Research Assistant Cover Letter Example

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Begin your Research Assistant cover letter with a strong opening that captures the reader's attention. Start by addressing the letter to a specific person, if possible. Use the first paragraph to introduce yourself and express your enthusiasm for the position. Highlight your relevant academic background and research experience, emphasizing how it aligns with the goals of the lab or project you're applying to. For instance: "Dear Dr. Smith, I am writing to express my keen interest in the Research Assistant position with XYZ Lab, as advertised on your department's website. With a strong foundation in biochemistry and a passion for groundbreaking research in neurodegenerative diseases, I am excited about the opportunity to contribute to your team's innovative work on Alzheimer's disease." This approach shows that you've done your homework and are genuinely interested in the specific role and research area.

The best way for Research Assistants to end a cover letter is with a strong, confident closing that reiterates their enthusiasm for the position and their readiness to contribute to the research team. They should express gratitude for the reader's time and consideration, and include a call to action that invites further discussion or an interview. For example: "I am eager to bring my expertise in [specific research skills or field] to [Research Institution/Team Name]. Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss how my skills and passion for research can contribute to the groundbreaking work at your lab. Please feel free to contact me at [phone number] or [email address] to schedule an interview." This ending strikes a balance between professionalism, eagerness to engage, and respect for the recipient's time, making it an effective conclusion for a Research Assistant's cover letter.

Research Assistants should include the following elements in their cover letter: 1. **Introduction**: Begin with a strong opening statement that captures the reader's attention. Mention the specific research assistant position you are applying for and where you found the job listing. 2. **Education and Relevant Coursework**: Highlight your educational background, focusing on degrees, majors, or coursework that is relevant to the research field. If you are currently a student or a recent graduate, mention your academic achievements and how they have prepared you for a research role. 3. **Research Experience**: Detail any previous research experience you have, including any academic or industry projects. Explain the nature of the research, your role in the project, the skills you utilized, and any outcomes or findings that were significant. 4. **Technical Skills**: List any technical skills that are pertinent to the job, such as proficiency in statistical software (e.g., SPSS, R), laboratory techniques, data analysis, programming languages (e.g., Python, MATLAB), or other specialized equipment or procedures. 5. **Soft Skills**: Research assistants need strong analytical, problem-solving, and communication skills. Highlight examples of how you have demonstrated these skills in past experiences, such as collaborating with a team, managing time effectively, or presenting research findings. 6. **Understanding of the Research Area**: Show that you have a solid understanding of the research area you will be working in. Mention any relevant literature you've read, conferences attended, or how your interests align with the research goals of the lab or project. 7. **Motivation and Goals**: Explain why you are interested in this particular research assistant position. Discuss your passion for the research topic, how this position aligns with your career goals, and what you hope to contribute to the research team. 8. **Professionalism and Compatibility**: Convey a sense of professionalism and an indication that you would be a good fit within the existing research team. Mention any soft skills or personality traits that make you a compatible team

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3 Research Assistant Cover Letter Examples for 2024

Stephen Greet

  • Research Assistant Cover Letter
  • Clinical Research Assistant Cover Letter
  • Graduate Research Assistant Cover Letter
  • Writing Your Research Assistant Cover Letter

You’re a pro at researching, analyzing your findings, and drawing useful conclusions that can lead to groundbreaking discoveries. Your analytical mind and impeccable eye for detail help you streamline and innovate the research process.

Whether you’re in an undergraduate program or already have your PhD, a research position can be an excellent way to progress your career. However, to beat the competition you’ll need to create a cover letter that complements your research assistant resume and highlights your strengths.

We’re here to help you with that. Check out our research assistant cover letter examples , expert tips, and free AI cover letter generator to help you prepare an irresistible job application.

presentation letter research assistant

Research Assistant Cover Letter Example

Copy this text for your research assistant cover letter.

123 Fictional Avenue Columbus, OH 43004 (123) 456-7890

August 10, 2023

Lily Nguyen JPMorgan Chase & Co. 123 Fictional Lane Columbus, OH 43004

Dear Ms. Nguyen:

Pursuing my master’s degree in statistics fueled my passion for the intricate mechanisms steering financial institutions. This curiosity, coupled with my eagerness to contribute to the industry, has led me to apply for the research assistant role at JPMorgan Chase & Co. With six years of experience conducting literature reviews, gathering data, and more, I am equipped to contribute to your dynamic environment.

In my recent role at Citizens Bank, I liaised with 11 financial analysts to collect, review, and interpret data from over 1000 client accounts. This data played a pivotal role in identifying emerging market trends, enabling the firm to increase its client base by 37 percent during my tenure.

I have also had the chance to lead a team diverse in skills and experiences. For example, I partnered with 3 financial managers from KeyBank, employing statistical analysis methodologies to cut financial forecast errors by $301,788.

With robust analytical and interpersonal skills, I can adapt swiftly to ever-changing circumstances. My professional competencies and propensity to thrive within dynamic environments make me a strong fit for this role.

It would be an honor to discuss how my skills and enthusiasm for finance can enhance JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s esteemed reputation. Thank you for considering my application.

Lucas Brown

Enclosures: Resume Application 2 letters of recommendation Academic Transcripts

Why this cover letter works

  • But again, don’t leave out interpersonal skills; you’ll need them to conduct interviews and communicate your findings effectively.

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Clinical Research Assistant Cover Letter Example

Copy this text for your clinical research assistant cover letter.

123 Fictional Avenue Denton, TX 14201 (123) 456-7890

Noah Smith Horizon Health Services 123 Fictional Lane Denton, TX 14201

Dear Mr. Smith:

I have long been impressed with Horizon Health Services’ reach across western New York along with your institution’s outstanding reputation as a behavioral health and addiction treatment leader. Friends and professional peers have spoken of the remarkable workplace environment at HHS, so I’m thrilled to bring my values and career goals to your team as a clinical research assistant. I believe my skills in data management, EMR systems, and clinical trial documentation will greatly contribute to your exceptional team.

My internship at LabCorp Innovation equipped me with a strong foundation in clinical research and data analysis. I managed data for over 69 patient studies, employing Meditech EMR to maintain high data accuracy and ensuring that records were up-to-date and compliant with stringent regulations. This initiative led to a 35% reduction in data retrieval time and an 18% improvement in record accuracy.

Recognizing the recurring issues in EMR accessibility, I led an initiative to restructure the system workflow, creating an easier interface while safeguarding patient information. This improved the staff’s efficiency in accessing and inputting data by 47%, which directly scaled the monthly number of successfully processed patient data from 750 to more than 987.

I also have hands-on experience managing clinical trial documentation. While with Medix Infusion, I supervised the document control process of 32 clinical trials, ensuring that all required papers were timely and accurately maintained. That enhanced the audit-readiness of trials by 40% and reduced preparation time for regulatory audits by 23%.

I believe my strong dedication to delivering high-quality research and a deep understanding of health data protocols will greatly contribute to your esteemed institute. Thank you for considering my application. I’m keen to discuss further how I could be a great fit for Horizon Health Services.

Malik Farag

  • Demonstrate your knowledge and application of data collection, analysis, and management methodologies and skills. More importantly, the hiring manager wants to see the quantified impacts of these proficiencies in your previous roles.

Graduate Research Assistant Cover Letter Example

Copy this text for your graduate research assistant cover letter.

123 Fictional Avenue Salt Lake City, UT 84004 (123) 456-7890

Emma White ARUP Laboratories 123 Fictional Lane Salt Lake City, UT 84004

Dear Ms. White:

Navigating through my degree in Biomedical Sciences, much like the calculated and precise nature of laboratory research, instilled in me an unquenchable thirst for breakthroughs, rapid advancements, and the quest for knowledge in the diagnostic medicine realm. Today, I am thrilled at the prospect of applying my skills and passion as a graduate research assistant at ARUP Laboratories, a leader in academic and diagnostic medicine.

While pursuing my undergraduate degree, I had the opportunity to complete a four-month-long internship at Myriad Genetics. Here, I worked alongside reputable professionals in the field, gaining deep insights into the world of diagnostic research. As an integral part of a team that conducted a groundbreaking study, I facilitated the automation of data collection and analysis procedures, resulting in a 29% increase in lab productivity.

I also accepted a seven-month part-time role at Intermountain Healthcare. I spearheaded an initiative to collate, review, and analyze five years’ worth of patient data. The comprehensive report I generated assisted the clinic in identifying diagnostic trends and has been instrumental in inculcating a data-oriented approach in their operations.

ARUP Laboratories’ commitment to diagnostic innovation and excellence resonates with my passion for pushing the boundaries of medical knowledge. Your prestigious, long-standing reputation in diagnostic medicine, complemented by my knack for pertinent research and comprehensive data analysis, creates a synergy I’m excited to explore. I look forward to further discussing how my experience and passion align with your research objectives.

Freya Nilsen

  • Enthusiasm also matters for a beginner role. Research the company and weave its mission or values into your passion for the role.

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How to Write an Excellent Research Assistant Cover Letter

Salesperson pops out of computer screen to depict outselling the competition with sales cover letter

Once you’ve captured the attention of recruiters or professors with your research assistant resume , the next step is to seal the deal with an excellent cover letter. Make sure your cover letter matches the job description but adds a personal flair that goes beyond mere keywords.

Use your cover letter to highlight your passion for your field, your experience in research and data analysis, and, most of all, your excitement at joining that particular company or institution. 

Tailoring your cover letter to match the job is a good way to show dedication and the ability to draw useful insights based on a limited amount of information. As both of those qualities are crucial for a research assistant, it’s a good way to impress the reader.

presentation letter research assistant

Write an intro that hooks the reader

If you want to prove that you’re a skilled researcher right off the bat, impress the recipient by addressing them by name. 

This might be easier if you’re applying for a position within your college, as you likely already have connections and may be addressing a professor or another faculty member. However, it’s just as important to do if you’re applying for a job, so be ready to do some digging.

Use the first paragraph of your cover letter to show that you’re familiar not just with the intricacies of your field, but also with the company you’re applying to.

Lastly, make sure to paint yourself as an expert from the get-go. For example, if you’re applying for a role in clinical research, mention your in-depth knowledge of medical studies and how you want to leverage it in a way that aligns with the company’s values.

The following opener fails to tick the boxes we’ve talked about above—it’s not at all personalized.

Better not!

I saw your job listing online and I want to apply for this position. I’m looking for any role that is hiring right away.

Now, the below example is what you want to aim for. It showcases an interest and expertise in a relevant field, and most of all, it explains why they chose this job and not any other.

presentation letter research assistant

Elaborate on your expertise in the body paragraphs

Research assistant jobs vary wildly, so use this part of your cover letter to show that you know what you’re about in your chosen field of study. 

Pick the things you’re most proud of for this. It’s okay if you don’t have professional experience yet—talk about your projects and academic background to give employers some insight into your level of knowledge.

Pepper in some useful metrics to make this section stand out even more. For instance, if you’re applying to a role that heavily prioritizes managing and collecting data, talk about how you’ve already analyzed over 50,000 entries in Python to identify crucial patterns, streamlining the process by 39%.

That sounds impressive!

presentation letter research assistant

End on a strong note with a closer and signoff

Having covered your background in using Matlab to automate data processing or conducting comprehensive literature reviews to support your research projects, you’ve established yourself as an expert. 

To leave a lasting impression on the reader, pick out a couple of skills that are key to this particular role, such as data visualization and technical writing. Next, describe how you’re excited to put them to good use and contribute to impactful research studies at your new workplace. 

Demonstrate that you’re a pleasant person to work with—a key factor in busy research facilities—and thank the reader for their consideration. Lastly, express how eager you are to join this research team to further seal the deal.

This closing paragraph doesn’t really work. It’s very generic and doesn’t highlight the applicant’s unique blend of expertise.

That won’t work…

I’m not an expert yet, but if you take the time to train me, I will do what I can. I really need a research placement for extra credits so please let me know if I can work with you.

The example below does a much better job. It delves into the applicant’s strengths and clearly shows what they can bring to the role.

You got this!

It would be an honor to discuss how my skills and enthusiasm for finance can enhance JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s esteemed reputation. Thank you for considering my application.

This depends on whether you’re applying for a part-time research role as part of your education or a full-time job. For the former, you’ll likely apply directly to the professor or researcher leading the project or department, so ask a faculty member if you’re unsure. Outside of academia, start by checking LinkedIn and the company website, then call or email the business if all else fails.

