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into the wild essay shaun callarman

  • Your Assignment
  • Topic Choices
  • Learn about Chris McCandless and Into the Wild
  • Final Essay: Into the Wild

Choose one of the following prompts:

Developing a theme: Explain how Krakauer develops a theme through his telling of McCandless's story. Choose one of the following topics and explain how Krakauer  develops this idea into a theme and for what purpose:

  • the American wilderness
  • arrogance/innocence/ignorance
  • isolation vs. intimacy
  • freedom of solitude
  • luck/chance/circumstance
  • materialism vs. idealism
  • risk and self-reinvention

Your thesis should address and explain the theme, how it is developed, what purpose it fulfills. The essay should be richly supported with references to the text, and the conclusion should consider the implications of the theme developed in the essay.

Argument option 1 : Consider carefully the following quotation from the "'Author's Note'":

Some readers admired the boy immensely for his courage and noble ideals; others fulminated that he was a reckless idiot, a wacko, a narcissist who perished out of arrogance and stupidity-and was undeserving of the considerable media attention he received (xi). --John Krakauer, Into the Wild

Consider what Krakauer believes. Is he qualified to give an objective opinion (think about reliable narrator)? Though Krakauer tries to maintain objectivity, even he admits that his bias will become apparent. In a well-organized essay, explain Krakauer's position on McCandless. Support your argument with references from throughout the text. Try to keep your opinion to yourself- rather, analyze what you see of Krakauer's bias and how you know.

Argument option 2:  Consider the following and what you have previously written about McCandless :

"I think that Chris McCandless was bright and ignorant at the same time. He had no common sense, and he had no business going into Alaska with his romantic silliness. He made a lot of mistakes based on arrogance. I don't admire him at all for his courage nor his noble ideas. Really, I think he was just plain crazy." - Shaun Callarman

In a well-organized essay, explain Callarman's view of McCandless, then, take a position yourself on McCandless discussing the extent to which you agree or disagree with his analysis. Support your argument with references from throughout the text.

Personal essay: Compare and contrast your own life, experience or viewpoint to either Krakauer's or Christopher McCandless's. Go beyond simply not getting along with parents, do you relate to Chris in other ways? Do you feel that you understand him and what he did? Do you admire him for his goals? Have you had any experiences that you think help you better understand him? You must use specific examples showing your experience and how it connects to the text; focus on several passages in your comparison. The passages from the text must be embedded clearly and explained effectively to reflect your understanding of the author's purpose. Do not oversimplify the text in your comparison; to do so would reflect an incomplete understanding of the text. If the situations are radically different, then that must be explained and acknowledged; if the feelings/emotions are similar, then you must show this similarity with examples, details, and anecdotes- don't simply "tell" your reader. Your thesis should clearly address the prompt and explain the comparison in the intro; the conclusion should also address the implications to the comparison.

  • The fiction that is Jon Krakauer's 'Into The Wild' Anchorage Daily News, 2016
  • How Chris McCandless Died: An Update New Yorker, 2015
  • Hiker Identified in Self Portrait New York Times article originally published in 1992 (found in database)
  • Christopher McCandless Biography from Research in Context database

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Expository Reading and Writing Final Essay: Into The Wild

into the wild essay shaun callarman

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Into the Wild

Based on the quote provided in the details, explain callarmans argument and discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with his analysis. support with examples from the novel..

Into the wild callarmans quote:"I think that Chris McCandless was bright and ignorant at the same time. He had no common sense, and he had no business going into Alaska with his romantic silliness. He made a lot of mistakes based on arrogance. I don't admire him at all for his courage nor his noble ideas. Really, I think he was just plain crazy."

I don't think Chris was crazy rather than extremely naive. I don't think that, as the quote suggests, Chris McCandless can be defined so easily. Yes, he was ignorant to the realities of the Alaskan wilderness. He also romanticized authors like Thoreau and Emerson. What captures readers about Chris is that Chris, naive as he was, actually followed his calling. His anti-establishment counterculture approach to life is rather appealing in a world saturated with materialism. In many ways Chris needed some more personal maturity but this is the case for many people in their young 20's. Chris's spirit of adventure and uncompromising ethos is what still draws people to his story.

