs, some of which have optional or required LGO tracks.  After graduation, alumni  lead strategic initiatives in high-tech, operations, and manufacturing companies.

The Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM)  offers students from participating departments an interdisciplinary core curriculum in polymer science and engineering, exposure to the broader polymer community through seminars, contact with visitors from industry and academia, and interdepartmental collaboration while working towards a PhD or ScD degree.

Research opportunities include functional polymers, controlled drug delivery, nanostructured polymers, polymers at interfaces, biomaterials, molecular modeling, polymer synthesis, biomimetic materials, polymer mechanics and rheology, self-assembly, and polymers in energy. The program is described in more detail under Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs.

The Master of Science in Technology and Policy is an engineering research degree with a strong focus on the role of technology in policy analysis and formulation. The Technology and Policy Program (TPP) curriculum provides a solid grounding in technology and policy by combining advanced subjects in the student's chosen technical field with courses in economics, politics, quantitative methods, and social science. Many students combine TPP's curriculum with complementary subjects to obtain dual degrees in TPP and either a specialized branch of engineering or an applied social science such as political science or urban studies and planning. See the program description under the Institute for Data, Systems, and Society.

Financial Support

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers three types of financial assistance to graduate students: research assistantships, teaching assistantships, and fellowships.

The majority of students in the department are supported by research assistantships (RAs), which are appointments to work on particular research projects with particular faculty members. Faculty members procure research grants for various projects and hire graduate students to carry out the research. The research is almost invariably structured so that it becomes the student's thesis. An RA appointment provides a full-tuition scholarship (i.e., covers all tuition) plus a salary that is adequate for a single person. The financial details are outlined in a separate handout available from the MechE Graduate Office. An RA may register for a maximum of 24 units (about two subjects) of classroom subjects per regular term and 12 units in the summer term, and must do at least the equivalent of 24 units of thesis (i.e., research on the project) per term. (Please note that Master of Engineering in Manufacturing students are not eligible for RA or TA positions since their subject credits exceed these limits.)

Teaching assistants (TAs) are appointed to work on specific subjects of instruction. As the name implies, they usually assist a faculty member in teaching, often grading homework problems and tutoring students. In the Mechanical Engineering Department, TAs are very seldom used for regular full-time classroom teaching. Full-time TAs are limited to 24 units of credit per regular term, including both classroom subjects and thesis. The TA appointment does not usually extend through the summer.

A fellowship provides the student with a direct grant, and leaves the student open to select his or her own research project and supervisor. A limited number of awards and scholarships are available to graduate students directly through the department. A number of students are also supported by fellowships from outside agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, and Department of Defense. Scholarships are awarded each year by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. These awards are normally granted to applicants whose interest is focused on naval architecture and marine engineering or on ocean engineering. Applications are made directly to the granting agency, and inquiries for the fall term should be made in the preceding fall term.

Prospective students are invited to communicate with the Department regarding any of these educational and financial opportunities.

Experience has shown that the optimum graduate program consists of about equal measures of coursework and research, consistent with an RA appointment. The main advantage of a fellowship is a greater freedom in choosing a research project and supervisor. A teaching assistantship gives the student teaching experience and can also be extremely valuable for reviewing basic subject material—for example, in preparation for the doctoral qualifying exams. It does not, however, leave much time for thesis research and may extend the time that the student needs to complete his or her degree.

For additional information on mechanical engineering graduate admissions, contact Una Sheehan. For general inquiries on the mechanical engineering graduate program, contact Leslie Regan. All can be reached in the MechE Graduate Office , Room 1-112, 617-253-2291.

Research Laboratories and Programs

The Mechanical Engineering Department is organized into seven areas that collectively capture the broad range of interests and activities within it. These areas are:

  • Mechanics: Modeling, Experimentation, and Computation (MMEC)

Design, Manufacturing, and Product Development

Controls, instrumentation, and robotics, energy science and engineering, ocean science and engineering, bioengineering, nano/micro science and technology.

The educational opportunities offered to students in mechanical engineering are enhanced by the availability of a wide variety of research laboratories and programs, and well-equipped shops and computer facilities.

The department provides many opportunities for undergraduates to establish a close relationship with faculty members and their research groups. Students interested in project work are encouraged to consult their faculty advisor or approach other members of the faculty.

Many members of the Department of Mechanical Engineering participate in interdepartmental or school-wide research activities. These include the Center for Biomedical Engineering, Center for Computational Science and Engineering, Computational and Systems Biology Program, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity, Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, MIT Energy Initiative, Operations Research Center, Program in Polymers and Soft Matter, and Sea Grant College Program. Detailed information about many of these can be found under Research and Study and Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs. The department also hosts a number of industrial consortia, which support some laboratories and research projects. Research in the department is supported, in addition, by a broad range of federal agencies and foundations.

A partial list of departmental laboratories, listed according to the seven core areas of research, follows.

Mechanics: Modeling, Experimentation, and Computation

Amp mechanical behavior of materials laboratory.

Mechanisms of deformation and fracture processes in engineering materials.

Center for Nonlinear Science

Interdisciplinary research into nonlinear phenomena. Incorporates the Nonlinear Dynamical Systems Lab (modeling, simulation, analysis), Nonlinear Dynamics Lab (experiments), and Nonlinear Systems Lab.

Composite Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory

Development of quantitative nondestructive evaluation characterizations which are directly correlatable with the mechanical properties of materials and structures.

Finite Element Research Group

Computational procedures for the solution of problems in structural, solid, and fluid mechanics.

Hatsopoulos Microfluids Laboratory

Fundamental research on the behavior of complex fluid systems at microscopic scales, and associated engineering applications.

Auto-ID Laboratory

Creation of the "Internet of Things" using radio frequency identification and wireless sensor networks, and of a global system for tracking goods using a single numbering system called the Electronic Product Code.

Computer-Aided Design Laboratory

Advancing the state of the art in design methodology and computer-aided design methods.

An interdepartmental laboratory in the School of Engineering. Polymer microfabrication for microfluidic devices, chemical mechanical planarization for the semiconductor industry, precision macro- and micro-scale devices, and novel metrology methods for micro-scale devices. Small-scale fuel cells design, photovoltaic material and process research, and manufacture of photovoltaic panels. Identification technologies such as RFID, wireless sensors, and complex systems. Methods to integrate data and models across global networks. Factory-level manufacturing systems design and control, and supply chain design and management. Environmentally benign manufacturing.

Martin Center for Engineering Design

Design methodology, design of integrated electrical-mechanical systems, prototype development, advanced computer-aided design techniques.

Park Center for Complex Systems

Research to understand complexity, educating students and scholars on complexity, designing complex systems for the benefit of humankind, and disseminating knowledge on complexity to the world at large.

Precision Engineering Laboratory

Fundamental and applied research on all aspects of the design, manufacture, and control of high precision machines ranging from manufacturing machines to precision consumer products.

Precision Systems Design and Manufacturing Laboratory

Modeling, design, and manufacturing methods for nanopositioning equipment, carbon nanotube-based mechanisms and machines, and compliant mechanisms.

d'Arbeloff Laboratory for Information Systems and Technology

Research on mechatronics, home and health automation, interface between hardware and software, and development of sensing technologies.

Field and Space Robotics Laboratory

Fundamental physics of robotic systems for unstructured environments. Development, design, and prototyping of control and planning algorithms for robotic applications, including space exploration, rough terrains, sea systems, and medical devices and systems.

Nonlinear Systems Laboratory

Analysis and control of nonlinear physical systems with emphasis on adaptation and learning in robots.

Center for Energy and Propulsion Research

Innovative science and technology for a sustainable energy future in a carbon-constrained world. Fundamental and applied research in energy conversion and transportation, with applications to low-carbon efficient energy and propulsion systems. Includes several research groups:

  • Electrochemical Energy Laboratory . Engineering of advanced materials for lithium batteries, proton exchange membrane and solid oxide fuel cells, and air battery and fuel cell hybrids.
  • Reacting Gas Dynamics Laboratory . Fluid flow, chemical reaction, and combustion phenomena associated with energy conversion in propulsion systems, power generation, industrial processes, and fires.
  • Sloan Automotive Laboratory . Processes and technology that control the performance, efficiency, and environmental impact of internal combustion engines, their lubrication, and fuel requirements.

Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory

Application of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and mechanical design to cryogenic processes and instrumentation and the operation of a liquid helium facility.

Rohsenow Kendall Heat Transfer Laboratory

Fundamental research in microscale/nanoscale transport, convection, laser/material interaction, and high heat fluxes; applied research in water purification, thermoelectric devices, energy-efficient buildings, and thermal management of electronics.

Center for Ocean Engineering

Provides an enduring ocean engineering identity, giving visibility to the outside world of MIT's commitment to the oceans, and serves as the focus point of ocean-related research at the Institute. Supports the research activities of the MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Oceanographic Engineering and the Naval Construction and Engineering Program. Encompasses the activities of the following research groups and laboratories:

  • Autonomous Marine Sensing Lab . Distributed ocean sensing concepts for oceanographic science, national defense, and coastal management and protection. Oceanographic sensing and modeling, sonar system technology, computational underwater acoustics, and marine robotics and communication networking.
  • Design Lab . Ship design, offshore structure design, marine robotics, geometric and solid modeling, advanced manufacturing, and shipbuilding. Includes the Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling.
  • Experimental Hydrodynamics Lab . Advanced surface ship, offshore platform, and underwater vehicle design. Development of non-invasive flow measurement and visualization methods.
  • Impact and Crashworthiness Laboratory . Industry-oriented fracture testing and prediction technology of advanced high-strength steel sheets for automotive and shipbuilding applications. Includes both quasi-static and high strain rate response and effect of loading history on fracture.
  • Experimental and Nonlinear Dynamics Lab . Laboratory experiments to obtain insight into all manner of dynamical phenomena, from micro-scale diffusive processes to global-scale oceanic wave fields. Field studies for ocean-related problems.
  • Laboratory for Ship and Platform Flows . Modeling of free surface flows past conventional and high-speed vessels and estimation of their resistance and seakeeping in deep and shallow waters. Analytical and computational techniques.
  • Laboratory for Undersea Remote Sensing . Ocean exploration, undersea remote sensing of marine life and geophysical phenomena, wave propagation and scattering theory in remote sensing, statistical estimation and information theory, acoustics and seismics, Europa exploration.
  • Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory (Propeller Tunnel) . A variable-pressure recirculating water tunnel capable of speeds up to 10 m/s. Experiments are performed using state-of-the-art measurement techniques and instrumentation.
  • Multidisciplinary Ocean Dynamics and Engineering Laboratory . Complex physical and interdisciplinary oceanic dynamics and processes. Mathematical model and computation methods for ocean predictions, dynamical diagnostics, and for data assimilation and data-model comparisons.
  • Ocean Engineering Testing Tank . The tank is 108 feet long, 8.5 feet wide, with an average depth of 4.5 feet. The wave generator can generate harmonic or random waves. The tank also houses several laser flow visualization systems.
  • Vortical Flow Research Laboratory . Advanced capabilities for simulation of complex vertical flows. Powerful computer workstations and LINUX clusters, computer-video image conversion, and state-of-the-art flow simulation animation technologies.
  • MIT Sea Grant AUV Lab . Dedicated to autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), the lab is a leading developer of advanced unmanned marine robots, with applications in oceanography, environmental monitoring, and underwater resource studies. It engages in instrumentation and algorithm development for underwater vehicles performing navigation- and information-intensive tasks. Various vehicle platforms, and fabrication tools and materials are available.

Bioinstrumentation Laboratory

Utilization of biology, optics, mechanics, mathematics, electronics, and chemistry to develop innovative instruments for the analysis of biological processes and new devices for the treatment and diagnosis of disease.

Human and Machine Haptics

Interdisciplinary studies aimed at understanding human haptics, developing machine haptics, and enhancing human-machine interactions in virtual reality and teleoperator systems.

Laboratory for Biomechanics of Cells and Biomolecules

Development of new instruments for the measurement of mechanical properties on the scale of a single cell or single molecule to better understand the interactions between biology and mechanics.

Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation

Research on bioinstrumentation, neuromuscular control, and technology for diagnosis and remediation of disabilities.

Pappalardo Laboratory for Micro/Nano Engineering

Creation of new engineering knowledge and products on the nano and micro scale through multidomain, multidisciplinary, and multiscale research.

Faculty and Teaching Staff

A. John Hart, PhD

Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Head, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Rohan Abeyaratne, PhD

Quentin Berg (1937) Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Triantaphyllos R. Akylas, PhD

Lallit Anand, PhD

Warren and Townley Rohsenow Professor

H. Harry Asada, PhD

Ford Foundation Professor of Engineering

George Barbastathis, PhD

Klaus-Jürgen Bathe, ScD, PhD

Professor Post-Tenure of Mechanical Engineering

Mark Bathe, PhD

Professor of Biological Engineering

(On leave, spring)

John G. Brisson II, PhD

Tonio Buonassisi, PhD

Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Manufacturing

Gang Chen, PhD

Carl Richard Soderberg Professor in Power Engineering

Wai K. Cheng, PhD

Chryssostomos Chryssostomidis, PhD

Henry L. Doherty Professor in Ocean Science and Engineering

Professor Post-Tenure of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering

Jung-Hoon Chun, PhD

Martin L. Culpepper, PhD

Domitilla Del Vecchio, PhD

George N. Hatsopoulos (1949) Faculty Fellowship in Interdisciplinary Research

Daniel Frey, PhD

(On leave, fall)

Ahmed F. Ghoniem, PhD

Ronald C. Crane (1972) Professor

Lorna Gibson, PhD

Matoula S. Salapatas Professor Post-Tenure of Materials Science and Engineering

Leon R. Glicksman, PhD

Professor Post-Tenure of Building Technology

Stephen C. Graves, PhD

Abraham J. Siegel Professor of Management

Professor of Operations Management and Leaders for Global Operations

Member, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society

Linda G. Griffith, PhD

School of Engineering Professor of Teaching Innovation

Timothy G. Gutowski, PhD

Nicolas Hadjiconstantinou, PhD

David E. Hardt, PhD

Ralph E. and Eloise F. Cross Professor in Manufacturing

Douglas Hart, PhD

Asegun Henry, PhD

Robert N. Noyce Career Development Professor

Neville Hogan, PhD

Sun Jae Professor in Mechanical Engineering

Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences

Anette E. Hosoi, PhD

Neil and Jane Pappalardo Professor

Professor of Mathematics

Ian Hunter, PhD

George N. Hatsopoulos Professor in Thermodynamics

Roger Dale Kamm, PhD

Cecil H. Green Distinguished Professor Post-Tenure

Professor Post-Tenure of Biological Engineering

Kenneth N. Kamrin, PhD

Rohit N. Karnik, PhD

Tata Professor

Sang-Gook Kim, PhD

Sangbae Kim, PhD

Robert Langer, ScD

David H. Koch (1962) Institute Professor

Professor of Chemical Engineering

Affiliate Faculty, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science

Steven B. Leeb, PhD

Emanuel Landsman (1958) Professor

Professor of Electrical Engineering

John J. Leonard, PhD

Samuel C. Collins Professor

Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering

Pierre F. J. Lermusiaux, PhD

Nam Pyo Suh Professor

John H. Lienhard, PhD

Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Water and Food

Seth Lloyd, PhD

Nicholas Makris, PhD

Scott R. Manalis, PhD

David H. Koch Professor in Engineering

Associate Head, Department of Biological Engineering

Gareth H. McKinley, PhD

David M. Parks, PhD

Anthony T. Patera, PhD

Nicholas M. Patrikalakis, PhD

Kawasaki Professor of Engineering

Thomas Peacock, PhD

Emanuel Michael Sachs, PhD

Themistoklis Sapsis, PhD

Sanjay E. Sarma, PhD

Fred Fort Flowers (1941) and Daniel Fort Flowers (1941) Professor

Henrik Schmidt, PhD

Paul D. Sclavounos, PhD

Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture

Warren Seering, PhD

Weber-Shaughness Professor

Yang Shao-Horn, PhD

JR East Professor of Engineering

Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Alexander H. Slocum, PhD

Walter M. May and A. Hazel May Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Jean-Jacques E. Slotine, PhD

Professor of Information Sciences

Peter T. C. So, PhD

Alexandra H. Techet, PhD

Russell L. Tedrake, PhD

Toyota Professor

Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Michael S. Triantafyllou, ScD

Henry L. and Grace Doherty Professor in Ocean Science and Engineering

David L. Trumper, PhD

J. Kim Vandiver, PhD

Kripa K. Varanasi, PhD

David Robert Wallace, PhD

Evelyn N. Wang, PhD

Ford Professor of Engineering

Tomasz Wierzbicki, PhD

Professor Post-Tenure of Applied Mechanics

James H. Williams Jr, PhD

Professor Post-Tenure of Teaching Excellence

Maria Yang, PhD

Gail E. Kendall Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Ioannis V. Yannas, PhD

Professor of Polymer Science and Engineering

Member, Health Sciences and Technology Faculty

Kamal Youcef-Toumi, ScD

Dick K. P. Yue, PhD

Philip J. Solondz (1948) Professor of Engineering

Xuanhe Zhao, PhD

Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Associate Professors

Irmgard Bischofberger, PhD

Class of 1942 Career Development Chair

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Cullen R. Buie, PhD

Tal Cohen, PhD

Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Betar Gallant, PhD

Ming Guo, PhD

Jeehwan Kim, PhD

Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Mathias Kolle, PhD

Stefanie Mueller, PhD

TIBCO Founders Professor

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Ellen Roche, PhD

Latham Family Career Development Professor

Core Faculty, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science

Giovanni Traverso, PhD

Amos Winter, PhD

Assistant Professors

Faez Ahmed, PhD

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Navid Azizan, PhD

Edgerton Career Development Professor

Kaitlyn P. Becker, PhD

Henry L. and Grace Doherty Professorship in Ocean Science and Engineering

Sili Deng, PhD

Class of 1954 Career Development Professor

Ashwin Gopinath, PhD

Carlos Portela, PhD

Ritu Raman, PhD

Brit (1961) and Alex (1949) d’Arbeloff Career Development Professor

Vivishek Sudhir, PhD

Loza Tadesse, PhD

Wim van Rees, PhD

Sherrie Wang, PhD

Professors of the Practice

Richard M. Wiesman, PhD

Professor of the Practice of Mechanical Engineering

Associate Professors of the Practice

Douglas Jonart, PhD

Associate Professor of the Practice of Naval Construction and Engineering

Visiting Professors

Nicholas Xuanlai Fang, PhD

Visiting Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Visiting Associate Professors

Alberto Rodriguez, PhD

Visiting Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Senior Lecturers

Daniel Braunstein, PhD

Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering

Stephen Fantone, PhD

Franz Hover, PhD

Barbara Hughey, PhD

Raymond S. McCord, MS, Eng

William Plummer, PhD

Amy Smith, MS, MEng

Simona Socrate, PhD

Abbott Weiss, PhD

Dawn Wendell, PhD

Kevin Cedrone, PhD

Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering

Christina Chase, BA

Harrison Chin, PhD

Benita Comeau, PhD

Kevin DiGenova, PhD

Julio Guerrero, PhD

Victor Hung, BS

Bavand Keshavarz, PhD

John Liu, PhD

Peter Nielsen, PhD

James Douglass Penn, PhD

Nathan Phipps, PhD

Robert Podoloff, PhD

Joshua Ramos, PhD

Michael Wardlaw, MS

Instructors

Rachel Mok, PhD

Instructor of Mechanical Engineering

Technical Instructors

Stephen G. Banzaert, MS

Technical Instructor of Mechanical Engineering

Daniel Gilbert, BA

Pierce Hayward, MS

Tasker Smith, BA

Research Staff

Senior research engineers.

Tian Tian, PhD

Senior Research Engineer of Mechanical Engineering

Senior Research Scientists

Anuradha M. Annaswamy, PhD

Senior Research Scientist of Mechanical Engineering

Lynette A. Jones, PhD

Yuming Liu, PhD

Principal Research Scientists

Brian Anthony, PhD

Principal Research Scientist of Mechanical Engineering

Michael Richard Benjamin, PhD

Svetlana V. Boriskina, PhD

H. Igo Krebs, PhD

Research Associates

Chris Mirabito, PhD

Research Associate of Mechanical Engineering

Yi J. Wang, PhD

Research Engineers

Kelli Hendrickson, ScD

Research Engineer of Mechanical Engineering

Benjamin Judge, PhD

Amanda Stack, PhD

Research Scientists

Moises Alencastre Miranda, PhD

Research Scientist of Mechanical Engineering

Susan Elizabeth Amrose, PhD

Rahul Bhattacharyya, PhD

Michael Bono Jr., PhD

Bachir El Fil, PhD

Micha Feigin-Almon, PhD

Richard Ribon Fletcher, PhD

Kiarash Gordiz, PhD

Patrick Haley, PhD

Nevan Clancy Hanumara, PhD

Stephen Ho, PhD

Nora C. Hogan, PhD

Po-Hsun Huang, PhD

Miguel Jimenez, PhD

Jeon Woong Kang, PhD

George E. Karniadakis, PhD

Hyunseok Kim, PhD

Suhin Kim, PhD

Aaron H. Persad, PhD

Mehdi Pishahang, PhD

Themistocles L. Resvanis, PhD

Santosh Shanbhogue, PhD

Dajiang Suo, PhD

Grgur Tokic, PhD

Jianan Zhang, PhD

Lenan Zhang, PhD

Professors Emeriti

Arthur B. Baggeroer, ScD

Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering

Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering

Mary C. Boyce, PhD

Ford Foundation Professor Emerita of Engineering

Professor Emerita of Mechanical Engineering

C. Forbes Dewey Jr, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Professor Emeritus of Biological Engineering

Steven Dubowsky, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Aeronautics and Astronautics

David C. Gossard, PhD

Alan J. Grodzinsky, ScD

John B. Heywood, ScD, PhD

Sun Jae Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering

Henry S. Marcus, DBA

Professor Emeritus of Marine Systems

Chiang C. Mei, PhD

Ford Professor Emeritus of Engineering

Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Borivoje Mikić, ScD

John Nicholas Newman, ScD

Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture

Carl R. Peterson, ScD

Derek Rowell, PhD

Thomas B. Sheridan, ScD

Professor Emeritus of Engineering and Applied Psychology

Nam P. Suh, PhD

Ralph E. and Eloise F. Cross Professor Emeritus

Neil E. Todreas, PhD

Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Science and Engineering

Gerald L. Wilson, PhD

Vannevar Bush Professor Emeritus

First-Year Introductory Subjects

2.00a designing for the future: earth, sea, and space.

