• Log in
  • Site search

Writing a personal statement for your CV

CV personal statements are like the sales pitch of your CV, but not everyone thinks they're useful. Discover if they're really necessary, how to write a CV personal profile and templates for inspiration

What is a CV personal statement?

A CV personal statement is a concise paragraph or summary, which details what you can bring to a job or company. It's also known as an opening statement, personal profile, personal summary or executive summary.

Sitting at the top of your CV, it's your opportunity to sell yourself to employers and to highlight the relevant skills and experience you possess.

While effectively and succinctly convincing recruiters that you're a good fit for the role, a personal statement gives you the chance to show off your strengths and share your career goals.

'The focus of your CV statement should be to target your offer to employers - why should they hire you and how are you different to other graduates? Therefore, making your personal statement as unique as possible is crucial to ensure you stand out from the crowd,' explains Alex Proctor, careers consultant at the University of Bradford.

Do I need a personal summary on my CV?

Traditionally, almost all CV types include a personal statement but there is some debate about whether you actually need to include one.

Some recruiters and careers advisers believe that personal profiles are one of the most important parts of a CV, as they provide an easily accessible overview of a candidate's ability, while others feel that personal statements are a waste of valuable space and time.

The latter belief is often the case with graduate CVs, as some employers feel that those just stepping onto the career ladder don't necessarily have enough knowledge or experience to warrant a personal statement. Because of this, a graduate's personal profile runs the risk of being bland and generic and stating things that should be a given, such as, 'I'm hardworking and organised,' which is why some recruiters believe that they are best suited to more senior CVs.

So while your CV doesn't need a personal statement, employers spend only seconds looking at application documents. With this in mind, a CV personal statement gives you an invaluable opportunity to make your application stand out as quickly as possible.

Alex believes 'that a CV personal statement is a good idea, because employers often have so many CVs to read through and the personal statement, if clear and concise, can elevate your chances of getting through to the next stage of the recruitment process.'

If you'd like to include a personal statement on your CV it might be best, as a graduate, to focus on your educational background and the career path you'd like to embrace. If you have relevant experiences use these to make your personal statement unique. 'If you haven’t got much work experience, focus on what experience you can extract from your degree,' advises Alex. 'If you have taken part in various projects demonstrate what your role was. Alternatively, if you have written a dissertation, showcase your topic and what skills you have developed from this experience. Employers will value your individuality even if you haven't had masses of practical work experience.'

If you're struggling to give it context and get it right, make an appointment with your university's careers or employability service and ask an adviser to help you hone your writing. 

What should I include in my CV personal profile?

In terms of length, a CV personal profile should be no longer than 150 words. 'It should be short, impactful and aligned effectively with the CV content,' explains David Ainscough, careers consultant team lead and deputy director at the University of Cambridge.

'A personal CV profile should include details of your educational background, evidence of work experience, as well as your career aspirations. You ideally need to ensure you are telling the reader what you can offer skill-wise and don't be afraid to also share any accomplishments,' adds Alex.  

If you're struggling with what to write, break your personal statement down into three parts. Focus on:

  • who you are
  • what you can offer
  • your career aims.

Start by introducing yourself. For example, 'A recent graduate with a 2:1 in English literature from the Hillview University' or a 'Highly-skilled physiotherapist with five years’ experience…'

Next, detail what you can offer the company. Ask yourself why you're suited to the role and cover any relevant skills or experience. If you lack practical work experience instead draw attention to your academic achievements, such as contributing to university publications, which developed written communication, attention to detail and teamworking skills. Or how you applied skills learned on your physical therapy degree during your time as a physio assistant for university sport teams.

Conclude your personal statement by highlighting your career goals. For example, 'I am looking to start my career in the exciting world of publishing and to develop the skills learned through my university studies and internships.'

It's up to you how you present this information; there is no hard and fast rule. However, personal statements are generally displayed as a single paragraph, without a title or subheading. You'll need to keep it consistent with the rest of your CV formatting, meaning that the font size and type will need to be the same throughout your document.

Also, consider the voice and tense you'd like to use. Personal statements can be written in either the first or third person, but you'll need to maintain this voice throughout - don't switch between the two.

Take a look at  how to write a CV .

How can I make it stand out to employers?

  • 'Remember that first impressions count so make sure you're giving the recruiter a comfortable reading experience. Layout and clarity are crucial,' says David.
  • Tailor your CV personal statement (and CV in general) to each application.
  • Be honest. Untruths are easy to uncover and lying on your CV is a criminal offence.
  • Provide evidence of skills and experience but remember to keep it brief. For example, 'experienced event manager, who led a team to organise a charity ball for 150 people, raising £5,000 - a 20% increase on previous years.'
  • Use the job description to help form your CV personal profile.
  • Stick to the word limit.
  • Check for spelling and grammar mistakes. The personal summary sits at the top of your CV so any errors will be immediately apparent.
  • 'Keep it fresh. It needs to be reviewed in each application you make so consider something new to say each time,' adds David.
  • Read it aloud once you've finished writing to make sure it flows.
  • Copy and paste from your  cover letter or from online CV personal statement examples. Your personal summary needs to be unique and personal to you.
  • Include unnecessary personal information such as your age, marital status etc.
  • Use clichés, slang or jargon.
  • Use bland, empty statements like 'I work well independently and as part of a team'. This tells employers absolutely nothing about what you’re capable of.
  • Overuse buzzwords.
  • Include quotes from previous employers.
  • Ramble. Recruiters don't have time to read through waffle, so get to the point.

Think about the connotations of the words you use - 'currently studying' implies things might change, 'trying' implies failure, 'might' or 'maybe' sounds like you're not sure. The words you use have power so choose them carefully. You want to sound confident, positive and enthusiastic.

Find out more about the  top 7 CV mistakes .