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Movie Review: Sean Penn's 'Into the Wild'

By A.O. Scott

  • Sept. 21, 2007

Into the Wild Directed by Sean Penn (U.S.)

There is plenty of sorrow to be found in "Into the Wild," Sean Penn's adaptation of the nonfiction bestseller by Jon Krakauer. The story begins with an unhappy family, proceeds through a series of encounters with the lonely and the lost, and ends in a senseless, premature death. But though the film's structure may be tragic, its spirit is anything but. It is infused with an expansive, almost giddy sense of possibility, and it communicates a pure, unaffected delight in open spaces, fresh air and bright sunshine.

Some of this exuberance in the film, with releases worldwide through February, comes from Christopher Johnson McCandless, the young adventurer whose footloose life and gruesome fate were the subject of Krakauer's book. As Penn understands him (and as he is portrayed, with unforced charm and brisk intelligence, by Emile Hirsch), Chris is at once a troubled, impulsive boy and a brave and dedicated spiritual pilgrim. He does not court danger but rather stumbles across it - thrillingly and then fatally - on the road to joy.

In letters to his friends, parts of which are scrawled across the screen in bright yellow capital letters, he revels in the simple beauty of the natural world. Adopting the pseudonym Alexander Supertramp, rejecting material possessions and human attachments, he proclaims himself an "aesthetic voyager."

Penn serves as both his biographer and his traveling companion.

After graduating from Emory University in 1990, McCandless set off on a zigzagging two-year journey that took him from South Dakota to Southern California, from the Sea of Cortez to the Alaskan wilderness, where he perished, apparently from starvation, in August 1992. "Into the Wild," which Penn wrote and directed, follows faithfully in his footsteps, and it illuminates the young man's personality by showing us the world as he saw it.

What he mostly saw was the glory of the North American landscape west of the Mississippi: the ancient woodlands of the Pacific Northwest, the canyons and deserts farther south, the wheat fields of the northern prairie and Alaska, a place that McCandless seemed to regard with almost mystical reverence. Penn, who did some of the camera work, was aided by the director of photography, Eric Gautier, who previously turned his careful, voracious eye on the wilds of South America in Walter Salles's "Motorcycle Diaries."

An enthusiastic reader (with a special affinity for Tolstoy and Jack London), Chris is in many ways the intellectual heir of 19th-century writer-naturalists like John Muir and especially Henry David Thoreau, whose uncompromising idealism - "rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth" - he takes as a watchword. (Had he survived, McCandless might well have joined the ranks of latter-day nature writers like Edward Abbey and Bill McKibben.)

His credo is perhaps most succinctly stated by Thoreau's mentor Ralph Waldo Emerson, who advised that "the ancient precept, 'Know thyself,' and the modern precept, 'Study Nature,' become at last one maxim."

One problem with this strain of American thought is that it sometimes finds expression in self-help nostrums and greeting-card sentiments. But the movie's theme, thankfully, is not so simple or so easily summed up in words.

Penn, even more than Krakauer, takes the Emersonian dimension of McCandless's project seriously, even as he understands the peril implicit in too close an identification with nature. The book took pains to defend its young protagonist against the suspicion that he was suicidal, unbalanced or an incompetent outdoorsman, gathering testimony from friends he had made in his last years as evidence of his kindness, his care and his integrity. The film, at some risk of sentimentalizing its hero, goes further, pushing him to the very brink of sainthood. At the same time, though, "Into the Wild" resists the impulse to interpret Chris's death as a kind of martyrdom or as the inevitable, logical terminus of his passionate desire for communion with nature.

Instead, with disarming sincerity, it emphasizes his capacity for love, the gift for fellowship that, somewhat paradoxically, accompanied his fierce need for solitude. Though he warns one of his friends against seeking happiness in human relationships - and also rails incoherently against the evils of "society" - Chris is a naturally sociable creature. And "Into the Wild" is populated with marvelous actors - including Brian Dierker, a river guide and ski-shop owner making his first appearance in a film - who make its human landscape as fascinating and various as its topography.