Prereq: Calculus I (GIR) and Physics I (GIR) U (Spring) 3-3-3 units

Student teams formulate and complete space/earth/ocean exploration-based design projects with weekly milestones. Introduces core engineering themes, principles, and modes of thinking. Specialized learning modules enable teams to focus on the knowledge required to complete their projects, such as machine elements, electronics, design process, visualization and communication. Includes exercises in written and oral communication and team building. Examples of projects include surveying a lake for millfoil, from a remote controlled aircraft, and then sending out robotic harvesters to clear the invasive growth; and exploration to search for the evidence of life on a moon of Jupiter, with scientists participating through teleoperation and supervisory control of robots. Enrollment limited; preference to freshmen.

2.00B Toy Product Design

Prereq: None U (Spring) 3-5-1 units

Provides students with an overview of design for entertainment and play, as well as opportunities in creative product design and community service. Students develop ideas for new toys that serve clients in the community, and work in teams with local sponsors and with experienced mentors on a themed toy design project. Students enhance creativity and experience fundamental aspects of the product development process, including determining customer needs, brainstorming, estimation, sketching, sketch modeling, concept development, design aesthetics, detailed design, and prototyping. Includes written, visual, and oral communication. Enrollment limited; preference to freshmen.

D. R. Wallace

2.00C[J] Design for Complex Environmental Issues

Same subject as 1.016[J] , EC.746[J] Prereq: None U (Spring) 3-1-5 units

Working in small teams with real clients, students develop solutions related to the year's Terrascope topic. They have significant autonomy as they follow a full engineering design cycle from client profile through increasingly sophisticated prototypes to final product. Provides opportunities to acquire skills with power tools, workshop practice, design, product testing, and teamwork. Focuses on sustainability and appropriate technology that matches the client's specific situation and constraints. Products are exhibited in the public Bazaar of Ideas and evaluated by an expert panel. Class taught in collaboration with D-Lab and Beaver Works. Limited to first-year students. Open to students outside of Terrascope.

A. W. Epstein, J. Grimm, S. L. Hsu

Core Undergraduate Subjects

2.00 introduction to design.

Prereq: None U (Fall; second half of term) 2-2-2 units

Project-based introduction to product development and engineering design. Emphasizes key elements of the design process, including defining design problems, generating ideas, and building solutions. Presents a range of design techniques to help students think about, evaluate, and communicate designs, from sketching to physical prototyping, as well as other types of modeling. Students work both individually and in teams.

2.000 Explorations in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Spring) 2-0-0 units

Broad introduction to the various aspects of mechanical engineering at MIT, including mechanics, design, controls, energy, ocean engineering, bioengineering, and micro/nano engineering through a variety of experiences, including discussions led by faculty, students, and industry experts. Reviews research opportunities and undergraduate major options in Course 2 as well as a variety of career paths pursued by alumni. Subject can count toward the 6-unit discovery-focused credit limit for first year students.

2.001 Mechanics and Materials I

Prereq: Physics I (GIR) ; Coreq: 2.087 or 18.03 U (Fall, Spring) 4-1-7 units. REST

Introduction to statics and the mechanics of deformable solids. Emphasis on the three basic principles of equilibrium, geometric compatibility, and material behavior. Stress and its relation to force and moment; strain and its relation to displacement; linear elasticity with thermal expansion. Failure modes. Application to simple engineering structures such as rods, shafts, beams, and trusses. Application to biomechanics of natural materials and structures.

S. Socrate, M. Culpepper, D. Parks, K. Kamrin

2.002 Mechanics and Materials II

Prereq: Chemistry (GIR) and 2.001 U (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Introduces mechanical behavior of engineering materials, and the use of materials in mechanical design. Emphasizes the fundamentals of mechanical behavior of materials, as well as design with materials. Major topics: elasticity, plasticity, limit analysis, fatigue, fracture, and creep. Materials selection. Laboratory experiments involving projects related to materials in mechanical design. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

L. Anand, K. Kamrin, P. Reis

2.003[J] Dynamics and Control I

Same subject as 1.053[J] Prereq: Physics II (GIR) ; Coreq: 2.087 or 18.03 U (Fall, Spring) 4-1-7 units. REST

Introduction to the dynamics and vibrations of lumped-parameter models of mechanical systems. Kinematics. Force-momentum formulation for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion. Work-energy concepts. Virtual displacements and virtual work. Lagrange's equations for systems of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion. Linearization of equations of motion. Linear stability analysis of mechanical systems. Free and forced vibration of linear multi-degree of freedom models of mechanical systems; matrix eigenvalue problems.

J. K. Vandiver, N. C. Makris, N. M. Patrikalakis, T. Peacock, D. Gossard, K. Turitsyn

2.004 Dynamics and Control II

Prereq: Physics II (GIR) and 2.003[J] U (Fall, Spring) 4-2-6 units

Modeling, analysis, and control of dynamic systems. System modeling: lumped parameter models of mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical systems; interconnection laws; actuators and sensors. Linear systems theory: linear algebra; Laplace transform; transfer functions, time response and frequency response, poles and zeros; block diagrams; solutions via analytical and numerical techniques; stability. Introduction to feedback control: closed-loop response; PID compensation; steady-state characteristics, root-locus design concepts, frequency-domain design concepts. Laboratory experiments and control design projects. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

D. Del Vecchio, D. Trumper

2.005 Thermal-Fluids Engineering I

Prereq: ( Physics II (GIR) , 18.03 , and ( 2.086 , 6.100B , or 18.06 )) or permission of instructor U (Fall, Spring) 5-0-7 units

Integrated development of the fundamental principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer, with applications. Focuses on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, mass conservation, and momentum conservation, for both closed and open systems. Entropy generation and its influence on the performance of engineering systems. Introduction to dimensionless numbers. Introduction to heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Steady-state and transient conduction. Finned surfaces. The heat equation and the lumped capacitance model. Coupled and uncoupled fluid models. Hydrostatics. Inviscid flow analysis and Bernoulli equation. Navier-Stokes equation and its solutions. Viscous internal flows, head losses, and turbulence. Introduction to pipe flows and Moody chart.

2.006 Thermal-Fluids Engineering II

Prereq: 2.005 U (Fall, Spring) 5-0-7 units

Focuses on the application of the principles of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics to the design and analysis of engineering systems. Dimensional analysis, similarity, and modeling. Pipe systems: major and minor losses. Laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Boundary layer separation, lift and drag on objects. Heat transfer associated with laminar and turbulent flow of fluids in free and forced convection in channels and over surfaces. Pure substance model. Heat transfer in boiling and condensation. Thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of steady flow components of thermodynamic plants. Heat exchanger design. Power cycles and refrigeration plants. Design of thermodynamic plants. Analyses for alternative energy systems. Multi-mode heat transfer and fluid flow in thermodynamic plants.

 R. Karnik, B. Gallant

2.007 Design and Manufacturing I

Prereq: 2.001 and 2.670 ; Coreq: 2.086 U (Spring) 3-4-5 units

Develops students' competence and self-confidence as design engineers. Emphasis on the creative design process bolstered by application of physical laws. Instruction on how to complete projects on schedule and within budget. Robustness and manufacturability are emphasized. Subject relies on active learning via a major design-and-build project. Lecture topics include idea generation, estimation, concept selection, visual thinking, computer-aided design (CAD), mechanism design, machine elements, basic electronics, technical communication, and ethics. Lab fee. Limited enrollment. Pre-registration required for lab assignment; special sections by lottery only.

S. Kim, A. Winter

2.008 Design and Manufacturing II

Prereq: 2.007 ; or Coreq: 2.017[J] and ( 2.005 or 2.051) U (Fall, Spring) 3-3-6 units. Partial Lab

Integration of design, engineering, and management disciplines and practices for analysis and design of manufacturing enterprises. Emphasis is on the physics and stochastic nature of manufacturing processes and systems, and their effects on quality, rate, cost, and flexibility. Topics include process physics and control, design for manufacturing, and manufacturing systems. Group project requires design and fabrication of parts using mass-production and assembly methods to produce a product in quantity. Six units may be applied to the General Institute Lab Requirement. Satisfies 6 units of Institute Laboratory credit. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

J.-H. Chun, J. Hart, S.G. Kim, J. Liu, W. Seering, D. Wendell

2.009 The Product Engineering Process

Prereq: 2.001 , 2.003[J] , ( 2.005 or 2.051), and ( 2.00B , 2.670 , or 2.678 ) U (Fall) 3-3-9 units

Students develop an understanding of product development phases and experience working in teams to design and construct high-quality product prototypes. Design process learned is placed into a broader development context. Primary goals are to improve ability to reason about design alternatives and apply modeling techniques appropriate for different development phases; understand how to gather and process customer information and transform it into engineering specifications; and use teamwork to resolve the challenges in designing and building a substantive product prototype. Instruction and practice in oral communication provided. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 seniors.

2.013 Engineering Systems Design

Subject meets with 2.733 Prereq: ( 2.001 , 2.003[J] , ( 2.005 or 2.051), and ( 2.00B , 2.670 , or 2.678 )) or permission of instructor U (Fall) 0-6-6 units

Focuses on the design of engineering systems to satisfy stated performance, stability, and/or control requirements. Emphasizes individual initiative, application of fundamental principles, and the compromises inherent in the engineering design process. Culminates in the design of an engineering system, typically a vehicle or other complex system. Includes instruction and practice in written and oral communication through team presentations, design reviews, and written reports. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

2.014 Engineering Systems Development

Subject meets with 2.734 Prereq: ( 2.001 , 2.003[J] , ( 2.005 or 2.051), and ( 2.00B , 2.670 , or 2.678 )) or permission of instructor U (Spring) 0-6-6 units Can be repeated for credit.

Focuses on implementation and operation of engineering systems. Emphasizes system integration and performance verification using methods of experimental inquiry. Students refine their subsystem designs and the fabrication of working prototypes. Includes experimental analysis of subsystem performance and comparison with physical models of performance and with design goals. Component integration into the full system, with detailed analysis and operation of the complete vehicle in the laboratory and in the field. Includes written and oral reports. Students carry out formal reviews of the overall system design. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

2.016 Hydrodynamics

Prereq: 2.005 U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Covers fundamental principles of fluid mechanics and applications to practical ocean engineering problems. Basic geophysical fluid mechanics, including the effects of salinity, temperature, and density; heat balance in the ocean; large scale flows. Hydrostatics. Linear free surface waves, wave forces on floating and submerged structures. Added mass, lift and drag forces on submerged bodies. Includes final project on current research topics in marine hydrodynamics.

A. H. Techet

2.017[J] Design of Electromechanical Robotic Systems

Same subject as 1.015[J] Prereq: 2.003[J] , 2.016 , and 2.678 ; Coreq: 2.671 U (Spring) 3-3-6 units. Partial Lab

Design, construction, and testing of field robotic systems, through team projects with each student responsible for a specific subsystem. Projects focus on electronics, instrumentation, and machine elements. Design for operation in uncertain conditions is a focus point, with ocean waves and marine structures as a central theme. Basic statistics, linear systems, Fourier transforms, random processes, spectra and extreme events with applications in design. Lectures on ethics in engineering practice included. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided. Satisfies 6 units of Institute Laboratory credit. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity.

M. Triantafyllou, M. Sacarny

2.019 Design of Ocean Systems

Prereq: 2.001 , 2.003[J] , and ( 2.005 or 2.016 ) U (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Complete cycle of designing an ocean system using computational design tools for the conceptual and preliminary design stages. Team projects assigned, with each student responsible for a specific subsystem. Lectures cover hydrodynamics; structures; power and thermal aspects of ocean vehicles, environment, materials, and construction for ocean use; generation and evaluation of design alternatives. Focus on innovative design concepts chosen from high-speed ships, submersibles, autonomous vehicles, and floating and submerged deep-water offshore platforms. Lectures on ethics in engineering practice included. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 seniors.

C. Chryssostomidis, M. S. Triantafyllou

2.086 Numerical Computation for Mechanical Engineers

Prereq: Calculus II (GIR) and Physics I (GIR) ; Coreq: 2.087 or 18.03 U (Fall, Spring) 2-2-8 units. REST

Covers elementary programming concepts, including variable types, data structures, and flow control. Provides an introduction to linear algebra and probability. Numerical methods relevant to MechE, including approximation (interpolation, least squares, and statistical regression), integration, solution of linear and nonlinear equations, and ordinary differential equations. Presents deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Uses examples from MechE, particularly from robotics, dynamics, and structural analysis. Assignments require MATLAB programming. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

D. Frey, F. Hover, N. Hadjiconstantinou,

2.087 Engineering Mathematics: Linear Algebra and ODEs

Prereq: Calculus II (GIR) and Physics I (GIR) U (Fall; first half of term) Not offered regularly; consult department 2-0-4 units

Introduction to linear algebra and ordinary differential equations (ODEs), including general numerical approaches to solving systems of equations. Linear systems of equations, existence and uniqueness of solutions, Gaussian elimination. Initial value problems, 1st and 2nd order systems, forward and backward Euler, RK4. Eigenproblems, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, including complex numbers, functions, vectors and matrices.

A. Hosoi, T. Peacock

Dynamics and Acoustics

2.032 dynamics.

Prereq: 2.003[J] G (Fall) 4-0-8 units

Review of momentum principles. Hamilton's principle and Lagrange's equations. Three-dimensional kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies. Study of steady motions and small deviations therefrom, gyroscopic effects, causes of instability. Free and forced vibrations of lumped-parameter and continuous systems. Nonlinear oscillations and the phase plane. Nonholonomic systems. Introduction to wave propagation in continuous systems.

T. R. Akylas, T. Peacock, N. Hadjiconstantinou

2.033[J] Nonlinear Dynamics and Turbulence

Same subject as 1.686[J] , 18.358[J] Subject meets with 1.068 Prereq: 1.060A Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: G (Spring) 3-2-7 units

See description under subject 1.686[J] .

L. Bourouiba

2.034[J] Nonlinear Dynamics and Waves

Same subject as 1.685[J] , 18.377[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Spring) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-0-9 units

A unified treatment of nonlinear oscillations and wave phenomena with applications to mechanical, optical, geophysical, fluid, electrical and flow-structure interaction problems. Nonlinear free and forced vibrations; nonlinear resonances; self-excited oscillations; lock-in phenomena. Nonlinear dispersive and nondispersive waves; resonant wave interactions; propagation of wave pulses and nonlinear Schrodinger equation. Nonlinear long waves and breaking; theory of characteristics; the Korteweg-de Vries equation; solitons and solitary wave interactions. Stability of shear flows. Some topics and applications may vary from year to year.

R. R. Rosales

2.036[J] Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

Same subject as 18.385[J] Prereq: 18.03 or 18.032 Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Spring) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-0-9 units

See description under subject 18.385[J] .

2.050[J] Nonlinear Dynamics: Chaos

Same subject as 12.006[J] , 18.353[J] Prereq: Physics II (GIR) and ( 18.03 or 18.032 ) U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

See description under subject 12.006[J] .

2.060[J] Structural Dynamics

Same subject as 1.581[J] , 16.221[J] Subject meets with 1.058 Prereq: 18.03 or permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: G (Fall) 3-1-8 units

See description under subject 1.581[J] .

2.062[J] Wave Propagation

Same subject as 1.138[J] , 18.376[J] Prereq: 2.003[J] and 18.075 G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Theoretical concepts and analysis of wave problems in science and engineering with examples chosen from elasticity, acoustics, geophysics, hydrodynamics, blood flow, nondestructive evaluation, and other applications. Progressive waves, group velocity and dispersion, energy density and transport. Reflection, refraction and transmission of plane waves by an interface. Mode conversion in elastic waves. Rayleigh waves. Waves due to a moving load. Scattering by a two-dimensional obstacle. Reciprocity theorems. Parabolic approximation. Waves on the sea surface. Capillary-gravity waves. Wave resistance. Radiation of surface waves. Internal waves in stratified fluids. Waves in rotating media. Waves in random media.

T. R. Akylas, R. R. Rosales

2.065 Acoustics and Sensing

Subject meets with 2.066 Prereq: 2.003[J] , 6.3000 , 8.03 , or 16.003 U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Introduces the fundamental concepts of acoustics and sensing with waves. Provides a unified theoretical approach to the physics of image formation through scattering and wave propagation in sensing. The linear and nonlinear acoustic wave equation, sources of sound, including musical instruments. Reflection, refraction, transmission and absorption. Bearing and range estimation by sensor array processing, beamforming, matched filtering, and focusing. Diffraction, bandwidth, ambient noise and reverberation limitations. Scattering from objects, surfaces and volumes by Green's Theorem. Forward scatter, shadows, Babinet's principle, extinction and attenuation. Ray tracing and waveguides in remote sensing. Applications to acoustic, radar, seismic, thermal and optical sensing and exploration. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

N. C. Makris

2.066 Acoustics and Sensing

Subject meets with 2.065 Prereq: 2.003[J] , 6.3000 , 8.03 , 16.003 , or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Introduces the fundamental concepts of acoustics and sensing with waves. Provides a unified theoretical approach to the physics of image formation through scattering and wave propagation in sensing. The linear and nonlinear acoustic wave equation, sources of sound, including musical instruments. Reflection, refraction, transmission and absorption. Bearing and range estimation by sensor array processing, beamforming, matched filtering, and focusing. Diffraction, bandwidth, ambient noise and reverberation limitations. Scattering from objects, surfaces and volumes by Green's Theorem. Forward scatter, shadows, Babinet's principle, extinction and attenuation. Ray tracing and waveguides in remote sensing. Applications to acoustic, radar, seismic, thermal and optical sensing and exploration. Students taking the graduate version of the subject complete additional assignments.

Solid Mechanics and Materials

2.071 mechanics of solid materials.

Prereq: 2.002 G (Spring) 4-0-8 units

Fundamentals of solid mechanics applied to the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. Kinematics of deformation, stress, and balance principles. Isotropic linear elasticity and isotropic linear thermal elasticity. Variational and energy methods. Linear viscoelasticity. Small-strain elastic-plastic deformation. Mechanics of large deformation; nonlinear hyperelastic material behavior. Foundations and methods of deformable-solid mechanics, including relevant applications. Provides base for further study and specialization within solid mechanics, including continuum mechanics, computational mechanics (e.g., finite-element methods), plasticity, fracture mechanics, structural mechanics, and nonlinear behavior of materials.

L. Anand, D. M. Parks

2.072 Mechanics of Continuous Media

Prereq: 2.071 Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Principles and applications of continuum mechanics. Kinematics of deformation. Thermomechanical conservation laws. Stress and strain measures. Constitutive equations including some examples of their microscopic basis. Solution of some basic problems for various materials as relevant in materials science, fluid dynamics, and structural analysis. Inherently nonlinear phenomena in continuum mechanics. Variational principles.

2.073 Solid Mechanics: Plasticity and Inelastic Deformation

Prereq: 2.071 G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Physical basis of plastic/inelastic deformation of solids; metals, polymers, granular/rock-like materials. Continuum constitutive models for small and large deformation of elastic-(visco)plastic solids. Analytical and numerical solution of selected boundary value problems. Applications to deformation processing of metals.

2.074 Solid Mechanics: Elasticity

Prereq: 2.002 and 18.03 G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Introduction to the theory and applications of nonlinear and linear elasticity. Strain, stress, and stress-strain relations. Several of the following topics: Spherically and cylindrically symmetric problems. Anisotropic material behavior. Piezoelectric materials. Effective properties of composites. Structural mechanics of beams and plates. Energy methods for structures. Two-dimensional problems. Stress concentration at cavities, concentrated loads, cracks, and dislocations. Variational methods and their applications; introduction to the finite element method. Introduction to wave propagation. 

R. Abeyaratne

2.075 Mechanics of Soft Materials

Prereq: None G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Covers a number of fundamental topics in the emerging field of soft and active materials, including polymer mechanics and physics, poroelasticity, viscoelasticity, and mechanics of electro-magneto-active and other responsive polymers. Lectures, recitations, and experiments elucidate the basic mechanical and thermodynamic principles underlying soft and active materials. Develops an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms for designing soft materials that possess extraordinary properties, such as stretchable, tough, strong, resilient, adhesive and responsive to external stimuli, from molecular to bulk scales.

2.076[J] Mechanics of Heterogeneous Materials

Same subject as 16.223[J] Prereq: 2.002 , 3.032, 16.20 , or permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Fall) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-0-9 units

See description under subject 16.223[J] .

B. L. Wardle, S-G. Kim

2.077 Solid Mechanics: Coupled Theories (New)

Prereq: 2.072 G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Complex problems in solid mechanics for a wide range of applications require a knowledge of the foundational balance laws of mechanics, thermodynamics, and electrodynamics of continua, together with a knowledge of the structure and properties of the materials which are provided by particular constitutive models for the so-called smart-materials, and the materials used in the many applications that involve thermo-, chemo-, electro- and/or magneto-mechanical coupling. Reviews the basic balance laws and the constitutive equations of the classical coupled theories of thermoelasticity and poroelasticity, and provides an introduction to the nonlinear theories of electroelasticity and magnetoelasticity. Examines the governing coupled partial differential equations and suitable boundary conditions. Discusses numerical solutions of the partial differential equations.

2.080[J] Structural Mechanics

Same subject as 1.573[J] Prereq: 2.002 G (Fall) 4-0-8 units

Applies solid mechanics fundamentals to the analysis of marine, civil, and mechanical structures.  Continuum concepts of stress, deformation, constitutive response and boundary conditions are reviewed in selected examples. The principle of virtual work guides mechanics modeling of slender structural components (e.g., beams; shafts; cables, frames; plates; shells), leading to appropriate simplifying assumptions. Introduction to elastic stability.  Material limits to stress in design. Variational methods for computational structural mechanics analysis.

T. Wierzbicki, D. Parks

2.081[J] Plates and Shells: Static and Dynamic Analysis

Same subject as 16.230[J] Prereq: 2.071 , 2.080[J] , or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-1-8 units

Stress-strain relations for plate and shell elements. Differential equations of equilibrium. Energy methods and approximate solutions. Bending and buckling of rectangular plates. Post-buckling and ultimate strength of cold formed sections and typical stiffened panels used in aerospace, civil, and mechanical engineering; offshore technology; and ship building. Geometry of curved surfaces. General theory of elastic, axisymmetric shells and their equilibrium equations. Buckling, crushing and bending strength of cylindrical shells with applications. Propagation of 1-D elastic waves in rods, geometrical and material dispersion. Plane, Rayleigh surface, and 3-D waves. 1-D plastic waves. Response of plates and shells to high-intensity loads. Dynamic plasticity and fracture. Application to crashworthiness and impact loading of structures.

2.082 Ship Structural Analysis and Design

Prereq: 2.081[J] and 2.701 G (Spring; second half of term) 3-0-3 units

Design application of analysis developed in 2.081[J] . Ship longitudinal strength and hull primary stresses. Ship structural design concepts. Design limit states including plate bending, column and panel buckling, panel ultimate strength, and plastic analysis. Matrix stiffness, and introduction to finite element analysis. Computer projects on the structural design of a midship module.

R. S. McCord, T. Wierzbicki

Computational Engineering

2.0911[j] computational design and fabrication (new).