CV personal statement examples

To help you get started take a look at the following CV personal profile examples.

As a recent graduate from the University of Townville, with a 2:1 honours degree in marketing, I have undertaken internships at industry-leading agencies such as Beyond Imagination and Noah Freemans. These placements have allowed me to develop sector knowledge and gain hands on experience, as well as expand transferable skills such as commercial awareness, communication and negotiation and analytical skills. My career aim is to gain a role which allows me to further my expertise and take on increased responsibility at a market-leading digital marketing agency.

I am a highly motivated 2:1 forensic science graduate from Groveshire University, looking to secure a graduate position that enables me to use and develop my analytical, attention to detail and communication skills. I have gained relevant experience in both scientific and hospital laboratories, which allowed me to build on my problem solving, concentration and team working skills. My career goal is to assume a role that enables me to analyse and interpret forensic data and to eventually move into crime scene investigation.

Remember; avoid copying and pasting ready-made examples. Instead use them as a guide to craft your own, tailored CV personal statement. Take a look at our  example CVs .

Find out more

  • Learn more about  applying for jobs .
  • Get more advice on CVs and cover letters .

How would you rate this page?

On a scale where 1 is dislike and 5 is like

  • Dislike 1 unhappy-very
  • Like 5 happy-very

Thank you for rating the page

StandOut CV

CV personal statement examples

Andrew Fennell photo

If you want to secure job interview, you need a strong personal statement at the top of your CV.

Your CV personal statement is a short paragraph which sits at the very top of your CV – and it’s aim is to summarise the benefits of hiring you and encourage employers to read your CV in full.

In this guide I have included 17 CV personal statement examples from a range of professions and experience levels, plus a detailed guide of how to write your own personal statement that will get you noticed by employers

CV templates 

17 CV personal statement examples

To start this guide, I have included 10 examples of good personal statements, to give you an idea of how a personal statement should look , and what should be included.

Note: personal statements are generally used by junior candidates – if you are experienced, check out our CV profile examples instead.

Graduate CV personal statement (no experience)

Graduate with no experience CV personal statement

Although this  graduate has no paid work experience, they compensate for it by showcasing all of the skills and knowledge the have gained during their studies, and demonstrating how they apply their knowledge in academic and personal projects.

When you have little or no experience, it’s important to draw out transferable workplace skills from your studies and extracurricular work, to showcase them to employers.

Graduate CV personal statement (part time freelance experience)

Graduate with part time freelance experience CV personal statement

This candidate has graduated with a degree in biochemistry but actually wants to start a career in digital marketing after providing some digital freelance services to fund their studies.

In this case, they haven’t made much mention of their studies because they aren’t relevant to the digital marketing agencies they are applying to. Instead they have focused their personal statement around their freelance work and passion for the digital field – although they still mention the fact they are degree educated to prove their academic success.

CV builder

School leaver CV personal statement (no experience)

School leaver with no experience CV personal statement

This candidate is 16 years old and has no work experience whatsoever, but they compensate for this by detailing their academic achievements that relate to the roles they are applying for (maths and literacy are important requirements in finance and accountancy roles).

They also add some info on their extracurricular activities and school work-placements, to strengthen this student CV further.

    Top tips for writing a CV personal statement

  • Thoroughly research the jobs and companies you are planning to apply for to identify the type of candidate they are looking for – try to reflect that in your personal statement
  • Don’t be afraid to brag a little – include some of your most impressive achievements from education, work or personal life
  • Focus on describing the benefits an employer will get from hiring you. Will you help them to get more customers? Improve their workplace? Save them time and money?
  • If you have no work experience, demonstrate transferable workplace skills from your education, projects, or even hobbies

School leaver CV personal statement (part time experience)

School leaver with part time experience CV personal statement

Although this person has only just left school, they have also undertaken some part-time work in a call centre alongside their studies.

To make the most of this experience, they have combined their academic achievements with their workplace exposure in this personal statement.

By highlighting their GCSE results, summer programme involvement, work experience and expressing their ambitions to progress within sales, this candidate really makes an appealing case for hiring them.

College leaver CV personal statement (no experience)

College leaver with no experience CV personal statement

This candidate has left college with good grades, but does not yet have any work experience.

To compensate for the lack of workplace exposure, they have made their A level results prominent and highlighted skills and experience which would benefit the employers they are targeting.

Any recruiter reading this profile can quickly understand that this candidate has great academic achievements, a passion for IT and finance and the ability to transfer their skills into an office environment.

College student CV personal statement (freelance experience)

College student with freelance experience CV personal statement

As this student has picked up a small amount of freelance writing work during their studies, they have made sure to brag about it in their personal statement.

They give details on their relevant A level studies to show the skills they are learning, and boost this further by highlighting the fact that they have been applying these skills in a real-life work setting by providing freelance services.

They also include key action verbs that recruiters will be looking for , such as creative writing, working to deadlines, and producing copy.

Academic CV personal statement

Academic CV personal statement

Aside from junior candidates, the only other people who might use a personal statement, are academic professionals; as their CV’s tend to be more longer and detailed than other professions.

This candidate provides a high level overview of their field of study, length of experience, and the roles they have held within universities.

School leaver CV personal statement with and sports experience

School leaver with part time experience CV personal statement

Although this person has no work experience, they are still able to show employers the value of hiring them by selling their other achievements and explaining how they could benefit an organisation.

They expand on their sports club involvement to demonstrate their teamwork, leadership skills, communication and motivation, which are all important traits in the workplace, and will be looked upon favourably by recruiters and hiring managers.

They also draw upon their future plans to study business studies and take a part time job, to further prove their ambition and dedication.

History graduate CV personal statement

History graduate CV personal statement

This history graduate proves their aptitude for both academic achievement and workplace aptitude by showcasing valuable skills from their degree and voluntary work.