The source of Chris's wanderlust, and of the melancholy that tugs at the film's happy-go-lucky spirit, is traced to his parents (William Hurt and Marcia Gay Harden), whose volatile marriage and regard for appearances begin to seem contemptible to their son. Fleeing from his mother and father, Chris finds himself drawn, almost unwittingly, to parental surrogates: a rowdy grain dealer in South Dakota (Vince Vaughn), a retired military man in the California desert (Hal Holbrook), a middle-aged hippie (Dierker), and the hippie's companion (Catherine Keener), who seems both carefree and careworn.

This story seems to have liberated Penn from the somber seriousness that has been his hallmark until now. "Into the Wild" is a movie about the desire for freedom that feels, in itself, like the fulfillment of that desire.

Which is not to say that there is anything easy or naïve in what Penn has done. "Into the Wild" is, on the contrary, alive to the mysteries and difficulties of experience in a way that very few recent American movies have been. There are some awkward moments and infelicitous touches, - a few too many Eddie Vedder songs on the soundtrack, for example, when Woody Guthrie, Aaron Copland or dead silence might have been more welcome - but the film's imperfection, like its grandeur, arises from a passionate, generous impulse that is as hard to resist as the call of the open road.

Shaun Callarman Into the Wild

Shaun Callarman Into the Wild

into the wild essay shaun callarman

You will have 45 minutes to program and write an essay on the assigned topic. Before beginning, carefully read the prompt and plan your response. Your essay should be well-organized and written with care. In my opinion, Chris McCandless was both intelligent and ignorant at the same time. He lacked common sense and had no reservations about embarking on his Alaska journey with a romanticized mindset. His arrogance led him to make many mistakes. Personally, I do not admire him for his bravery or noble thoughts; instead, I consider him simply insane. Shaun Callarman expands on this viewpoint and examines the extent of agreement or disagreement with his analysis. Support your stance by providing evidence and examples from personal experience, observations, or reading materials.

The included sample student essays adhere to the scoring standards outlined in the EPT Scoring Guide for their respective scores. The following is a sample student essay scoring a 6: “Life: Not an Episode of ‘Grizzly Man'”. Living alone in the wilderness may seem thrilling, reminiscent of Thoreau or London’s adventures—especially if one can fabricate parts of their experiences or retreat when hunger strikes. However, Chris McCandless does not have these luxuries;Shaun Callarman argues that Chris embodies the concept of “Romantic absurdity,” suggesting that he only sees the positive aspects of living in the wilderness when venturing into Alaska. I share Callarman’s perspective on Chris having a mind filled with “Romantic ideas” and lacking “common sense,” although I wouldn’t go as far as calling him completely crazy. When Chris decides to explore a part of the Alaskan wilderness that has already been mapped, it clearly demonstrates his “Romantic absurdity.” Callarman correctly points this out; it doesn’t strike me as particularly brave to waste time duplicating work that others have already accomplished. Personally, I prefer to spend my time creating something more constructive. The pristine Alaskan wilderness is being harmed by oil pipelines and spills. Chris could have taken some of his lofty ideals and applied them for the betterment of our country. If he had directed his energy towards a noble cause, he wouldn’t have appeared so arrogant and ignorant, just like Callarman asserts. While drawing his own map might have seemed romantic to him, it becomes quite evident to me that someone else had been there before when considering that he stayed in a coach. Furthermore, Callarman claims that Chris “made numerous errors due to haughtiness,” which I wholeheartedly agree with; Chris indeed makes plenty of mistakes. For instance, he brings the wrong type of gun, inappropriate clothing, too many books, and inadequate food supplies. What is the purpose of reading and conducting library research in Alaska if he refuses to listen to advice? Therefore, it is possible that Chris’s mistakes are a result of his arrogant mindset. In contrast to Callarman’s statement, Chris does show some “noble thoughts.” He deliberately keeps others at a distance to prevent them from getting involved with him. Additionally, he did indeed hunt an elk, not a caribou as some people taunted him for. Furthermore, Chris manages to survive in the wilderness for longer periods than most people could. Callarman argues that Chris possesses a peculiar combination of qualities; however, upon reflection, I realize that Chris is not as terrible as he may seem. This phase of life (high school and college) should be filled with romantic absurdity – a time when we are expected to be dreamers. It would be unfair for our plans and dreams to be labeled as “arrogant” or “ignorant,” especially since they hold significance for us and we aspire for them to come true. Overall, considering his dysfunctional family background and lack of proper role models like London, Chris did relatively well given the circumstances. While I do feel sympathy towards his parents, sister, and friends, his life serves as a lesson for all of us: we should proceed