Same subject as 6.4420[J] Subject meets with 6.8420 Prereq: Calculus II (GIR) and ( 6.1010 or permission of instructor) U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

See description under subject 6.4420[J] .

2.095 Introduction to Finite Element Methods

Subject meets with 2.098 Prereq: 2.086 or permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Ordinary differential equation boundary value problems: 2nd-order, 4th-order spatial operators, eigenproblems. Partial differential equations for scalar fields: elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic. Strong statement, weak form, minimization principle. Rayleigh-Ritz, Galerkin projection. Numerical interpolation, integration, differentiation, best-fit. Finite element method for spatial discretization in one and two space dimensions: formulation (linear, quadratic approximation), mesh generation, bases and discrete equations, uniform and adaptive refinement, a priori and a posteriori error estimates, sparse solvers, implementation, testing. Finite difference-finite element methods for mixed initial-boundary value problems; nonlinear problems and Newton iteration; linear elasticity. Applications in heat transfer and structural analysis. Assignments require MATLAB coding. Students taking graduate version complete additional work.

2.096[J] Introduction to Modeling and Simulation

Same subject as 6.7300[J] , 16.910[J] Prereq: 18.03 or 18.06 G (Fall) 3-6-3 units

See description under subject 6.7300[J] .

2.097[J] Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations

Same subject as 6.7330[J] , 16.920[J] Prereq: 18.03 or 18.06 G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

See description under subject 16.920[J] .

2.098 Introduction to Finite Element Methods

Subject meets with 2.095 Prereq: 2.086 or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Ordinary differential equation boundary value problems: 2nd-order, 4th-order spatial operators; eigenproblems. Partial differential equations for scalar fields: elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic. Strong statement, weak form, minimization principle. Rayleigh-Ritz,  Galerkin projection. Numerical interpolation, integration, differentiation; best-fit. Finite element method for spatial discretization in one and two space dimensions: formulation (linear, quadratic approximation), mesh generation, bases and discrete equations, uniform and adaptive refinement, a priori and a posteriori error estimates, sparse solvers, implementation, testing. Finite difference-finite element methods for mixed initial-boundary value problems; nonlinear problems and Newton iteration; linear elasticity. Applications in heat transfer and structural analysis. Assignments require MATLAB coding. Students taking graduate version complete additional work.

2.099[J] Computational Mechanics of Materials

Same subject as 16.225[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

See description under subject 16.225[J] .

R. Radovitzky

System Dynamics and Control

2.110 information, entropy, and computation.

Prereq: Physics I (GIR) U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-6 units

Explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include information and computation, digital signals, codes, and compression. Biological representations of information. Logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information. Noise, probability, and error correction. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics. Reversible and irreversible operations and the physics of computation. Quantum computation.

P. Penfield, Jr.

2.111[J] Quantum Computation

Same subject as 6.6410[J] , 8.370[J] , 18.435[J] Prereq: 8.05 , 18.06 , 18.700 , 18.701 , or 18.C06[J] G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

See description under subject 18.435[J] .

I. Chuang, A. Harrow, P. Shor

2.12 Introduction to Robotics

Subject meets with 2.120 Prereq: 2.004 U (Spring) 3-2-7 units

Cross-disciplinary studies in robot mechanics and intelligence. Emphasizes physical understanding of robot kinematics and dynamics, differential motion and energy method, design and control of robotic arms and mobile robots, and actuators, drives, and transmission. Second half of course focuses on algorithmic thinking and computation, computer vision and perception, planning and control for manipulation, localization and navigation, machine learning for robotics, and human-robot systems. Weekly laboratories include brushless DC motor control, design and fabrication of robotic arms and vehicles, robot vision and navigation, and programming and system integration using Robot Operating System (ROS). Group term project builds intelligent robots for specific applications of interest. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

2.120 Introduction to Robotics

Subject meets with 2.12 Prereq: 2.004 or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-2-7 units

Cross-disciplinary studies in robot mechanics and intelligence. Emphasizes physical understanding of robot kinematics and dynamics, differential motion and energy method, design and control of robotic arms and mobile robots, and actuators, drives, and transmission. Second half of course focuses on algorithmic thinking and computation, computer vision and perception, planning and control for manipulation, localization and navigation, machine learning for robotics, and human-robot systems. Weekly laboratories include brushless DC motor control, design and fabrication of robotic arms and vehicles, robot vision and navigation, and programming and system integration using Robot Operating System (ROS). Group term project builds intelligent robots for specific applications of interest. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity.

2.121 Stochastic Systems

Subject meets with 2.122 , 2.22 Prereq: None. Coreq: 2.004 U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Response of systems to stochastic excitation with design applications. Linear time-invariant systems, convolution, Fourier and Laplace transforms. Probability and statistics. Discrete and continuous random variables, derived distributions. Stochastic processes, auto-correlation. Stationarity and ergodicity, power spectral density. Systems driven by random functions, Wiener-Khinchine theorem.  Sampling and filtering. Short- and long-term statistics, statistics of extremes. Problems from mechanical vibrations and statistical linearization, statistical mechanics, and system prediction/identification. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments and a short-term project.

N. M. Patrikalakis, T. P. Sapsis, M. S. Triantafyllou

2.122 Stochastic Systems

Subject meets with 2.121 , 2.22 Prereq: 2.004 and 2.087 G (Spring) 4-0-8 units

2.124[J] Robotics: Science and Systems (New)

Same subject as 6.4200[J] , 16.405[J] Prereq: (( 1.00 or 6.100A ) and ( 2.003[J] , 6.1010 , 6.1210 , or 16.06 )) or permission of instructor U (Spring) 2-6-4 units. Institute LAB

See description under subject 6.4200[J] . Enrollment limited.

L. Carlone, S. Karaman, D. Hadfield-Manell, J. Leonard

2.131 Advanced Instrumentation and Measurement

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-6-3 units

Provides training in advanced instrumentation and measurement techniques. Topics include system level design, fabrication and evaluation with emphasis on systems involving concepts and technology from mechanics, optics, electronics, chemistry and biology. Simulation, modeling and design software. Use of a wide range of instruments/techniques (e.g., scanning electron microscope, dynamic signal/system analyzer, impedance analyzer, laser interferometer) and fabrication/machining methods (e.g., laser micro-machining, stereo lithography, computer controlled turning and machining centers). Theory and practice of both linear and nonlinear system identification techniques. Lab sessions include instruction and group project work. No final exam.

I. W. Hunter

2.14 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems

Subject meets with 2.140 Prereq: 2.004 U (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. Analysis in time and frequency domains. Design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping). Describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems. Extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers. Discrete and digital hybrid systems and use of z-plane design. Extended design case studies and capstone group projects. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

D. L. Trumper, K. Youcef-Toumi

2.140 Analysis and Design of Feedback Control Systems

Subject meets with 2.14 Prereq: 2.004 or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Develops the fundamentals of feedback control using linear transfer function system models. Analysis in time and frequency domains. Design in the s-plane (root locus) and in the frequency domain (loop shaping). Describing functions for stability of certain non-linear systems. Extension to state variable systems and multivariable control with observers. Discrete and digital hybrid systems and use of z-plane design. Extended design case studies and capstone group projects. Student taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity.

D. Rowell, D. L. Trumper, K. Youcef-Toumi

2.141 Modeling and Simulation of Dynamic Systems

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Modeling multidomain engineering systems at a level of detail suitable for design and control system implementation. Network representation, state-space models; multiport energy storage and dissipation, Legendre transforms; nonlinear mechanics, transformation theory, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian forms; Control-relevant properties. Application examples may include electro-mechanical transducers, mechanisms, electronics, fluid and thermal systems, compressible flow, chemical processes, diffusion, and wave transmission.

2.145 Design of Compliant Mechanisms, Machines and Systems (New)

Subject meets with 2.147 Prereq: 2.003[J] and 2.007 U (Fall) 3-3-6 units

Design, modeling and integration of compliance into systems that enable performance which is impractical to obtain via rigid mechanisms. Includes multiple strategies (pseudo-rigid body, topology synthesis, freedom and constraint topology) to engineer compliant mechanisms for mechanical systems. Emphasis is placed upon the integration of first principles (math/physics/engineering classes) to optimize kinematics, stiffness, energy storage/release, load capacity, efficiency and integration with actuation/sensing. Synthesize concepts, optimize them via computational models and test prototypes. Prototypes integrate multiple engineering sub-disciplines (e.g. mechanics + dynamics or mechanics + energy) and are drawn from biological systems, prosthetics, energy harvesting, precision instrumentation, robotics, space-based systems and others. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

M.  Culpepper

2.147 Design of Compliant Mechanisms, Machines and Systems (New)

Subject meets with 2.145 Prereq: 2.003[J] and 2.007 G (Fall) 3-3-6 units

Design, modeling and integration of compliance into systems that enable performance which is impractical to obtain via rigid mechanisms. Students learn strategies (pseudo-rigid body, topology synthesis, freedom and constraint topology) to engineer compliant mechanisms for mechanical systems. Emphasis is placed upon the integration of first principles (math/physics/engineering classes) to optimize kinematics, stiffness, energy storage/release, load capacity, efficiency and integration with actuation/sensing. Students synthesize concepts, optimize them via computational models and test prototypes. Prototypes integrate multiple engineering sub-disciplines (e.g. mechanics + dynamics or mechanics + energy) and are drawn from biological systems, prosthetics, energy harvesting, precision instrumentation, robotics, space-based systems and others. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

2.151 Advanced System Dynamics and Control

Prereq: 2.004 and ( 2.087 or 18.06 ) G (Fall) 4-0-8 units

Analytical descriptions of state-determined dynamic physical systems; time and frequency domain representations; system characteristics - controllability, observability, stability; linear and nonlinear system responses. Modification of system characteristics using feedback. State observers, Kalman filters. Modeling/performance trade-offs in control system design. Basic optimization tools. Positive systems. Emphasizes applications to physical systems.

J.-J. E. Slotine, K. Youcef-Toumi, N. Hogan

2.152[J] Nonlinear Control

Same subject as 9.110[J] Prereq: 2.151 , 6.7100[J] , 16.31 , or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Introduction to nonlinear control and estimation in physical and biological systems. Nonlinear stability theory, Lyapunov analysis, Barbalat's lemma. Feedback linearization, differential flatness, internal dynamics. Sliding surfaces. Adaptive nonlinear control and estimation. Multiresolution bases, nonlinear system identification. Contraction analysis, differential stability theory. Nonlinear observers. Asynchronous distributed computation and learning. Concurrent synchronization, polyrhythms. Monotone nonlinear systems. Emphasizes application to physical systems (robots, aircraft, spacecraft, underwater vehicles, reaction-diffusion processes, machine vision, oscillators, internet), machine learning, computational neuroscience, and systems biology. Includes term projects.

J.-J. E. Slotine

2.153 Adaptive Control and Connections to Machine Learning

Prereq: 2.151 Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Fall) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-0-9 units

Lays the foundation of adaptive control, and investigates its interconnections with machine learning. Explores fundamental principles of adaptive control, including parameter estimation, recursive algorithms, stability properties, and conditions for convergence. Studies their relationship with machine learning, including the minimization of a performance error and fast convergence. Discusses robustness and regularization in both fields. Derives conditions of learning and implications of imperfect learning. Examines the trade-off between stability and learning. Focuses throughout the term on dynamic systems and on problems where real-time control is needed. Uses examples from aerospace, propulsion, automotive, and energy systems to elucidate the underlying concepts.

A. Annaswamy

2.154 Maneuvering and Control of Surface and Underwater Vehicles

Prereq: 2.22 G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Maneuvering motions of surface and underwater vehicles. Derivation of equations of motion, hydrodynamic coefficients. Memory effects. Linear and nonlinear forms of the equations of motion. Control surfaces modeling and design. Engine, propulsor, and transmission systems modeling and simulation during maneuvering. Stability of motion. Principles of multivariable automatic control. Optimal control, Kalman filtering, loop transfer recovery. Term project: applications chosen from autopilots for surface vehicles; towing in open seas; remotely operated vehicles.

M. S. Triantafyllou

2.155 Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning for Engineering Design (New)

Subject meets with 2.156 Prereq: 2.086 , 6.100A , or permission of instructor U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Machine learning and artificial intelligence techniques in engineering design applications. Emphasizes state-of-the-art machine learning techniques to design new products or systems or solve complex engineering problems. Lectures cover the theoretical and practical aspects of machine learning and optimization methods. Challenge problems, research paper discussions, and interactive in-class activities are used to highlight the unique challenges of machine learning for design applications. A group term project on students' applications of interest. Basic programming and machine learning familiarity are recommended. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. 

2.156 Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning for Engineering Design (New)

Subject meets with 2.155 Prereq: None G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Machine learning and artificial intelligence techniques in engineering design applications. Emphasizes state-of-the-art machine learning techniques to design new products or systems or solve complex engineering problems. Lectures cover the theoretical and practical aspects of machine learning and optimization methods. Challenge problems, research paper discussions, and interactive in-class activities are used to highlight the unique challenges of machine learning for design applications. A group term project on students' applications of interest. Basic programming and machine learning familiarity are recommended. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

2.16 Learning Machines

Subject meets with 2.168 Prereq: 2.086 , 18.075 , and ( 6.3700 or 18.05 ) U (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 4-0-8 units

Introduces fundamental concepts and encourages open-ended exploration of the increasingly topical intersection between artificial intelligence and the physical sciences. Energy and information, and their respective optimality conditions are used to define supervised and unsupervised learning algorithms; as well as ordinary and partial differential equations. Subsequently, physical systems with complex constitutive relationships are drawn from elasticity, biophysics, fluid mechanics, hydrodynamics, acoustics, and electromagnetics to illustrate how machine learning-inspired optimization can approximate solutions to forward and inverse problems in these domains.

G. Barbastathis

2.160 Identification, Estimation, and Learning

Prereq: 2.151 G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Provides a broad theoretical basis for system identification, estimation, and learning. Least squares estimation and its convergence properties, Kalman filter and extended Kalman filter, noise dynamics and system representation, function approximation theory, neural nets, radial basis functions, wavelets, Volterra expansions, informative data sets, persistent excitation, asymptotic variance, central limit theorems, model structure selection, system order estimate, maximum likelihood, unbiased estimates, Cramer-Rao lower bound, Kullback-Leibler information distance, Akaike's information criterion, experiment design, and model validation.

2.165[J] Robotics

Same subject as 9.175[J] Prereq: 2.151 or permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Introduction to robotics and learning in machines. Kinematics and dynamics of rigid body systems. Adaptive control, system identification, sparse representations. Force control, adaptive visual servoing. Task planning, teleoperation, imitation learning. Navigation. Underactuated systems, approximate optimization and control. Dynamics of learning and optimization in networks. Elements of biological planning and control. Motor primitives, entrainment, active sensing, binding models. Term projects.

J.-J. E. Slotine, H. Asada

2.166 Autonomous Vehicles

Prereq: 6.041B or permission of instructor G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-1-8 units

Theory and application of probabilistic techniques for autonomous mobile robotics. Topics include probabilistic state estimation and decision making for mobile robots; stochastic representations of the environment; dynamic models and sensor models for mobile robots; algorithms for mapping and localization; planning and control in the presence of uncertainty; cooperative operation of multiple mobile robots; mobile sensor networks; application to autonomous marine (underwater and floating), ground, and air vehicles. Enrollment limited to 8.

J. J. Leonard

2.168 Learning Machines

Subject meets with 2.16 Prereq: None G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

2.171 Analysis and Design of Digital Control Systems

Prereq: 2.14 , 2.151 , or permission of instructor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-3-6 units

A comprehensive introduction to digital control system design, reinforced with hands-on laboratory experiences. Major topics include discrete-time system theory and analytical tools; design of digital control systems via approximation from continuous time; direct discrete-time design; loop-shaping design for performance and robustness; state-space design; observers and state-feedback; quantization and other nonlinear effects; implementation issues. Laboratory experiences and design projects connect theory with practice.

D. L. Trumper

2.174[J] Advancing Mechanics and Materials via Machine Learning

Same subject as 1.121[J] Subject meets with 1.052 Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

See description under subject 1.121[J] .

2.177[J] Designing Virtual Worlds (New)

Same subject as CMS.342[J] Subject meets with 2.178[J] , CMS.942[J] Prereq: None U (Fall, Spring) 3-1-2 units

Three primary areas of focus are: creating new Virtual Reality experiences; mapping the state of emerging tools; and hosting guests - leaders in the VR/XR community, who serve as coaches for projects. Students have significant leeway to customize their own learning environment. As the field is rapidly evolving, each semester focuses on a new aspect of virtual worlds, based on the current state of innovations. Students work in teams of interdisciplinary peers from Berklee College of Music and Harvard University. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

2.178[J] Designing Virtual Worlds (New)

Same subject as CMS.942[J] Subject meets with 2.177[J] , CMS.342[J] Prereq: None G (Fall, Spring) 3-1-2 units

2.18 Biomolecular Feedback Systems

Subject meets with 2.180 Prereq: Biology (GIR) , 18.03 , or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Comprehensive introduction to dynamics and control of biomolecular systems with emphasis on design/analysis techniques from control theory. Provides a review of biology concepts, regulation mechanisms, and models. Covers basic enabling technologies, engineering principles for designing biological functions, modular design techniques, and design limitations. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

D. Del Vecchio, R. Weiss

2.180 Biomolecular Feedback Systems

Subject meets with 2.18 Prereq: Biology (GIR) , 18.03 , or permission of instructor U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

D. Del Vecchio

2.183[J] Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement

Same subject as 9.34[J] Subject meets with 2.184 Prereq: 2.004 or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Presents a quantitative description of how biomechanical and neural factors interact in human sensory-motor behavior. Students survey recent literature on how motor behavior is controlled, comparing biological and robotic approaches to similar tasks. Topics may include a review of relevant neural, muscular and skeletal physiology, neural feedback and "equilibrium-point" theories, co-contraction strategies, impedance control, kinematic redundancy, optimization, intermittency, contact tasks and tool use. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

2.184 Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement

Subject meets with 2.183[J] , 9.34[J] Prereq: 2.004 or permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Fluid Mechanics and Combustion

2.20 marine hydrodynamics.

Prereq: 1.060 , 2.006 , 2.016 , or 2.06 G (Fall) 4-1-7 units

The fundamentals of fluid mechanics are developed in the context of naval architecture and ocean science and engineering. Transport theorem and conservation principles. Navier-Stokes' equation. Dimensional analysis. Ideal and potential flows. Vorticity and Kelvin's theorem. Hydrodynamic forces in potential flow, D'Alembert's paradox, added-mass, slender-body theory. Viscous-fluid flow, laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Model testing, scaling laws. Application of potential theory to surface waves, energy transport, wave/body forces. Linearized theory of lifting surfaces. Experimental project in the towing tank or propeller tunnel.

D. K. P. Yue

2.22 Design Principles for Ocean Vehicles

Subject meets with 2.121 , 2.122 Prereq: 2.20 G (Spring) 3-1-8 units

Design tools for analysis of linear systems and random processes related to ocean vehicles; description of ocean environment including random waves, ocean wave spectra and their selection; short-term and long-term wave statistics; and ocean currents. Advanced hydrodynamics for design of ocean vehicles and offshore structures, including wave forces on towed and moored structures; inertia vs. drag-dominated flows; vortex induced vibrations (VIV) of offshore structures; ship seakeeping and sensitivity of seakeeping performance. Design exercises in application of principles. Laboratory exercises in seakeeping and VIV at model scale.

2.23 Hydrofoils and Propellers

Prereq: 2.20 and 18.085 Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Spring) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-0-9 units

Reviews the theory and design of hydrofoil sections; lifting and thickness problems for sub-cavitating sections and unsteady flow problems. Covers lifting line and lifting surface theory with applications to hydrofoil craft, rudder, control surface, propeller and wind turbine rotor design. Topics include propeller lifting line and lifting surface theory; wake adapted propellers, steady and unsteady propeller thrust and torque; waterjets; performance analysis and design of wind turbine rotors. Presents numerical principles of vortex lattice and lifting surface panel methods. Projects illustrate the development of theoretical and computational methods for lifting, propulsion and wind turbine applications.

P. D. Sclavounos

2.24[J] Seakeeping of Ships and Offshore Energy Systems

Same subject as 1.692[J] Prereq: 2.20 and 18.085 Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: G (Spring) 4-0-8 units

Surface wave theory, conservation laws and boundary conditions, properties of regular surface waves and random ocean waves. Linearized theory of floating body dynamics, kinematic and dynamic free surface conditions, body boundary conditions. Simple harmonic motions. Diffraction and radiation problems, added mass and damping matrices. General reciprocity identities on diffraction and radiation. Ship wave resistance theory, Kelvin wake physics, ship seakeeping in regular and random waves. Discusses point wave energy absorbers, beam sea and head-sea devises, oscillating water column device and Well's turbine. Discusses offshore floating energy systems and their interaction with ambient waves, current and wind, including oil and gas platforms, liquefied natural gas (LNG) vessels and floating wind turbines. Homework drawn from real-world applications.

2.25 Fluid Mechanics

Prereq: 2.006 or 2.06; Coreq: 18.075 or 18.085 G (Fall) 4-0-8 units

Survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua. Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Similarity and dimensional analysis. Lubrication theory. Boundary layers and separation. Circulation and vorticity theorems. Potential flow. Introduction to turbulence. Lift and drag. Surface tension and surface tension driven flows.

A. F. Ghoniem, A. E. Hosoi, G. H. McKinley, A. T. Patera

2.250[J] Fluids and Diseases

Same subject as 1.631[J] , HST.537[J] Subject meets with 1.063 Prereq: None Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Spring) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-3-6 units

See description under subject 1.631[J] .

2.26[J] Advanced Fluid Dynamics

Same subject as 1.63[J] Prereq: 18.085 and ( 2.25 or permission of instructor) G (Spring) 4-0-8 units

Fundamentals of fluid dynamics intrinsic to natural physical phenomena and/or engineering processes. Discusses a range of topics and advanced problem-solving techniques. Sample topics include brief review of basic laws of fluid motion, scaling and approximations, creeping flows, boundary layers in high-speed flows, steady and transient, similarity method of solution, buoyancy-driven convection in porous media, dispersion in steady or oscillatory flows, physics and mathematics of linearized instability, effects of shear and stratification. In alternate years, two of the following modules will be offered: I: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics of Coastal Waters, II: Capillary Phenomena, III: Non-Newtonian Fluids, IV: Flagellar Swimming.

T. R. Akylas, G. H. McKinley, R. Stocker

2.28 Fundamentals and Applications of Combustion

Prereq: 2.006 or (2.051 and 2.06) Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Fall) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-0-9 units

Fundamentals and modeling of reacting gas dynamics and combustion using analytical and numerical methods. Conservation equations of reacting flows. Multi-species transport, chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Non-equilibrium flow. Detonation and reacting boundary layers. Ignition, flammability, and extinction. Premixed and diffusion flames. Combustion instabilities. Supersonic combustion. Turbulent combustion. Liquid and solid burning. Fire, safety, and environmental impact. Applications to power and propulsion.