Mention the company by name a couple of times, especially in the opening and closing paragraphs. Delve into why you chose it above others—perhaps it’s an industry leader or its mission to introduce new life-saving medicine is close to your heart. Lastly, emphasize your expertise in relevant fields like qualitative and quantitive research.

Lean into your education and discuss relevant coursework and projects you were part of, such as field studies and laboratory work. You can also mention transferable skills from part-time jobs, including attention to detail and database management.

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Research Assistant Cover Letter Example (Free Guide)

Create an research assistant cover letter that lands you the interview with our free examples and writing tips. use and customize our template and land an interview today..

Research Assistant Cover Letter Example

Are you interested in applying for a research assistant position? Writing the perfect cover letter should be at the top of your priority list. Our Research Assistant Cover Letter Guide will provide you with the necessary tips and advice to ensure your cover letter makes an impact and stands out from the competition.

We will cover:

  • How to write a cover letter, no matter your industry or job title.
  • What to put on a cover letter to stand out.
  • The top skills employers from every industry want to see.
  • How to build a cover letter fast with our professional Cover Letter Builder .
  • What a cover letter template is, and why you should use it.

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Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample

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Dear [Hiring Manager],

I am writing to apply for the position of Research Assistant at [Company Name], as advertised on [Job Posting Website]. With my research experience and ability to work both independently and collaboratively, I am confident that I am the ideal candidate for this role.

I hold a Bachelor’s degree in [Field of Study] and am currently working towards a Master’s degree in [Field of Study] with a focus on [Area of Focus]. During my studies, I have gained the solid foundation of knowledge and technical skills necessary to excel in this role, including data analysis, literature review, and quantitative research.

In my current role as a Research Assistant at [Organization], I have had the opportunity to work on a variety of research projects. I have used qualitative and quantitative research methods to develop research questions, analyze data, and produce meaningful insights. I am also experienced in conducting interviews, writing reports, and presenting research results.

I am an organized and detail-oriented individual with strong problem-solving skills and an ability to think critically. I am also an effective communicator with excellent interpersonal skills, which allows me to work with a diverse range of people. I am comfortable working both independently and as part of a team, and I am confident that I can contribute to the success of your research projects.

I am excited at the prospect of working with [Company Name] and would be delighted to be given the opportunity to do so. I am available for an interview at any time and can be reached at [Phone Number] or [Email Address]. I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely, [Your Name]

Why Do you Need a Research Assistant Cover Letter?

Writing a Research Assistant cover letter is an important step in your job search and helps you stand out from other applicants. It showcases your best qualifications and highlights the unique value you can bring to the role. Here are some reasons why you need a Research Assistant cover letter:

  • It gives you an opportunity to explain why you are the best candidate for the job.
  • It allows you to elaborate on the research experience and skills you have gained to date.
  • It shows the employer that you are serious about the job and committed to doing a great job.
  • It gives you a chance to showcase your knowledge of the company and the research field you are applying for.
  • It helps you to stand out from the competition by highlighting your unique qualifications and experience.
  • It allows you to express your enthusiasm for the position and the research field.

A Few Important Rules To Keep In Mind

  • Be sure to address your letter to the appropriate person. If a name is not provided, contact the company to determine the hiring manager’s name.
  • Open your letter with an enthusiastic and professional salutation.
  • Explain why you are writing. Include the position you are applying for and how you heard about it.
  • Highlight your qualifications that make you a good fit for the job. Mention specific skills and experience from your background that make you an ideal candidate.
  • Make connections between your qualifications and the role. Show how your skills and experience are transferable to the job.
  • Close your letter with an expression of appreciation and a call to action.
  • Proofread your letter carefully. Have someone else read it as well for a second opinion.
  • Include a professional signature at the end of your letter.

What's The Best Structure For Research Assistant Cover Letters?

After creating an impressive Research Assistant resume , the next step is crafting a compelling cover letter to accompany your job applications. It's essential to remember that your cover letter should maintain a formal tone and follow a recommended structure. But what exactly does this structure entail, and what key elements should be included in a Research Assistant cover letter? Let's explore the guidelines and components that will make your cover letter stand out.

Key Components For Research Assistant Cover Letters:

  • Your contact information, including the date of writing
  • The recipient's details, such as the company's name and the name of the addressee
  • A professional greeting or salutation, like "Dear Mr. Levi,"
  • An attention-grabbing opening statement to captivate the reader's interest
  • A concise paragraph explaining why you are an excellent fit for the role
  • Another paragraph highlighting why the position aligns with your career goals and aspirations
  • A closing statement that reinforces your enthusiasm and suitability for the role
  • A complimentary closing, such as "Regards" or "Sincerely," followed by your name
  • An optional postscript (P.S.) to add a brief, impactful note or mention any additional relevant information.

Cover Letter Header

A header in a cover letter should typically include the following information:

  • Your Full Name: Begin with your first and last name, written in a clear and legible format.
  • Contact Information: Include your phone number, email address, and optionally, your mailing address. Providing multiple methods of contact ensures that the hiring manager can reach you easily.
  • Date: Add the date on which you are writing the cover letter. This helps establish the timeline of your application.

It's important to place the header at the top of the cover letter, aligning it to the left or center of the page. This ensures that the reader can quickly identify your contact details and know when the cover letter was written.

Cover Letter Greeting / Salutation

A greeting in a cover letter should contain the following elements:

  • Personalized Salutation: Address the hiring manager or the specific recipient of the cover letter by their name. If the name is not mentioned in the job posting or you are unsure about the recipient's name, it's acceptable to use a general salutation such as "Dear Hiring Manager" or "Dear [Company Name] Recruiting Team."
  • Professional Tone: Maintain a formal and respectful tone throughout the greeting. Avoid using overly casual language or informal expressions.
  • Correct Spelling and Title: Double-check the spelling of the recipient's name and ensure that you use the appropriate title (e.g., Mr., Ms., Dr., or Professor) if applicable. This shows attention to detail and professionalism.

For example, a suitable greeting could be "Dear Ms. Johnson," or "Dear Hiring Manager," depending on the information available. It's important to tailor the greeting to the specific recipient to create a personalized and professional tone for your cover letter.

Cover Letter Introduction

An introduction for a cover letter should capture the reader's attention and provide a brief overview of your background and interest in the position. Here's how an effective introduction should look:

  • Opening Statement: Start with a strong opening sentence that immediately grabs the reader's attention. Consider mentioning your enthusiasm for the job opportunity or any specific aspect of the company or organization that sparked your interest.
  • Brief Introduction: Provide a concise introduction of yourself and mention the specific position you are applying for. Include any relevant background information, such as your current role, educational background, or notable achievements that are directly related to the position.
  • Connection to the Company: Demonstrate your knowledge of the company or organization and establish a connection between your skills and experiences with their mission, values, or industry. Showcasing your understanding and alignment with their goals helps to emphasize your fit for the role.
  • Engaging Hook: Consider including a compelling sentence or two that highlights your unique selling points or key qualifications that make you stand out from other candidates. This can be a specific accomplishment, a relevant skill, or an experience that demonstrates your value as a potential employee.
  • Transition to the Body: Conclude the introduction by smoothly transitioning to the main body of the cover letter, where you will provide more detailed information about your qualifications, experiences, and how they align with the requirements of the position.

By following these guidelines, your cover letter introduction will make a strong first impression and set the stage for the rest of your application.

Cover Letter Body

Dear Hiring Manager,

I am writing to apply for the position of Research Assistant, as advertised on [insert job board]. With over [insert years] of experience as a Research Assistant, I am confident that I am the ideal candidate for this role.

I have a strong academic background in [insert relevant subject], and have gained extensive experience of conducting research and data analysis in a laboratory setting. I am highly organized and efficient in my approach to research, and have a keen eye for detail. I am also highly motivated and able to work independently, as well as part of a team.

I am particularly experienced in the areas of [insert relevant areas], and have a proven track record of producing accurate and reliable research results. I have excellent communication skills, and am confident in presenting my research findings in a variety of ways. I also have a comprehensive knowledge of [insert relevant software packages], and am able to quickly learn and become proficient in any new software.

I am confident that I can make a valuable contribution to your research team, and am available to discuss my application further in an interview. Please find attached my CV, which contains further details of my qualifications and experience.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Yours sincerely,

[insert name]

Complimentary Close

The conclusion and signature of a cover letter provide a final opportunity to leave a positive impression and invite further action. Here's how the conclusion and signature of a cover letter should look:

  • Summary of Interest: In the conclusion paragraph, summarize your interest in the position and reiterate your enthusiasm for the opportunity to contribute to the organization or school. Emphasize the value you can bring to the role and briefly mention your key qualifications or unique selling points.
  • Appreciation and Gratitude: Express appreciation for the reader's time and consideration in reviewing your application. Thank them for the opportunity to be considered for the position and acknowledge any additional materials or documents you have included, such as references or a portfolio.
  • Call to Action: Conclude the cover letter with a clear call to action. Indicate your availability for an interview or express your interest in discussing the opportunity further. Encourage the reader to contact you to schedule a meeting or provide any additional information they may require.
  • Complimentary Closing: Choose a professional and appropriate complimentary closing to end your cover letter, such as "Sincerely," "Best Regards," or "Thank you." Ensure the closing reflects the overall tone and formality of the letter.
  • Signature: Below the complimentary closing, leave space for your handwritten signature. Sign your name in ink using a legible and professional style. If you are submitting a digital or typed cover letter, you can simply type your full name.
  • Typed Name: Beneath your signature, type your full name in a clear and readable font. This allows for easy identification and ensures clarity in case the handwritten signature is not clear.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Writing a Research Assistant Cover Letter

When crafting a cover letter, it's essential to present yourself in the best possible light to potential employers. However, there are common mistakes that can hinder your chances of making a strong impression. By being aware of these pitfalls and avoiding them, you can ensure that your cover letter effectively highlights your qualifications and stands out from the competition. In this article, we will explore some of the most common mistakes to avoid when writing a cover letter, providing you with valuable insights and practical tips to help you create a compelling and impactful introduction that captures the attention of hiring managers. Whether you're a seasoned professional or just starting your career journey, understanding these mistakes will greatly enhance your chances of success in the job application process. So, let's dive in and discover how to steer clear of these common missteps and create a standout cover letter that gets you noticed by potential employers.

  • Not tailoring the cover letter to the specific position.
  • Using a generic salutation such as "To whom it may concern."
  • Using overly casual language and slang.
  • Making typos and spelling mistakes.
  • Failing to proofread the cover letter for errors.
  • Stating that you need a job instead of how you can help the employer.
  • Failing to demonstrate enthusiasm for the position.
  • Including irrelevant information.
  • Using overly formal language.
  • Failing to provide concrete examples of your skills.

Key Takeaways For a Research Assistant Cover Letter

  • Highlight your research experience and skills, including familiarity with academic databases and research methods.
  • Showcase your ability to effectively communicate the results of your research.
  • Demonstrate your ability to work independently and as part of a team.
  • Mention any relevant awards or recognitions you have earned.
  • Include any specialized research software that you are proficient with.
  • Be sure to proofread your letter for errors and typos.

Create Cover Letter

  • Premed Research

Research Assistant Cover Letter: The Ultimate Guide

Research Assistant Cover Letter

You should never underestimate the power of a good research assistant cover letter. Whether you are seeking to gain some research experience to bolster your applications for medical school and MD-PhD programs or seeking to get a coveted research assistant position, your cover letter is one of the key components of your application.

Research assistant cover letters can be tricky to write, but I'm going to guide you through this process. In this blog, you will learn why a cover letter is important, how to write your research assistant cover letter, learn tips to make your cover letter stand out, and get to read cover letter samples, including one with no research experience! Whether you're a premed or not, this ultimate guide will help you get your desired research position.

>> Want us to help you get accepted? Schedule a free strategy call here . <<

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Article Contents 17 min read

Why get involved in research.

Research is certainly one of the ways to build up your medical school application and impress the admissions committees with your extracurriculars for medical school . However, it is also your chance to build up professional skills and knowledge in the field of your interest. Admission committees appreciate applicants with a research background because these students demonstrate interest in actively shaping medical and scientific progress.

Since the research process is challenging and enriching, these students develop critical thinking skills and confidence to challenge the status quo. Research fosters patience and stamina. It provides freedom to experiment and a space for constructive criticism. If you are looking to gain research experience, do not limit your search to strictly medical positions. Pursue disciplines that interest you. Research skills can often be transferred to a variety of fields.