cautiously but still pursue our dreams as much as possible. The commentary accompanying this essay demonstrates the criteria established by the EPT Scoring Guide for achieving a score of 6.The writer’s exceptional response demonstrates their high proficiency in handling college-level reading and writing tasks. They present a concise and accurate interpretation of the Callarman quote, effectively addressing all aspects of the prompt and displaying excellent preparation skills. The essay comprehensively critiques Callarman’s viewpoint, both directly and indirectly, while noting his lack of knowledge and experience in wilderness survival. Additionally, Callarman emphasizes Chris’s “grievous errors” and “fatal mistake” in venturing into the Alaskan wilderness ill-prepared. The author adeptly incorporates Callarman’s criticism into their analysis by summarizing his viewpoint before offering their own perspective, expressing partial agreement with him. They acknowledge Chris’s naivety and lack of preparation but argue that his journey still holds value and meaning. Throughout the essay, the author effectively uses quotes from Callarman’s article to strengthen their arguments. For instance, they quote Callarman stating that Chris was “harrowing and not admirable,” followed by their own analysis highlighting Chris’s bravery and determination in seeking freedom and self-discovery. Furthermore, specific examples are provided by the author to support their points.The text highlights the symbolic importance of Chris’s map as a representation of his desire for exploration and freedom from societal constraints. It also emphasizes his rejection of material possessions through his lack of proper clothing and food, showcasing his determination to live off the land. The author concludes by referencing Jack London’s quote about the “call of the wild” to illustrate that Chris embarked on this journey in response to that call.

The essay’s structure is well-developed, with paragraphs flowing smoothly and building upon each other. The author effectively uses present tense to add urgency to the narrative. Although there are a few minor grammatical errors, such as spelling mistakes (“definately” instead of “definitely”), they do not significantly impact the meaning of the essay.

Overall, this essay demonstrates a strong understanding of Callarman’s critique of Chris McCandless while effectively arguing against it and acknowledging its validity. The author supports their points with specific examples, insightful analysis, and skillful incorporation of quotes to create a compelling and persuasive essay.

However, I find Callarman’s belief that Chris was “obviously insane” too extreme. While I agree that Chris acted foolishly and made mistakes due to his arrogance, I don’t believe he had mental illness. He was simply a combination of intelligence and stupidity. As a college graduate, he should have known better than to inadequately prepare for the wilderness.Why would anyone venture into the cold and isolated terrain of Alaska, armed only with books in their backpacks and a bag of rice? Chris possessed enough funds to procure the necessary supplies for survival. So why did he not spare some of his savings on a $5 map? Considering his $24,000 fortune, he could have acquired ample equipment and nourishment. Despite numerous offers from people offering to purchase gear for him, Chris always declined. Is this an act of independence or sheer

stupidity? Personally, I believe it’s utter foolishness. Undoubtedly, Chris grappled with various issues that influenced his decision to embark on a journey into the wild. Notably, his parents’ turbulent marriage coupled with the shocking revelation of his father’s double life must have profoundly impacted him. It appears as though Chris engaged in acts that inflicted pain upon his parents – fabricating his identity, disregarding letters from home, and criticizing both his mother and father. Many individuals like him possess an urge to prove themselves and ultimately resort to reckless actions. By venturing to Alaska, all Chris managed to demonstrate was his own imprudence. If he harbored such disdain towards his parents, perhaps he should have sought refuge elsewhere and commenced a fresh life instead of subjecting himself to starvation within an abandoned bus while awaiting rescue by unsuspecting hikers at a later time. While it is possible that Chris may be mentally unstable, many others share similar traits; however, he seems more akin to a fool – even cruel at times. The way Ron treated the old man, Chris, is an example of how self-focused the main character in the book is. Despite Ron genuinely caring about Chris and having lost his entire family, Chris tried to teach him how to live. However, after all the drama with Ron, Chris left him behind and hit the road again. Callarman labels Chris as “crazy” but I believe he was mostly naive and angry rather than mentally ill. If he had been mentally ill, he could have received help. His fit of anger led him to Alaska in order to prove a point but ultimately resulted in his death.