A. F. Ghoniem

2.29 Numerical Fluid Mechanics

Subject meets with 2.290 Prereq: 18.075 and ( 2.006 , 2.016 , 2.06, 2.20 , or 2.25 ) G (Spring) 4-0-8 units

Introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB: errors, condition numbers and roots of equations. Navier-Stokes. Direct and iterative methods for linear systems. Finite differences for elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations. Fourier decomposition, error analysis and stability. High-order and compact finite-differences. Finite volume methods. Time marching methods. Navier-Stokes solvers. Grid generation. Finite volumes on complex geometries. Finite element methods. Spectral methods. Boundary element and panel methods. Turbulent flows. Boundary layers. Lagrangian Coherent Structures. Includes a final research project.  Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

P. F. J. Lermusiaux

2.290 Numerical Fluid Mechanics

Subject meets with 2.29 Prereq: 2.005 U (Spring) 4-0-8 units

P. Lermusiaux

2.341[J] Macromolecular Hydrodynamics

Same subject as 10.531[J] Prereq: 2.25 , 10.301 , or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-6 units

Physical phenomena in polymeric liquids undergoing deformation and flow. Kinematics and material functions for complex fluids; techniques of viscometry, rheometry; and linear viscoelastic measurements for polymeric fluids. Generalized Newtonian fluids. Continuum mechnanics, frame invariance, and convected derivatives for finite strain viscoelasticity. Differential and integral constitutive equations for viscoelastic fluids. Analytical solutions to isothermal and non-isothermal flow problems; the roles of non-Newtonian viscosity, linear viscoelasticity, normal stresses, elastic recoil, stress relaxation in processing flows. Introduction to molecular theories for dynamics of polymeric fluids. (Extensive class project and presentation required instead of a final exam).

R. C. Armstrong, G. H. McKinley

MEMS and Nanotechnology

2.37 fundamentals of nanoengineering.

Subject meets with 2.370 Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Presents the fundamentals of molecular modeling in engineering in the context of nanoscale mechanical engineering applications. Statistical mechanics and its connection to engineering thermodynamics. Molecular origin and limitations of macroscopic descriptions and constitutive relations for equilibrium and non-equilibrium behavior. Introduction to molecular simulation, solid-state physics and electrokinetic phenomena. Discusses molecular approaches to modern nanoscale engineering problems. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content.

N. G. Hadjiconstantinou

2.370 Fundamentals of Nanoengineering

Subject meets with 2.37 Prereq: Chemistry (GIR) and 2.001 U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

2.391[J] Nanostructure Fabrication

Same subject as 6.6600[J] Prereq: 2.710 , 6.2370 , 6.2600[J] , or permission of instructor G (Spring) 4-0-8 units

See description under subject 6.6600[J] .

K. K. Berggren

Thermodynamics

2.42 general thermodynamics.

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

General foundations of thermodynamics from an entropy point of view, entropy generation and transfer in complex systems. Definitions of work, energy, stable equilibrium, available energy, entropy, thermodynamic potential, and interactions other than work (nonwork, heat, mass transfer). Applications to properties of materials, bulk flow, energy conversion, chemical equilibrium, combustion, and industrial manufacturing.

2.43 Advanced Thermodynamics (New)

Prereq: 2.42 or permission of instructor G (Spring) 4-0-8 units

<p class="xmsolistparagraph">Self-contained concise review of general thermodynamics concepts, multicomponent equilibrium properties, chemical equilibrium, electrochemical potentials, and chemical kinetics, as needed to introduce the methods of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and to provide a unified understanding of phase equilibria, transport and nonequilibrium phenomena useful for future energy and climate engineering technologies. Applications include: second-law efficiencies and methods to allocate primary energy consumptions and CO2 emissions in cogeneration and hybrid power systems, minimum work of separation, maximum work of mixing, osmotic pressure and membrane equilibria, metastable states, spinodal decomposition, Onsager's near-equilibrium reciprocity in thermodiffusive, thermoelectric, and electrokinetic cross effects.

G. P. Beretta

Heat and Mass Transfer

2.500 desalination and water purification.

Prereq: 1.020 , 2.006 , 10.302 , (2.051 and 2.06), or permission of instructor G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Introduces the fundamental science and technology of desalinating water to overcome water scarcity and ensure sustainable water supplies. Covers basic water chemistry, flash evaporation, reverse osmosis and membrane engineering, electrodialysis, nanofiltration, solar desalination, energy efficiency of desalination systems, fouling and scaling, environmental impacts, and economics of desalination systems. Open to upper-class undergraduates.

J. H. Lienhard, M. Balaban

2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer

Prereq: ( 2.005 and 18.03 ) or permission of instructor U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Covers conduction (governing equations and boundary conditions, steady and unsteady heat transfer, resistance concept); laminar and turbulent convection (forced-convection and natural-convection boundary layers, external flows); radiation (blackbody and graybody exchange, spectral and solar radiation); coupled conduction, convection, radiation problems; synthesis of analytical, computational, and experimental techniques; and mass transfer at low rates, evaporation.

J. H. Lienhard, A. T. Patera, E. N. Wang

2.52[J] Modeling and Approximation of Thermal Processes

Same subject as 4.424[J] Prereq: 2.51 G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Provides instruction on how to model thermal transport processes in typical engineering systems such as those found in manufacturing, machinery, and energy technologies. Successive modules cover basic modeling tactics for particular modes of transport, including steady and unsteady heat conduction, convection, multiphase flow processes, and thermal radiation. Includes a creative design project executed by the students.

L. R. Glicksman

2.55 Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer

Prereq: 2.51 G (Spring) 4-0-8 units

Advanced treatment of fundamental aspects of heat and mass transport. Covers topics such as diffusion kinetics, conservation laws, laminar and turbulent convection, mass transfer including phase change or heterogeneous reactions, and basic thermal radiation. Problems and examples include theory and applications drawn from a spectrum of engineering design and manufacturing problems.

J. H. Lienhard

2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes

Subject meets with 2.570 Prereq: 2.005 , 2.051, or permission of instructor G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers; aiming at a fundamental understanding of descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes, from nanoscale to macroscale. Topics include energy levels; statistical behavior and internal energy; energy transport in the forms of waves and particles; scattering and heat generation processes; Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws; and deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions. Applications in nanotechnology and microtechnology. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

2.570 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes

Subject meets with 2.57 Prereq: 2.005 , 2.051, or permission of instructor U (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

2.58 Radiative Transfer

Prereq: 2.51 , 10.302 , or permission of instructor G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Principles of thermal radiation and their application to engineering heat and photon transfer problems. Quantum and classical models of radiative properties of materials, electromagnetic wave theory for thermal radiation, radiative transfer in absorbing, emitting, and scattering media, and coherent laser radiation. Applications cover laser-material interactions, imaging, infrared instrumentation, global warming, semiconductor manufacturing, combustion, furnaces, and high temperature processing.

2.59[J] Thermal Hydraulics in Power Technology

Same subject as 10.536[J] , 22.313[J] Prereq: 2.006 , 10.302 , 22.312 , or permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Fall) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-2-7 units

See description under subject 22.313[J] .

E. Baglietto, M. Bucci

Energy and Power Systems

2.60[j] fundamentals of advanced energy conversion.

Same subject as 10.390[J] Subject meets with 2.62[J] , 10.392[J] , 22.40[J] Prereq: 2.006 , (2.051 and 2.06), or permission of instructor U (Spring) 4-0-8 units

Fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, and transport applied to energy systems. Analysis of energy conversion and storage in thermal, mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical processes in power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, performance, and environmental impact. Applications to fuel reforming and alternative fuels, hydrogen, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, catalysis, combined and hybrid power cycles using fossil, nuclear and renewable resources. CO 2 separation and capture. Biomass energy. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

A. F. Ghoniem, W. Green

2.603 Fundamentals of Smart and Resilient Grids

Prereq: 2.003[J] U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 4-0-8 units

Introduces the fundamentals of power system structure, operation and control. Emphasizes the challenges and opportunities for integration of new technologies: photovoltaic, wind, electric storage, demand response, synchrophasor measurements. Introduces the basics of power system modeling and analysis. Presents the basic phenomena of voltage and frequency stability as well technological and regulatory constraints on system operation. Describes both the common and emerging automatic control systems and operator decision-making policies. Relies on a combination of traditional lectures, homework assignments, and group projects. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

K. Turitsyn

2.61 Internal Combustion Engines

Prereq: 2.006 G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-1-8 units

Fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, efficiency, fuel requirements, and environmental impact. Study of fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, relevant to engine power, efficiency, and emissions. Examination of design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. Engine Laboratory project. For graduate and senior undergraduate students.

W. K. Cheng

2.611 Marine Power and Propulsion

Subject meets with 2.612 Prereq: 2.005 G (Fall) 4-0-8 units

Selection and evaluation of commercial and naval ship power and propulsion systems. Analysis of propulsors, prime mover thermodynamic cycles, propeller-engine matching. Propeller selection, waterjet analysis, review of alternative propulsors; thermodynamic analyses of Rankine, Brayton, Diesel, and Combined cycles, reduction gears and integrated electric drive. Battery operated vehicles, fuel cells. Term project requires analysis of alternatives in propulsion plant design for given physical, performance, and economic constraints. Graduate students complete different assignments and exams.

J. Harbour, M. S. Triantafyllou, R. S. McCord

2.612 Marine Power and Propulsion

Subject meets with 2.611 Prereq: 2.005 U (Fall) 4-0-8 units

2.62[J] Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion

Same subject as 10.392[J] , 22.40[J] Subject meets with 2.60[J] , 10.390[J] Prereq: 2.006 , (2.051 and 2.06), or permission of instructor G (Spring) 4-0-8 units

Fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, and transport applied to energy systems. Analysis of energy conversion and storage in thermal, mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical processes in power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, performance and environmental impact. Applications to fuel reforming and alternative fuels, hydrogen, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, catalysis, combined and hybrid power cycles using fossil, nuclear and renewable resources. CO 2 separation and capture. Biomass energy. Meets with 2.60[J] when offered concurrently; students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.

2.625[J] Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage: Fundamentals, Materials and Applications

Same subject as 10.625[J] Prereq: 2.005 , 3.046 , 3.53 , 10.40 , (2.051 and 2.06), or permission of instructor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 4-0-8 units

Fundamental concepts, tools, and applications in electrochemical science and engineering. Introduces thermodynamics, kinetics and transport of electrochemical reactions. Describes how materials structure and properties affect electrochemical behavior of particular applications, for instance in lithium rechargeable batteries, electrochemical capacitors, fuel cells, photo electrochemical cells, and electrolytic cells. Discusses state-of-the-art electrochemical energy technologies for portable electronic devices, hybrid and plug-in vehicles, electrical vehicles. Theoretical and experimental exploration of electrochemical measurement techniques in cell testing, and in bulk and interfacial transport measurements (electronic and ionic resistivity and charge transfer cross the electrode-electrolyte interface).

Y. Shao-Horn

2.626 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 4-0-8 units

Fundamentals of photoelectric conversion: charge excitation, conduction, separation, and collection. Studies commercial and emerging photovoltaic technologies. Cross-cutting themes include conversion efficiencies, loss mechanisms, characterization, manufacturing, systems, reliability, life-cycle analysis, and risk analysis. Photovoltaic technology evolution in the context of markets, policies, society, and environment. Graduate students complete additional work.

T. Buonassisi

2.627 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics

Prereq: Permission of instructor U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 4-0-8 units

2.630 Interfacial Engineering (New)

Interfacial interactions are ubiquitous in many industries including energy, water, agriculture, medical, transportation, and consumer products. Transport processes are typically limited by interfaces. Addresses how interfacial properties (eg., chemistry, morphology, thermal, electrical) can be engineered for significant efficiency enhancements. Topics include surface tension and wetting phenomena, thermodynamics of interfaces, surface chemistry and morphology, nonwetting, slippery, and superwetting surfaces, charged interfaces and electric double layers, intermolecular forces, Van der Waals and double-layer forces, DLVO theory, electrowetting and electro-osmotic flows, electrochemical bubbles, surfactants, phase transitions, and bio-interfaces. Manufacturing approaches, entrepreneurial efforts to translate technologies to markets, guest lectures and start-up company tours provide real-world exposure.  Anticipated enrollment is 15-20.

K. Varanasi

2.65[J] Sustainable Energy

Same subject as 1.818[J] , 10.391[J] , 11.371[J] , 22.811[J] Subject meets with 2.650[J] , 10.291[J] , 22.081[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-1-8 units

See description under subject 22.811[J] .

M. W. Golay

2.650[J] Introduction to Sustainable Energy

Same subject as 10.291[J] , 22.081[J] Subject meets with 1.818[J] , 2.65[J] , 10.391[J] , 11.371[J] , 22.811[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor U (Fall) 3-1-8 units

See description under subject 22.081[J] . Limited to juniors and seniors.

2.651[J] Introduction to Energy in Global Development

Same subject as EC.711[J] Subject meets with EC.791 Prereq: None U (Spring) 3-2-7 units

See description under subject EC.711[J] . Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session.

D. Sweeney, S. Hsu

2.652[J] Applications of Energy in Global Development

Same subject as EC.712[J] Subject meets with EC.782 Prereq: None U (Fall) 4-0-8 units

See description under subject EC.712[J] . Limited to 20; preference to students who have taken EC.711[J] .

D. Sweeney, Staff

Experimental Engineering

2.670 mechanical engineering tools.

Prereq: None U (Fall, IAP, Spring) 0-1-2 units

Introduces the fundamentals of machine tools use and fabrication techniques. Students work with a variety of machine tools including the bandsaw, milling machine, and lathe. Mechanical Engineering students are advised to take this subject in the first IAP after declaring their major. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity. Preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

M. Culpepper

2.671 Measurement and Instrumentation

Prereq: Physics II (GIR) , 2.001 , 2.003[J] , and 2.086 U (Fall, Spring) 3-3-6 units. Institute LAB

Introduces fundamental concepts and experimental techniques for observation and measurement of physical variables such as force and motion, liquid and gas properties, physiological parameters, and measurements of light, sound, electrical quantities, and temperature. Emphasizes mathematical techniques including uncertainty analysis and statistics, Fourier analysis, frequency response, and correlation functions. Uses engineering knowledge to select instruments and design experimental methods to obtain and interpret meaningful data. Guided learning during lab experiments promotes independent experiment design and measurements performed outside the lab in the semester-long "Go Forth and Measure" project. Advances students' ability to critically read, evaluate, and extract specific technical meaning from information in a variety of media, and provides extensive instruction and practice in written, graphical, and oral communication. Enrollment limited.

I. W. Hunter, M. Kolle, B. Hughey

2.673[J] Instrumentation and Measurement for Biological Systems

Same subject as 20.309[J] Subject meets with 20.409 Prereq: ( Biology (GIR) , Physics II (GIR) , 6.100B , and 18.03 ) or permission of instructor U (Fall, Spring) 3-6-3 units

See description under subject 20.309[J] . Enrollment limited; preference to Course 20 undergraduates.

P. Blainey, S. Manalis, E. Frank, S. Wasserman, J. Bagnall, E. Boyden, P. So

2.674 Introduction to Micro/Nano Engineering Laboratory

Prereq: Physics II (GIR) or permission of instructor U (Spring) 1-3-2 units Credit cannot also be received for 2.675 , 2.676

Presents concepts, ideas, and enabling tools for nanoengineering through experiential lab modules, which include microfluidics, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and nanomaterials and nanoimaging tools such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic-force microscopy (AFM). Provides knowledge and experience via building, observing and manipulating micro- and nanoscale structures. Exposes students to fluid, thermal, and dynamic systems at small scales. Enrollment limited; preference to Course 2 and 2-A majors and minors.

N. Fang, S. G. Kim, R. Karnik, M. Kolle, J. Kim

2.675 Micro/Nano Engineering Laboratory

Subject meets with 2.676 Prereq: 2.25 and (6.777 or permission of instructor) G (Fall) 2-3-7 units Credit cannot also be received for 2.674

Covers advanced nanoengineering via practical lab modules in connection with classical fluid dynamics, mechanics, thermodynamics, and material physics. Labs include microfluidic systems, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), emerging nanomaterials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and nanoimaging tools. Student teams lead an experimental term project that uses the tools and knowledge acquired through the lab modules and experimental work, and culminates in a report and presentation. Recitations cover idea development, experiment design, planning and execution, and analysis of results pertinent to the project. Enrollment limited.

B. Comeau, J. Kim

2.676 Micro/Nano Engineering Laboratory

Subject meets with 2.675 Prereq: 2.001 , 2.003[J] , 2.671 , and Coreq: ( 2.005 or (2.051 and 2.06)) ; or permission of instructor U (Fall) 2-3-7 units Credit cannot also be received for 2.674

Studies advanced nanoengineering via experiental lab modules with classical fluid dynamics, mechanics, thermodynamics, and materials science. Lab modules include microfluidic systems; microelectromechanical systems (MEMS); emerging nanomaterials, such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs); and nanoimaging tools. Recitation develops in-depth knowledge and understanding of physical phenomena observed in the lab through quantitative analysis. Students have the option to engage in term projects led by students taking 2.675 . Enrollment limited; preference to Course 2 and 2-OE majors and minors.

2.677 Design and Experimentation for Ocean Engineering

Prereq: 2.00A and 2.086 ; Coreq: 2.016 or permission of instructor U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 0-3-3 units

Design and experimental observation for ocean engineering systems focusing on the fundamentals of ocean wave propagation, ocean wave spectra and wave dispersion, cavitation, added mass, acoustic sound propagation in water, sea loads on offshore structures, design of experiments for ship model testing, fish-like swimming propulsion, propellers, and ocean energy harvesting. Emphasizes fundamentals of data analysis of signals from random environments using Fourier transforms, noise filtering, statistics and error analysis using MATLAB. Students carry out experiential laboratory exercises in various Ocean Engineering laboratories on campus, including short labs and demos, longer exercises with written reports, and a final experimental design project. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity.

2.678 Electronics for Mechanical Systems

Prereq: Physics II (GIR) U (Fall, Spring) 2-2-2 units

Practical introduction to the fundamentals of electronics in the context of electro-mechanical systems, with emphasis on experimentation and project work in basic electronics. Laboratory exercises include the design and construction of simple electronic devices, such as power supplies, amplifiers, op-amp circuits, switched mode dc-dc converters, and dc motor drivers. Surveys embedded microcontrollers as system elements. Laboratory sessions stress the understanding of electronic circuits at the component level, but also point out the modern approach of system integration using commercial modules and specialized integrated circuits. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

S. Banzaert, J. Leonard, M. Kolle, D. Trumper

2.679 Electronics for Mechanical Systems II

Prereq: 2.086 , 2.678 , and 18.03 U (Spring) 2-3-1 units

Extends the concepts and techniques developed in 2.678 to include complex systems and modeling of real-world elements with a strong emphasis on lab experimentation and independent project work. Topics include sampling theory, energy storage, embedded mobile systems, autonomous navigation, printed circuit board design, system integration, and machine vision. Enrollment may be limited; preference to Course 2 majors.

S. Banzaert, J. Leonard

Oceanographic Engineering and Acoustics

2.680 unmanned marine vehicle autonomy, sensing, and communication.

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Spring) 2-6-4 units

Focuses on software and algorithms for autonomous decision making (autonomy) by underwater vehicles operating in ocean environments. Discusses how autonomous marine vehicles (UMVs) adapt to the environment for improved sensing performance. Covers sensors for acoustic, biological and chemical sensing and their integration with the autonomy system for environmentally adaptive undersea mapping and observation. Introduces students to the underwater acoustic communication environment and various options for undersea navigation, highlighting their relevance to the operation of collaborative undersea networks for environmental sensing. Labs involve the use of the MOOP-IvP autonomy software for the development of integrated sensing, modeling and control solutions. Solutions modeled in simulation environments and include field tests with small autonomous surface and underwater vehicles operated on the Charles River. Limited enrollment.

H. Schmidt, J. J. Leonard, M. Benjamin

2.681 Environmental Ocean Acoustics

Prereq: 2.066 , 18.075 , or permission of instructor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Fundamentals of underwater sound, and its application to mapping and surveillance in an ocean environment. Wave equations for fluid and elastic media. Reflection and transmission of sound at plane interfaces. Wave theory representation of acoustic source radiation and propagation in shallow and deep ocean waveguides. Interaction of underwater sound with elastic waves in the seabed and an Arctic ice cover, including effects of porosity and anisotropy. Numerical modeling of the propagation of underwater sound, including spectral methods, normal mode theory, and the parabolic equation method, for laterally homogeneous and inhomogeneous environments. Doppler effects. Effects of oceanographic variability and fluctuation - spatial and temporal coherence. Generation and propagation of ocean ambient noise. Modeling and simulation of signals and noise in traditional sonar systems, as well as modern, distributed, autonomous acoustic surveillance systems.

2.682 Acoustical Oceanography

Prereq: 2.681 G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units Can be repeated for credit.

Provides brief overview of what important current research topics are in oceanography (physical, geological, and biological) and how acoustics can be used as a tool to address them. Three typical examples are climate, bottom geology, and marine mammal behavior. Addresses the acoustic inverse problem, reviewing inverse methods (linear and nonlinear) and the combination of acoustical methods with other measurements as an integrated system. Concentrates on specific case studies, taken from current research journals.

J. F. Lynch, Woods Hole Staff

2.683 Marine Bioacoustics and Geoacoustics

Prereq: 2.681 G (Spring) 3-0-9 units Can be repeated for credit.

Both active and passive acoustic methods of measuring marine organisms, the seafloor, and their interactions are reviewed. Acoustic methods of detecting, observing, and quantifying marine biological organisms are described, as are acoustic methods of measuring geological properties of the seafloor, including depth, and surficial and volumetric composition. Interactions are also described, including effects of biological scatterers on geological measurements, and effects of seafloor scattering on measurements of biological scatterers on, in, or immediately above the seafloor. Methods of determining small-scale material properties of organisms and the seafloor are outlined. Operational methods are emphasized, and corresponding measurement theory is described. Case studies are used in illustration. Principles of acoustic-system calibration are elaborated.

K. G. Foote, Woods Hole Staff

2.684 Wave Scattering by Rough Surfaces and Inhomogeneous Media

Prereq: 2.066 or permission of instrctor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units Can be repeated for credit.

An advanced-level subject designed to give students a working knowledge of current techniques in this area. Material is presented principally in the context of ocean acoustics, but can be used in other acoustic and electromagnetic applications. Includes fundamentals of wave propagation through, and/or scattering by: random media, extended coherent structures, rough surfaces, and discrete scatterers.