Unique research experiences will also make you stand out in your medical school applications. As you might already know, one of the most common medical school interview questions  you’ll be asked is how you can contribute to the diversity of the incoming class – research is your chance to add another unique experience to your application.

Research experience is highly valued by some of the top medical schools in the world. For example, over 90% of Ivy League medical schools’ matriculants have research experience. According to the latest data, 99% of  Stanford Medical School  matriculants have research and lab experience. Research is especially valuable if you are looking at MD-PhD programs.

Firstly, you should always send a cover letter in addition to your CV as part of your job or volunteer application, unless otherwise expressed by the recruiter. Even if you have had the chance to explain your motivation for applying in the application form or email, you should still include a separate cover letter. This letter is an additional opportunity to present yourself as the perfect candidate for the research position.

The primary goal of a research assistant cover letter is to intrigue your potential employer enough to invite you to an interview. Whether you’re an experienced researcher or an undergraduate student looking for research experience, your cover letter is the “face” of your application. Most likely, your cover letter will be the first document your potential colleagues read about you. A perfect research assistant cover letter should include the following:

Your cover letter must compel the reader to read your CV and other application components, if applicable. "}]" code="timeline3">

Simply put, your cover letter should explain why you are the most suitable candidate for the position. Your letter must demonstrate how you meet the criteria for the research position and what makes you a unique candidate. Additionally, this letter is your chance to show off your communication and language skills. Remember, research reports require the ability to articulate clearly and succinctly. Your strong technical research abilities must be accompanied by excellent verbal and written communication skills.

How to Write Your Cover Letter

Let’s examine what steps you need to take to create an outstanding research assistant cover letter.

Research the Position

First and foremost, when you write a cover letter for a research assistant position, you must know exactly what the position entails, what expectations your potential colleagues have of the new hire, and how this research position might develop in the future.

If you found a position as a job posting, it would certainly be wise to study the job description closely. It usually gives you some important, albeit surface, information. You can start by carefully studying the position summary, duties and responsibilities, qualifications, requirements, etc. However, this is usually not enough. Whether you found this position as a job posting or not, it is important to do your research.

Your cover letter needs to show that you are the best possible match for this research position. The job description you have found can only give you so much. You need to find out how your research interests match with this institution’s research program, what the recruiters are really looking for, and how it can help you in your future career as a medical professional or a researcher.

Start by researching the institution or department you’re applying to online. Research their programs, their research profile, and the research interests of their staff. Often you can find important information about the institution’s latest research ranking and their research projects on their website. It could also be interesting to read reviews written by people who have worked in the institution to which you’re applying. Do take these with a grain of salt, but some of these reviews can give you insights into the program’s expectations.

Another way to find out more information about the position is to contact the institution or the department. There is usually someone who can answer your questions, such as an administrative assistant, recruiter, or someone directly involved in the research project. They will be happy to answer any questions you might have about the job, the department, or the institution.

Avoid asking specific questions that will be covered in an interview such as “how much does the job pay” as this will send the impression that you're only interested in the position for the pay, and not because it's what you really want to do. Calling to inquire about the job may also make your name stand out among dozens of applicants for this position. The recruiters may make a note that you personally called and showed enthusiasm about the job.

Before you call, make sure you prepare a list of questions. Beware that your phone call may turn into an unofficial interview, especially if you talk to someone involved in the research process. Be ready to speak about yourself in relation to the position and prepare to answer some of the most common interview questions like “ Tell me about yourself ?”, “why do you want to work with us?” and so on. These are common introductory questions that allow the interviewer to get some insights about you as a potential colleague.

If you are a current undergraduate student, you can also try speaking to your classmates and any TAs you know who may have worked in the research lab you are applying to. You can ask them what they enjoyed and what they found challenging about the work, allowing you to learn from a first-person perspective what it is like to work in that lab.

It might seem like a lot of work, but researching the position, the institution, faculty, and staff will give you a competitive edge. Whoever reads your research assistant cover letter and CV will be able to tell the depth of your research. Your dedication and curiosity will really show in your application and distinguish you as a serious applicant from the rest of the hopefuls. It is also great preparation for the interview stage.

A research position cover letter should be no longer than a page. Your language must be succinct and clear. You must be able to demonstrate that you can express your ideas fluently and clearly – do not use informal language or include any fluff. Your cover letter is not the place to give a detailed account of every research position you have held.

Remember, your letter may go through several readers and not all of them may be researchers, so do not use overly technical language. Your letter must capture the interest of any reader, while further details of your research experiences and education can be included in your CV. If you want to accompany your cover letter with a stellar CV, check out our blog on how to write a CV for graduate school .

For your cover letter, use a classic font such as Times New Roman or Calibri sized 11 or 12 and break your letter into paragraphs. This order of paragraphs is not set in stone, but it may give you some ideas about how to structure your letter:

Remind the reader why you are a good fit for this job and restate your interest in the position. "}]">

Are you planning to apply to medical school? Check out how research can help you:

How to Stand Out in Your Research Position Cover Letter

When you prepare your cover letter, you need to reflect on what makes you a unique candidate for the research position to which you’re applying. To do this, think about what may differentiate you from the competition and try to anticipate what other candidates may offer.

First of all, try to analyze and have a clear understanding of your depth of expertise in this field. Do you have a high research profile? Have you had much research experience in this field? If your answer is yes, then it might be a good point to include in your cover letter. Perhaps you have demonstrated passion for this research field, and you want to commit your future to this area of research? Or maybe you want to stay and work in this particular institution? Perhaps you completed your undergraduate degree there and know the ins-and-outs of their labs? Try to think of yourself in relation to the position, your potential colleagues, and the department. You might find more connections upon a deeper inspection.

Another great selling point is your ability to access research and funding networks and organizations. If you have had success in applying to and receiving research grants or organizing fundraisers for your research projects, be sure to include this in your cover letter. A colleague who can increase funding for a research project is an invaluable addition to any team.

If you do not have a strong research background in this field, do not worry. Try to think of your personal research experience – do you have a diverse background? Does your particular blend of experiences give you a unique perspective? If you have had research experience in a variety of disciplines, it might be your competitive edge!

What if you have not had the chance to gain research experience? Maybe you have had a limited amount of opportunities for research? You can talk about this in your cover letter by expressing enthusiasm to be exposed to research. In this case, try to focus on your biggest successes and most relevant qualities. You might possess a qualification that would be highly relevant to this research position even if you’ve never had a serious research experience. Have your abilities to multitask been praised by previous employers? Have you received awards for teaching excellence? Are you particularly skilled with technology and computer software? All these qualities and accomplishments may help you impress the reader. Try to market yourself, your skills, and qualifications in relation to the position – you might have something other applicants don’t.

How to Look for Research Positions if You Have Little to No Experience

If you have little to no research experience, but want this experience for your medical school application or to be eligible to apply for a research position you really want – here are some tips:

1. If you’re out of school, finding out about research positions and opportunities is quite difficult. Oftentimes, research positions are not posted externally. Even within the institution, professors and PIs tend to select students they have taught to help them in their research projects.

With this said, there are things you can do to search for these opportunities. One of the most common ways to find a research position is to email professors in the departments you would like to join as a researcher. Whether you are still a student or a graduate, explain in your email that you want to volunteer in the lab. Do not mention money – state clearly that you want to gain research experience. Without experience, a paying research position is almost impossible to get. Start as a volunteer and see where it takes you.

  • Your cover letter should include your most recent successes. Talk about your most recent or current jobs.
  • You should present evidence that would support your relevancy for the position in the first half of the letter. Support your pertinent qualifications with examples of achievements from your previous or current roles (i.e. awards, distinctions, publications, etc.).
  • Illustrate your successes with brief but solid examples, explaining why you would be a good fit for this position.
  • Concentrate on achievements and qualities that make you unique, rather than simply listing the job description’s criteria.
  • Your cover letter should indicate that you spent much time researching the position, the faculty, and the institution. Demonstrate how well you know the role and the research context when explaining your career motivations.
  • Ensure your letter is error-free and clearly written. A grammatically correct and succinct letter is professional and shows the reader you are capable of communicating effectively in writing.

Things to Avoid in Your Research Assistant Cover Letter

  • Do not summarize your CV or give too much detail. Remember, the reviewer already has your CV so it's not appropriate to list items that are available elsewhere in your application. You must be selective about the qualifications and responsibilities you emphasize.
  • Do not leave out examples when you make statements about the relevancy of your skills and experiences.
  • Never send the same cover letter to more than one employer. Do not cut and paste from one letter to another. Your reader will be able to tell your lack of research and career focus.
  • Do not use jargon and overly technical vocabulary. You might want to come off as a knowledgeable candidate for this position but try to stick to a professional tone and language as much as possible.
  • Do not concentrate your cover letter on what the employer can do for you. Instead, focus on what you can do for the employer and the research project.
  • Do not make statements that are too general. For example, do not say “I’ve always wanted to work in this research field” – rather, show that you have worked in this research area and that you are passionate about this field. Do not write that you want to work for this institution or with this PI because they are famous all over the world. You must include other reasons for wanting to work with them. Searching for validation might make the wrong impression and eliminate you from the competition.

Some Important Don'ts for Research Assistant Cover Letters:

Do not make statements that are too general "}]" code="timeline2">

Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample #1

Dear Dr. Smith,

With this letter and enclosed CV, I would like to express my strong interest in the Research Assistant position you have available in the X department. I am a recent master’s graduate with experience in facilitating successful clinical trials. My graduate research involved working with clinicians and patient populations. Before my master’s, I graduated from a premed program at X university with the highest honors.

This research assistant position is a perfect combination of my educational background and my clinical experience. During my master’s degree, not only was I able to read, analyze, and interpret information from professional journals, technical procedures, and government regulations, but I also participated in clinical procedures directed by my PI, Dr. John Johnson. I completed and maintained case report forms as per FDA guidelines and reviewed them against the patient’s medical record for completeness and accuracy. I was heavily involved in assisting my superiors with the clinical process. I collected, processed, and shipped blood and urine specimens at scheduled patients’ visits. I was in charge of ensuring that all laboratory results were given to appropriate doctors for review of clinical significance, then filed the results in the patient study binder. My dedication to research and my team earned me the Research Assistant Excellence Award. Today, I am still in touch with my PI and my colleagues, with whom I have maintained professional and friendly ties. After recently graduating from my master’s degree, I am looking to apply my skills and knowledge to your research project.

Aside from learning a set of clinical and laboratory skills, working in research has trained my other competencies. My research position involved working in a team of researchers from different disciplines and nationalities. This experience significantly improved my ability to communicate as I often found myself explaining complex concepts to people outside of the medical field. Working with such an international team taught me to problem-solve and find quick solutions. For example, one aspect of the project involved collaborating with team members in Japan. We had a hard time communicating due to the time difference. I suggested to my colleagues and PI that we create a message board online where we could quickly ask questions and send documents back and forth; this board was available both on mobiles and computers, allowing for easier communication between our two teams at any time. This initiative improved our productivity and speed, as well as allowed us to quickly communicate practical solutions to any problems that came up during research. This successful collaboration resulted in the university funding our research project for one more year.

My interests and responsibilities outside of research would also make great contributions to your team. I am particularly impressed with your Institution’s commitment to improving patient experience in deprived communities. As an active volunteer at my local Street Heath Community Clinic, your dedication to providing healthcare to all in need is very inspiring. I am also drawn to your department's interdisciplinary approach. As a master's graduate, I learned the value of combining academic and clinical research. I know from experience that thinking beyond your discipline will only improve your research approach and results.

I am confident that my clinical research experience, my in-depth educational background, and interests make me an ideal match for this position. I would appreciate any opportunity to discuss my expertise in more detail at the interview and I look forward to hearing from you shortly.

Author’s signature

What makes this cover letter strong:

1. Uses a personal address.

2. States right away that his/her educational and research background are relevant.

3. Gives solid descriptions of his/her duties, experiences, and successes in the most recent research project.

4. Uses specific examples to show his/her soft skills, including superb communication skills.

5. Mentions that he/she was able to secure extra funding for a research project.

6. Includes interests outside of research that make him/her relevant to this institution.

7. Restates his/her interest and shows confidence in closing remarks.

Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample #2 (No Research Experience)

Dear Dr. Roe,

I am writing to you regarding the Research Assistant position available at the Biological Sciences department at X University. As a second-year pre-medical student at X University, I strive to gain in-depth, comprehensive research experience, and the position of an assistant in your research project may become my stepping stone into the world of scientific discovery and progress. I am certain that my academic and professional experiences make me the perfect candidate for this research position.  