They do this by breaking down the key requirements for each and showing how their skills could be beneficial for future employers, such as listening, communication, and crisis management.

They also describe how their ability to balance studies alongside voluntary work has not only boosted their knowledge and skills, but also given excellent time management and organisational skills – which are vital assets to any employer.

Law graduate CV personal statement

Law graduate CV personal statement

This legal graduate makes the most from their work university work placements by using it to bulk out the contents of their CV personal statement.

They include their degree to show they have the necessary qualifications for legal roles, which is crucial, but more importantly, they showcase how they applied their legal skills within a real-life work setting.

They give a brief overview of the types of legal professionals they have been working alongside and the type of work they have been carrying out – this is all it takes to get the attention of recruiters and show employers they have what it takes to fulfil roles in the legal sector.

Medical student CV personal statement

Medical student CV personal statement

This medical student proves their fit for the role by showcasing the key skills they have gained from their studies and their work experience placements.

In just these few sentences, they are able to highlight the vast amount of experience they have across different disciplines in the industry, something which is particularly important in the medical sector.

As they have not graduated yet and are still studying, they have provided proof of their most recent grades. This can give the recruiter some indication as to the type of grade they could be graduating with in the near future.

Masters student CV personal statement

Masters student CV personal statement

This masters student has started by specifying their area of study, in this case, accounting, and given details about the specific areas of finance they are most interested in. This can hint towards their career goals and passions.

They have then carefully listed some of the key areas of accounting and finance that they are proficient in. For example, business finance, advanced corporate finance and statistics.

They have also outlined some of the transferable skills needed for accounting roles that employers will be looking out for, such as communication, attention to detail and analytical skills.

Finance student CV personal statement

Finance student CV personal statement

As this finance student has recently undertaken some relevant work experience, they’ve made sure to shout about this in their personal profile.

But more than this, they have included a list of some of the important finance skills they gained as a result of this work experience – for example, financial reporting, processing invoices and month-end reconciliations.

Plus, through power words and phrases such as ‘prevent loss’ and ‘ improve upon accuracy and efficiency’, they have also showcased how they can apply these skills in a workplace setting to benefit the potential employer.

Internship  CV personal statement

Internship CV personal statement

This digital marketing professional has started their personal profile by outlining their most relevant qualifications and work experience, most notably their freelance role as a content manager.

They have also provided examples of some of the key marketing skills that potential employers might be looking for, including very detailed examples of the platforms and tools they are proficient in – for example, LinkedIn, Twitter and Pinterest.

They have then closed their statement by giving a detailed description of the type of role or opportunity they are looking for. In this case, an in-house position in a marketing company.

Graduate career changer personal statement

Graduate career changer CV personal statement

Switching careers as a graduate can be tough. Especially when it comes to writing a personal statement that will attract employers in your new chosen field.

This candidate is looking to move from history teaching into journalism, so they have created a statement which briefly mentions their current workplace, but mainly focuses on highlighting transferable skills which are relevant to journalism. They achieve this by discussing the writing skills they use in their current role, and mentioning their hobby of writing – including some publications they have been featured in for extra brownie points.

Business management graduate personal statement

Business management graduate CV personal statement

This business management proves their ability to work within a junior business management position by swiftly highlighting their impressive degree (to ensure it is not missed) and summarising some of the real-life experience they have gained in management during their university placements and volunteering. They do not let their lack of paid work experience, stop them demonstrating their valuable skills.

PhD graduate

PhD graduate CV personal statement

PhD graduate roles attract a lot of competition, so it’s important that your CV contains a personal statement that will quickly impress and attract recruiters.

This candidate provides a short-but-comprehensive overview of their academic achievements, whilst demonstrating their exceptional level of knowledge in research, languages and publication writing.

By highlighting a number of skills and abilities that are in high-demand in the academic workplace, this CV is very likely to get noticed and land interviews.

How to write a personal statement for your CV

Now that you’ve seen what a personal statement should look like and the type of content it should contain, follow this detailed guide to one for your own CV – and start racking those interviews up.

Guide contents

What is a CV personal statement?

Cv personal statement or cv profile, personal statement format, what to include in a cv personal statement.

  • Personal statement mistakes

How to write persuasively

A personal statement is a short paragraph at the top of your CV which gives employers an overview of your education, skills and experience

It’s purpose is to capture the attention of busy recruiters and hiring managers when your CV is first opened – encouraging them to read the rest of it.

You achieve this by writing a tailored summary of yourself that explains your suitability for the roles you are applying for at a very high level, and matches your target job descriptions .

Personal statement basics

One question candidates often ask me is , “what is the difference between a personal statement and a CV profile?”

To be honest, they are almost the same – they are both introductory paragraphs that sit at the top of your CV… but there are 2 main differences

A personal statement tends to be used more by junior candidates (graduates, school leavers etc.) and is relatively long and detailed.

A CV profile tends to be favoured by more experienced candidates , and is shorter in length than a personal statement.

CV personal statement vs profile

Note: If you are an experienced candidate, you may want to switch over to my CV profile writing guide , or example CV profiles page.

To ensure you grab recruiters’ attention with your personal statement, lay it out in the following way.

Positioning

You need to ensure that your personal statement sits at the very top of your CV, and all of it should be totally visible to readers, without the need to scroll down the page.

Do this by reducing the top page margin and minimising the space taken up by your contact details.

CV margins

This will ensure that your whole personal statement can be seen, as soon as your CV is opened.

We have a Word CV template which can help you to get this right.

Size/length

Your personal statement needs to contain enough detail to provide an introduction to your skills and knowledge, but not so much detail that it bores readers.

To strike the right balance, anything between 8-15 lines of text is perfect – and sentences should be sharp and to-the-point.

As with the whole of your CV or resume , your personal statement should be written in a simple clean font at around size 10-12 to ensure that it can be read easily by all recruiters and employers.