T. K. Stanton, A. C. Lavery, Woods Hole Staff

2.687 Time Series Analysis and System Identification

Prereq: 6.3010 and 18.06 G (Fall, Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units Can be repeated for credit.

Covers matched filtering, power spectral (PSD) estimation, and adaptive signal processing / system identification algorithms. Algorithm development is framed as an optimization problem, and optimal and approximate solutions are described. Reviews time-varying systems, first and second moment representations of stochastic processes, and state-space models. Also covers algorithm derivation, performance analysis, and robustness to modeling errors. Algorithms for PSD estimation, the LMS and RLS algorithms, and the Kalman Filter are treated in detail.

J. C. Preisig, Woods Hole Staff

2.688 Principles of Oceanographic Instrument Systems -- Sensors and Measurements

Prereq: 2.671 and 18.075 Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: G (Fall) 3-3-6 units

Introduces theoretical and practical principles of design of oceanographic sensor systems. Transducer characteristics for acoustic, current, temperature, pressure, electric, magnetic, gravity, salinity, velocity, heat flow, and optical devices. Limitations on these devices imposed by ocean environment. Signal conditioning and recording; noise, sensitivity, and sampling limitations; standards. Principles of state-of-the-art systems being used in physical oceanography, geophysics, submersibles, acoustics discussed in lectures by experts in these areas. Day cruises in local waters during which the students will prepare, deploy and analyze observations from standard oceanographic instruments constitute the lab work for this subject.

H. Singh, R. Geyer, A. Michel

2.689[J] Projects in Oceanographic Engineering

Same subject as 1.699[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall, Spring, Summer) Units arranged [P/D/F] Can be repeated for credit.

Projects in oceanographic engineering, carried out under supervision of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution staff. Given at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

J. Preisig, Woods Hole Staff

2.690 Corrosion in Marine Engineering

Prereq: 3.012 and permission of instructor G (Summer) 3-0-3 units

Introduction to forms of corrosion encountered in marine systems material selection, coatings and protection systems. Case studies and causal analysis developed through student presentations.

J. Page, T. Eagar

Naval Architecture

2.700 principles of naval architecture.

Subject meets with 2.701 Prereq: 2.002 U (Fall) 4-2-6 units

Presents principles of naval architecture, ship geometry, hydrostatics, calculation and drawing of curves of form, intact and damage stability, hull structure strength calculations and ship resistance. Introduces computer-aided naval ship design and analysis tools. Projects include analysis of ship lines drawings, calculation of ship hydrostatic characteristics, analysis of intact and damaged stability, ship model testing, and hull structure strength calculations. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

R. Bebermeyer, P. D. Sclavounos

2.701 Principles of Naval Architecture

Subject meets with 2.700 Prereq: 2.002 G (Fall) 4-2-6 units

R. Bebermeyer, P. Sclavounuos

2.702 Systems Engineering and Naval Ship Design

Prereq: 2.701 G (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Introduces principles of systems engineering and ship design with an overview of naval ship design and acquisition processes, requirements setting, formulation of a systematic plan, design philosophy and constraints, formal decision making methods, selection criteria, optimization, variant analysis, trade-offs, analysis of ship design trends, risk, and cost analysis. Emphasizes the application of principles through completion of a design exercise and project.

R. Bebermeyer, A. Gillespy

2.703 Principles of Naval Ship Design

Prereq: 2.082 , 2.20 , 2.611 , and 2.702 G (Fall) 4-2-6 units

Covers the design of surface ship platforms for naval applications. Includes topics such as hull form selection and concept design synthesis, topside and general arrangements, weight estimation, and technical feasibility analyses (including strength, stability, seakeeping, and survivability.). Practical exercises involve application of design principles and utilization of advanced computer-aided ship design tools.

J. Harbour, J. Page

2.704 Projects in Naval Ship Conversion Design

Prereq: 2.703 G (IAP, Spring) 1-6-5 units

Focuses on conversion design of a naval ship. A new mission requirement is defined, requiring significant modification to an existing ship. Involves requirements setting, design plan formulation and design philosophy, and employs formal decision-making methods. Technical aspects demonstrate feasibility and desirability. Includes formal written and verbal reports and team projects.

2.705 Projects in New Concept Naval Ship Design

Prereq: 2.704 G (Fall, Spring) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

Focus on preliminary design of a new naval ship, fulfilling a given set of mission requirements. Design plan formulation, system level trade-off studies, emphasizes achieving a balanced design and total system integration. Formal written and oral reports. Team projects extend over three terms.

R. Bebermeyer, R. Jonart

2.707 Submarine Structural Acoustics

Prereq: 2.066 G (Spring; first half of term) Not offered regularly; consult department 2-0-4 units

Introduction to the acoustic interaction of submerged structures with the surrounding fluid. Fluid and elastic wave equations. Elastic waves in plates. Radiation and scattering from planar structures as well as curved structures such as spheres and cylinders. Acoustic imaging of structural vibrations. Students can take 2.085 in the second half of term.

2.708 Traditional Naval Architecture Design

Prereq: None G (IAP) Not offered regularly; consult department 2-0-1 units

Week-long intensive introduction to traditional design methods in which students hand draw a lines plan of a N. G. Herreshoff (MIT Class of 1870) design based on hull shape offsets taken from his original design model. After completing the plan, students then carve a wooden half-hull model of the boat design. Covers methods used to develop hull shape analysis data from lines plans. Provides students with instruction in safe hand tool use and how to transfer their lines to 3D in the form of their model. Limited to 15.

K. Hasselbalch, J. Harbour

2.71 Optics

Subject meets with 2.710 Prereq: ( Physics II (GIR) , 2.004 , and 18.03 ) or permission of instructor U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Emphasis on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

G. Barbastathis, P. T. So

2.710 Optics

Subject meets with 2.71 Prereq: ( Physics II (GIR) , 2.004 , and 18.03 ) or permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

2.715[J] Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy for Biology and Medicine

Same subject as 20.487[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Introduces the theory and the design of optical microscopy and its applications in biology and medicine. The course starts from an overview of basic optical principles allowing an understanding of microscopic image formation and common contrast modalities such as dark field, phase, and DIC. Advanced microscopy imaging techniques such as total internal reflection, confocal, and multiphoton will also be discussed. Quantitative analysis of biochemical microenvironment using spectroscopic techniques based on fluorescence, second harmonic, Raman signals will be covered. We will also provide an overview of key image processing techniques for microscopic data.

P. T. So, C. Sheppard

2.717 Optical Engineering

Prereq: 2.710 or permission of instructor G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design. Emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. Provides engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included.

P. T. So, G. Barbastathis

2.718 Photonic Materials

Subject meets with 2.719 Prereq: 2.003[J] , 8.03 , 6.2370 , or permission of instructor U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Provides a review of Maxwell's equations and the Helmholtz wave equation. Optical devices: waveguides and cavities, phase and group velocity, causality, and scattering. Light-matter interaction in bulk, surface, and subwavelength-structured matter. Effective media, dispersion relationships, wavefronts and rays, eikonal description of light propagation, phase singularities. Transformation optics, gradient effective media. Includes description of the experimental tools for realization and measurement of photonic materials and effects. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

G. Barbastathis, N. Fang

2.719 Photonic Materials

Subject meets with 2.718 Prereq: 2.003[J] , 8.03 , 6.2370 , or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

2.70 FUNdaMENTALS of Precision Product Design

Subject meets with 2.77 Prereq: 2.008 U (Fall) 3-3-6 units

Examines design, selection, and combination of machine elements to produce a robust precision system. Introduces process, philosophy and physics-based principles of design to improve/enable renewable power generation, energy efficiency, and manufacturing productivity. Topics include linkages, power transmission, screws and gears, actuators, structures, joints, bearings, error apportionment, and error budgeting. Considers each topic with respect to its physics of operation, mechanics (strength, deformation, thermal effects) and accuracy, repeatability, and resolution. Includes guest lectures from practicing industry and academic leaders. Students design, build, and test a small benchtop precision machine, such as a heliostat for positioning solar PV panels or a two or three axis machine. Prior to each lecture, students review the pre-recorded detailed topic materials and then converge on what parts of the topic they want covered in extra depth in lecture. Students are assessed on their preparation for and participation in class sessions. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited.

2.77 FUNdaMENTALS of Precision Product Design

Subject meets with 2.70 Prereq: 2.008 G (Fall) 3-3-6 units

2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design

Subject meets with 2.720 Prereq: 2.008 and ( 2.005 or 2.051); Coreq: 2.671 U (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Advanced study of modeling, design, integration, and best practices for use of machine elements, such as bearings, bolts, belts, flexures, and gears. Modeling and analysis is based upon rigorous application of physics, mathematics, and core mechanical engineering principles, which are reinforced via laboratory experiences and a design project in which students model, design, fabricate, and characterize a mechanical system that is relevant to a real-world application. Activities and quizzes are directly related to, and coordinated with, the project deliverables. Develops the ability to synthesize, model and fabricate a design subject to engineering constraints (e.g., cost, time, schedule). Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited.

M. L. Culpepper

2.720 Elements of Mechanical Design

Subject meets with 2.72 Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Advanced study of modeling, design, integration, and best practices for use of machine elements, such as bearings, bolts, belts, flexures, and gears. Modeling and analysis is based upon rigorous application of physics, mathematics, and core mechanical engineering principles, which are reinforced via laboratory experiences and a design project in which students model, design, fabricate, and characterize a mechanical system that is relevant to a real-world application. Activities and quizzes are directly related to, and coordinated with, the project deliverables. Develops the ability to synthesize, model and fabricate a design subject to engineering constraints (e.g., cost, time, schedule). Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

2.722[J] D-Lab: Design

Same subject as EC.720[J] Prereq: 2.670 or permission of instructor U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

See description under subject EC.720[J] . Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session.

2.7231[J] Introduction to Design Thinking and Innovation in Engineering

Same subject as 6.9101[J] , 16.6621[J] Prereq: None U (Fall, Spring; first half of term) 2-0-1 units

See description under subject 6.9101[J] . Enrollment limited to 25; priority to first-year students.

2.723A Design Thinking and Innovation Leadership for Engineers

Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject. Offered under: 2.723A , 6.910A , 16.662A Prereq: None U (Fall, Spring; first half of term) 2-0-1 units

See description under subject 6.910A .

2.723B Design Thinking and Innovation Project

Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject. Offered under: 2.723B , 6.910B , 16.662B Prereq: 6.910A U (Fall, Spring; second half of term) 2-0-1 units

See description under subject 6.910B .

2.729[J] D-Lab: Design for Scale

Same subject as EC.729[J] Subject meets with 2.789[J] , EC.797[J] Prereq: None. Coreq: 2.008 ; or permission of instructor U (Fall) 3-2-7 units

See description under subject EC.729[J] .

2.733 Engineering Systems Design

Subject meets with 2.013 Prereq: ( 2.001 , 2.003[J] , ( 2.005 or 2.051), and ( 2.00B , 2.670 , or 2.678 )) or permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Fall) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 0-6-6 units

Focuses on the design of engineering systems to satisfy stated performance, stability, and/or control requirements. Emphasizes individual initiative, application of fundamental principles, and the compromises inherent in the engineering design process. Culminates in the design of an engineering system, typically a vehicle or other complex system. Includes instruction and practice in written and oral communication through team presentation, design reviews, and written reports. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity.

2.734 Engineering Systems Development

Subject meets with 2.014 Prereq: ( 2.001 , 2.003[J] , ( 2.005 or 2.051), and ( 2.00B , 2.670 , or 2.678 )) or permission of instructor G (Spring) 0-6-6 units

Focuses on the implementation and operation of engineering systems. Emphasizes system integration and performance verification using methods of experimental inquiry. Students refine their subsystem designs and the fabrication of working prototypes. Includes experimental analysis of subperformance and comparison with physical models of performance and with design goals. component integration into the full system, with detailed analysis and operation of the complete vehicle in the laboratory and in the field. Includes written and oral reports. Students carry out formal reviews of the overall system design. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication provided. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity.

2.737 Mechatronics

Prereq: 6.2000 and ( 2.14 , 6.3100 , or 16.30 ) Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Fall) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-5-4 units

Introduction to designing mechatronic systems, which require integration of the mechanical and electrical engineering disciplines within a unified framework. Significant laboratory-based design experiences form subject's core. Final project. Topics include: low-level interfacing of software with hardware; use of high-level graphical programming tools to implement real-time computation tasks; digital logic; analog interfacing and power amplifiers; measurement and sensing; electromagnetic and optical transducers; control of mechatronic systems. Limited to 20.

2.739[J] Product Design and Development

Same subject as 15.783[J] Prereq: 2.009 , 15.761 , 15.778 , 15.814 , or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-3-6 units

See description under subject 15.783[J] . Engineering students accepted via lottery based on WebSIS pre-registration.

S. Eppinger, M. C. Yang

2.74 Bio-inspired Robotics

Subject meets with 2.740 Prereq: 2.004 or permission of instructor U (Fall) 3-1-8 units

Interdisciplinary approach to bio-inspired design, with emphasis on principle extraction applicable to various robotics research fields, such as robotics, prosthetics, and human assistive technologies. Focuses on three main components: biomechanics, numerical techniques that allow multi-body dynamics simulation with environmental interaction and optimization, and basic robotics techniques and implementation skills. Students integrate the components into a final robotic system project of their choosing through which they must demonstrate their understanding of dynamics and control and test hypothesized design principles. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory capacity.

2.740 Bio-inspired Robotics

Subject meets with 2.74 Prereq: 2.004 or permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-3-6 units

Interdisciplinary approach to bio-inspired design, with emphasis on principle extraction applicable to various robotics research fields, such as robotics, prosthetics, and human assistive technologies. Focuses on three main components: biomechanics, numerical techniques that allow multi-body dynamics simulation with environmental interaction and optimization, and basic robotics techniques and implementation skills. Students integrate the components into a final robotic system project of their choosing through which they must demonstrate their understanding of dynamics and control and test hypothesized design principles. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment may be limited due to lab capacity.

2.744 Product Design

Prereq: 2.009 G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Project-centered subject addressing transformation of ideas into successful products which are properly matched to the user and the market. Students are asked to take a more complete view of a new product and to gain experience with designs judged on their aesthetics, ease of use, and sensitivities to the realities of the marketplace. Lectures on modern design process, industrial design, visual communication, form-giving, mass production, marketing, and environmentally conscious design.

2.75[J] Medical Device Design

Same subject as 6.4861[J] , HST.552[J] Subject meets with 2.750[J] , 6.4860[J] Prereq: 2.008 , 6.2040 , 6.2050 , 6.2060 , 22.071 , or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Provides an intense project-based learning experience around the design of medical devices with foci ranging from mechanical to electro mechanical to electronics. Projects motivated by real-world clinical challenges provided by sponsors and clinicians who also help mentor teams. Covers the design process, project management, and fundamentals of mechanical and electrical circuit and sensor design. Students work in small teams to execute a substantial term project, with emphasis placed upon developing creative designs — via a deterministic design process — that are developed and optimized using analytical techniques. Includes mandatory lab. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication provided. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited.

A. H. Slocum, E. Roche, N. C. Hanumara, G. Traverso, A. Pennes

2.750[J] Medical Device Design

Same subject as 6.4860[J] Subject meets with 2.75[J] , 6.4861[J] , HST.552[J] Prereq: 2.008 , 6.2040 , 6.2050 , 6.2060 , 22.071 , or permission of instructor U (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Provides an intense project-based learning experience around the design of medical devices with foci ranging from mechanical to electro mechanical to electronics. Projects motivated by real-world clinical challenges provided by sponsors and clinicians who also help mentor teams. Covers the design process, project management, and fundamentals of mechanical and electrical circuit and sensor design. Students work in small teams to execute a substantial term project, with emphasis placed upon developing creative designs -- via a deterministic design process -- that are developed and optimized using analytical techniques. Includes mandatory lab. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication provided. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited.

A. H. Slocum, E. Roche, N. C. Hanumara, G. Traverso, A. Pennes

2.752 Development of Mechanical Products

Subject meets with 2.753 Prereq: 2.009 , 2.750[J] , or permission of instructor U (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Focuses on evolving a product from proof-of-concept to beta prototype: Includes team building, project planning, budgeting, resource planning; models for scaling, tolerancing and reliability, patents, business planning. Students/teams start with a proof-of-concept product they bring to class or select from projects provided by instructor. In lieu of taking 12 units of 2.THU , Course 2 majors taking 2.752 may write a bachelor's thesis that documents their contributions to the product developed in the team project. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited; preference to Course 2 majors and minors.

2.753 Development of Mechanical Products

Subject meets with 2.752 Prereq: 2.009 , 2.750[J] , or permission of instructor G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Focuses on evolving a product from proof-of-concept to beta prototype: Includes team building, project planning, budgeting, resource planning; models for scaling, tolerancing and reliability, patents, business planning. Students/teams start with a proof-of-concept product they bring to class or select from projects provided by instructor. In lieu of taking 12 units of 2.THU , Course 2 majors taking 2.752 may write a bachelor's thesis that documents their contributions to the product developed in the team project. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited.

2.76 Global Engineering

Subject meets with 2.760 Prereq: 2.008 or permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Combines rigorous engineering theory and user-centered product design to create technologies for developing and emerging markets. Covers machine design theory to parametrically analyze technologies; bottom-up/top-down design processes; engagement of stakeholders in the design process; socioeconomic factors that affect adoption of products; and developing/emerging market dynamics and their effect on business and technology. Includes guest lectures from subject matter experts in relevant fields and case studies on successful and failed technologies. Student teams apply course material to term-long projects to create new technologies, developed in collaboration with industrial partners and other stakeholders in developing/emerging markets. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

2.760 Global Engineering

Subject meets with 2.76 Prereq: 2.008 or permission of instructor U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

2.771[J] D-Lab: Supply Chains

Same subject as 15.772[J] , EC.733[J] Subject meets with 2.871 Prereq: None U (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-3-6 units

See description under subject 15.772[J] .

S. C. Graves

2.772[J] Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems

Same subject as 20.110[J] Prereq: ( Biology (GIR) , Calculus II (GIR) , Chemistry (GIR) , and Physics I (GIR) ) or permission of instructor U (Fall) 5-0-7 units. REST

See description under subject 20.110[J] .

M. Birnbaum, C. Voigt

2.777 Large and Complex Systems Design and Concept Development

Subject meets with 2.778 Prereq: 2.00B , 2.007 , or permission of instructor U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Examines structured principles and processes to develop concepts for large and complex systems. Term projects introduce students to large-scale system development with several areas of emphasis, including idea generation, concept development and refinement, system-level thinking, briefing development and presentation, and proposal generation. Interactive lectures and presentations guide students throughout the course to develop and deliver team presentations focused on solving large and complex problems. Includes a semester-long project in which students apply design tools/processes to solve a specific problem. Students taking graduate version complete the project individually.

2.778 Large and Complex Systems Design and Concept Development

Subject meets with 2.777 Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Examines structured principles and processes to develop concepts for large and complex systems. Term projects introduce students to large-scale system development with several areas of emphasis, including idea generation, concept development and refinement, system-level thinking, briefing development and presentation, and proposal generation. Interactive lectures and presentations guide students throughout the course to develop and deliver individual and team presentations focused on solving large and complex problems. Includes a semester-long project in which students apply design tools/processes to solve a specific problem. Students taking graduate version complete project individually. Limited enrollment.

2.78[J] Principles and Practice of Assistive Technology

Same subject as 6.4530[J] , HST.420[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 2-4-6 units

See description under subject 6.4530[J] . Enrollment may be limited.

R. C. Miller, J. E. Greenberg, J. J. Leonard

2.782[J] Design of Medical Devices and Implants

Same subject as HST.524[J] Prereq: ( Biology (GIR) , Chemistry (GIR) , and Physics I (GIR) ) or permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Solution of clinical problems by use of implants and other medical devices. Systematic use of cell-matrix control volumes. The role of stress analysis in the design process. Anatomic fit: shape and size of implants. Selection of biomaterials. Instrumentation for surgical implantation procedures. Preclinical testing for safety and efficacy: risk/benefit ratio assessment. Evaluation of clinical performance: design of clinical trials. Project materials drawn from orthopedic devices, soft tissue implants, artificial organs, and dental implants.

I. V. Yannas, M. Spector

2.785[J] Cell-Matrix Mechanics

Same subject as HST.523[J] Prereq: ( Biology (GIR) , Chemistry (GIR) , and 2.001 ) or permission of instructor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Mechanical forces play a decisive role during development of tissues and organs, during remodeling following injury as well as in normal function. A stress field influences cell function primarily through deformation of the extracellular matrix to which cells are attached. Deformed cells express different biosynthetic activity relative to undeformed cells. The unit cell process paradigm combined with topics in connective tissue mechanics form the basis for discussions of several topics from cell biology, physiology, and medicine.

2.787[J] Tissue Engineering and Organ Regeneration

Same subject as HST.535[J] Prereq: ( Biology (GIR) , Chemistry (GIR) , and Physics I (GIR) ) or permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

See description under subject HST.535[J] .

M. Spector, I. V. Yannas

2.788 Mechanical Engineering and Design of Living Systems

Prereq: None G (Fall) 4-2-6 units

For students interested in research at the interface of mechanical engineering, biology, and materials science. Specific emphasis lies on interfacing living systems with engineered materials and devices, and on engineering living system behavior.

M. Kolle, M. Guo

2.789[J] D-Lab: Design for Scale

Same subject as EC.797[J] Subject meets with 2.729[J] , EC.729[J] Prereq: None. Coreq: 2.008 ; or permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-2-7 units

See description under subject EC.797[J] .

M. Yang, H. Quintus-Bosz, S. Grama, K. Bergeron

2.79[J] Biomaterials: Tissue Interactions

Same subject as HST.522[J] Prereq: ( Biology (GIR) , Chemistry (GIR) , and Physics I (GIR) ) or permission of instructor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

Principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the development and implementation of biomaterials for the fabrication of medical devices/implants, including artificial organs and matrices for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Employs a conceptual model, the "unit cell process for analysis of the mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation of biomaterials/devices in various organs, including matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Methodology of tissue and organ regeneration. Discusses methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions. Comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to case studies. Criteria for restoration of physiological function for tissues and organs.

2.791[J] Cellular Neurophysiology and Computing

Same subject as 6.4810[J] , 9.21[J] , 20.370[J] Subject meets with 2.794[J] , 6.4812[J] , 9.021[J] , 20.470[J] , HST.541[J] Prereq: ( Physics II (GIR) , 18.03 , and ( 2.005 , 6.2000 , 6.3000 , 10.301 , or 20.110[J] )) or permission of instructor U (Spring) 5-2-5 units

See description under subject 6.4810[J] . Preference to juniors and seniors.