Research demands high attention to detail and accuracy. As a sophomore student majoring in biochemistry, I understand the great responsibility of scientific research. I have been exposed to the intricate nature of scientific discovery and trained to think like a future researcher. Not only have I achieved grades in the 80th percentile in all my premed courses, but my lab experiences have taught me how to build a hypothesis and develop a method of inquiry. During lab work, experiments did not always work the first time. I sought feedback from my supervisor about how to refine my technique, always striving for better results. My attention to detail allowed me to reach great heights in my premed coursework and I am ready to apply the skills I have learned to a serious research project.

My interests and competencies reach beyond academia and can help me become a valuable member of your research team. As a member of the student council at X University over the last two years, I am in charge of developing successful state and federal grant applications. Last year, I was successful in obtaining a municipal grant that was used to renovate computer labs in the Y building on our campus. Additionally, my organizational skills are further demonstrated by the fundraising events I have helped organize with the student body. While research demands high levels of scientific expertise and knowledge, research also requires paperwork and financial support from the state – my background can help advance our research in this regard. 

While I have not had the chance to participate in professional research, I have substantial professional experience in keeping records and updating databases while working as an assistant to my mother in our family's grocery store. In addition to working with numbers at the till, I was in charge of keeping records of deliveries. This responsibility taught me to keep neat and accurate records while working with a lot of information – a skill that’s greatly valuable while documenting the research process and findings. 

Working at the grocery has also trained my ability to interact and get along with a variety of people. Through cooperating with people of different languages and cultures, I developed outstanding comprehension and communication skills, which help me not only in my academic work but also in my personal life. Research is not a lonely endeavor – rather, it is a cooperative effort where communication and patience are key. My professional background will certainly make me a suitable member of any research team, and I would be honored if you gave me a chance to showcase my talents.   

I look forward to discussing my candidacy with you further. If you would like any additional information that will help me gain this position, please let me know. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Author’s Signature

Check out our video for a quick recap:

In truth, the recruiter may decide to go with a candidate with more research experience than you. However, your cover letter is exactly the place where you can address any lack of experiences found in your resume or CV. This letter is an opportunity to reinforce yourself as a candidate, rather than highlight your flaws.

If you do not have specific research experience appropriate for the position, perhaps you can augment your candidacy by demonstrating other qualities that your recruiter is seeking for in their potential colleague. For example, you can demonstrate that you are a fast learner with experience in reading and analyzing complex information, or that you have experience in organizing and executing fundraising activities.

A cover letter is your chance to be more than a list of experiences and accomplishments. You can make them come alive and describe how they are relevant to the specific position to which you’re applying. CVs can be a few pages long, it's a lot of information for reviewers to sift through. Instead, they prefer an easy to read, one-page document that summarizes an applicant’s main accomplishments, experiences, and overall suitability for the role. Keep in mind that hiring departments may not even review your CV if they are not first impressed by your cover letter.

Your cover letter is an addition to your CV, and you need to show you can concisely focus on the strongest experiences you have had. A well-written cover letter demonstrates your ability to write and prioritize information clearly, which is something you must do as a researcher. Even though most job criteria have more than 3 qualities or skills they look for, it is important to stay succinct in your cover letter.

Remember, you cannot just list the skills but must show that you have them by using concrete examples of encounters and interactions you have had. Including examples will limit the number of skills you can include in your cover letter to a maximum of 3, as it is usually not possible to talk about more than 3 in any detail at all. So, reflect on your experiences and pick a maximum of 3 that you have solid examples for.

Your cover letter must be easy to follow and easy to read. Consider ordering your experiences in chronological order so the reader can follow the timeline of events easily. Include your most recent experiences.

Brainstorming experiences, creating an outline, writing, revising, and finalizing your cover letter may take a while, so think about giving yourself at least 1 week. Pay attention to the deadline to submit your job application and give yourself enough time.

Once you have created an outline and thought up experiences, you want to write your body paragraphs first, using a few sentences to describe each experience and what you gained from it that will contribute to this research position. You can then write succinct concluding and opening paragraphs. You want to ensure you read through your cover letter at least twice and correct any instances of unclear phrasing. Your first revision should be designed to change any wording or examples that are not as effective. Your second revision should finalize all the elements of your cover letter and include a check of grammar and fix any typos.

No, they don’t! You could have picked up relevant skills for a research position through academic experiences, but also through extracurriculars, volunteering, other work, or even personal experiences. For example, playing on a sports team teaches you a lot about perseverance, reliability, and teamwork. You can definitely include these types of experiences if you feel they are relevant.

To get an idea of what kind of experiences you should include, start by looking at the job posting. The job description should indicate the main criteria the recruiters are looking for in their candidates. Make a list of all the examples you can think of that relate to those criteria, and then choose a few that best highlight a variety of skills. Make sure to include the most recent examples in your cover letter.

If you’re an undergraduate student, start looking for research positions in your school. They may be posted in science department classrooms, on the departments' website pages, or around the lab spaces. It's also important to pay attention to your professors, perhaps they have mentioned that they are involved in a research project right now and are looking for a student assistant. If you're unsure, don't be afraid to ask them if they are looking for any help.

If you’re no longer a student, you can always reach out to your past professors and ask if they need any help with research. Make inquiries in local medical centers, hospitals, and other institutions. You will need to explain your situation and ask if they are looking for any help. Be aware that many entry-level positions are not paid well. Sometimes you may be required to help for free, but this will all depend on the position. If you have volunteered or shadowed a physician, you should reach out to them and ask if they are involved in research and could use your help.

If you are a serious researcher, you can look for research positions on job websites. These positions usually require an in-depth research background. If you are simply looking to gain some experience to build up your medical school applications, this option may not be for you. Some research projects last years and med schools can be skeptical of applicants who spend too much time on research and not enough time gaining clinical experience. They might wonder how well you will transition to patient interaction and clinical work.

You should avoid using any funky fonts, colors, or formatting in your cover letter. It is a professional document not suitable for experiments. So, stick to the standard font types and size, professional tone, and appearance.

You can certainly include these great achievements as long as they add to the overall narrative of your cover letter. Be sure to show what kind of skills and qualities your accomplishments helped you develop. Make your achievements come alive on the page.

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presentation letter research assistant

Resume Worded   |  Career Strategy

14 research assistant cover letters.

Approved by real hiring managers, these Research Assistant cover letters have been proven to get people hired in 2024. A hiring manager explains why.

Hiring Manager for Research Assistant Roles

Table of contents

  • Research Assistant
  • Senior Research Assistant
  • Senior Research Analyst
  • Research Analyst
  • Policy Research Assistant
  • Market Research Coordinator
  • Alternative introductions for your cover letter
  • Research Assistant resume examples

Research Assistant Cover Letter Example

Why this cover letter works in 2024, quantifiable accomplishment.

Highlighting a specific, quantifiable accomplishment in the cover letter showcases your ability to deliver results and sets you apart from other applicants. This is a powerful way to demonstrate your value to the company.

Highlighting relevant skills

By emphasizing your relevant skills and experiences, you can show the hiring manager that you're a strong fit for the position. Make sure to connect these skills to the company's needs and the specific role you're applying for.

Showing genuine excitement

Expressing genuine excitement about the role and the company's mission can help you stand out as a passionate and engaged candidate. This demonstrates that you're not just applying to any job, but have a real interest in their work and the impact it can have on the world.

Showcase Relevant Skills With Real-Life Applications

When you describe how you carried out market research to discover new business opportunities, you're highlighting your ability to apply knowledge and skills to real-world scenarios. This proves to recruiters that your skills aren't just theoretical, but have practical applications that can benefit their organization.

Highlight tangible achievements

Identifying a niche market segment and linking it with a 20% increase in sales is a great way to show the direct impact of your work. By providing hard numbers, you're showing that you can deliver results, not just carry out tasks.

Include process improvement

By stating that you developed and implemented a new data analysis process, you're demonstrating problem-solving skills, initiative, and the ability to improve efficiency. This is a great selling point for you as a potential employee, as companies value these skills highly.

Show your personal connection

When discussing your early interest in the field, like this candidate's fascination with biotech, you're showing me your passion. It's not just a job for you, it's an extension of who you are. This also tells me that your commitment to our field runs deep, and you're likely to stay with us longer.

Highlight your innovations

Telling me about the novel algorithm you developed that boosted efficiency speaks volumes about your problem-solving skills. It shows you're not just a participant in your field, but a contributor. This makes me believe that you'll bring fresh ideas to our team.

Demonstrate your grit

Your experience with publishing a paper underlines your persistence and creativity in research, two qualities essential for a research position. This tells me you're not easily discouraged and you're capable of seeing projects through to the end. I want someone with that kind of tenacity on my team.

Express your enthusiasm for the company

When you tell me how excited you are about our company's work and values, it helps me see that you're not just interested in any job, but this specific role at our company. This tells me you're more likely to be satisfied and stick around.

Show your excitement for the research assistant role

Expressing genuine interest in the job and the organization's work makes your application more memorable.

Demonstrate your research skills

Describing specific skills and how you've used them in past roles shows you're capable and experienced.

Highlight leadership in research projects

Leading a team and meeting deadlines showcases your ability to manage responsibilities and collaborate.

Connect your goals to the research assistant position

Talking about how the role aligns with your career aspirations illustrates a good fit for the job.

Express gratitude and eagerness to contribute

A polite thank you and expressing a desire to discuss further shows professionalism and enthusiasm.

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Align your passion with the institution's mission

Your admiration for the organization’s work and your desire to contribute to its research efforts show you're not just looking for any job, but a role that matches your career aspirations.

Showcase your research and analysis skills

Mentioning your experience with data analysis, project management, and report writing, alongside a successful project, illustrates your readiness to tackle the responsibilities of a research assistant.

Emphasize your contribution to research projects

Confidence in your ability to drive research projects from start to finish, supported by examples of past successes, makes a strong case for your potential to add value immediately.

Highlight interest in specific research areas

Pointing to your interest in the Global Economy and Development program signals your intention to engage deeply with specific areas of the institution's research, suggesting a strategic fit.

Convey eagerness to contribute

Expressing eagerness to apply your skills and perspectives to the institution's mission demonstrates your readiness to be an active, contributing member of their team.

Show your research passion

When you talk about your "lifelong learner" spirit and passion for uncovering insights, it makes me feel you are genuinely interested in the job. This is what I love to see.

Connect your interests with the company's work

By highlighting a specific study that aligns with your interests, you're showing me you have done your homework about our company. This tells me you're a thoughtful candidate.

Detail your research skills and achievements

Mentioning your experience in research design, data analysis, and communication of findings demonstrates your capability in key areas needed for a research assistant role.

Highlight the impact of your work

Talking about your published paper and its media attention shows you can produce work that gets recognized. This is impressive and suggests you'd bring value to our team.

Express eagerness to contribute

Your closing statement about contributing to our mission reflects a readiness to be part of the team and supports a collaborative spirit, which is highly valued.

Senior Research Assistant Cover Letter Example

Emphasize leadership experience.

Leading a team of junior researchers shows that you're more than just a team player, you're a team leader. This is particularly important for a senior role. It shows recruiters that you have experience in guiding, mentoring and managing others, which are crucial skills for a senior position.

Display results of your work

When you link your work to a 30% increase in customer acquisition, you're showing that your research skills have real-world, measurable impacts. This makes your achievement more concrete and impressive, showing employers what you could potentially bring to their company.

Demonstrate cost-saving initiatives

Reducing operational costs by 25% is a big deal. It shows that you're not only focused on growth, but also on efficiency and profitability. Employers love a candidate who can make their operations smoother and more cost-effective.

Highlight innovation

Developing a new data collection method shows creativity and innovation. It proves that you're not just about maintaining the status quo, but are always seeking ways to improve processes and deliver better results. This is a highly sought after quality in research roles.

Relate personally to the senior research assistant role

Sharing a personal connection to the organization’s mission can make your cover letter stand out.

Showcase impactful research achievements

Providing examples of successful projects and their outcomes demonstrates your effectiveness as a researcher.

Emphasize innovative thinking in research

Highlighting your creative approach to solving problems indicates you can add unique value to the team.

Express a commitment to pushing research boundaries

Showing a desire to explore new research methods indicates a forward-thinking mindset.

Thank the reader and express eagerness to discuss further

Closing with thanks and a willingness to talk more about your fit for the role is courteous and proactive.