This essay meets the criteria outlined in the EPT Scoring Guide for a score of 5 as it demonstrates clear competence and shows that the author is ready for college-level reading and writing. The author presents a logical thesis that effectively addresses the prompt by focusing on whether or not Chris is mentally ill. Although there are slight lapses in logic when considering opposing viewpoints in the third paragraph, overall it is well-reasoned response. However, some parts of the essay rely too heavily on generalizations (especially regarding McClandless being “dumb” or “stupid”) and lack development.The author provides specific examples, such as McCandless’ refusal to obtain equipment and abandonment of Ron, to support their claims. Throughout the essay, the writer consistently uses a lively personal voice. Although there are some awkward or confusing passages, the author effectively uses transitional language to guide the reader. The main point of the essay is successfully restated in the concluding paragraph without being repetitive. Despite mistakes in expression, including spelling errors (“equipment,” “lying”), improper use of verbs (“would have,” “should have”), mechanics issues (such as incorrectly referring to “his parents’ marriage”), incorrect usage of semicolons, pronoun confusion (using “he” in the first paragraph), and overuse of certain phrases like “a lot,” these concerns generally do not detract from the meaning. On a positive note, this writer has learned to use commas before coordinating conjunctions that connect independent clauses. Here is a sample student essay with a score of

4: Chris McCandless was an individual who took risks and sought independence; he desired freedom and wanted to live life on his own terms. While some criticize him for being ignorant and arrogant, others admire him for maintaining independence while staying true to his principles.According to Callarman, McCandless was both intelligent and naive at the same time. It is clear that he had intelligence because he read challenging books and followed their guidance diligently. However, Callarman also believes that McCandless was ignorant for following those instructions. Was it really ignorance on McCandless’s part to follow the guidance provided by those books? No, he was simply curious and determined.

Callarman argues that McCandless lacked common sense and had no hesitation about venturing into Alaska with his idealistic views. I agree with Callarman’s perspective that common sense would have dictated the need for necessary supplies before embarking on a journey into the Alaskan wilderness. From a young age, I have been taught the importance of carrying essentials like money, food, and water when going anywhere. Additionally, I have been advised against traveling alone in risky situations. Chris McCandless completely ignored these principles of common sense.

However, I do not consider him crazy; instead, I admire his ability to uphold his morals and pursue his dreams wholeheartedly. He took risks and ultimately achieved what he desired most: independence.

Commentary: This essay showcases college-level reading and writing skills as outlined by the EPT Scoring Guide’s criteria for a score of 4.The author demonstrates a mostly accurate comprehension of the text, although they struggle with certain aspects of Callarman’s arguments, such as the concept of Chris being both “bright and ignorant at the same time”. The thesis is effectively presented in the first sentence, providing a concise response to the prompt. Despite its brevity, the introductory paragraph adequately establishes the investigation into whether Chris was independent or arrogant. To paraphrase and unify the text while maintaining grammatical correctness and preserving HTML tags and their contents intact, it should be noted that the author incorporates direct and indirect quotes from Callarman with an aim to seamlessly integrate them using tag phrases, introductions, and other markers. However, after the initial paragraph, there is repetitiveness in both structure and logic when it comes to citations. Overall, the essay is somewhat simplistic and repetitive. For instance, in the concluding paragraph, it essentially restates what was already stated in the thesis paragraph (first paragraph), while each body paragraph tends to reiterate its main points. Furthermore, inconsistencies in logic can be observed throughout the essay. Specifically in the third paragraph, it appears that there is an argument against its own thesis when attempting to acknowledge Callarman’s criticism of “Romantic silliness”. Although transitional language is employed by the author on some level, it lacks a similar level of guidance for readers transitioning between paragraphs.The provided text contains relevant examples and demonstrates good control over grammar usage and mechanics. However, it lacks organization and development. The essay discusses Chris McCandless, who changed his name to Alex the Supertramp and embarked on a journey to live on the road. He burned his money but sadly died 112 days later. Some view him as inspiring while others think he was crazy. Personally, I find him inspiring because he had a purpose in life and wanted to show people how they can achieve their goals. Despite differing opinions about his story, Chris McCandless made a difference in at least one person’s life during his journey. He was not just an ordinary man – he was an inspiration to us all according to Shawn Callarman.This essay illustrates the requirements for a score of 3 according to the EPT Scoring Guide, but it is an overall weak 3. It suggests that further practice in college-level reading and writing is needed due to significant flaws. The author lacks transitions and focuses solely on McCandless’s possible foolishness. In the concluding sentence of the first paragraph, Callarman’s quote is used without attribution through deduction. Callarman is only directly mentioned in the second paragraph, leaving one citation unaddressed. The author struggles to choose between two potential thesis statements (“I personally believe that Alex was an inspiration” and “I believe Alex had a purpose in life”), which are reiterated but not supported elsewhere in the essay. The organic structure paragraphs consist of assertions without effective transitions. Sentence structure and vocabulary control are limited as the author uses repetitive sentence constructions with similar length, grammatical structure, and simplicity (e.g.,