Keep the text colour simple , ensuring that it contrasts the background (black on white is best) and break it into 2 or even 3 paragraphs for a pleasant reading experience.

It should also be written in a punchy persuasive tone, to help you sell yourself and increase your chances of landing interviews , I cover how to do this in detail further down the guide.

Quick tip: A poorly written CV will fail to impress recruiters and employers. Use our quick-and-easy CV Builder to create a winning CV in minutes with professional CV templates and pre-written content for every industry.

Once you have the style and format of your personal statement perfected, you need to fill it with compelling content that tells recruiters that your CV is worth reading.

Here’s what needs to go into your personal statement…

Before you start writing your personal statement, it’s crucial that you research your target roles to find out exactly what your new potential employers are looking for in a candidate.

Run a search for your target jobs on one of the major job websites , look through plenty of adverts and make a list of the candidate requirements that frequently appear.

Key words in job adverts

This research will show you exactly what to include in your personal statement in order to impress the recruiters who will be reading it.

Education and qualifications are an important aspect of your personal statement, especially if you are a junior candidate.

You should highlight your highest and most relevant qualifications, whether that is a degree, A levels or GCSEs. You could potentially go into some more detail around modules, papers etc. if they are relevant to the roles you are applying for.

It’s important that you discuss the experience you have gained in your personal statement, to give readers an idea of the work you are comfortable undertaking.

This can of course be direct employed work experience, but it doesn’t have to be.

You can also include:

  • School/college Uni work placements
  • Voluntary work
  • Personal projects
  • Hobbies/interests

As with all aspects of your CV , the content should be tailored to match the requirements of your target roles.

Whilst discussing your experience, you should touch upon skills used, industries worked in, types of companies worked for, and people you have worked with.

Where possible, try to show the impact your actions have made. E.g . A customer service agent helps to make sales for their employer.

Any industry-specific knowledge you have that will be useful to your new potential employers should be made prominent within your personal statement.

For example

  • Knowledge of financial regulations will be important for accountancy roles
  • Knowledge of IT operating systems will be important for IT roles
  • Knowledge of the national curriculum will be important for teachers

You should also include some information about the types of roles you are applying for, and why you are doing so. Try to show your interest and passion for the field you are hoping to enter, because employers want to hire people who have genuine motivation and drive in their work.

This is especially true if you don’t have much work experience, as you need something else to compensate for it.

CV personal statement mistakes

The things that you omit from your personal statement can be just as important as the things you include.

Try to keep the following out of your personal statement..

Irrelevant info

Any information that doesn’t fall into the requirements of your target roles can be cut out of your personal statement. For example, if you were a professional athlete 6 years ago, that’s great – but it won’t be relevant if you’re applying to advertising internships, so leave it out.

Generic clichés

Poor resume profile

If you are describing yourself as a “ dynamic team player with high levels of motivation and enthusiasm” you aren’t doing yourself any favours.

These cliché terms are vastly overused and don’t provide readers with any factual details about you – so keep them to a minimum.

Stick to solid facts like education, skills , experience, achievements and knowledge.

If you really want to ensure that your personal statement makes a big impact, you need to write in a persuasive manner.

So, how do you so this?

Well, you need to brag a little – but not too much

It’s about selling yourself and appearing confident, without overstepping the mark and appearing arrogant.

For example, instead of writing.

“Marketing graduate with an interest in entering the digital field”

Be creative and excite the reader by livening the sentence up like this,

“Marketing graduate with highest exam results in class and a passion for embarking on a long and successful career within digital”

The second sentence is a much more interesting, makes the candidate appear more confident, throws in some achievements, and shows off a wider range of writing skills.

Quick tip: A poorly written CV will fail to impress recruiters and employers. Use our quick-and-easy CV Builder to create a winning CV in minutes with professional templates and pre-written content for every industry.

Your own personal statement will be totally unique to yourself, but by using the above guidelines you will be able to create one which shows recruiters everything they need.

Remember to keep the length between 10-20 lines and only include the most relevant information for your target roles.

You can also check our school leaver CV example , our best CV templates , or our library of example CVs from all industries.

Good luck with the job hunt!

  • International edition
  • Australia edition
  • Europe edition

Black and white photo of 1950s waitresses.

How to write a personal statement for your CV

A personal statement on your CV is a great way to give your job application extra impact. Here are some examples to help you get started.

  • Looking for a job? Explore the range of vacancies on Guardian Jobs and find the perfect role for you

A critical aspect of creating an effective CV is writing a personal statement, sometimes called a profile or career summary, that enables the recruiter to quickly identify the strategic value you can add to their organisation. Your CV should be a self-marketing document aimed at persuading the recruiter to interview you – and your personal statement is a critical part of making this happen.

Many candidates struggle with writing the statement but it doesn’t have to be a difficult as you may think. A well written statement can be between 50 and 200 words, although it is important not to ramble. Remember you always have your cover letter for interesting and engaging information.

It’s important to read the job specification carefully and ensure not only that your skills and experience match but you reflect this in your statement. I am often asked whether a statement should be written in the first or third person and, while there are no definitive rules about this, my preference is always to write in the first person because the CV is all about you and your skillset. This doesn’t mean that you have to add “I” at the beginning of each sentence, however. The reader knows it’s about you so avoid this type of repetition and keep them engaged in your value and transferable skills.

For example an opening statement without the opening “I” could read:

As a highly-motivated and results orientated manager within the luxury hotel sector, I have a proven track record of providing exemplary levels of service to a broad range of guests, including VIPs and high-profile individuals.

This example reads naturally and flows for the reader, whereas if an “I” was inserted at the start, while not hugely different, it would read more like a list. As you move forward with additional information it then becomes difficult to break out of the format you have started.