J. Han, T. Heldt

2.792[J] Quantitative and Clinical Physiology

Same subject as 6.4820[J] , HST.542[J] Subject meets with 2.796[J] , 6.4822[J] Prereq: Physics II (GIR) , 18.03 , or permission of instructor U (Fall) 4-2-6 units

See description under subject 6.4820[J] .

T. Heldt, R. G. Mark

2.793[J] Fields, Forces and Flows in Biological Systems

Same subject as 6.4830[J] , 20.330[J] Prereq: Biology (GIR) , Physics II (GIR) , and 18.03 U (Spring) 4-0-8 units

See description under subject 20.330[J] .

J. Han, S. Manalis

2.794[J] Cellular Neurophysiology and Computing

Same subject as 6.4812[J] , 9.021[J] , 20.470[J] , HST.541[J] Subject meets with 2.791[J] , 6.4810[J] , 9.21[J] , 20.370[J] Prereq: ( Physics II (GIR) , 18.03 , and ( 2.005 , 6.2000 , 6.3000 , 10.301 , or 20.110[J] )) or permission of instructor G (Spring) 5-2-5 units

See description under subject 6.4812[J] .

2.795[J] Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems

Same subject as 6.4832[J] , 10.539[J] , 20.430[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

See description under subject 20.430[J] .

M. Bathe, A. J. Grodzinsky

2.796[J] Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems

Same subject as 6.4822[J] Subject meets with 2.792[J] , 6.4820[J] , HST.542[J] Prereq: 6.4810[J] and ( 2.006 or 6.2300 ) G (Fall) 4-2-6 units

See description under subject 6.4822[J] .

2.797[J] Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics

Same subject as 3.053[J] , 6.4840[J] , 20.310[J] Subject meets with 2.798[J] , 3.971[J] , 6.4842[J] , 10.537[J] , 20.410[J] Prereq: Biology (GIR) and 18.03 U (Spring) 4-0-8 units

Develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. Experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

M. Bathe, K. Ribbeck, P. T. So

2.798[J] Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Biomechanics

Same subject as 3.971[J] , 6.4842[J] , 10.537[J] , 20.410[J] Subject meets with 2.797[J] , 3.053[J] , 6.4840[J] , 20.310[J] Prereq: Biology (GIR) and 18.03 G (Spring) 3-0-9 units

2.799 The Cell as a Machine

Prereq: 5.07[J] , 7.05 , or 18.03 G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-3-6 units

Examines a variety of essential cellular functions from the perspective of the cell as a machine. Includes phenomena such as nuclear organization, protein synthesis, cell and membrane mechanics, cell migration, cell cycle control, cell transformation. Lectures are provided by video twice per week; live 3-hour recitation one evening per week. Course is taken simultaneously by students at multiple universities; homework and take-home exams common to all students. Preference to students in Courses 2 and 20.

R. Kamm, M. Sheetz, H. Yu

Manufacturing

2.810 manufacturing processes and systems.

Prereq: 2.001 , 2.006 , and 2.008 G (Fall) 3-3-6 units

Introduction to manufacturing processes and manufacturing systems including assembly, machining, injection molding, casting, thermoforming, and more. Emphasis on the physics and randomness and how they influence quality, rate, cost, and flexibility. Attention to the relationship between the process and the system, and the process and part design. Project (in small groups) requires fabrication (and some design) of a product using several different processes (as listed above). Enrollment may be limited due to laboratory constraints; preference given to MechE students and students who need to satisfy degree requirements.

J. Hart, D. Wendell, W. Seering, J. Liu

2.812 Solving for Carbon Neutrality at MIT

Prereq: None Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: U (Spring) 3-3-6 units

Working in teams, students address the problem of reducing MIT's greenhouse gas emissions in a manner consistent with the climate goals of maintaining our planet in a suitable regime to support human society and the environment. Solution scenarios include short-, middle- and long-term strategies. Experts from MIT's faculty and operations staff, as well as outside experts who address the multidisciplinary features of the problem guide solutions. These include climate science, ethics, carbon accounting, cost estimating, MIT's energy supply, energy demand, and infrastructure, new technologies, financial instruments, electricity markets, policy, human behavior, and regulation.Develops skills to address carbon neutrality at other universities, and at other scales, including cities and nations. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

T. Gutowski, J. Newman

2.813 Energy, Materials, and Manufacturing

Subject meets with 2.83 Prereq: 2.008 or permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: U (Spring) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-0-9 units

Introduction to the major dilemma that faces manufacturing and society for the 21st century: how to support economic development while protecting the environment. Subject addresses industrial ecology, materials flows, life-cycle analysis, thermodynamic analysis and exergy accounting, manufacturing process performance, product design analysis, design for the environment, recycling and ecological economics. Combines lectures and group discussions of journal articles and selected literature, often with opposing views. Graduate students complete term-long project with report required for graduate credit.

T. G. Gutowski

2.814 Exploring Sustainability at Different Scales (New)

Subject meets with 1.834[J] , 2.834[J] Prereq: None U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Develops environmental accounting tools including energy, carbon, materials, land use, and possibly others, from small scales (e.g., products and processes) to larger scales, (e.g., companies, nations and global) to reveal how reoccurring human behavior patterns have dominated environmental outcomes. Involves visiting experts and readings in areas such as ethics, economics, governance, and development to frame core issues in human relationship to the environment and future societies. Explores how local actions, including engineering interventions and behavior change, play out at larger scales associated with the concept of sustainability, and how local actions may be modified to realize sustainability. Class is participatory and includes an exploratory project. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 25.

T. Gutowski

2.821[J] Structural Materials

Same subject as 3.371[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall, Summer) 3-0-9 units Can be repeated for credit. Credit cannot also be received for 3.171

See description under subject 3.371[J] .

D. Baskin, A. Slocum

2.83 Energy, Materials and Manufacturing

Subject meets with 2.813 Prereq: 2.008 or permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: G (Spring) Acad Year 2024-2025: Not offered 3-0-9 units

2.830[J] Control of Manufacturing Processes

Same subject as 6.6630[J] Prereq: 2.008 , 6.2600[J] , or 6.3700 G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Statistical modeling and control in manufacturing processes. Use of experimental design and response surface modeling to understand manufacturing process physics. Defect and parametric yield modeling and optimization. Forms of process control, including statistical process control, run by run and adaptive control, and real-time feedback control. Application contexts include semiconductor manufacturing, conventional metal and polymer processing, and emerging micro-nano manufacturing processes.

D. E. Hardt, D. S. Boning

2.832 Solving for Carbon Neutrality at MIT

Prereq: None Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: G (Spring) 3-3-6 units

2.834[J] Exploring Sustainability at Different Scales (New)

Same subject as 1.834[J] Subject meets with 2.814 Prereq: None G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

2.851[J] System Optimization and Analysis for Operations

Same subject as 15.066[J] Prereq: Calculus II (GIR) G (Summer) 4-0-8 units

See description under subject 15.066[J] . Restricted to Leaders for Global Operations students.

2.853 Introduction to Manufacturing Systems

Subject meets with 2.854 Prereq: 2.008 U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Provides ways to analyze manufacturing systems in terms of material flow and storage, information flow, capacities, and times and durations of events. Fundamental topics include probability, inventory and queuing models, forecasting, optimization, process analysis, and linear and dynamic systems. Factory planning and scheduling topics include flow planning, bottleneck characterization, buffer and batch-size tactics, seasonal planning, and dynamic behavior of production systems. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content.

S. B. Gershwin

2.854 Introduction to Manufacturing Systems

Subject meets with 2.853 Prereq: Undergraduate mathematics G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Provides ways to analyze manufacturing systems in terms of material flow and storage, information flow, capacities, and times and durations of events. Fundamental topics include probability, inventory and queuing models, forecasting, optimization, process analysis, and linear and dynamic systems. Factory planning and scheduling topics include flow planning, bottleneck characterization, buffer and batch-size tactics, seasonal planning, and dynamic behavior of production systems. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments.

2.871 D-Lab: Supply Chains

Subject meets with 2.771[J] , 15.772[J] , EC.733[J] Prereq: None G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-3-6 units

Introduces concepts of supply chain design and planning with a focus on supply chains for products destined to improve quality of life in developing countries. Topics include demand estimation, process analysis and improvement, facility location and capacity planning, inventory management, and supply chain coordination. Also covers issues specific to emerging markets, such as sustainable supply chains, choice of distribution channels, and how to account for the value-adding role of a supply chain. Students conduct D-Lab-based projects on supply chain design or improvement. Students taking graduate version will complete additional assignments.

2.874[J] Process Data Analytics

Same subject as 10.354[J] Subject meets with 2.884[J] , 10.554[J] Prereq: 18.03 or permission of instructor Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: U (Fall) 4-0-8 units

See description under subject 10.354[J] .

R. D. Braatz, B. Anthony

2.884[J] Process Data Analytics

Same subject as 10.554[J] Subject meets with 2.874[J] , 10.354[J] Prereq: None Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: G (Fall) 4-0-8 units

See description under subject 10.554[J] .

2.888 Professional Seminar in Global Manufacturing Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Prereq: None G (Spring) 2-0-1 units

Covers a broad range of topics in modern manufacturing, from models and structures for 21st-century operations, to case studies in leadership from the shop floor to the executive office. Also includes global perspectives from Asia, Europe and North America, with guest speakers from all three regions. Explores opportunities for new ventures in manufacturing. Intended primarily for Master of Engineering in Manufacturing students.

D. E. Hardt, S. B. Gershwin

2.890[J] Global Operations Leadership Seminar

Same subject as 10.792[J] , 15.792[J] , 16.985[J] Prereq: None G (Fall, Spring) 2-0-0 units Can be repeated for credit.

See description under subject 15.792[J] . Preference to LGO students.

Engineering Management

2.351[j] introduction to making and hardware ventures.

Same subject as 15.351[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Spring) 3-0-3 units

See description under subject 15.351[J] . Enrollment limited; application required.

C. Lowell, M. Kenney, M. Culpepper

2.900 Ethics for Engineers

Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject. Offered under: 1.082 , 2.900 , 6.9320 , 10.01 , 16.676 , 22.014 Subject meets with 6.9321 , 20.005 Prereq: None U (Fall, Spring) 2-0-4 units

See description under subject 10.01 .

D. A. Lauffenberger, B. L. Trout

2.907[J] Innovation Teams

Same subject as 10.807[J] , 15.371[J] Prereq: None G (Fall) 4-4-4 units

See description under subject 10.807[J] .

L. Perez-Breva, D. Hart

2.912[J] Venture Engineering

Same subject as 3.085[J] , 15.373[J] Prereq: None U (Spring) 3-0-9 units

Provides an integrated approach to the development and growth of new innovative ventures. Intended for students who seek to leverage their engineering and science background through innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Emphasizes the concept that innovation-driven entrepreneurs must make a set of interdependent choices under conditions of high uncertainty, and demonstrates that venture engineering involves reducing uncertainty through a structured process of experimental learning and staged commitments. Provides deep understanding of the core technical, customer, and strategic choices and challenges facing start-up innovators, and a synthetic framework for the development and implementation of ventures in dynamic environments.

S. Stern, E. Fitzgerald

2.916[J] Money for Startups

Same subject as 10.407[J] Prereq: None G (Spring; second half of term) 2-0-4 units

See description under subject 10.407[J] .

S. Loessberg, D. P. Hart

2.96 Management in Engineering

Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject. Offered under: 2.96 , 6.9360 , 10.806 , 16.653 Prereq: None U (Fall) 3-1-8 units

Introduction and overview of engineering management. Financial principles, management of innovation, technical strategy and best management practices. Case study method of instruction emphasizes participation in class discussion. Focus is on the development of individual skills and management tools. Restricted to juniors and seniors.

H. S. Marcus, J.-H. Chun

2.961 Management in Engineering

Prereq: None G (Fall) 3-1-8 units

Introduction and overview of engineering management. Financial principles, management of innovation, technical strategy and best management practices. Case study method of instruction emphasizes participation in class discussion. Focus is on the development of individual skills and management tools.

J.-H. Chun, H. S. Marcus

2.965[J] Global Supply Chain Management

Same subject as 1.265[J] , 15.765[J] , SCM.265[J] Prereq: 15.761 , 15.778 , SCM.260[J] , SCM.261[J] , or permission of instructor G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 2-0-4 units

See description under subject SCM.265[J] .

Advanced Topics and Special Subjects

2.98 sports technology: engineering & innovation.

Subject meets with 2.980 Prereq: None G (Spring) 2-2-2 units

Examines the future of sports technology across technical disciplines, including mechanical design, biomechanics, quantified self, sports analytics, and business strategies. Includes visits by leaders in the field to discuss various industries, career pathways, and opportunities for innovation in the field. Projects explore and potentially kickoff larger research and/or entrepreneurial initiatives.

A. Hosoi, C. Chase

2.980 Sports Technology: Engineering & Innovation

Subject meets with 2.98 Prereq: None U (Spring) 2-2-8 units

2.981 New England Coastal Ecology

Prereq: None U (IAP) 2-0-1 units

Provides exposure to marine communities found along the coast of New England and how they fit into global patterns. Focuses on the ecology of salt marshes and rocky shores, and the biology of plants and animals that live in these complex habitats. Prepares students to recognize common inhabitants of these two communities and develops understanding of the major environmental factors affecting them, the types of ecological services they provide, and likely impacts of current and future climate change. Includes visits to field and research centers. Limited to 20.

Consult C. Bastidas

2.982 Ecology and Sustainability of Coastal Ecosystems

Prereq: None U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-2-4 units

Prepares students to recognize coastal ecosystems, their major environmental and biological drivers, and common impacts that human population growth and climate change have on them.  Students engage in a semester-long project to address and seek solutions to current challenges in sustainability of human activities on the coast, and to promote resilience of natural communities and ecosystem services.

J. Simpson, C. Bastidas

2.984[J] The Art and Science of Time Travel (New)

Same subject as CMS.343[J] Prereq: 8.02 and 18.02 G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Explores time travel and other physical paradoxes—black holes, wormholes, and the multiverse—in the contexts of human narrative and contemporary scientific understanding. Instruction provided in the fundamental science of time travel in relativity and quantum mechanics. Students read and view classic time travel narratives in visual art and in film, and construct their own original time travel narratives. Limited to 20.

S. Lloyd, M. Reilly

2.989 Experiential Learning in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Units arranged

Provides students the opportunity to learn and gain professional experience by participating in industrial projects related to Mechanical Engineering. Minimum project length is 10 weeks. Requires a written report upon completion. Before enrolling, students must contact MechE Graduate Office for procedures and restrictions; they must also have a firm internship offer and an identified MechE faculty member who will act as supervisor. Limited to Mechanical Engineering graduate students.

N. Hadjiconstantinou

2.990 Practical Experience

Prereq: None U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) 0-1-0 units Can be repeated for credit.

For Mechanical Engineering undergraduates participating in curriculum-related off-campus experiences in mechanical engineering. Before enrolling, students must have an employment offer from a company or organization and must find a Mech E supervisor. Upon completion of the coursework the student must submit a detailed design notebook, approved by the MIT supervisor. Subject to departmental approval. Consult Department Undergraduate Office for details on procedures and restrictions.

Consult R. Karnik

2.991 Introduction to Graduate Study in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None G (Fall) 1-2-0 units

Familiarizes students with the requirements for their desired degree and the resources, both at MIT and beyond, to help them reach their educational and professional goals. Series of interactive lectures and seminars guides students through various aspects of life critical to navigating graduate school successfully. Topics include course requirements, PhD qualifying examinations, advisor/advisee relationships, funding and fellowships, mental health and wellbeing, housing options in the Boston area, and career options after graduation. Limited to first-year graduate students.

2.992 Professional Industry Immersion Project

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Summer) Units arranged

Provides students a unique opportunity to participate in industry-based projects. Students gain professional industry experience in mechanical engineering projects that complement their academic experiences. Each project has a company supervisor, a specific advisor, and a course instructor. Course staff help students connect with specific companies and collaboratively design a project of mutual interest and benefit. Requires a written report and project presentation upon completion of a minimum of 10 weeks of off-campus activities. Limited to Mechanical Engineering graduate students.

2.993 Independent Study

Prereq: None U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

Designed for undergraduates wanting to continue substantial projects of own choice, under faculty supervision, in mechanical engineering. Work may be of experimental, theoretical, or design nature. Projects may be arranged individually in most fields of department interest, i.e., in mechanics, design and manufacturing, controls and robotics, thermal science and energy engineering, bioengineering, ocean engineering and nanotechnology. 2.993 is letter-graded; 2.994 is P/D/F.

2.994 Independent Study

Prereq: None U (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Units arranged [P/D/F] Can be repeated for credit.

2.995 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

Assigned reading and problems or research in distinct areas, either theoretical or experimental, or design. Arranged on individual basis with instructor in the following areas: mechanics and materials, thermal and fluid sciences, systems and design, biomedical engineering, and ocean engineering. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.

Consult R. Abeyaratne

2.996 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering

2.997 advanced topics in mechanical engineering.

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

2.998 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering

2.s007 special subject in mechanical engineering.

Prereq: None U (Spring) Units arranged

Lecture, seminar or laboratory course consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.

2.S009 Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged

2.S19 Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

B. Aulet, A. Hosoi, M. Jester, S. Johnson, C. Lawson

2.S372 Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None G (Spring) Units arranged

Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.

2.S670 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

2.S679 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

2.s790-2.s792 graduate special subject in bioengineering.

Advanced lecture, seminar or laboratory course consisting of material in the broadly-defined field of bioengineering not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.

Consult R. Kamm

2.S793 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-3-6 units

Advanced lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter.

2.S794 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None G (Fall) Units arranged [P/D/F]

2.S795 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

2.S796 Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

2.S885 Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-3-6 units

2.S97 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units Can be repeated for credit.

Lecture, seminar or laboratory course consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter. 2.S972 - 2.S974 are graded P/D/F.

2.S971 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-3-6 units Can be repeated for credit.

2.S972 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Fall, Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-1-2 units Can be repeated for credit.

Consult K. Zolot

2.S973 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Fall) Units arranged [P/D/F] Can be repeated for credit.

2.S974 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

2.S975 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (IAP) Units arranged [P/D/F] Can be repeated for credit.

Lecture, seminar or laboratory course consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter. See staff for scheduling information. Limited to 16.

Consult T. Consi

2.S976 Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

2.s977 special subject in mechanical engineering, 2.s979 graduate special subject in mechanical engineering.

Prereq: None G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged

2.S980 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) Units arranged [P/D/F] Can be repeated for credit.

Advanced lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter. 2.S980 and 2.S996 are graded P/D/F.

2.S981 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Spring) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

2.S982 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Advanced lecture, seminar or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter. 2.S980 and 2.S996 are graded P/D/F.

Consult V. Sudhir

2.S983 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

2.S984 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units

2.S985 Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

2.s986 special subject in mechanical engineering.

Prereq: None Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: G (Spring) Units arranged

2.S987 Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

S. Boriskina

2.S988 Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

G. Traverso

2.S989 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

D. Frey, A. Talebinejad

2.S990 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None G (Spring) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

Lecture, seminar or laboratory course consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter. Enrollment limited.

2.S991 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged

Consult Staff

2.S992 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

A. Gopinath

2.S993 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None Acad Year 2023-2024: Not offered Acad Year 2024-2025: U (Spring) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

Lecture, seminar or laboratory course consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter. 2.S972 - 2.S974 , 2.S992 are graded P/D/F.

2.S994 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Spring) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

Lecture, seminar, or laboratory consisting of material not offered in regularly scheduled subjects. Can be repeated for credit only for completely different subject matter. 2.S972 - 2.S974 and 2.S992 are graded P/D/F.

2.S995 Undergraduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: None U (Fall) 0-6-0 units Can be repeated for credit.

Consult I. Hunter

2.S996 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall, Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged [P/D/F] Can be repeated for credit.

2.S997 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) Not offered regularly; consult department 3-0-9 units Can be repeated for credit.

Consult F. Ahmed

2.S998 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Consult R. Abeyaratne, J. Hart

2.S999 Graduate Special Subject in Mechanical Engineering

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Spring) Not offered regularly; consult department Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

Consult R. Abeyaratne, T. Gutowski

Thesis, Research and Practice

2.978 instruction in teaching engineering.

Subject meets with 1.95[J] , 5.95[J] , 7.59[J] , 8.395[J] , 18.094[J] Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall) Units arranged [P/D/F]

Participatory seminar focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary for teaching engineering in higher education. Topics include research on learning; course development; promoting active learning, problemsolving, and critical thinking in students; communicating with a diverse student body; using educational technology to further learning; lecturing; creating effective tests and assignments; and assessment and evaluation. Field-work teaching various subjects in the Mechanical Engineering department will complement classroom discussions.

2.979 Undergraduate Teaching

Prereq: None U (Fall, IAP, Spring) Units arranged [P/D/F] Can be repeated for credit.

For students participating in departmentally approved undergraduate teaching programs. Students assist faculty in the design and execution of the curriculum and actively participate in the instruction and monitoring of the class participants. Students prepare subject materials, lead discussion groups, and review progress. Credit is arranged on a subject-by-subject basis and is reviewed by the department.

A. E. Hosoi

2.999 Engineer's Degree Thesis Proposal Preparation

Prereq: Permission of instructor G (Fall, Spring, Summer) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

For students who must do additional work to convert an SM thesis to a Mechanical Engineer's (ME) or Naval Engineer's (NE) thesis, or for students who write an ME/NE thesis after having received an SM degree.

R. Abeyaratne, M. S. Triantafyllou

2.C01 Physical Systems Modeling and Design Using Machine Learning

Subject meets with 2.C51 Prereq: 2.086 ; Coreq: 6.C01 U (Spring; second half of term) 1-3-2 units Credit cannot also be received for 1.C01 , 1.C51 , 2.C51 , 3.C01[J] , 3.C51[J] , 10.C01[J] , 10.C51[J] , 20.C01[J] , 20.C51[J] , 22.C01 , 22.C51 , SCM.C51

Building on core material in 6.C01 , encourages open-ended exploration of the increasingly topical intersection between artificial intelligence and the physical sciences. Uses energy and information, and their respective optimality conditions, to define supervised and unsupervised learning algorithms as well as ordinary and partial differential equations. Subsequently, physical systems with complex constitutive relationships are drawn from elasticity, biophysics, fluid mechanics, hydrodynamics, acoustics, and electromagnetics to illustrate how machine learning-inspired optimization can approximate solutions to forward and inverse problems in these domains. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Students cannot receive credit without simultaneous completion of 6.C01 .