Show your alignment with the organization's mission

Expressing how your personal values match the goals of the institute makes your application more compelling. It tells me you're not just looking for any job, but you're passionate about what we do.

Highlight your project leadership and results

Detailing your experience in leading significant projects and the outcomes achieved, like securing a grant, demonstrates your capability to handle responsibilities. It's exactly what we want in a senior research assistant.

Express enthusiasm for specific programs

Your excitement about contributing to a particular program shows you've done your homework and are genuinely interested in our work. This kind of enthusiasm is infectious and valued.

Appreciate the review process

Acknowledging the time taken to review your application is courteous and respects the hiring process. It wraps up your letter on a positive note.

Invite further discussion confidently

Ending your cover letter by looking forward to discussing how your skills align with the job shows confidence and readiness for the next step. It's a proactive closing.

Senior Research Analyst Cover Letter Example

Appreciate the company's unique approach.

You're showing me that you've done your homework on our company and like what you've seen. Complimenting our innovative approach tells me you're in sync with our company's direction and philosophy.

Speak to the role of data

By highlighting your belief in the power of data to drive growth, you’re directly aligning with the main purpose of a Research Analyst role. This shows me your understanding of the role and your commitment to maximize the impact of data for business growth.

Emphasize your leadership skills

You’re not just focusing on your technical skills but also emphasizing your leadership abilities. This is important because a Senior Research Analyst often has to manage a team. Your experience with developing a successful forecasting model also demonstrates your competence in strategic decision making.

Align with the company culture

Telling me that you’re excited about working with a passionate team shows me that you’re a good cultural fit for our company. It also suggests that you value collaboration and could add positively to our work environment.

Reiterate your value

By summarizing your key skills and how you plan to contribute, you're making it easy for me to visualize what you'd bring to the table. It also reaffirms your enthusiasm for the job and tells me you're eager to contribute to our success.

Share your inspiration from industry reports

Pointing out specific reports that inspire you is a great way to show your ongoing engagement with industry trends as a senior research analyst.

Showcase your project leadership

Discussing your role in leading end-to-end research projects demonstrates your ability to manage significant responsibilities and deliver results, which is key for a senior role.

Demonstrate the real-world impact of your research

By mentioning how your insights led to a "game-changing" roadmap for a client, you're proving your work can have a tangible impact on business strategy, making you a compelling candidate.

Express enthusiasm for joining the team

Your excitement about contributing to a firm known for being at the forefront of business research shows you're motivated and ready to be part of something significant.

Emphasize your value addition

Ending with a note on the value you can bring to the team not only shows confidence but also wraps up your cover letter on a forward-looking and positive note.

Research Analyst Cover Letter Example

Show your passion for research impact.

Telling a personal story about how research influenced policy and improved lives shows deep motivation and a clear understanding of the role's impact beyond the desk.

Highlight project leadership and results

Detailing your leadership in a significant project and its tangible outcomes, like influencing state funding decisions, demonstrates your ability to produce valuable insights and drive change.

Express excitement for specific challenges

Your enthusiasm for tackling pressing policy issues with the Brookings Institution aligns your personal goals with the organization's mission, showing you are a good fit.

Connect your skills to the organization's mission

By relating your research skills and collaborative spirit to the institution's goals, you present yourself as someone who can contribute meaningfully to its success.

Invite further discussion

Ending with an invitation to discuss your fit for the role further demonstrates openness and eagerness to engage with the team.

Policy Research Assistant Cover Letter Example

Communicate your excitement for the role.

Starting your letter by expressing genuine excitement about the organization's mission and your potential role there sets a positive tone for the rest of your application.

Demonstrate your impact through specific achievements

Sharing specific instances where your research influenced policy shows that you possess the skills to produce meaningful work. It's exactly the kind of impact we look for in a policy research assistant.

Show commitment to societal issues

Your interest in contributing to efforts that address racial equity and justice indicates a deep understanding of and commitment to the organization's broader goals. This makes you a more attractive candidate.

Thank the reader politely

A polite thank you to the hiring manager for considering your application demonstrates good manners and professionalism, traits that never go unnoticed.

Closing your letter by stating your eagerness to contribute to the organization's mission reinforces your enthusiasm and commitment to the role you're applying for.

Market Research Coordinator Cover Letter Example

Connect with the company’s values.

When you express a deep connection with the company's core principles right at the start, it shows you're not just looking for any job but are interested in this specific role at this company because of its values. This sets a positive tone.

Share your initial excitement for market research

Talking about how you discovered your passion for market research makes your cover letter more relatable. It gives a personal touch to your professional journey, which can capture the recruiter's interest.

Demonstrate your market research impact

By quantifying your achievements, like how your insights led to a sales increase, you make your contribution tangible. This not only showcases your ability to drive results but also your understanding of the business impact of market research.

Express eagerness to grow and contribute

Mentioning your desire to learn from and contribute to the company highlights your drive for professional development and willingness to add value. It demonstrates a balance between seeking growth and offering skills.

Close with a forward-looking statement

Ending your cover letter by expressing hope for a discussion about your potential role shows confidence and openness. It invites the recruiter to consider not just your current capabilities but the future contributions you're eager to make.

Alternative Introductions

If you're struggling to start your cover letter, here are 6 different variations that have worked for others, along with why they worked. Use them as inspiration for your introductory paragraph.

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presentation letter research assistant

Thank you for the checklist! I realized I was making so many mistakes on my resume that I've now fixed. I'm much more confident in my resume now.

presentation letter research assistant

Professional Graduate Research Assistant Cover Letter Examples for 2024

Your graduate research assistant cover letter must demonstrate your dedication to academic research. Highlight specific experiences that showcase your expertise and analytical skills. Connect your scholarly pursuits to the research goals of the department you're applying to. Illustrate how your unique abilities will contribute to their ongoing projects.

Cover Letter Guide

Graduate Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample

Cover Letter Format

Cover Letter Salutation

Cover Letter Introduction

Cover Letter Body

Cover Letter Closing

No Experience Graduate Research Assistant Cover Letter

Key Takeaways

Graduate Research Assistant cover letter

Embarking on your job hunt, you've realized a standout graduate research assistant cover letter is crucial, yet penning one feels like hitting a wall. You know your resume lays out the facts, but your cover letter should breathe life into one significant accomplishment, not echo bullet points. Crafting a narrative that's both professional and cliché-free can be tricky, especially within the confines of a single page. Let's unlock the secrets to creating a cover letter that tells your story compellingly.

  • Personalize your graduate research assistant cover letter and get inspired by other professionals to tell a compelling story;
  • Format and design your graduate research assistant cover letter to make an excellent first impression;
  • Introduce your best achievement in your graduate research assistant cover letter to recruiters;
  • How to make sure recruiters get in touch with you, using your graduate research assistant cover letter greeting and closing paragraphs.

What is more, did you know that Enhancv's AI can write your cover letter for you? Just upload your graduate research assistant resume and get ready to forward your job application in a flash.

If the graduate research assistant isn't exactly the one you're looking for we have a plethora of cover letter examples for jobs like this one:

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Graduate Research Assistant cover letter example

Payton Webster

Indianapolis, Indiana

+1-(234)-555-1234

[email protected]

  • Emphasizing relevant professional experiences: Mentioning specific roles and responsibilities, such as leading a team during an annual audit and reducing the error rate by 75%, directly correlates to the demands of the role and demonstrates an ability to achieve tangible results.
  • Quantifying achievements: Quantitative results, like enhancing data quality by 80%, provides evidence of the candidate's impact and effectiveness in previous positions which can be particularly persuasive to hiring managers.
  • Alignment with company's mission and values: Expressing an understanding of the company’s objectives and showing how past work experience and personal philosophy align with those goals, suggests a natural fit and potential for a smoother integration into the company culture.

What about your graduate research assistant cover letter format: organizing and structuring your information

Here is one secret you should know about your graduate research assistant cover letter assessment. The Applicant Tracker System (or ATS) won't analyze your cover letter.

You should thus focus on making an excellent impression on recruiters by writing consistent:

  • Introduction
  • Body paragraphs (and explanation)
  • Promise or Call to action
  • Signature (that's optional)

Now, let's talk about the design of your graduate research assistant cover letter.

Ensure all of your paragraphs are single-spaced and have a one-inch margins on all sides (like in our cover letter templates ).

Also, our cover letter builder automatically takes care of the format and comes along with some of the most popular (and modern) fonts like Volkhov, Chivo, and Bitter.

Speaking of fonts, professionals advise you to keep your graduate research assistant cover letter and resume in the same typography and avoid the over-used Arial or Times New Roman.

When wondering whether you should submit your graduate research assistant cover letter in Doc or PDF, select the second, as PDF keeps all of your information and design consistent.

The top sections on a graduate research assistant cover letter

  • Header with Contact Information: It includes your name, address, phone number, and email, providing the recruiter with immediate access to your contact details for further communication.
  • Opening Salutation: This section addresses the recipient by name if known, such as "Dear Dr. [Last Name]," which shows that you have researched the department and are addressing the correct individual.
  • Introduction: This should clearly state your intent to apply for the graduate research assistant position, your current status as a graduate student, and a brief mention of the specific research interests that align with the role.
  • Research Experiences and Skills: Elaborating on your academic and research achievements, as well as technical and analytical skills, demonstrates your suitability for the graduate research assistant position and how you can contribute to ongoing projects.
  • Closing Paragraph: Express your enthusiasm for the opportunity, reiterate how your skills and interests align with the department's research, and include a call to action such as looking forward to discussing your application in an interview.

Key qualities recruiters search for in a candidate’s cover letter

  • Research experience: Recruiters look for candidates who have hands-on experience in conducting research, analyzing data, and publishing findings.
  • Technical proficiency: Familiarity with specialized software, laboratory techniques, or programming languages relevant to the field of study indicates a candidate can contribute meaningfully to research tasks.
  • Attention to detail: Accuracy is critical in research, and candidates must demonstrate an ability to perform meticulous work without errors.
  • Initiative and self-motivation: Graduate research assistants often work independently, so demonstrating the ability to initiate projects and work autonomously is crucial.
  • Critical thinking and problem-solving skills: The ability to analyze problems, formulate hypotheses, and develop innovative solutions is key for a successful graduate research assistant.
  • Communication skills: Clear and concise writing abilities for drafting reports, as well as strong verbal communication for presenting findings and collaborating with team members, are essential traits.

Greeting recruiters with your graduate research assistant cover letter salutation

What better way to start your conversation with the hiring manager, than by greeting them?

Take the time to find out who the professional, recruiting for the role, is.

Search on LinkedIn, the company website. And for those still keen on making a fantastic first impression, you could even contact the organization, asking for the recruiter's name and more details about the job.

Address recruiters in the graduate research assistant greeting by either their first name or last name. (e.g. "Dear Anthony" or "Dear Ms. Smarts").

If you're unable to discover the recruiter's name - don't go for the impersonal "To whom it may concern", but instead use "Dear HR team".

List of salutations you can use

  • Dear [Recipient's Name],
  • Dear Dr. [Last Name],
  • Dear Professor [Last Name],
  • Dear Mr./Ms./Mx. [Last Name],
  • Dear Hiring Committee,
  • Dear [Department Name] Selection Committee,

Introducing your profile to catch recruiters' attention in no more than two sentences

The introduction of your graduate research assistant cover letter is a whole Catch 22 .

You have an allocated space of no more than just a paragraph (of up to two sentences). With your introduction, you have to stand out and show why you're the best candidate out there.

Set out on a journey with your graduate research assistant cover letter by focusing on why you're passionate about the job. Match your personal skills and interests to the role.

Another option for your graduate research assistant cover letter introduction is to show you're the ideal candidate. Write about how your achievements and skills are precisely what the company is looking for.

However you decide to start your graduate research assistant cover letter, always remember to write about the value you'd bring about. Making it both tangible (with your metrics of success) and highly sought out.

How to write an achievement-focused graduate research assistant cover letter body

We've got the intro and greeting covered. Now, comes the most definitive part of your graduate research assistant cover letter - the body .

In the next three to six paragraphs, you'd have to answer why should recruiters hire you.

What better way to do this than by storytelling?

And, no, you don't need a "Once upon a time" or "I started from the bottom and made it to the top" career-climbing format to tell a compelling narrative.

Instead, select up to three most relevant skills for the job and look back on your resume.

Find an achievement, that you're proud of, which has taught you these three job-crucial skills.

Quantify your accomplishment, using metrics, and be succinct in the way you describe it.