As a general rule, it’s best to break the statement into three sections:

Who you are

As recent graduate from Durham University, with a 2:1 honours degree in media communications, I have undertaken several internships within leading organisations such as Bertelsmann and Times Warner. These placements have enabled me to develop not only specific media industry experience, but also a valuable and transferable skill set in this fast-paced sector.

The above opening allowes the recruiter to quickly identify where you are coming from, that you have had industry experience (something that may be in the selection criteria) and core transferable skills. This in itself could be enough for your opening statement, but it can be expanded upon by adding some additional information.

What you can bring to the table

During placement with Bertelsmann, I worked in the media division contributing to projects – such as the award-winning China Max Documentary – and managed my own research, liaised with various divisions, formulated media reports and participated in group project meetings. Utilising excellent communication skills, I developed and maintained successful working relationships with both internal and external staff.

Your career aim

Looking to secure a position in a media organisation, where I can bring immediate and strategic value and develop current skillset further.

An example of a poorly written personal statement

Tim is a recent graduate from Durham University with a 2:1 honours degree in media communications. I have undertaken several internships within leading organisations. Tim is now looking to secure a position in a media organisation where I can develop my current skill set.

The mismatch of first and third person is not only confusing to the reader, but it almost sounds like a profile about different people. It also lacks specific detail and proof of what value the candidate could bring to the company.

Key points on writing a dynamic and interesting personal statement:

  • Get straight to the point: avoid lengthy descriptions and make your testimonies punchy and informative.
  • Keep it between 50 to 200 words maximum.
  • If you have enough space, use 1.5 line spacing to make you statement easier to read.
  • Match person and job specifications with well written copy.
  • Read your profile out loud to ensure it reads naturally.
  • Don’t mix first and third person sentences.

Other essential resources

Three excellent cover letter examples

CV templates: graduates, career changers and ladder climbers

What questions to ask at the end of your interview

How to write a CV when you lack direct work experience

Elizabeth Bacchus is a consultant and founder of The Successful CV Company .

Looking for a job? Browse Guardian Jobs for your next career step.

  • Guardian Careers
  • The Careers Blog
  • Applications

Comments (…)

Most viewed.

Protect your data

This site uses cookies and related technologies for site operation, and analytics as described in our Privacy Policy . You may choose to consent to our use of these technologies, reject non-essential technologies, or further manage your preferences.

  • CV and Cover Letter
  • Craft a winning personal...

Craft a winning personal statement for your CV to stand out

8 min read · Updated on April 18, 2024

Charlotte Grainger

Let the personal statement on your CV speak volumes about you

You probably have a fairly good idea of how to write a CV . Your employment history , education , and qualifications are relatively easy to pull together as you just need to look at dates, your previous job specs, and what you've achieved over the years.

The personal statement is often the trickiest component of a CV to write. Thankfully, we've got this comprehensive guide to help you write a winning one.

What is a personal statement for a CV?

Your personal statement is a short paragraph that sits at the top of your CV, just below your name and contact details. Diving into three key aspects, this section offers the recruiter or hiring manager a powerful overview of you as a professional:

1.    Who you are

2.    Your suitability for the role and the value you can add

3.    Your career goals 

Why include a personal statement on your CV?

It is estimated that recruiters spend an average of less than 8 seconds reviewing a CV before deciding whether the applicant is a good fit. 

As the personal statement is the first section they will read, it must be powerful and tailored to the job you're applying for to successfully showcase your suitability. If it's not, you're unlikely to convince the recruiter you're the talent they need for the job.

5 tips on writing your personal statement

Before we look at some personal statement examples, let's take a look at the basics. Here are some expert-backed tips for writing a good personal statement on your CV.

1. Keep it short and on point

Keep your personal statement clean and concise. It's typically around four sentences long, or about 50 to 200 words. If you're overshooting that word count, see which nonessential parts can be omitted.

2. Get the layout right from the start

Make sure that your layout is consistent with the rest of your CV's formatting . That means maintaining the same font size , font type, and text justification. Recruiters will notice these minor details, and so it's smart to get ahead of the game here. 

3. Use a heading (if there's space!)

You can add a “personal statement” heading in the same way that you'd title the subsequent sections of your CV. However, if you're tight on space, you can cut the heading as recruiters will know what this paragraph is nonetheless.

4. Choose the right perspective

The first person is acceptable for a statement (“I am an IT professional looking for a job in…”) as is the third person (“An IT professional looking for a job in…”). Choose the point of view that's most comfortable to write in, but, as always, keep it consistent with the rest of your CV.

5. Cut back on unnecessary words

If you're writing in the third person, remove all pronouns. Otherwise, it sounds existentially awkward, rather than objective. For example, “She is a retail professional seeking a management role…” would become “A retail professional seeking a management role…”

How to write a personal statement for a CV

We've looked at the purpose of a personal statement, what it should include, and how it should look on the page. Now let's zoom in on exactly how to write a winning statement.

When writing, keep in mind that the personal statement on your CV is your elevator pitch; it's the equivalent of the “Tell me about yourself” or “Why should I hire you?” question in an interview. Below, we break down what you need to include in your personal statement.

Part 1: Who you are

Your opening statement needs to tell the prospective employer where you stand in your career. 

This introduction could include your current role, years of experience, and what you like the most about your career or professional field. It gives the recruiter a hint of the qualities that make you valuable to the vacancy.

Your first sentence may read like so:

As a successful digital marketing professional with five years specialising in e-commerce, I have recently worked with several global brands in the sector to improve their marketing strategy and boost their reach.

Part 2: Your suitability and value

The next part of your statement should line up with the requirements in the job description and prove your relevant and impressive qualifications.

It's always best to address here the essential job specifications to articulate from the beginning that you're the right person for the job. For example, if the role requires management experience or a certain degree and you have these, say so.