beginning three sentences of the first paragraph with “Chris”). Although accurate, examples from the text provided by the author (McCandless changing his name, burning money, making friends along his journey) are often broad and lack development or support. The essay contains numerous errors including inconsistent verb tenses and spelling mistakes. The author struggles to maintain a clear argument throughout the essay. Callarman’s argument is that McCandless possessed both intelligence and ignorance, leading to his foolish choices. Callarman additionally claims that McCandless showed a lack of concern for going to Alaska and made prideful errors. It is also observed that McCandless behaved irrationally and purposelessly. I agree with Callarman’s perspective as it remains unclear why McCandless desired to go to Alaska in the first place. In my opinion, he should have stayed with his family instead of embarking on such a risky journey. Going to Alaska solely due to Romantic dissatisfaction was a mistake, as it did not justify living in unfavorable conditions. I believe he could have overcome his Romantic dissatisfaction and even found companionship. Unfortunately, he ultimately ended his own life, which is regrettable.

Commentary: This essay exemplifies the criteria outlined in the EPT Scoring Guide for a score of 2; however, there are numerous significant grammatical errors present. Therefore, this writer will need more practice before achieving success in college-level reading and writing. Nevertheless, the essay provides insight into an ESL student whose writing characteristics hinder the potential for a stronger (3-level) essay. The writer demonstrates basic comprehension of transitioning but primarily focuses on reiterating Callarman’s points without establishing a clear direction for the essay while maintaining coherence within their arguments through transitions effectively enoughThe response to the prompt lacks a focused thesis and does not explicitly materialize, although it is hinted at in the second paragraph. There is little logical connection between the four body paragraphs and within each paragraph. Overall, the organization of this essay leaves much up to interpretation by the reader. Specific support for its generalizations (“he was moving weird with his parents”) is not provided in the essay. Sentence structure control is lacking, as seen in the first sentence of the third paragraph. Vocabulary errors include using “Romantic illness,” and there are some illogical or syntactic statements like the third sentence of the second paragraph and first sentence of the third paragraph. Additionally, there are consistent grammar, usage, and mechanics errors (spelling, inconsistent capitalization) that greatly affect meaning. Many English scholars struggle with idioms (“because why he wanted to go”) and verb tenses (“he attempts to said”). In my opinion, I wholeheartedly agree with Callarman’s statement. Her assessment that McCandless was intelligent but lacked common sense is absolutely correct. He was an unusual individual who defied expectations. Specifying terms allows me to effectively support my position because he consistently made poor decisions. From my perspective, McCandless was an incredibly unique individual who dared to engage in actions that no one else would even consider attempting. For instance, he would assume different identities and work at various places without revealing his true self. This summarizes my main point and response in this paragraph.