The ultimate aim would be to show recruiters how this particular success has built up your experience to become an invaluable candidate.

Final words: writing your graduate research assistant cover letter closing paragraph

The final paragraph of your graduate research assistant cover letter allows you that one final chance to make a great first impression .

Instead of going straight to the "sincerely yours" ending, you can back up your skills with a promise of:

  • how you see yourself growing into the role;
  • the unique skills you'd bring to the organization.

Whatever you choose, always be specific (and remember to uphold your promise, once you land the role).

If this option doesn't seem that appealing to you, close off your graduate research assistant cover letter with a follow-up request.

You could even provide your availability for interviews so that the recruiters would be able to easily arrange your first meeting.

No experience graduate research assistant cover letter: making the most out of your profile

Candidates who happen to have no professional experience use their graduate research assistant cover letter to stand out.

Instead of focusing on a professional achievement, aim to quantify all the relevant, transferrable skills from your life experience.

Once again, the best practice to do so would be to select an accomplishment - from your whole career history.

Another option would be to plan out your career goals and objectives: how do you see yourself growing, as a professional, in the next five years, thanks to this opportunity?

Be precise and concise about your dreams, and align them with the company vision.

Key takeaways

We hope this graduate research assistant cover letter writing guide has shown you how to:

  • Format your graduate research assistant cover letter with the mandatory sections (e.g. header, greeting, intro, body, and closing) and select the right font (P.S. It should be the same as the one you've used for your resume);
  • Substitute your lack of professional experience with your most noteworthy achievement, outside of work, or your dreams and passions;
  • Ensure recruiters have a more personalized experience by tailoring your cover letter not just to the role, but to them (e.g. writing their first/last name in the salutation, etc.);
  • Introducing your biggest achievement and the skills it has taught you in your graduate research assistant cover letter body;
  • Write no more than two sentences in your graduate research assistant cover letter introduction to set the right tone from the get-go.

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Research Assistant Cover Letter

presentation letter research assistant

About this sample

This Research Assistant cover letter is a professional document that is used to introduce yourself to a potential employer and highlight your skills and experience in the field of research. This template is optimized to get interviews by clearly outlining your relevant qualifications and showcasing your ability to assist researchers and support their work . With skills such as attention to detail, problem-solving, and organization , you can demonstrate your ability to handle the demands of a research assistant position and showcase your potential as a valuable employee. By using this template, you can help your cover letter stand out from other applicants and increase your chances of getting an interview.

Here's how Rezi AI Cover Letter Writer works

Create a resume with a targeted job description.

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Written Samples

10 sample cover letters for research assistant with no experience.

Starting a career as a research assistant is a significant step for those passionate about contributing to the vast world of research and development. This role is integral in supporting research projects, gathering data, and assisting in the analysis and presentation of findings.

For individuals seeking to enter this field without direct experience, a well-crafted cover letter is essential. It must convey your enthusiasm for research, your ability to learn quickly, and your understanding of the fundamental aspects of research work.

When composing a cover letter for a Research Assistant position without prior experience, it is crucial to emphasize transferable skills, academic achievements, attention to detail, and a strong desire to learn and contribute to the research team’s goals.

Sample Cover Letters for Research Assistant with No Experience

Below are 10 sample cover letters, each tailored to demonstrate a unique approach to presenting qualifications and enthusiasm for a Research Assistant role.

Sample 1: Emphasizing Academic Achievements

Subject: Application for Research Assistant Position in [Research Field]

Dear Hiring Manager,

I am writing to express my interest in the Research Assistant position within your [Specific Department or Research Field] at [Institution or Company Name]. As a recent graduate with a degree in [Your Degree], I have developed a solid academic foundation and a keen interest in [Specific Area of Research].

Throughout my academic journey, I have engaged in various projects and assignments that required meticulous research, data analysis, and presentation skills. These experiences have equipped me with a strong understanding of the research process and an eagerness to apply my knowledge in a practical setting.

I am particularly drawn to this opportunity at [Institution or Company Name] due to your renowned work in [Specific Aspect of the Research Field]. I am confident that my academic background and enthusiasm for research make me a well-suited candidate for this role.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of contributing to your research team and gaining invaluable practical experience.

[Your Name]

Sample 2: Showcasing Transferable Skills

Subject: Entry-Level Research Assistant Application in [Field of Research]

Dear [Research Team Leader or Hiring Committee],

As an enthusiastic individual with a strong academic background in [Your Major] from [Your University], I am excited to apply for the Research Assistant position at [Institution or Company Name]. While I may not have direct experience in research, my educational journey has honed essential skills that are transferable to a research setting.

Through my coursework and involvement in [University Clubs or Activities], I have developed strong analytical, organizational, and critical thinking skills. I have consistently demonstrated the ability to handle complex information, manage data, and work collaboratively on team projects.

I am eager to bring these skills to the Research Assistant role at [Institution or Company Name] and contribute to the impactful work being conducted in your department.

Warm regards,

Sample 3: Highlighting Attention to Detail and Analytical Skills

Subject: Application for Research Assistant – Detail-Oriented Candidate

Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name or Department Head],

I am applying for the Research Assistant position in the [Specific Department or Field] at [Institution or Company Name]. My educational background in [Your Field of Study] and my inherent attention to detail make me a strong candidate for this role.

During my time at [University or Previous Employment], I engaged in activities and projects that required precision and a keen eye for detail. My ability to analyze data accurately and efficiently is a skill that I am particularly proud of and one that I am eager to apply in a research setting.

I am enthusiastic about the opportunity to support the groundbreaking research at [Institution or Company Name], particularly in the area of [Specific Research Focus of the Department or Team].

Thank you for considering my application. I am looking forward to the opportunity to demonstrate my analytical skills and meticulous approach in your research team.

Sample 4: Demonstrating Eagerness to Learn and Contribute

Subject: Motivated Applicant for Research Assistant Position in [Research Area]

Dear [Hiring Manager or Research Team Leader],

With great enthusiasm, I submit my application for the Research Assistant position in the field of [Specific Research Area] at [Institution or Company Name]. My passion for [Related Field or Subject] and my eagerness to contribute to meaningful research are the driving forces behind my application.

Although I am at the beginning of my professional journey in research, my academic experiences have instilled in me a deep appreciation for the research process and the value of contributing to the advancement of knowledge in [Your Field of Study].

I am particularly interested in the work being done at [Institution or Company Name] and am excited about the prospect of learning from and contributing to your esteemed research team.

I look forward to discussing how my passion for research and willingness to learn can make a positive impact on your ongoing projects.

Kind regards,

Sample 5: Focusing on Collaborative Skills

Subject: Application for Research Assistant Role – Team Player

Dear [Hiring Manager or Department Head],

I am writing to express my interest in the Research Assistant position within the [Specific Department or Research Field] at [Institution or Company Name]. My background in [Your Degree or Field], coupled with my experience working in team environments, makes me a strong candidate for this role.

Throughout my academic and extracurricular activities, I have consistently demonstrated the ability to work effectively as part of a team. I understand the importance of collaboration in research and am skilled at communicating ideas, sharing insights, and contributing to a positive team dynamic.

I am excited about the opportunity to bring my collaborative skills to your research team and to contribute to the innovative work being conducted at [Institution or Company Name].

Thank you for considering my application. I am eager to discuss how I can support and enhance the collaborative efforts of your research team.

Best regards,

Sample 6: Highlighting Quick Learning Abilities

Subject: Eager Learner Applying for Research Assistant Position

As a recent graduate with a strong academic record in [Your Major], I am enthusiastic about the opportunity to join [Institution or Company Name] as a Research Assistant in [Specific Research Area]. Although I am new to the field of research, my ability to learn quickly and adapt to new challenges sets me apart as a candidate.

During my time at [University or Previous Employment], I have been praised for my rapid absorption of new information and my ability to apply new knowledge effectively. My proactive approach and dedication to continuous learning are qualities that I believe are essential for success in a research environment.

I am excited about the chance to apply my learning abilities to contribute to the research projects at [Institution or Company Name], particularly in the area of [Specific Research Interest].

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the possibility of joining your team and contributing my quick learning capabilities to your research endeavors.

Sample 7: Showcasing Organizational and Planning Skills

Subject: Organized Applicant for Research Assistant Role

Dear [Department Head or Hiring Committee],

I am eager to apply for the Research Assistant position at [Institution or Company Name] in the field of [Specific Research Area]. My ability to organize, plan, and manage tasks efficiently makes me a strong candidate for this role.

In my academic career and personal projects, I have demonstrated a talent for managing multiple responsibilities and meeting tight deadlines. My organizational skills ensure that I can handle the diverse demands of a research project while maintaining a high level of accuracy and attention to detail.

I am particularly drawn to the opportunity at [Institution or Company Name] because of your innovative approach to research in [Specific Research Field]. I am excited about the prospect of applying my organizational skills to support your research team.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to discussing how my planning and organizational abilities can contribute to the success of your research projects.

Sample 8: Emphasizing Data Analysis Skills

Subject: Application for Research Assistant with Strong Analytical Skills

Dear Hiring Team at [Institution or Company Name],

I am writing to express my interest in the Research Assistant position within the [Specific Department or Research Field]. My academic background in [Your Degree], combined with my proficiency in data analysis, makes me a well-suited candidate for this role.

During my studies, I have developed a strong ability to analyze and interpret data, skills that are crucial in research. My experience with [Specific Software or Analytical Tools] has further enhanced my capabilities in this area.

I am excited about the opportunity to bring my analytical skills to the research team at [Institution or Company Name], contributing to the impactful and innovative work being conducted in [Specific Research Area].

Thank you for considering my application. I am looking forward to the opportunity to demonstrate my data analysis skills and contribute to your research endeavors.

Sample 9: Demonstrating Passion for the Research Field

Subject: Passionate Candidate for Research Assistant Position in [Research Area]

It is with great enthusiasm that I apply for the Research Assistant position in the field of [Specific Research Area] at [Institution or Company Name]. My deep passion for [Related Field or Subject] and my desire to contribute to meaningful research drive my application.

My academic journey, particularly my involvement in [Specific Projects or Courses], has fostered a strong interest in [Specific Aspect of Research]. Although I am new to a formal research role, my commitment to the field and my dedication to pursuing research excellence are unwavering.

I am particularly attracted to the opportunity at [Institution or Company Name] because of your reputation for [Specific Aspect of Research or Academic Excellence]. I am eager to contribute to your team and to grow professionally in an environment that values innovation and in-depth research.

Thank you for considering my application. I am looking forward to the possibility of joining your team and contributing my passion and dedication to your research projects.

Best wishes,

Sample 10: Focusing on Communication and Presentation Skills

Subject: Application for Research Assistant Position – Effective Communicator

Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name or Department Team],

I am applying for the Research Assistant role at [Institution or Company Name] in the field of [Specific Research Area]. My strong communication and presentation skills, honed through my academic experiences and extracurricular activities, make me a suitable candidate for this position.

During my studies in [Your Degree], I have had the opportunity to present research findings and lead group projects, which required clear, concise, and effective communication. These experiences have equipped me with the ability to articulate complex research concepts in an understandable manner, a skill crucial for any research role.

I am particularly interested in the Research Assistant position at [Institution or Company Name] due to its focus on [Specific Aspect of the Research or Department]. I am excited about the prospect of applying my communication skills to facilitate the dissemination of research findings and contribute to the collaborative efforts of your team.

Thank you for considering my application. I am looking forward to discussing how my communication and presentation skills can contribute to the success of your research projects.

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Research statements for faculty job applications

The purpose of a research statement.

The main goal of a research statement is to walk the search committee through the evolution of your research, to highlight your research accomplishments, and to show where your research will be taking you next. To a certain extent, the next steps that you identify within your statement will also need to touch on how your research could benefit the institution to which you are applying. This might be in terms of grant money, faculty collaborations, involving students in your research, or developing new courses. Your CV will usually show a search committee where you have done your research, who your mentors have been, the titles of your various research projects, a list of your papers, and it may provide a very brief summary of what some of this research involves. However, there can be certain points of interest that a CV may not always address in enough detail.

  • What got you interested in this research?
  • What was the burning question that you set out to answer?
  • What challenges did you encounter along the way, and how did you overcome these challenges?
  • How can your research be applied?
  • Why is your research important within your field?
  • What direction will your research take you in next, and what new questions do you have?