Your middle sentences may look like this:

I have experience in optimising quality digital products via my most recent role and am therefore in tune with the latest developments across the online landscape. As a result, I have devised winning branding strategies for e-commerce businesses that are robust, customer-centric and set for aggressive growth.

Part 3: Your career goals

The last part of your personal statement should be short and snappy as it's reaffirming why you are applying for this vacancy.

It might read something like so:

I am currently looking for a senior branding or marketing management role within the e-commerce sector where I can maintain my strong track record and deliver similar results.

Complete CV personal profile examples

In addition to the samples above, here are a couple of complete personal statement examples to give you an idea of what yours should look like.

For a graduate, written in the third person:

A recent graduate with a first-class BSc degree in Mathematics, specialising in analytics and statistics. Holds commercial experience within the finance sector, thanks to an internship with a corporate UK business, and has resultantly developed technical skills in data science and data engineering. Has a proven ability to meet deadlines, prioritise, problem solve, and maintain high standards having balanced a part-time job alongside studies over the last three years. Now looking to secure a place on a graduate programme that will provide exposure to data science and career progression opportunities.

Addressing a recent redundancy, written in the first person:

I am a skilled and successful Product Engineer within the automotive industry, with an HND in mechanical engineering and seven years of experience in the sector. Having worked in a number of labs handling vehicle-based testing and mentoring development technicians, I am confident in managing teams in a hands-on environment and running new development projects from briefing to sign off. Currently looking for a role that complements my skill set and experience. Available immediately.

Writing your personal statement: common mistakes to avoid  

There are some common profile errors that you should avoid. Steer clear of these popular pitfalls to keep your personal statement as powerful as possible.

Buzzword overload

Are you an extremely self-motivated, ambitious professional with extensive experience and passion for a certain industry? We thought so.

Buzzwords are great, and you'll find them in abundance in job adverts. But it's best to sprinkle just a few through your personal statement as they don't particularly provide evidence of your skill or ability. It's much stronger to show the employer how you're self-motivated and ambitious with an example.

Using a generic personal statement

You might think that your personal statement can work for every application. For the most part, it will, because, in theory, the jobs you're applying for will be similar and match your skill set.

However, you must tweak and tailor your statement (and your entire CV) so that it targets the skills each vacancy requires. Otherwise, it won't be as impactful.

Including too much waffle

As you begin to plan and write the personal statement for your CV, you'll most likely find that you have a lot more to say than you originally thought. Be careful not to overwrite as you may be left with a statement that's clogged with too many adjectives and is clunky to read.

As a rule of thumb, highlight your best bits in your personal statement and save the details for your cover letter .

FAQs about your personal statement 

Now that we've shown you some examples of a personal statement on a CV, there's just one last thing to cover. Here are some frequently asked questions on the topic:

How long should a personal statement be?

When you're writing a personal statement for a CV, your word count should be between 50 and 200 words. Be sure not to waste any space with unnecessary waffle here. 

Does a personal statement have other names?

Yes! The personal statement on your CV may also be called a personal profile, a CV summary, or a professional summary. 

Does a CV (really) need a personal statement?

Yes, most CVs require a personal statement at the top of the page. Use our guide to help you write a summary that grabs the hiring manager's attention for the right reasons. 

Stand out with a winning personal statement

Writing a captivating personal statement on your CV is a quick way to hook potential employers. Make sure that your summary showcases what makes you unique and adds value to your application. 

Still unsure about your personal statement? Get in touch with one of our career experts by requesting a free CV critique today! 

Recommended reading: 

Professional email salutations that work (with examples)

Written communication: definition and examples

How long should a cover letter be and what should it include?

Related Articles:

How to choose the best CV paper

Professional CV writing service cost in 2024

Choosing the optimal CV font size for readability & impact

See how your CV stacks up.

Career Advice Newsletter

Our experts gather the best career & CV tips weekly. Delivered weekly, always free.

Thanks! Career advice is on its way.

Share this article:

Let's stay in touch.

Subscribe today to get job tips and career advice that will come in handy.

Your information is secure. Please read our privacy policy for more information.

jobs.ac.uk - Great jobs for bright people

  • Skip to primary navigation
  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to primary sidebar
  • Skip to secondary sidebar
  • Skip to footer

career-advice.jobs.ac.uk

How To Write A Personal Statement

personal statement

A personal statement is usually situated at the top of a cv under your personal information and is one of the first sections of a cv that the reader will come across. You have a limited amount of time to make an impact on the reader (no more than 30 seconds to be precise) therefore the effect has to be immediate. There are various formats and types of cv that are useful dependant on the job role or your skillset, however, almost all include a personal profile. In addition generally, most application forms will also include a personal statement section.

“This is your banner heading summarising your main selling points”

So what should this heading or opening paragraph include.

  • A brief overview of who you are and what personal qualities you have to offer.
  • Reference to your skills ensuring they are specifically tailored to that of the position
  • Outline your areas of expertise and experience

In addition, it should entice the reader to want to know more and go on to read the rest of your cv or application form.

How long should a personal statement be?

There is no definitive answer providing the information is relevant and interesting, however generally a profile will consist of between 30 – 60 words. No more than a few short sentences around 5 lines long.

How do we go about writing a personal profile?

  • Firstly you should think about compiling a list of descriptive words or phrases that you may wish to use when explaining the above-mentioned bullet points.

Some sample words; Approachable, Analysed, Caring, Challenging, Creative, Diplomatic, Experienced, Flexible, Helpful, Influential, Inspiring, Motivated, Organised, Professional.

Some sample skills; Effective listener, Good at motivating others, Training, Writing, Public Speaking, Completing Forms, Cooking, Innovative thinker.