Commentary: This essay serves as a clear example of how the EPT Scoring Guide’s criteria can result in a score of 1, while also highlighting numerous grammatical errors throughout the text. The author of this essay clearly displays significant deficiencies that indicate a need for much more practice in order to succeed at college-level reading and writing. Not only does the author blindly agree with the Callarman quote without demonstrating any understanding of the passage, but they also fail to effectively use the Callarman passage to respond meaningfully to the prompt. Furthermore, the essay lacks development and mainly consists of statements agreeing with Callarman. The aside about “cushioning my position” adds no value to the already minimal text provided by the author. Similarly, brooding statements about intent made by the writer are wasted. Moreover, the author only presents one supporting point – McCandless’s evasive attitude towards self-identification at work – but even this example is poorly expressed and almost incomprehensible. It is evident that the author lacks basic control over sentence structure and vocabulary.Moreover, the essay contains numerous significant and persistent errors in mechanics that greatly diminish its importance. Spelling and verb form mistakes continue to be consistent problems that require attention.

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COMMENTS

  1. Character Analysis Of Shaun Callarman's 'Into The Wild'

    Into the Wild Essay Most people go into the wilderness to go camping for a week or less than a week, then leave. ... to ultimately completely disconnect himself from society and instead tries to find his own meaning of life in the wild. Shaun Callarman says " I think that Chris McCandless was bright and ignorant at the same time." and i ...

  2. Shaun Callarman's Into The Wild

    871 Words. 4 Pages. Open Document. Into The Wild was a tremendous story which Shaun Callarman did not have many positive things to say about Chris McCandless, the main character. He went on this adventure to find out what life is all about in his own eyes. He wanted to see how different living in the wild really was compared to society because ...

  3. Into The Wild Shaun Callarman

    Into The Wild Shaun Callarman. 556 Words3 Pages. Into the Wild, a book by Jon Krauker and a film by Sean Penn, features the journey of Christopher McCandless, the son of wealthy parents who graduates from Emory University as a top student and athlete. However, instead of embarking on a prestigious and profitable career, he chooses to give his ...

  4. Home

    Final Essay: Into the Wild. Choose one of the following prompts: Developing a theme: ... Really, I think he was just plain crazy." - Shaun Callarman. In a well-organized essay, explain Callarman's view of McCandless, then, take a position yourself on McCandless discussing the extent to which you agree or disagree with his analysis. Support your ...

  5. Into The Wild Analysis

    Character Analysis Of Shaun Callarman's 'Into The Wild' 871 Words | 4 Pages. He made a lot of mistakes based on arrogance. I don't admire him at all for his courage nor his noble ideas. ... Into the Wild Essay In 1992, 24 year old Christopher McCandless abandoned his possessions and decided to hitchhike to Alaska and invent a new life for ...

  6. Callarman's Arguments In Into The Wild

    Callarman's argument from the book "Into the Wild" is that Chris McCandless made a lot of mistakes because he was arrogant and that he had no business going into Alaska with his Romantic silliness and he says that he was just crazy. I disagree with Callarman's argument because I think that Chris McCandless (Alexander Supertramp) was not ...

  7. Into The Wild Analysis Essay

    Into The Wild by Jon Krakauer provides a diverse protagonist named Chris McCandless. Many people have different opinions about how he reacted to his situation and how he dealt with his life. Shaun Callarman claims that he had, "No common sense, and he had no business going to Alaska."

  8. Into the Wild: Full Book Summary

    Into the Wild begins with the discovery of Christopher McCandless's body by a group of Alaskan hunters who visit Denali National Park and Preserve on a yearly excursion. They radio for help. The FBI arrives and removes the body. Krakauer then visits with Wayne Westerberg, who knew Christopher McCandless as "Alex McCandless" and who ...

  9. Expository Reading and Writing Final Essay: Into The Wild

    Expository Reading and Writing Final Essay: Into The Wild Directions: Please pick one of the essay topics below. Please have a typed essay completed, 2-3 pages long, double spaced, 12 point, Times New Roman Font. ... I think he was just plain crazy." -Shaun Callarman Explain Callarman's argument and discuss the extent to which you agree ...

  10. PDF Into the Wild Essay Topics

    into Alaska with his romantic silliness. He made a lot of mistakes based on arrogance. I don't admire him at all for his courage nor his noble ideas. Really, I think he was just plain crazy." -Shaun Callarman • In a well-organized essay, explain Callarman's view of McCandless, then, take a position yourself on McCandless discussing

  11. Into the Wild

    Into the Wild Based on the quote provided in the details, explain Callarmans argument and discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with his analysis. Support with examples from the novel. Into the wild callarmans quote:"I think that Chris McCandless was bright and ignorant at the same time.