While you may not have a good sense of where your research will ultimately lead you, you should have a sense of some of the possible destinations along the way. You want to be able to show a search committee that your research is moving forward and that you are moving forward along with it in terms of developing new skills and knowledge. Ultimately, your research statement should complement your cover letter, CV, and teaching philosophy to illustrate what makes you an ideal candidate for the job. The more clearly you can articulate the path your research has taken, and where it will take you in the future, the more convincing and interesting it will be to read.

Separate research statements are usually requested from researchers in engineering, social, physical, and life sciences, but can also be requested for researchers in the humanities. In many cases, however, the same information that is covered in the research statement is often integrated into the cover letter for many disciplines within the humanities and no separate research statement is requested within the job advertisement. Seek advice from current faculty and new hires about the conventions of your discipline if you are in doubt.

Timeline: Getting Started with your Research Statement

You can think of a research statement as having three distinct parts. The first part will focus on your past research, and can include the reasons you started your research, an explanation as to why the questions you originally asked are important in your field, and a summary some of the work you did to answer some of these early questions.

The middle part of the research statement focuses on your current research. How is this research different from previous work you have done, and what brought you to where you are today? You should still explain the questions you are trying to ask, and it is very important that you focus on some of the findings that you have (and cite some of the publications associated with these findings). In other words, do not talk about your research in abstract terms, make sure that you explain your actual results and findings (even if these may not be entirely complete when you are applying for faculty positions), and mention why these results are significant.

The final part of your research statement should build on the first two parts. Yes, you have asked good questions, and used good methods to find some answers, but how will you now use this foundation to take you into your future? Since you are hoping that your future will be at one of the institutions to which you are applying, you should provide some convincing reasons why your future research will be possible at each institution, and why it will be beneficial to that institution, or to the students at that institution.

While you are focusing on the past, present, and future or your research, and tailoring it to each institution, you should also think about the length of your statement and how detailed or specific you make the descriptions of your research. Think about who will be reading it. Will they all understand the jargon you are using? Are they experts in the subject, or experts in a range of related subjects? Can you go into very specific detail, or do you need to talk about your research in broader terms that make sense to people outside of your research field focusing on the common ground that might exist? Additionally, you should make sure that your future research plans differ from those of your PI or advisor, as you need to be seen as an independent researcher. Identify 4-5 specific aims that can be divided into short-term and long-term goals. You can give some idea of a 5-year research plan that includes the studies you want to perform, but also mention your long-term plans, so that the search committee knows that this is not a finite project.

Another important consideration when writing about your research is realizing that you do not perform research in a vacuum. When doing your research you may have worked within a team environment at some point, or sought out specific collaborations. You may have faced some serious challenges that required some creative problem-solving to overcome. While these aspects are not necessarily as important as your results and your papers or patents, they can help paint a picture of you as a well-rounded researcher who is likely to be successful in the future even if new problems arise, for example.

Follow these general steps to begin developing an effective research statement:

Step 1: Think about how and why you got started with your research. What motivated you to spend so much time on answering the questions you developed? If you can illustrate some of the enthusiasm you have for your subject, the search committee will likely assume that students and other faculty members will see this in you as well. People like to work with passionate and enthusiastic colleagues. Remember to focus on what you found, what questions you answered, and why your findings are significant. The research you completed in the past will have brought you to where you are today; also be sure to show how your research past and research present are connected. Explore some of the techniques and approaches you have successfully used in your research, and describe some of the challenges you overcame. What makes people interested in what you do, and how have you used your research as a tool for teaching or mentoring students? Integrating students into your research may be an important part of your future research at your target institutions. Conclude describing your current research by focusing on your findings, their importance, and what new questions they generate.

Step 2: Think about how you can tailor your research statement for each application. Familiarize yourself with the faculty at each institution, and explore the research that they have been performing. You should think about your future research in terms of the students at the institution. What opportunities can you imagine that would allow students to get involved in what you do to serve as a tool for teaching and training them, and to get them excited about your subject? Do not talk about your desire to work with graduate students if the institution only has undergraduates! You will also need to think about what equipment or resources that you might need to do your future research. Again, mention any resources that specific institutions have that you would be interested in utilizing (e.g., print materials, super electron microscopes, archived artwork). You can also mention what you hope to do with your current and future research in terms of publication (whether in journals or as a book), try to be as specific and honest as possible. Finally, be prepared to talk about how your future research can help bring in grants and other sources of funding, especially if you have a good track record of receiving awards and fellowships. Mention some grants that you know have been awarded to similar research, and state your intention to seek this type of funding.

Step 3: Ask faculty in your department if they are willing to share their own research statements with you. To a certain extent, there will be some subject-specific differences in what is expected from a research statement, and so it is always a good idea to see how others in your field have done it. You should try to draft your own research statement first before you review any statements shared with you. Your goal is to create a unique research statement that clearly highlights your abilities as a researcher.

Step 4: The research statement is typically a few (2-3) pages in length, depending on the number of images, illustrations, or graphs included.  Once you have completed the steps above, schedule an appointment with a career advisor to get feedback on your draft. You should also try to get faculty in your department to review your document if they are willing to do so.

Explore other application documents:

presentation letter research assistant

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Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University

Research assistant internship.

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The Bridging Divides Initiative (BDI) is a non-partisan research initiative that tracks and mitigates political violence in the United States. BDI supports efforts to grow and build local community resilience through elections and other periods of heightened risk, laying the groundwork for longer-term to bridge the divides we face as a nation.

We do this by 1) producing action-oriented and responsive research to fill existing gaps and empower local leaders; 2) enabling cross-sector collaboration, so individuals and organizations are better prepared to mitigate risk and respond to crisis when it does arise; and 3) helping to drive the policy and community response. Over the past four years, BDI played an essential role in supporting a wide range of actors preparing for and responding to political violence and democratic crises. Our data, analysis, and tools continue to help a diverse coalition of national and local decision-makers better target their interventions.

BDI is based at the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA), co-hosted by the Empirical Studies of Conflict (ESOC).

For more information, please visit our website: https://bridgingdivides.princeton.edu/ .

Position and Internship Overview

BDI is seeking several student Research Assistants (RA) to support BDI’s strategic objectives across multiple portfolios including our early warning project , threats and harassment against local officials project , and state-level violence mitigation project among others. Research Assistants will work directly with the researcher or project manager who oversees each of these portfolios.

The Research Assistant Internship is part of BDI’s efforts to support and train the next generation of conflict mitigation and peacebuilding practitioners in the United States. The internship is a paid 12-month program, where RAs will receive hands-on experience in political violence research and mitigation efforts.

The internship program will include regular skill-building and professional development workshops on topics such as open-source intelligence research and analysis, digital safety and threat modeling, conflict analysis, briefing and presentation skills, and much more. Research Assistants will also have the opportunity to receive mentorship, resume and job support, and network with other mission-aligned organizations.

The Research Assistants will work remotely but will be expected to attend an in-person retreat to onboard, meet, and network with others in the cohort and BDI staff at the beginning of the internship.

Project Overviews

Research Assistants will be assigned to one of the following projects. Please indicate your preference in your application.

Building and Modeling Structures for Early Warning – BDI’s early warning project identifies the signs of violence and provides situational awareness for effective community responses. BDI’s core monitoring and analysis work, delivered reliably through our verified distribution network, has proven to be an essential part of the U.S. early warning infrastructure. Our strategic use of regular reporting, timely issue briefs, and custom memos – drawing on data and collaboration with over a dozen monitoring partners – provides reliable, trusted, and actionable information to help the entire early warning ecosystem get ahead of and respond to risk.

BDI is hiring 3 RAs to join the Early Warning team. In these roles, Early Warning RAs will provide research and ad hoc support to not only the regular production of our early warning products (such as our nationally focused Situation Reports or ‘SitReps’) and support BDI’s overarching research processes and systems. This group of RAs will report to the Early Warning Project Manager and will support both the Project Manager, two full-time Early Warning Researchers, and the research team more broadly, to identify and support the analysis of early warning indicators of offline political violence and hostility.

State-level violence mitigation support – BDI State Leads provide real-time monitoring and analysis of political violence risk, including tailored briefings for a range of stakeholders, rapid response memos, and additional concierge support to translate insights into action. Individual State Leads serve as conduits to and from state and local groups to national networks, resources, and training. By focusing on the unique needs of each state, our State Leads provide specialized, locally informed assistance to partners and regularly host state-wide coordination tables on monitoring and analysis.

BDI is hiring 6 RAs for this role and they will be paired with a State Lead and will support their work in that state by contributing to state-focused Situation Reports and supporting local networks. BDI state leads work in Arizona, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Michigan, North Carolina, and Wisconsin.

Data coding and analysis support – Data-driven research is at the heart of our work. BDI seeks to fill gaps in information about political violence in the United States and translate these insights into timely, accessible, and actionable resources that empower people working to track and mitigate risk.

BDI is hiring 1 RA for this role who will work with BDI’s research team to expand opportunities for project outputs, support in meeting turnaround times for fast-moving requests, and improve quality assurance of analysis. The RA in this position should be proficient in R and Tableau.

Media and communications support – BDI is a trusted provider of actionable research that translates complex data into the practical tools that communities need to mitigate risk. To amplify the impact of our work and distribute resources to key stakeholders, BDI conducts regular outreach to a wide range of audiences – including media, mitigation practitioners, and policymakers – and collaborates with partner organizations to push back on the threat of political violence, foster democratic resilience, and elevate local community voices.

BDI is hiring 1 RA to support the Communications Manager with media and public relations, digital content production, website management, and branding, among other communications projects. Preference will be given to applicants who have data visualization, graphic design, and/or audiovisual production skills and are especially interested in the intersection of research and communications.

Understanding Threats and Harassment Against Local Officials – The threats and harassment project is a mixed methods and participatory approach, BDI’s work advances essential understanding of where, who, and how threats are most directly impacting officials and our democracy at its most local level. Within this project, BDI coordinates (1) quarterly survey work, (2) interviews with officials, and (3) the Threats and Harassment Dataset (THD) – a first-of-its-kind database that tracks threats against local officials across the United States. Through documentation of threats against and harassment of local officials, the project helps to identify and monitor trends. Such work allows BDI to get the right data into the hands of communities and policymakers to drive research-informed interventions, especially in advance of the upcoming election season.

BDI is hiring 2 RAs for this role and they will report to the Threats and Harassment Project Manager and will support both the Project Manager and the THD Researcher, and the research team more broadly, to support their work to research and record content for the Understanding Threats and Harassment project, including though not limited to coding for THD.

Qualifications and Requirements

Applicants should meet all of many of the following qualifications and requirements:

  • Current 3rd or 4th-year undergraduate, or graduate student enrolled in a relevant discipline.
  • Expressed interest in gaining skills to mitigate and transform conflict in the United States.
  • Willing to commit to the entire one-year internship (September 2024 – August 2025).
  • Commit to work at least 10-15 hours per week including attending meetings with supervisors, training sessions, and other team meetings.
  • Interpersonal and communication skills.
  • Reliably meet project deadlines.
  • Ability to work independently to locate and interpret information from multiple sources.
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills that aim to master and apply complex methodology.
  • High level of attention to detail.
  • Ability to receive and incorporate feedback.
  • Familiarity with MS Office suite (Word, Excel) & Google Drive (Docs, Sheets, Forms).
  • Familiarity with common research tools (NexisUni, ProQuest, Google News Alerts).
  • Experience conducting desk-based research.

Timeline: Start date for the position is September 3, 2024. Approximate hours: 10-15 per week. While the BDI team will work with Research Assistants to accommodate their schedules, Research Assistants are expected to adhere to the schedules to which they have committed.

Compensation: $18 for undergraduate students; $25/hour for those with a degree.

How to apply : Submit your resume and cover letter, specifying the position that aligns best with your skills and goals. For state-based roles, specify your preferred state in your cover letter.

Email your resume and cover letter to [email protected] with “Research Assistant Internship Application” in the subject line.

You may email [email protected] with any questions. Applications will be considered incomplete until all materials are received.

No matter who you are, BDI is a place you can call home. We know that our unique perspectives make us stronger, smarter, and well-positioned for success. We value and rely on the collective voices of our team to help guide our work on challenging issues. That’s why we’re proud Princeton is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, race, color, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Research Associate Recommendation Letter: 4 Templates

Letter Template: 1

Table of Contents

Research Associate Recommendation Letter

[Your Name]

[Job Title]

[Organization Name]

[Address, Zip Code]

[Addressee’s Name]

[Institution Name]

Sub- Recommendation for research associate.