  • Your personal profile should be written in third person narrative, as written in the first person will appear as only your opinion of yourself.
  • Compile a few short sentences combining your pre-selected words and key skills. It is recommended you have two versions of your profile, one which targets a specific job or industry sector and a general multi-purpose version which you can adapt dependant on your requirements. This will also help if you are applying for a range of different jobs.
  • You must feel comfortable in explaining and justifying the points included and be mindful of not sounding “too good to be true”.

It is not uncommon to be asked questions in relation to points included within your profile for example;

Q: You state that you are a good problem solver can you provide an example of a problem you have solved and how?

Q: You mention you are an innovative thinker, can you explain an idea that you have suggested that was successful?

  • Where possible have someone proofread or help suggest points for you to include as it can sometimes be difficult to write in a positive and descriptive manner about yourself.

To conclude here are some example profiles and important Do’s and Don’ts:

  • Set the tone appropriately and word in a positive manner that will help precondition the reader.
  • Contain only appropriate and relevant information.
  • Keep it within the recommended length or you run the risk of waffling.
  • Pigeon hole yourself to one type of person or profession (unless your intention is to achieve one very specific objective).
  • Include and information in relation to your life eg, married, single, age, how long you have been unemployed.
  • Go over the top, try where possible to keep it simple and do not include anything negative in this opening paragraph.

Example Profiles

A responsible, intelligent and experienced retail professional with an extensive background in fashion and children’s wear both in large departments and small boutiques. Highly creative, adaptable and bright individual with an excellent eye for visual detail and design.

A skilled and adaptable Project Manager, with experience in implementing and overseeing change. Has a proven track record of exceeding performance expectations, remaining customer focused and adhering to budgets and timescales. Ability to bring about the fundamental changes needed in response to changing commercial, legislative and financial factors. Strong strategic vision; along with the ability to successfully deliver complex multi-track projects.

An energetic, ambitious individual who has developed a mature and responsible approach to any tasks undertaken. As a Finance graduate who also possesses three years’ managerial experience, now seeks a senior financial management role. Has the ability to organise people and systems in order to achieve objectives and is used to working under pressure and meet strict deadlines.

For more advice see:

  • What You Should Include in a Personal Statement
  • Writing a Personal Profile for your CV
  • How to create a CV: Personal Statement
  • Preparing to Change Jobs? Make sure your CV is ready too!

What did you think of our article? - please rate

Share this article

Reader Interactions

You may also like:.

' src=

5th July 2020 at 1:27 am

Outstanding post however , I was wondering if you could write a litte more on this subject? I’d be very thankful if you could elaborate a little bit further. Cheers!

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Please enter an answer in digits: 12 + 15 =

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

How to Write a CV Personal Statement [+4 Real-life Examples]

Background Image

Creating an effective CV takes time and close attention to detail. You've already included your jobs and experience , and now you want to allow the recruiter or hiring manager to understand the strategic value you can add.

This is when you need to utilize a personal statement at the top of your CV.

How to Write a CV Personal Statement [+4 Real-life Examples] 

cv personal statement example

What is a Personal Statement? 

A personal statement is a few brief and direct sentences at the top of your CV. The personal statement is also referred to as a career summary or personal mission statement.

This is used to grab the attention of the recruiter or hiring manager and summarizes essential experiences or training that you can bring to this position.

Why do I Need a Personal Statement?

A recruiter or hiring manager is tasked with sorting through an enormous amount of resumes every single day. A personal statement is a way to separate yourself from the other applicants.

This statement summarizes your experience and highlights your unique talents . The CV personal statement is meant to demonstrate why you are the perfect fit for the job. 

Even med students need a medical school personal statement , as it is what differentiates them from all the other students applying. Plus, it allows them to share their personal stories and objectives.

Where do I Start? 

Always begin by reading the job description carefully and thoroughly.

Your personal statement should be tailored to each job description, so it explicitly states the value you’ll bring to the position you are applying. A generic personal statement cannot do that. 

Once you have a solid handle on the job description, you can begin writing. It’s important to keep your personal statement brief, about 50-200 words will do.

Don’t forget that you have your whole cover letter to show some personality and include engaging content.

The personal statement should be a quick summary that highlights why you are the best person for the job. 

You’ll need to decide whether you are writing your personal statement in first- or third-person. This should follow how you've written the rest of your CV.

For example, if you've already written, “I grew and developed a team of 50 salespeople,” in your CV then you will want to keep your personal statement in first-person to match the prevailing style.

No matter what you choose, make sure that you keep it consistent throughout. Do not switch between first- and third-person as that will get confusing to the hiring manager.

Writing a personal statement for your CV in first-person does not mean you need to start every sentence with “I.”

There are ways to craft your personal statement to sound snappy, concise and personal, and here are a few examples to help inspire your personal statement. 

CV Personal Statement Examples

It doesn’t matter what chose as your desired career or how much experienc e you have, use these examples to drive the creation of your own personal statement.

You can take snippets from each or write something completely different. Always remember that your personal statement is a reflection of yourself and should align with your own personal goals and experience.

If these examples don’t fit your exact career, feel free to take some pointers and write yours from scratch. 

#1: Personal Statement Example for Recent Graduate CV

“As a recent graduate from university, with an honors degree in communications, I held several internships within leading organizations, including Bertelsmann. These internships enabled me to gain experience in the field and learn how to serve up valuable contributions in a fast-paced, professional environment.”

Explanation: This example should be customized to include the university you’ve graduated from and any relevant internships. A compelling personal statement always highlights relevant skills and experiences.

In this case, a recent graduate does not have extensive experience in the workforce, so soft skills like experiencing success in a fast-paced work environment and becoming a trusted team member become even more critical.

#2: Personal Statement Example for Returning to the Workforce CV

“A highly motivated and experienced office administrator, I am currently looking to resume my professional career after an extended hiatus to raise my family. Proficient in all Microsoft Office programs, I can lead meetings and work with clients to keep your office running smoothly and efficiently. After spending several years volunteering as an administrative worker for a local charity, I am committed to resuming my professional career on a full-time basis.”