2.C27[J] Computational Imaging: Physics and Algorithms (New)

Same subject as 3.C27[J] , 6.C27[J] Subject meets with 2.C67[J] , 3.C67[J] , 6.C67[J] Prereq: 18.C06[J] and ( 1.00 , 1.000 , 2.086 , 3.019 , or 6.100A ) U (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Explores the contemporary computational understanding of imaging: encoding information about a physical object onto a form of radiation, transferring the radiation through an imaging system, converting it to a digital signal, and computationally decoding and presenting the information to the user. Introduces a unified formulation of computational imaging systems as a three-round "learning spiral": the first two rounds describe the physical and algorithmic parts in two exemplary imaging systems. The third round involves a class project on an imaging system chosen by students. Undergraduate and graduate versions share lectures but have different recitations. Involves optional "clinics" to even out background knowledge of linear algebra, optimization, and computational imaging-related programming best practices for students of diverse disciplinary backgrounds. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.

G. Barbastathis, J. LeBeau, R. Ram, S. You

2.C51 Physical Systems Modeling and Design Using Machine Learning

Subject meets with 2.C01 Prereq: 18.0751 or 18.0851 ; Coreq: 6.C51 G (Spring; second half of term) 1-3-2 units Credit cannot also be received for 1.C01 , 1.C51 , 2.C01 , 3.C01[J] , 3.C51[J] , 10.C01[J] , 10.C51[J] , 20.C01[J] , 20.C51[J] , 22.C01 , 22.C51 , SCM.C51

Building on core material in 6.C51 , encourages open-ended exploration of the increasingly topical intersection between artificial intelligence and the physical sciences. Uses energy and information, and their respective optimality conditions, to define supervised and unsupervised learning algorithms as well as ordinary and partial differential equations. Subsequently, physical systems with complex constitutive relationships are drawn from elasticity, biophysics, fluid mechanics, hydrodynamics, acoustics, and electromagnetics to illustrate how machine learning-inspired optimization can approximate solutions to forward and inverse problems in these domains. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Students cannot receive credit without simultaneous completion of 6.C51 .

2.C67[J] Computational Imaging: Physics and Algorithms (New)

Same subject as 3.C67[J] , 6.C67[J] Subject meets with 2.C27[J] , 3.C27[J] , 6.C27[J] Prereq: 18.C06[J] and ( 1.00 , 1.000 , 2.086 , 3.019 , or 6.100A ) G (Fall) 3-0-9 units

Contemporary understanding of imaging is computational: encoding onto a form of radiation the information about a physical object, transferring the radiation through the imaging system, converting it to a digital signal, and computationally decoding and presenting the information to the user. This class introduces a unified formulation of computational imaging systems as a three-round "learning spiral": the first two rounds, instructors describe the physical and algorithmic parts in two exemplary imaging systems. The third round, students conduct themselves as the class project on an imaging system of their choice. The undergraduate and graduate versions share lectures but have different recitations. Throughout the term, we also conduct optional "clinics" to even out background knowledge of linear algebra, optimization, and computational imaging-related programming best practices for students of diverse disciplinary backgrounds.

2.EPE UPOP Engineering Practice Experience

Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject. Offered under: 1.EPE , 2.EPE , 3.EPE , 6.EPE , 8.EPE , 10.EPE , 15.EPE , 16.EPE , 20.EPE , 22.EPE Prereq: None U (Fall, Spring) 0-0-1 units Can be repeated for credit.

Provides students with skills to prepare for and excel in the world of industry. Emphasizes practical application of career theory and professional development concepts. Introduces students to relevant and timely resources for career development, provides students with tools to embark on a successful internship search, and offers networking opportunities with employers and MIT alumni. Students work in groups, led by industry mentors, to improve their resumes and cover letters, interviewing skills, networking abilities, project management, and ability to give and receive feedback. Objective is for students to be able to adapt and contribute effectively to their future employment organizations. A total of two units of credit is awarded for completion of the fall and subsequent spring term offerings. Application required; consult UPOP website for more information.

K. Tan-Tiongco, D. Fordell

2.EPW UPOP Engineering Practice Workshop

Engineering School-Wide Elective Subject. Offered under: 1.EPW , 2.EPW , 3.EPW , 6.EPW , 10.EPW , 16.EPW , 20.EPW , 22.EPW Prereq: 2.EPE U (IAP, Spring) 1-0-0 units

Provides sophomores across all majors with opportunities to develop and practice communication, teamwork, and problem-solving skills to become successful professionals in the workplace, particularly in preparation for their summer industry internship. This immersive, multi-day Team Training Workshop (TTW) is comprised of experiential learning modules focused on expanding skills in areas that employers report being most valuable in the workplace. Modules are led by MIT faculty with the help of MIT alumni and other senior industry professionals. Skills applied through creative simulations, team problem-solving challenges, oral presentations, and networking sessions with prospective employers. Enrollment limited to those in the UPOP program.

2.THG Graduate Thesis

Prereq: Permission of advisor G (Fall, IAP, Spring, Summer) Units arranged Can be repeated for credit.

Program of research leading to the writing of an SM, PhD, or ScD thesis; to be arranged by the student and an appropriate MIT faculty member.

2.THU Undergraduate Thesis

Individual self-motivated study, research, or design project under faculty supervision. Departmental program requirement: minimum of 6 units. Instruction and practice in written communication provided.

2.UR Undergraduate Research in Mechanical Engineering

Individual study, research, or laboratory investigations under faculty supervision, including individual participation in an ongoing research project. See projects listing in Undergraduate Office, 1-110, for guidance.

Consult D. Rowell

2.URG Undergraduate Research in Mechanical Engineering

Consult N. Fang, K. Kamrin

MIT Academic Bulletin

Print this page.

The PDF includes all information on this page and its related tabs. Subject (course) information includes any changes approved for the current academic year.

The MSME degree program requires a total of 30 credit hours to be completed, with thesis or non-thesis option. It is anticipated that the degree may be completed in two years of full time graduate study. To earn the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) degree, students must complete 30 credit hours, with a minimum cumulative graduate grade point average of 3.0 for the courses listed in the Plan of Study.

Assistantships

Teaching and research assistantships are available to qualified graduate students.

Course Requirements

One advanced mathematics course (3 credit hours) at the 50000-level taught by either the mathematics department or one of the engineering departments is required for both thesis and non-thesis options.

Thesis Option

Thesis option allows a student to earn credit for conducting independent research leading to a publishable report or thesis. This option requires 21 credit hours of advanced ME/mathematics coursework and a minimum of 9 credit hours of thesis research work.

The thesis research is undertaken and completed under the supervision of a graduate faculty member and the thesis committee. The student’s thesis committee is responsible for approving the research plan, monitoring progress and reviewing the thesis prior to acceptance.

Thesis option is normally available to students only after their completion of 9 credit hours with an overall grade point average of 3.0 or better in the degree program.

  • 3 credit hours of advanced mathematics at the 500 level taught by either the mathematics department or one of the engineering departments.
  • 18 credit hours (six (6) graduate courses) from the approved list of mechanical engineering primary courses (thermo-fluids, dynamics, structural mechanics and machine design).
  • 9 credit hours of research (ME 69800 Research MS Thesis)

Non-Thesis Option

The course requirements are divided into three categories:

  • 3 credit hours of advanced mathematics at the 50000-level taught by either the mathematics department or one of the engineering departments,
  • 24 credit hours (8 graduate courses) from the approved list of ME primary (thermofluids, dynamics, structural mechanics, machine design) courses, and
  • 3 credit hours (one course) from a list of approved courses in engineering, mathematics, statistics, computer science, physics, and life sciences. Any exceptions to the above requirements must be approved by the graduate committee.

List of Some Primary ME Courses

  • ME 50000 - Advanced Thermodynamics
  • ME 50200 - Numerical Heat And Mass Transfer
  • ME 50201 - Single Phase Convective Heat Transfer
  • ME 50202 - Sustainable Thermal Fluid Systems Analysis
  • ME 50500 - Intermediate Heat Transfer
  • ME 50810 - Introduction To Two Phase Flow And Heat Transfer
  • ME 51210 - Introduction To Aerodynamics
  • ME 51300 - Engineering Acoustics
  • ME 51900 - Introduction To Wind Energy
  • ME 52100 - Air Quality Modeling
  • ME 52300 - Electronics System Cooling
  • ME 52400 - Design And Analysis-Heating Ventilation And Air Conditioning
  • ME 52950 - Theory Of Plates And Shells
  • ME 54310 - Solar Energy Engineering Systems
  • ME 54510 - Advanced Finite Element Analysis
  • ME 55101 - Introduction To Microfluidics
  • ME 55610 - Finite Element Method For Fluid Flow And Heat Transfer
  • ME 56000 - Kinematics
  • ME 56300 - Mechanical Vibrations
  • ME 56801 - Intermediate Fluid Dynamics
  • ME 57500 - Theory And Design Of Control Systems
  • ME 58300 - Design Of Heat Exchangers
  • ME 58700 - Engineering Optics
  • ME 59310 - Modeling Of Solar Cells And Batteries
  • ME 59400 - Modeling Of Micro/Nano Materials Systems
  • ME 59700 - Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I or CE 57000 - Advanced Structural Mechanics    
  • ME 59700 - Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I    (Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD))
  • ME 59700 - Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I    (Finite Element Analysis)
  • ME 59700 - Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I    (Materials Selection For Design)
  • ME 59700 - Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I    (Matrix Analysis Of Structures)
  • ME 59700 Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I    (Musculoskeletal Biomechanics)
  • ME 59700 Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I    (Solid Waste Management)
  • ME 59700 Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I    (Vehicle Dynamics)

List of Some Related Courses

  • ME 51500 - Quality Control
  • ME 51600 - Advanced Engineering Project Management
  • ME 53400 - System Engineering
  • ME 53600 - Numerical Methods In Engineering
  • ME 54300 - Advanced Engineering Economics
  • ME 59700 - Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I (Adv. Mechanical Engineering Projects I)
  • ME 59700 - Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I    (Energy System)
  • ME 59700 - Advanced Mechanical Engineering Projects I    (Optimization and Simulation Models)

Total 30 Credits Required

The Mechanical Engineering (ME) Department offers graduate programs in the broad field of mechanical engineering. The PhD program prepares students for basic and applied research in mechanical engineering.

While there are no officially designated tracks or concentrations, students are required to complete the degree requirements listed below and will choose one of the following areas of emphasis (AOE), based on their interests.

Areas of Emphasis (AOE)

  • Design and Manufacturing - computer-aided design, optimal design, design with reliability, additive manufacturing, micro-and nano-fabrication
  • Solid Mechanics and Mechanical Design - mechanics of materials and structures, computational mechanics, biomechanics, waves and vibration, computer-aided design, design optimization, design with reliability, design for additive manufacturing
  • Transport Phenomena and Energy - heat and mass transfer in biological/environmental/industrial applications, microfluidics/nanofluidics, complex fluids, interfacial phenomena/wetting, additive manufacturing, energy generation, energy storage, energy efficient space heating and cooling, smart electronics and data center cooling, small-scale power harvesting
  • Materials - materials characterization, microstructure/property relationships, thin films, computational materials, interfacial phenomena, functional materials, materials processing
  • Dynamics and Mechatronics  - electromechanical system dynamics, microstructural vibrations, rigid-body dynamics, MEMS/NEMS, novel acoustic measurement techniques, mechatronics, robotics, microscale vibrations and acoustics, nonlinear dynamics, sensors and actuators, control systems

The PhD in Materials Science and Engineering is described under Materials Science and Engineering, PhD in the Graduate School    section of the Academic Guide.

Program Requirements

The PhD program in Mechanical Engineering requires a minimum of three academic years of full-time graduate level study after the baccalaureate degree, or their equivalent in part-time study.

To complete the PhD in Mechanical Engineering, students must maintain at least a B average in all graduate coursework.

Residency Requirement

All PhD students must complete 24 letter-graded (A-F) credits.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

All rules of the Graduate School apply regarding probation and academic jeopardy, except probation may not last more than two semesters.

Research Requirement

  • Students pursuing the PhD in mechanical engineering must complete a research dissertation.
  • The written dissertation and an oral presentation defending the dissertation must be approved by the student’s research committee before they are eligible for the degree.
  • Publication of the student’s research in an archival journal is expected.

Obtaining an Advisor

Upon admission to the doctoral program, new students will be advised by the director of graduate studies, who is responsible for:

  • Explaining the department requirements for the PhD degree
  • Assisting the student in establishing a preliminary course of study
  • Informing the student of selecting an advisor

The above actions should be completed during the first semester in residence. It is the responsibility of the student to select an advisor, select a guidance committee (in consultation with their advisor), and prepare a learning contract by the end of the fall semester in the second year.

Guidance Committee

The student, upon selecting an advisor, should identify faculty to serve on the guidance committee. The committee must have a minimum of four members (including the student’s advisor); one member can be from outside the department.

The student should submit the first page of the learning contract listing the names of the proposed committee members to the ME Graduate Studies Committee (GSC) for approval. Review of the proposed guidance committee is very thorough, because the guidance committee acts on behalf of the department in monitoring the student’s academic progress. When the guidance committee is accepted by the ME GSC, the signed learning contract will be placed in the student’s file in the department office as an active document. Any subsequent proposed changes made to the approved guidance committee must be made in writing to the director of graduate studies for approval. The student, upon approval, must submit an amended learning contract to the director of graduate studies.

Learning Contract

Preparation: Every new PhD student should work immediately with his/her advisor to develop a learning contract. The purpose of the learning contract is to define the knowledge and skills appropriate for the student’s intended area of research; this document will guide the student’s preparation for the comprehensive examination. The learning contract should identify courses and concepts that must be mastered in order to provide breadth of background, as well as specialized courses and concepts which are germane to the proposed area of research. The learning contract will remain an active document in the student’s file that charts their progress through the various milestones of the PhD process. It is the responsibility of the student to update the learning contract and obtain the appropriate signatures confirming the successful completion of each PhD milestone.

Registering the Learning Contract: A copy of the learning contract will be placed in the student’s file and maintained by the secretary to the director of graduate studies.

Course Requirements

  • ME 535 - Analytical Methods I
  • ME 635 - Analytical Methods II
  • All courses listed in the learning contract.

PhD Qualifying Evaluation

Every PhD student must successfully complete the qualifying evaluation at the end of the spring semester of the first year. Failure to pass Part 1 and Part 2 of the qualifying evaluation is considered sufficient reason for dismissal from the PhD program.

Part 1: Recommendation Letter from Faculty Advisor

This letter, provided by the faculty advisor, will comment on the student’s suitability and qualifications for the PhD program. Its content will focus on the student’s ability and/or potential for conducting research at a high level. This letter will be sent by the advisor directly to the Graduate Studies Committee.

The Graduate Studies Committee will review the recommendation letter. To successfully pass Part 1, the student’s qualifications for the PhD program must be approved by the committee. As needed, the committee may request a meeting with the student’s advisor to obtain additional information before making a final decision.

Part 2: Average Grade for Math and Area of Emphasis (AOE) Courses

An average grade will be calculated using the following courses:

  • All AOE classes (at least 2 must be included)

To successfully pass Part 2, the student must obtain an average grade of B+ (GPA 3.3) for this list of courses. Courses associated with each AOE are available on the Mechanical Engineering Department Graduate Programs website . Note that independent study and research credit courses cannot be used to calculate the average grade as part of the qualifying evaluation.

PhD Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive examination is structured by the guidance committee to cover topics described in the learning contract. Before taking the comprehensive examination, the student must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours in residence on the Binghamton University campus. The comprehensive exam must be taken by the end of the summer of the second year.

Preparation and Approval of Prospectus

Upon completion of the comprehensive examination, the candidate must write a prospectus, describing the proposed dissertation research in detail. This prospectus is presented and defended in an open colloquium. After successfully defending the prospectus, the final revised prospectus will be placed in the student’s file. The prospectus must be completed by the end of the fall semester of the third year.

Admission to Candidacy

Upon passing the comprehensive examination, the student is admitted to candidacy for the PhD degree. A student may only register for full time certification (FTC) credits if they have been admitted to candidacy (i.e., obtained ABD status) by the start of the semester. This means to be eligible to register for FTC credits, the student must have successfully passed their comprehensive exam and completed all course and credit requirements before the add/drop date of the current semester.

Evidence of Proficiency in Teaching

PhD students must meet the teaching proficiency requirement in one of the following ways:

  • Teaching two lectures
  • Teaching one lecture and two recitations

Note: The lectures and recitations can be from different courses.

Oral Defense of PhD Dissertation

The PhD candidate will be required to orally present their dissertation research in an open colloquium. The guidance committee, as well as an outside examiner appointed by the Graduate School, will be present at this colloquium and will also conduct the defense of the dissertation immediately following the oral presentation

Summary of Minimum Requirements

  • Submission of learning contract
  • Satisfaction of qualifying evaluation requirement
  • Satisfaction of comprehensive exam requirement
  • Submission of prospectus and presentation of proposed research in an open colloquium
  • Acceptance of prospectus by the guidance committee
  • Oral presentation and defense of dissertation

PhD Timeline

Additional information about the program.

For more information on the Mechanical Engineering PhD program, please refer to the Mechanical Engineering Graduate Programs website . To apply to the Mechanical Engineering PhD program, please visit the University Graduate Admissions website .

  • Skip to Content
  • Catalog Home
  • Mechanical Engineering: Accelerated Program, MS

This is a named option within the Mechanical Engineering MS .

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers a Master of Science (MS) degree in Mechanical Engineering with a named option in Accelerated Program. Graduate students may take coursework in the six Department of Mechanical Engineering emphasis areas: Advanced Manufacturing, Biomechanics, Computational Engineering and Design, Energy Systems, Fluid and Solid Mechanics, and Robotics, Controls and Sensing. The Accelerated Program takes approximately three terms (one calendar year) to complete. The Accelerated Program only includes coursework. Each student will be assigned an academic advisor, based on emphasis area, from the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Please consult the table below for key information about this degree program’s admissions requirements. The program may have more detailed admissions requirements, which can be found below the table or on the program’s website.

Graduate admissions is a two-step process between academic programs and the Graduate School. Applicants must meet the minimum requirements of the Graduate School as well as the program(s). Once you have researched the graduate program(s) you are interested in, apply online .

Submitted scores will not be used in admission decisions.

Applicants earning a BS degree from UW-Madison are not required to obtain any letters of recommendation. Within the Graduate School application, in the letters of recommendation section, you will need to enter at least one contact.

Application Requirements and Process

All applicants must satisfy requirements that are set forth by the Graduate School . Admitted applicants without Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science degrees may be required to complete one or more courses in addition to degree requirements to satisfy any deficiencies (this requirement cannot be determined prior to admission).

Most applicants have a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering. Applicants with a Bachelor of Science in other engineering or physical and natural science disciplines will be considered for admission. International applicants must have a degree comparable to a regionally accredited US bachelor’s degree.

The Department of Mechanical Engineering prefers a 3.2/4.0 GPA. The minimum GPA to be reviewed by the admission committee is 3.0/4.0.

Application Materials

Each application must include the following:

  • Graduate School Application
  • Academic transcripts
  • Statement of purpose
  • Three letters of recommendation (see below for exception)
  • English proficiency score (if required)
  • Application fee

Academic Transcript 

Within the online application, upload undergraduate transcript(s) and, if applicable, the previous graduate transcript. Unofficial copies of transcripts are required for review, but official copies are required for admitted applicants. Please do not send transcripts or any other application materials to the Graduate School or the Department of Mechanical Engineering unless requested. Review the requirements set by the  Graduate School  for additional information about degrees/transcripts.

Statement of Purpose

In this document, applicants should explain why they want to pursue further education in Mechanical Engineering (see the Graduate School for  more advice on how to structure a personal statement ).

Upload your resume in your application.

Three Letters of Recommendation

These letters are required from people who can accurately judge the applicant's academic and/or work performance. Letters of recommendation are submitted electronically to graduate programs through the online application. See the  Graduate School for FAQs  regarding letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation are due by the deadline listed above. 

English Proficiency Score 

Every applicant whose native language is not English, or whose undergraduate instruction was not in English, must provide an English proficiency test score. The UW-Madison Graduate School accepts TOEFL, IETLS, or Duolingo English Test scores. Your score will not be accepted if it is more than two years old from the start of your admission term. Country of citizenship does not exempt applicants from this requirement. Language of instruction at the college or university level and how recent the language instruction was taken are the determining factors in meeting this requirement.

International degree-seeking applicants must prove English proficiency using the Graduate School's requirements .

Application Fee

Submission must be accompanied by the one-time application fee. See the  Graduate School for FAQs for fee information.

Fee grants are only available through the conditions  outlined here by the Graduate School . The Department of Mechanical Engineering is unable to offer fee grants for applicants to this program.

Reentry Admissions

If an applicant was previously enrolled as a graduate student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and did not earn the degree, but has had a break in enrollment for a minimum of a fall or spring term, that applicant must re-apply to resume studies. Please review the Graduate School requirements for previously enrolled students . The previous faculty advisor (or another Mechanical Engineering faculty advisor) must be willing to supply advising support and should e-mail the Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student Services Coordinator regarding next steps in the process.

If an applicant was previously enrolled in a UW-Madison graduate degree, a completed that degree, had a break in enrollment since earning the degree and would now like to apply for another UW-Madison program, they must submit a new student application through the UW-Madison Graduate School online application. For Mechanical Engineering graduate programs, you must follow the entire application process as described above.

Currently Enrolled Graduate Student Admissions

Applicants currently enrolled as a graduate student at UW-Madison, whether in Mechanical Engineering or a non-Mechanical Engineering graduate program, wishing to apply to this degree program should contact the Mechanical Engineering Graduate Admissions Team to inquire about the process and deadlines several months in advance of the anticipated enrollment term. Current students may apply to change or add programs for any term (fall, spring, or summer).

If you have questions, contact  [email protected] .

Graduate School Resources

Resources to help you afford graduate study might include assistantships, fellowships, traineeships, and financial aid.  Further funding information is available from the Graduate School. Be sure to check with your program for individual policies and restrictions related to funding.

Program Resources

Students enrolled in this program are not eligible to receive tuition remission from graduate assistantship appointments at this institution.

Additional Resources

Student loans.

Students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents may be eligible to receive some level of funding through the federal direct loan program. Private loans may also be available. Learn more about financial aid at the  Financial Aid website . 

International Student Services Funding and Scholarships

For information on International Student Funding and Scholarships, visit the  International Student Services website .

Minimum Graduate School Requirements

Named option requirements  .

Review the Graduate School minimum academic progress and degree requirements , in addition to the program requirements listed below.

 Mode of Instruction Definitions

Accelerated: Accelerated programs are offered at a fast pace that condenses the time to completion. Students typically take enough credits aimed at completing the program in a year or two.

Evening/Weekend: ​Courses meet on the UW–Madison campus only in evenings and/or on weekends to accommodate typical business schedules.  Students have the advantages of face-to-face courses with the flexibility to keep work and other life commitments.

Face-to-Face: Courses typically meet during weekdays on the UW-Madison Campus.

Hybrid: These programs combine face-to-face and online learning formats.  Contact the program for more specific information.

Online: These programs are offered 100% online.  Some programs may require an on-campus orientation or residency experience, but the courses will be facilitated in an online format.

Curricular Requirements

Required courses.