  12. Into The Wild Poem Analysis

    Satisfactory Essays. 1268 Words. 6 Pages. Open Document. With the movie Into the Wild and the poem "Give Me Splendid Silent Sun" it had shown all of us as people who live a regular suburban American lifestyle a point of view of another way of life. While looking at the rural and city lives in the movie versus what the poem is like, we see a ...

  13. Movie Review: Sean Penn's 'Into the Wild'

    There is plenty of sorrow to be found in "Into the Wild," Sean Penn's adaptation of the nonfiction bestseller by Jon Krakauer. The story begins with an unhappy family, proceeds through a series of ...

  14. Shaun Callarman Into the Wild

    Additionally, Callarman emphasizes Chris's "grievous errors" and "fatal mistake" in venturing into the Alaskan wilderness ill-prepared. The author adeptly incorporates Callarman's criticism into their analysis by summarizing his viewpoint before offering their own perspective, expressing partial agreement with him.

  15. Shaun Callarman Character Analysis Essay

    Character Analysis Of Shaun Callarman's 'Into The Wild'. He made a lot of mistakes based on arrogance. I don't admire him at all for his courage nor his noble ideas. Really, I think he was just plain crazy," shows that Shaun believes Chris had no common sense in his doing for leaving society for the wild.

  16. Into the Wild Essay.docx

    View Essay - Into the Wild Essay.docx from ENGL 1102 at Kennesaw State University. Bennett1 Kristina Bennett Ms.Kovel Honors American Lit December 10, 2014 Shaun Callarman once said, I think that ... 2014 Shaun Callarman once said, "I think that Chris McCandless was bright and ignorant at the same time.

  17. Into The Wild Review Essay

    Into The Wild Review Essay. Decent Essays. 559 Words; 3 Pages; Open Document. ... Shaun Callarman describes McCandless as a "crazy person" however I believe if you feel the need to take off from society and fulfill your dreams then do so. On the other hand, I do agree with Callarman. McCandless's rash decisions and mistakes are what got ...

  18. Free Essay: into the wild

    Into the Wild Essay Shaun Callarman does not have much good to say about Chris McCandless. He believes that he, "was bright and ignorant at the same time," meaning that Chris was smart; just smart enough to get himself killed in Alaska. Callarman also believes that Chris, "was just plain crazy," which I think is taking his argument too ...

  19. Into The Wild Analysis

    John Callarman's Argument Essay 560 Words | 3 Pages. Into the wild is a book written by Jon Krakauer. There is also a movie directed by sean penn. The main character is chris mccandless. He goes on a fool's trip running away from society and ended up dead in alaska. Shaun callarman says he was bright and ignorant at the same time.

  20. Persuasive Essay On Into The Wild

    Shaun Callarman states, "He had no common sense, and he had no business going into Alaska with his Romantic silliness." Chris knew going into the wild that he did not have much survival skills but that did not stop him from doing what he wanted to do because he did not care about society and was just completely over everything which was why ...

  21. Into the Wild: Chris McCandless

    The essay is generally free of errors in grammar, usage, and mechanics, except for minor slips (such as "definately" and "maybe" versus "may be") that do not interfere with meaning. Sample student essay with a score of 5: Into the Wild Essay Shaun Callarman does not have much good to say about Chris McCandless. He believes that he ...

  22. John Callarman's Argument Essay

    John Callarman's Argument Essay. 560 Words3 Pages. Into the wild is a book written by Jon Krakauer. There is also a movie directed by sean penn. The main character is chris mccandless. He goes on a fool's trip running away from society and ended up dead in alaska. Shaun callarman says he was bright and ignorant at the same time.

  23. Character Analysis Of Chris Mccandless In 'Into The Wild'

    According to Shaun Callarman Chris McCandless has no business going to Alaska with his "Romantic silliness.". Shaun Callarman thinks that McCandless is bright and ignorant because he made mistakes along the way. Callarman doesn't admire his courage and noble ideas. Chris McCandless is a bright person and I disagree with Shaun Callarman.