Dear [Addressee’s Name],

It is my pleasure to recommend [Name Of The Person] as a research associate for [Name Of The Research Work] in [Institution Name]. I can surely tell you that [He/She] will be a great associate in your research work.

I am fully aware of [His/her] extensive professional skills as I have worked with [Him/her] before. [He/She] always keeps [Himself/Herself] updated with profound knowledge about the research work and thus, making [Himself/Herself] a great research associate.

[He/She] is patient and attentive in [His/her] work. [He/She] always embraces hard work to make the research work fruitful. [He/She] works effectively and keeps everything well-organized and labeled. [He/She] is quick to help and has an optimistic and energetic attitude.

I can assure you that [He/She] will help your research work if you give [Him/her] the chance to be your research associate. So please consider my recommendation.

Contact me for further queries.

Sincerely, 

[Your Name].

Download Template : ( pdf, docs, ODT, RTF, txt, HTML, Epub, Etc )

Letter Template: 2

[Your Name] [Your Position] [Your Institution/Organization] [Address] [City, State, ZIP Code] [Email Address] [Phone Number] [Date]

[Recipient’s Name] [Recipient’s Position] [Recipient’s Institution/Organization] [Address] [City, State, ZIP Code]

Dear [Recipient’s Name],

I am writing to highly recommend [Applicant’s Full Name] for the position of Research Associate at your esteemed institution/organization. I have had the privilege of working closely with [Applicant’s Name] during their time as a research assistant in my laboratory, and I can confidently attest to their exceptional skills, dedication, and passion for scientific research.

[Applicant’s Name] has been an invaluable asset to our research team. Their strong analytical abilities, attention to detail, and critical thinking skills have consistently impressed me. They have actively contributed to multiple research projects, demonstrating exceptional competence in experimental design, data analysis, and interpretation.

What sets [Applicant’s Name] apart is their unwavering commitment to excellence and their ability to collaborate effectively with colleagues. They possess excellent communication skills, both written and verbal, and consistently present their findings with clarity and precision. Their ability to work independently and as part of a team has been instrumental in the success of our research endeavors.

Furthermore, [Applicant’s Name] is highly organized, meticulous, and exhibits a strong work ethic. They have consistently met project deadlines and have shown exceptional adaptability in handling unforeseen challenges. Their willingness to learn new techniques and embrace emerging technologies showcases their enthusiasm for staying at the forefront of scientific advancements.

I have been particularly impressed by [Applicant’s Name]’s ability to think critically and propose innovative solutions to complex research questions. Their intellectual curiosity and dedication to advancing scientific knowledge make them an ideal candidate for a research position.

In conclusion, I wholeheartedly recommend [Applicant’s Full Name] for the position of Research Associate. Their remarkable skills, exceptional work ethic, and passion for research will undoubtedly contribute to the success of your institution/organization. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you require any further information regarding [Applicant’s Name]’s qualifications and achievements.

Thank you for considering [Applicant’s Full Name] for this position. I am confident that they will thrive as a valuable member of your research team.

[Your Name] [Your Position] [Your Institution/Organization]

Letter Template: 3

I am delighted to write this letter of recommendation on behalf of [Applicant’s Full Name] for the position of Research Associate at your institution/organization. Having had the pleasure of working closely with [Applicant’s Name] as their supervisor during their time as a research assistant in my lab, I am confident in their abilities and believe they would be an exceptional addition to your team.

[Applicant’s Name] has consistently impressed me with their dedication, passion, and outstanding research skills. They possess a deep understanding of the scientific process and have actively contributed to several research projects in our lab. Their ability to design experiments, collect and analyze data, and draw meaningful conclusions is truly commendable.

What truly stands out about [Applicant’s Name] is their eagerness to learn and grow as a researcher. They are always up-to-date with the latest developments in their field and proactively seek opportunities to enhance their knowledge and skills. Their intellectual curiosity and innovative thinking have resulted in valuable insights and contributions to our research.

Moreover, [Applicant’s Name] is a reliable and responsible team member. They demonstrate excellent communication skills, effectively collaborating with fellow researchers and presenting their findings with clarity and confidence. Their positive attitude, strong work ethic, and ability to handle pressure make them an asset to any research team.

Beyond their technical abilities, [Applicant’s Name] exhibits exceptional professionalism and interpersonal skills. They are respectful, empathetic, and supportive of their colleagues, fostering a collaborative and harmonious work environment. Their commitment to integrity and ethical research practices is evident in all aspects of their work.

I have no doubt that [Applicant’s Name] will thrive as a Research Associate at your institution/organization. They have the necessary skills, knowledge, and passion for research that will enable them to make significant contributions to your team and advance your research goals.

I highly recommend [Applicant’s Full Name] for the position of Research Associate. Should you require any additional information or have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. Thank you for considering [Applicant’s Name] for this opportunity, and I am confident that they will exceed your expectations.

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  1. How to Write a Great Research Assistant Cover Letter (Sample Included

    Part 5: Drafting an entry-level research assistant cover letter Formatting your cover letter correctly. Your research assistant cover letter should be one page, single- or 1.5-spaced and contain 4-5 paragraphs. Each paragraph will have a specific purpose. Here's an outline showing the best format for research assistant cover letters.

  2. Research Assistant Cover Letter Example & Tips

    5508 Terrace Drive. La Crescenta, CA, 91214. (818) 835-3371. [email protected]. Dear Dr. Reed, I'm writing to you regarding the Lab Research Assistant position at BioSpace. I'm confident my academic background in molecular biology and biomedical research experience will make me a competent contributor to your team.

  3. 2024 Research Assistant Cover Letter Example (+Free Tools & Guidance)

    We will be covering the following key components of a professional cover letter: 1. Cover Letter Header 2. Cover Letter Greeting 3. Cover Letter Introduction 4. Cover Letter Body 5. Cover Letter Closing Each of these sections plays a vital role in presenting a comprehensive picture of your capabilities and suitability for the research role.

  4. Research Assistant Cover Letter Example and Template for 2024

    Closing paragraph: To close the cover letter, you can reiterate your interest in the position and the research project, while thanking the hiring manager for considering your application. You can also include a statement about a career goal you have if you're chosen for the role. 6. Include a signature.

  5. Research Assistant Cover Letter Samples (Lab, Technician)

    A closing paragraph with a powerful call to action. A complimentary close (e.g., Sincerely) and your full name. Optionally, a postscript (P.S.) Keep your research position application letter to between 200-300 words, depending on your education level and trial experience.

  6. How To Write a Successful Research Assistant Cover Letter

    Related: Top Interview Questions for Research Assistants. 2. List your contact information. When you're ready to write your letter, include your contact information at the top of your document. Try to match the formatting and style choices you used in your resume. This can help your entire application remain cohesive.

  7. Research Assistant Cover Letter Examples & Expert Tips

    Adaptable cover letter greeting and introduction example. Dear Professor McMahon, For the past four years, I have been working in the psychology department of Miami University as a research assistant, on both field- and laboratory-based research projects around cognitive health across a range of age profiles.

  8. Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample & Template for 2024

    310-738-2105. [email protected]. You can tell how connected Naomi is to the research this university conducts. She shows she has the skills but also believes in the work they are doing. It's two essential parts of what makes this a great research assistant cover letter. Maybe this cover letter has you worried.

  9. 3 Research Assistant Cover Letter Examples for 2024

    3 Research Assistant Cover. Letter Examples for 2024. Stephen Greet May 16, 2024. You're a pro at researching, analyzing your findings, and drawing useful conclusions that can lead to groundbreaking discoveries. Your analytical mind and impeccable eye for detail help you streamline and innovate the research process.

  10. Research Assistant Cover Letter Example (Free Guide)

    Cover Letter Body. Dear Hiring Manager, I am writing to apply for the position of Research Assistant, as advertised on [insert job board]. With over [insert years] of experience as a Research Assistant, I am confident that I am the ideal candidate for this role.

  11. Research Assistant Cover Letter: The Ultimate Guide

    Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample #1. Dear Dr. Smith, With this letter and enclosed CV, I would like to express my strong interest in the Research Assistant position you have available in the X department. I am a recent master's graduate with experience in facilitating successful clinical trials.

  12. Research Assistant Cover Letter

    Lancaster. LA1 4YF. (0131) 123 4567. [email protected]. Dear [Mr/Ms/Mx] [Contact Person's Name], I am writing to express my interest in the Psychology Research Assistant position advertised on the Lancaster University careers page. With a strong academic background in psychology and hands-on experience in research settings, I am ...

  13. 14 Research Assistant Cover Letters

    Research Assistant Cover Letter Example. Dear Dr. Henson, I am reaching out to express my enthusiasm for the Research Assistant position at GenTech Biotechnologies. My fascination with biotech took root in a high school biology class, where I first learned about the revolutionary impact of CRISPR technology.

  14. Professional Graduate Research Assistant Cover Letter ...

    Another option for your graduate research assistant cover letter introduction is to show you're the ideal candidate. Write about how your achievements and skills are precisely what the company is looking for. However you decide to start your graduate research assistant cover letter, always remember to write about the value you'd bring about.

  15. Free Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample

    This Research Assistant cover letter is a professional document that is used to introduce yourself to a potential employer and highlight your skills and experience in the field of research. This template is optimized to get interviews by clearly outlining your relevant qualifications and showcasing your ability to assist researchers and support their work.

  16. 10 Sample Cover Letters for Research Assistant with No Experience

    Sample 1: Emphasizing Academic Achievements. Subject: Application for Research Assistant Position in [Research Field] Dear Hiring Manager, I am writing to express my interest in the Research Assistant position within your [Specific Department or Research Field] at [Institution or Company Name]. As a recent graduate with a degree in [Your Degree ...

  17. Research Assistant Cover Letter: Examples & Templates (2024)

    310-738-2105. [email protected]. You can tell how connected Naomi is to the research this university conducts. She shows she has the skills but also believes in the work they are doing. It's two essential parts of what makes this a great research assistant cover letter. Maybe this cover letter has you worried.

  18. Graduate Research Assistant Cover Letter Examples

    Dear Mr. Mills: With this letter and the enclosed CV, I would like to express my sincere interest in becoming your next Graduate Research Assistant. As a detail-oriented and analytical doctoral student with an MA in Health Sciences and in current pursuit of my PhD in Public Health Science from the University of Texas, I have gained solid ...

  19. Research Assistant Skills: Definition and Examples

    Research assistant skills involve the use of technical and soft skills to effectively conduct research and other tasks per the request of their lead researcher. Important soft skills that research assistants may need include communication, time management and organization. Technical skills can include understanding how to use specific equipment ...

  20. Research statements for faculty job applications

    Step 4: The research statement is typically a few (2-3) pages in length, depending on the number of images, illustrations, or graphs included. Once you have completed the steps above, schedule an appointment with a career advisor to get feedback on your draft. You should also try to get faculty in your department to review your document if they ...

  21. PDF Interviewing for a Faculty Position

    Application Faculty hiring committee meets: 2nd round of selection from 50 to 5-10 top candidates. First interview via Phone/Online (20-45 minutes) To confirm meeting of selection criteria and compare candidates. 3rd round of selection 4. First visit (1-3 days) to 3-4 final candidates. Meet faculty 1:1, students in groups, 5.

  22. (PDF) Research Assistant Cover Letter Md. Shahin Parvez

    Thanks for your time and consideration. Sincerely, Md. Shahin Parvez 159/16/2, Content uploaded by Md. Shahin Parvez. Author content. Content may be subject to copyright. 14 November, 2020. The ...

  23. Welcome to the Purdue Online Writing Lab

    Mission. The Purdue On-Campus Writing Lab and Purdue Online Writing Lab assist clients in their development as writers—no matter what their skill level—with on-campus consultations, online participation, and community engagement. The Purdue Writing Lab serves the Purdue, West Lafayette, campus and coordinates with local literacy initiatives.

  24. Research Assistant Internship

    Research Assistants will work directly with the researcher or project manager who oversees each of these portfolios. The Research Assistant Internship is part of BDI's efforts to support and train the next generation of conflict mitigation and peacebuilding practitioners in the United States. The internship is a paid 12-month program, where ...

  25. Research Associate Recommendation Letter: 4 Templates

    Sub- Recommendation for research associate. Dear [Addressee's Name], It is my pleasure to recommend [Name Of The Person] as a research associate for [Name Of The Research Work] in [Institution Name]. I can surely tell you that [He/She] will be a great associate in your research work. I am fully aware of [His/her] extensive professional skills ...