Two semesters of  M E 903 Graduate Seminar are required. These should be taken the first two semesters the student is in residence.

A minimum of 24 formal credits are required (minimum of 15 credits in Mechanical Engineering ( M E ) taken at UW-Madison). Acceptable courses are numbered 400 and above. Up to two courses numbered 300-399 in engineering, math, or the sciences may also be used towards the formal course credit requirement. (If Mechanical Engineering courses, they must be approved by the faculty advisor and the Mechanical Engineering Graduate Committee).  

For a list of mechanical engineering courses numbered 400 and above, review the  list of mechanical engineering courses .

The remaining 6 credits may be formal credits*, independent study credits, or seminar credits (see Graduate Program Handbook for additional guidance). No thesis/research credits are permitted. Up to 3 credits of independent study are permitted but not required. 

*Formal credits are any course offering that is not a seminar course, thesis research course, or independent study course.

Advisor Approval of Study Plan

The faculty advisor must always approve the courses a student takes in the MS program. Students should schedule an appointment with their adviser when selecting their courses. During the final semester, the faculty advisor will review the courses taken again and if approved, sign the warrant request form.

Other Policy

Students in this program may not take courses outside the prescribed curriculum without faculty advisor and program director approval. Students in this program cannot enroll concurrently in other undergraduate or graduate degree programs.

Graduate School Policies

The  Graduate School’s Academic Policies and Procedures  provide essential information regarding general university policies. Program authority to set degree policies beyond the minimum required by the Graduate School lies with the degree program faculty. Policies set by the academic degree program can be found below.

Named Option-Specific Policies

Prior coursework, graduate credits earned at other institutions.

With faculty advisor approval, students may transfer up to 12 credits of graduate coursework from other institutions toward the minimum credit requirement and the minimum graduate coursework (50%) requirement. No credits from other institutions can be counted toward the minimum graduate residence credit requirement. Coursework earned ten or more years prior to admission is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

Undergraduate Credits Earned at Other Institutions or UW-Madison

  • Undergraduate credits from UW-Madison:  With faculty advisor approval, a maximum of 7 credits from a UW-Madison undergraduate degree may be applied toward the minimum credit requirement. Only coursework that is applicable to the degree curriculum is eligible. These credits are not allowed to count toward the minimum graduate coursework (50%) requirement unless taken in courses numbered 700 or above. No credits can be counted toward the minimum graduate residence credit requirement.  Coursework earned ten or more years prior to admission is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

Undergraduate credits from other institutions:  Undergraduate credits from other institutions are not permitted to be used in this degree program.

Credits Earned as a Professional Student at UW-Madison (Law, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Veterinary careers)

Refer to the Graduate School: Transfer Credits for Prior Coursework policy.

Credits Earned as a University Special student at UW–Madison

With faculty advisor approval, students may transfer up to 15 credits of coursework taken as a UW–Madison University Special student toward the minimum credit requirement. Only coursework that is applicable to the degree curriculum is eligible. UW–Madison coursework taken as a University Special student would not be allowed to count toward the minimum graduate coursework (50%) requirement unless taken in courses numbered 700 or above or are taken to meet the requirements of a capstone certificate and has the “Grad 50%” attribute. Coursework earned ten or more years prior to admission is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

The Department of Mechanical Engineering graduate programs satisfactory academic progress policy may be reviewed in the Graduate Handbook (see Contact box for link). 

Advisor / Committee

All students will be assigned a mechanical engineering faculty advisor, based on emphasis area, who assists them in planning a course sequence that meets degrees requirements and who will discuss career objectives with the students.

Credits Per Term Allowed

Time  limits.

Refer to the Graduate School: Time Limits policy.

Grievances and Appeals

These resources may be helpful in addressing your concerns:

  • Bias or Hate Reporting  
  • Graduate Assistantship Policies and Procedures
  • Office of the Provost for Faculty and Staff Affairs
  • Employee Assistance (for personal counseling and workplace consultation around communication and conflict involving graduate assistants and other employees, post-doctoral students, faculty and staff)
  • Employee Disability Resource Office (for qualified employees or applicants with disabilities to have equal employment opportunities)
  • Graduate School (for informal advice at any level of review and for official appeals of program/departmental or school/college grievance decisions)
  • Office of Compliance (for class harassment and discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual violence)
  • Office Student Assistance and Support (OSAS)  (for all students to seek grievance assistance and support)
  • Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards (for conflicts involving students)
  • Ombuds Office for Faculty and Staff (for employed graduate students and post-docs, as well as faculty and staff)
  • Title IX (for concerns about discrimination)

Mechanical Engineering Grievance Procedures

If a student feels unfairly treated or aggrieved by faculty, staff, or another student, the University offers several avenues to resolve the grievance. Students’ concerns about unfair treatment are best handled directly with the person responsible for the objectionable action. If the student is uncomfortable making direct contact with the individual(s) involved, they should contact the advisor or the person in charge of the unit where the action occurred (program or department chair, section chair, lab manager, etc.). Many departments and schools/colleges have established specific procedures for handling such situations; check their web pages and published handbooks for information. If such procedures exist at the local level, these should be investigated first. For more information see the Graduate School Academic Policies & Procedures: https://grad.wisc.edu/acadpolicy/?policy=grievancesandappeals . The Assistant Dean for Graduate Affairs ( [email protected] ) provides overall leadership for graduate education in the College of Engineering (CoE), and is a point of contact for graduate students who have concerns about education, mentoring, research, or other difficulties.

The student is encouraged to speak first with the person toward whom the grievance is directed to see if a situation can be resolved at this level.

Should a satisfactory resolution not be achieved, the student should contact the  Associate Chair for Graduate Studies or the John Bollinger Chair of Mechanical Engineering  to discuss the grievance. The Associate Chair for Graduate Studies or Department Chair will facilitate problem resolution through informal channels and facilitate any complaints or issues of students. The first attempt is to help students informally address the grievance prior to any formal complaint. Students are also encouraged to talk with their faculty advisors regarding concerns or difficulties if necessary. University resources for sexual harassment, discrimination, disability accommodations, and other related concerns can be found on the UW Office of Compliance website . Other campus resources can be found above. 

If the issue is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction the student can submit the grievance to the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies in writing, within 60 calendar days of the alleged unfair treatment.

On receipt of a written complaint, a faculty committee will be convened by the Associate Chair for Graduate Studies to manage the grievance. The faculty committee will obtain a written response from the person toward whom the complaint is directed. This response will be shared with the person filing the grievance.

The faculty committee will determine a decision regarding the grievance. The Associate Chair for Graduate Studies will report on the action taken by the committee in writing to both the student and the party toward whom the complaint was directed within 15 working days from the date the complaint was received.

At this point, if either party (the student or the person toward whom the grievance is directed) is unsatisfied with the decision of the faculty committee, the party may file a written appeal. Either party has 10 working days to file a written appeal to the School/College.

Documentation of the grievance will be stored for at least 7 years. Significant grievances that set a precedent will be stored indefinitely.

The Graduate School has procedures for students wishing to appeal a grievance decision made at the school/college level. These policies are described in the Graduate School’s Academic Policies & Procedures: https://grad.wisc.edu/acadpolicy/?policy=grievancesandappeals .

Students are strongly discouraged to pursue positions as Project Assistants, Teaching Assistants or Research Assistants during their time in this program, as the rigor and accelerated nature of this program may not accommodate those work time commitments. Students in this program will not receive the tuition remission that is typically part of the compensation package for a graduate assistantship.

  • Professional Development

Take advantage of the Graduate School's  professional development resources to build skills, thrive academically, and launch your career. 

Associate Professors

Assistant professors, see also  mechanical engineering faculty directory ..

  • Requirements

Contact Information

Mechanical Engineering College of Engineering 2107 Mechanical Engineering Building 1513 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706 Department of Mechanical Engineering

Contact Us Sign up here to receive more information

Graduate Student Services [email protected] 3182 Mechanical Engineering Building 1513 University Ave., Madison, WI 53706

Associate Chair for Graduate Studies [email protected]

Graduate Program Handbook View Here

Graduate School grad.wisc.edu

  • /​api/​
  • /​pdf/​
  • Explore Graduate Opportunities
  • Explore UW-​Madison's Undergraduate Opportunities
  • Accounting and Information Systems
  • African American Studies
  • African Cultural Studies
  • Agricultural and Applied Economics
  • Agricultural and Life Sciences -​ College-​Wide
  • Animal and Dairy Sciences
  • Anthropology
  • Art History
  • Asian Languages and Cultures
  • Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
  • Bacteriology
  • Biochemistry
  • Biological Systems Engineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biostatistics and Medical Informatics
  • Business -​ School-​Wide
  • Cell and Regenerative Biology
  • Chemical and Biological Engineering
  • Chicana/​o and Latina/​o Studies
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Civil Society &​ Community Studies
  • Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies
  • Communication Arts
  • Communication Sciences and Disorders
  • Community and Environmental Sociology
  • Computer Sciences
  • Counseling Psychology
  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis
  • Educational Policy Studies
  • Educational Psychology
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Engineering -​ College-​Wide
  • Food Science
  • Forest and Wildlife Ecology
  • French and Italian
  • Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies
  • Gender and Women's Studies
  • German, Nordic, and Slavic
  • Graduate -​ School-​Wide
  • Human Ecology -​ School-​Wide
  • Industrial and Systems Engineering
  • Information School
  • Institute for Clinical and Translational Research
  • Institute for Regional and International Studies
  • Integrative Biology
  • Journalism and Mass Communication
  • Kinesiology
  • La Follette School of Public Affairs
  • Language Institute
  • Language Sciences
  • Law -​ School-​Wide
  • Life Sciences Communication
  • Management and Human Resources
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mathematics
  • Mead Witter School of Music
  • Engineering Mechanics, Doctoral Minor
  • Engineering Mechanics, MS
  • Engineering Mechanics, PhD
  • Mechanical Engineering, Doctoral Minor
  • Mechanical Engineering: Automotive Engineering, MS
  • Mechanical Engineering: Modeling and Simulation in Mechanical Engineering, MS
  • Mechanical Engineering: Research, MS
  • Mechanical Engineering, PhD
  • Medical Physics
  • Medicine and Public Health -​ School-​Wide
  • Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics
  • Nursing -​ School-​Wide
  • Nutritional Sciences
  • Operations and Information Management
  • Pharmacy -​ School-​Wide
  • Planning and Landscape Architecture
  • Plant and Agroecosystem Sciences
  • Plant Pathology
  • Political Science
  • Population Health Sciences
  • Real Estate and Urban Land Economics
  • Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education
  • Religious Studies
  • Risk and Insurance
  • Sandra Rosenbaum School of Social Work
  • Soil and Environmental Sciences
  • Soil Science
  • Spanish and Portuguese
  • Veterinary Medicine -​ School-​Wide
  • Nondegree/​Visiting Student Guide
  • Pharmacy Guide
  • School of Medicine and Public Health Guide
  • Undergraduate Guide
  • Veterinary Guide

Logo

  • Joseph Bordogna Forum
  • Pender Lecture
  • Berger Lecture
  • Heilmeier Lecture
  • Grace Hopper Lecture
  • Technology, Business and Government Lecture
  • Rachleff Lecture
  • Commencement
  • Departmental Events
  • Make a Gift
  • Current Students

« All Events

MEAM Ph.D. Thesis Defense: “Bistable Structures Enable Passive Transitions in Mobile Robots”

June 17 at 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm.

The use of passive subsystems can allow a robot to perform a discrete-state task without requiring a dedicated actuator. Reducing the number of actuators in robots can reduce the overall system weight and power consumption, leading to longer operation times, especially in aerial vehicles. This thesis considers the use of bistable mechanisms to create systems that are passively actuated and exhibit passive locking capabilities. Three unique systems within this emerging class are developed, including two grippers and a morphing aerial vehicle that deploys wings.

The main contribution is the method for determining the actuation force requirements for dynamically-actuated bistable mechanisms, where the locomotion actuators cause snap-through of a passive bistable structure by leveraging inertial forces. We find that the minimum dynamically-actuating force depends on friction but not on viscous damping.

The secondary contribution is the idea that “force reversal” provides a practical means of causing bidirectionally passive snap-through of a bistable structure, meaning that in the frame of the bistable mechanism, the force must be applied toward each target equilibrium to cause snap-through. The alternative to force reversal is storing a large amount of elastic energy in the structure by displacing the bistable structure past its stable equilibrium, but analysis shows that force reversal reduces the actuating force required and removes dependence on viscous damping, which is difficult to accurately model.

Finally, this thesis makes contributions in the application areas of the passive bistable systems. For perching, we show that the use of a passive bistable structure where the linkage augments the gripper’s locking strength can lead to passive grasping with a high strength to weight ratio. For aerial reconfiguration, we demonstrate that the energy cost of passive dynamic transformation can be offset by the efficiency gains of transforming from a quadrotor to a fixed wing mode.

Overall, this thesis shows that by using passive bistable mechanisms in a structure, task-specific actuators can be eliminated by repurposing the existing locomotion actuators. Considerations for system design are discussed, along with limitations of these systems.

university thesis mechanical engineering

Jessica Weakly

Ph.d. candidate, department of mechanical engineering & applied mechanics, university of pennsylvania.

Jessica Weakly is advised by Cynthia Sung .

  • Google Calendar
  • Outlook 365
  • Outlook Live

COMMENTS

  1. Mechanical Engineering Masters Theses Collection

    Theses from 2021 PDF. Design and Testing of a Foundation Raised Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter, Jacob R. Davis, Mechanical Engineering. PDF. Wind Turbine Power Production Estimation for Better Financial Agreements, Shanon Fan, Mechanical Engineering. PDF

  2. Mechanical Engineering Theses and Dissertations

    Waterproofing Shape-Changing Mechanisms Using Origami Engineering; Also a Mechanical Property Evaluation Approach for Rapid Prototyping, Andrew Jason Katz. PDF. Hydrogen Effects on X80 Steel Mechanical Properties Measured by Tensile and Impact Testing, Xuan Li. PDF. Application and Analysis of Asymmetrical Hot and Cold Stimuli, Ahmad Manasrah. PDF

  3. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Dissertations Collection

    Dissertations from 2016 PDF. Eulerian CFD Modeling of Multiphase Internal Injector Flow and External Sprays, Eli T. Baldwin, Mechanical Engineering. PDF. Simulating the Hydrodynamics of Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Platforms in a Finite Volume Framework, Maija Benitz, Mechanical Engineering. PDF

  4. Theses and Dissertations--Mechanical Engineering, University of

    Theses/Dissertations from 2024 PDF. The Determination of Darcy Permeabilities and Slip Parameters in Porous Thermal Protection Media via Pressure-Driven Steady Flows at Varying Levels of Thermal Decomposition, John Ryan O'Nan. Theses/Dissertations from 2023 PDF

  5. Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Honors Theses

    The Analysis of Mechanical Exfoliation of Graphene for Various Fabrication and Automation Techniques, Lance Yarbrough. Theses from 2023 PDF. A Systematic Study into the Design and Utilization of Burn Wire as a means of Tensioning and Releasing Spacecraft Mechanisms through Applied Joule Heating, Chandler Dye. PDF

  6. Mechanical Engineering: Find Theses and Dissertations

    Carnegie Mellon University. Carnegie Mellon theses are now ONLINE and can be searched through the ProQuest database Dissertations & Theses @ Carnegie Mellon University that enables access to citations and abstracts of all dissertations and theses, as well as the fulltext in PDF format. Scroll down and select Dissertations & Theses, then do a ...

  7. Mechanical Engineering Theses and Dissertations

    Theses/Dissertations from 2022. Mechanisms for Improvement of Key Mechanical Properties in Polymer Powder Bed Fusion Processes, Clinton Spencer Abbott. Reformulated Vortex Particle Method and Meshless Large Eddy Simulation of Multirotor Aircraft, Eduardo J. Alvarez.

  8. Mechanical Engineering Master's Theses

    The DRS was developed by the Northeastern University Library as a tool for University faculty and staff to protect the valuable information and data that has been created as part of the University's research and instructional mission. ... Mechanical Engineering Master's Theses; Mechanical Engineering Master's Theses Collection Search http ...

  9. Theses and Dissertations

    Theses and Dissertations. Industrial Relations. Location. Department of Mechanical Engineering. Engineering Building 1, Room N207. 4226 Martin Luther King Boulevard. Houston, TX 77204-4006. Phone: 713-743-4500. Campus Map.

  10. MS in Mechanical Engineering

    An example of a recent MS thesis prospectus can be found in the Mechanical Engineering office. The examining committee for MS candidates completing theses should be composed of three (3) members. The committee chair is normally a full-time, tenure-track faculty member. One committee member must be from outside the ME department.

  11. Mechanical Engineering Master's Theses

    Theses/Dissertations from 2022. The Swimming of Slender Bodies at Low Reynolds Numbers in Newtonian and Complex Fluids, Ke Qin. The Effect of Particle Geometry on Squirming Through a Shear-Thinning Fluid, Brandon van Gogh. Low-Reynolds-Number Locomotion via Reinforcement Learning, Zonghao Zou.

  12. Brown Digital Repository

    Brown University Theses and Dissertations. Brown University Library archives dissertations in accordance with the Brown Graduate School policy. For dissertations published prior to 2008, ... Mechanical engineering Collection: Engineering Theses and Dissertations. Full Record

  13. Theses and Dissertations

    Preserve your works. University Libraries. Tel: +1205-348-8647 [email protected].

  14. Dissertations & Theses

    Mechanical Science and Engineering dissertations and theses granted from 1985 to 1999 were assigned Q.629.1Ta, followed by the 2-number year, followed by starting letters from the author's last name. (Example: A 1991 thesis by M. Doyle would be Q.629.1Ta91D).

  15. M.S. in Mechanical Engineering (MSME)

    Thesis students should be advised of the following: M.S. Thesis Option. The Mechanical Engineering, MS thesis option requires the completion of 9 hours of thesis credits (MECE 6399, MECE 7399, and MECE 7399) Only one MECE 7399 course can be taken per semester, so please plan accordingly. An S or U grade must be assigned to every thesis course ...

  16. Browsing/Searching: Mechanical Engineering Ph.D. Theses

    Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Rochester. Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2023. 2023. 8/31/2025. Elliot Maxwell Snider - Author. Ranga Dias - Thesis Advisor. All-optical nanothermometry of isolated hotspots using NV centers in individual nanodiamonds. Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Rochester. Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2024.

  17. M.S. degree thesis requirements

    Thesis requirements apply to all students in the thesis option, including part-time and online students. Thesis credits Students in the thesis option need to register for a total of 12 thesis credits: ME 700. Thesis supervisor and committee To formally opt into the thesis track, students must complete the following three steps. There is no hard deadline by when these steps must be completed ...

  18. Mechanical Engineering Theses and Dissertations

    Theses/Dissertations from 2023 PDF. Water Quality Monitoring and Mapping Using Rapidly Deployable Sensor Nodes, Mohamed Abdelwahab. PDF. Rapid Prediction of Phonon Density of States by Graph Neural Network and High-Throughput Screening of Candidate Substrates for Wide Bandgap Electronic Cooling, Mohammed Saif Ali Al-Fahdi. PDF

  19. Senior Thesis

    For an A.B. degree, a research thesis is strongly encouraged but not required; a thesis is necessary to be considered for High or Highest Honors. Additionally, a thesis will be particularly useful for students interested in pursuing graduate engineering research. In the S.B. degree programs, every student completes a design thesis as part of the required senior capstone design course (ES 100hf).

  20. Thesis

    Supplementary information about thesis in Mechanical Engineering. The master's thesis is a 30-credit entity that also includes the maturity test and presentation of the thesis. The master's thesis is a piece of applied research and is written on a topic related to the advanced studies of the degree programme. The key goal of the master's ...

  21. Final Examination & Depositing Your Thesis/Dissertation

    [email protected]. (765) 494-5730. Virtual office hours available every Tues/Wed/Thurs. Purdue's School of Mechanical Engineering is one of the largest in the country, conducting world-class research in manufacturing, propulsion, sustainable energy, nanotechnology, acoustics, materials, biomedicine, combustion, computer simulation, HVAC ...

  22. Candidate Checklist Thesis

    ME Graduate Office. 516 Northwestern Ave. (4th floor of Wang Hall) West Lafayette, IN 47906. [email protected]. (765) 494-5730. Virtual office hours available every Tues/Wed/Thurs. Purdue's School of Mechanical Engineering is one of the largest in the country, conducting world-class research in manufacturing, propulsion, sustainable ...

  23. PDF The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering: Thesis Program

    The Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering: Thesis Program Planning Sheet (matriculated after 2024) ... least 24 credits must be taken at Boston University. To graduate, a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 (B) must be attained. ... intended to provide each student with core competency in a specific area of mechanical engineering.

  24. Department of Mechanical Engineering < MIT

    Area 1: Mechanics: Modeling, Experimentation, and Computation (MMEC). At the heart of mechanical engineering lies the ability to measure, describe, and model the physical world of materials and mechanisms. The MMEC area focuses on teaching the fundamental principles, essential skills, and scientific tools necessary for predicting thermo ...

  25. Degree Program: Mechanical Engineering, MSME

    The MSME degree program requires a total of 30 credit hours to be completed, with thesis or non-thesis option. It is anticipated that the degree may be completed in two years of full time graduate study. To earn the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) degree, students must complete 30 credit hours, with a minimum cumulative ...

  26. Program: Mechanical Engineering, MS

    The Mechanical Engineering (ME) Department offers graduate programs in the broad field of mechanical engineering. The program leading to the Master of Science (MS) degree provides the balance of advanced theory and practical knowledge necessary for either practice within the profession or for advancement to a doctoral program.

  27. Program: Mechanical Engineering Major, MS

    In mechanical engineering, three options are available for each concentration. ... Nuclear Space Science and Engineering — Thesis Option, Project Option, Coursework Only with Comprehensive Exams Option ... This program is designed for students attending the University of Tennessee for their Master of Science degree because other universities ...

  28. Program: Mechanical Engineering, PhD

    Students pursuing the PhD in mechanical engineering must complete a research dissertation. The written dissertation and an oral presentation defending the dissertation must be approved by the student's research committee before they are eligible for the degree. Publication of the student's research in an archival journal is expected.

  29. Mechanical Engineering: Accelerated Program, MS < University of

    A minimum of 24 formal credits are required (minimum of 15 credits in Mechanical Engineering ( M E) taken at UW-Madison). Acceptable courses are numbered 400 and above. Up to two courses numbered 300-399 in engineering, math, or the sciences may also be used towards the formal course credit requirement.

  30. Events for June 2024

    MEAM Ph.D. Thesis Defense: "Bistable Structures Enable Passive Transitions in Mobile Robots". June 17 at 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM. The use of passive subsystems can allow a robot to perform a discrete-state task without requiring a dedicated actuator. Reducing the number of actuators in robots can reduce the overall system weight and power ...