Explanation: After time off from a career, it can be hard to break back into the market. This personal statement outlines the reason for the break, the relevant qualifications and what the applicant has been doing in between jobs.

Any volunteer experience becomes highly relevant when there is no concrete professional experience to draw upon, to demonstrate the use of those skills. 

job search masterclass

#3: Personal Statement Example for a Career Change CV

“With over 15 years as a sales manager, I have extensive experience building high-functioning sales teams that consistently achieve budget numbers. In fact, my ability to grow talent led to a 20% increase in annual renewals across the board. Now, after 15 years, I am seeking new challenges to flex my marketing muscles in a fast-paced environment.” 

Explanation: When changing careers , it's essential to highlight skills that are transferable between industries.

In this case, leadership and team-building experience can apply to any industry. Homing in on concrete numbers and percentages increases credibility when applying for a position.

The applicant ends with the reason behind the desired career change. This part is not necessary but may be appealing to some hiring managers who are wondering what the impetus for the career change.

#4: Personal Statement Example for a Experienced Professional CV

“As a friendly, professional and highly trained educator, I am passionate about teaching and have an innate ability to understand student’s needs. Creating a safe and productive environment for optimal learning is my top priority. I’ve worked as a teacher for nearly 10 years in a variety of subjects and my experience and skill set make me the perfect fit for your team.”

Explanation: With more experience comes more skills and a better idea of strengths and weaknesses. Showcasing your passion for the industry is a great way to begin a personal statement, as it shows the hiring manager your dedication to the craft. 

A personal statement can be written in many different ways, but it is ultimately up to you to determine what skills you want to highlight for your chosen position.

You can follow these examples or take learnings from each to contribute towards your personal statement. 

If you understand the job you are applying for and know the unique skill set that you bring to the table, you will have a stellar personal statement for your CV that will get you across the table from the hiring manager in no time.  

Suggested Reading:

  • How to Write a CV (Curriculum Vitae) in 2024 [31+ Examples]
  • 43+ Resume Tips and Tricks to Land Your Next Job
  • 150+ Must-Have Skills for Any Resume  [With Tips + Tricks]
  • How to Answer “Tell Me About Yourself”

cookies image

To provide a safer experience, the best content and great communication, we use cookies. Learn how we use them for non-authenticated users.

Politics latest: Polls set to open across England and Wales as voting takes place in local elections

England and Wales are holding a series of elections on Thursday, with several regional mayors and police and crime commissioners being decided as well as council seats up for grabs. Polling stations will be open from 7am to 10pm.

Wednesday 1 May 2024 23:28, UK

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

  • First illegal migrants bound for Rwanda detained
  • Jon Craig:  Raids were like something from Miami Vice
  • Scottish government survives confidence vote
  • Yousaf denies he was victim of plot to oust him
  • 'Realistic prospect' Tories try to oust PM after local elections
  • Local elections:  All you need to know about this week's votes
  • Live reporting by Faith Ridler and (earlier)  Charlotte Chelsom-Pill

We'll be back from 6am as polls prepare to open in local elections across the country, with mayoral and police commissioner votes also planned.

Until then, here are the headlines:

Scotland's First Minister Humza Yousaf has resigned – days after he cut the SNP's powersharing deal with the Scottish Greens.

It followed a bitter row over the SNP's climbdown on climate targets as he said the agreement between the parties had "served its purpose".

As a result, his former Green allies teamed up with the Conservatives, Labour and Liberal Democrats to get behind two no-confidence motions, one in himself as leader of Scotland and another regarding the entire Scottish government.

Now attention turns to another SNP leadership contest and what the divisions in Scottish politics could mean for the future of the independence campaign.  

On the Sky News Daily , Matt Barbet speaks to Paul Hutcheon, political editor of the Daily Record, and Shona Craven, from The National, about how the SNP can move on after Mr Yousaf's resignation.

Plus, Connor Gillies , our Scotland correspondent , explains how the leadership election will unfold.  

Sir Keir Starmer told Sky News today he doesn't "believe" in the government's Rwanda scheme.

He said Labour would ditch it, vowing not to "flog a dead horse".

His plan would be to "stop the gangs that are running this vile trade" of smuggling people across the Channel, working with law enforcement in Europe.

"And that's why I've already had discussions in The Hague (including with EU law enforcement agency Europol) about how quickly we can share data intelligence to do that," he said.

"I'm absolutely determined to tackle this problem because the government has lost control of the borders."

Watch more below:

It's been three years since the 2,600 council seats up for grabs this week were in play - and Sir Keir Starmer couldn't be in more different place as he goes into polling day.

Back in 2021, facing an ascending Boris Johnson, Sir Keir lost the Hartlepool by-election, hundreds of councillors and a clutch of councils.

It was, Sir Keir tells me on his final election rally in the Essex town of Harlow - where Labour wants to take the council off the Tories this week and win the constituency back at the general election - a "low point", as he confirmed for the first time that he considered quitting as the results came in and the Johnson inflatable blimp flew high over Hartlepool.

"I did [consider quitting] because I didn't feel that I should be bigger than the party and that if I couldn't bring about the change, perhaps there should be a change," he said.

"But actually in the end I reflected on it, talked to very many people and doubled down and determined no it is the change in the Labour Party we need."

You can read more from Beth below:

A trade union representing senior civil servants has submitted an application for a judicial review against the government's controversial plan to send migrants to Rwanda.

The FDA said its move related to the relationship of the Civil Service Code with the government's Safety of Rwanda Act.

The union said that under the act a minister could determine whether to comply with an order made by the European Court of Human Rights.

A direction to ignore such an order would breach international law, which conflicts with the duty of civil servants under the Civil Service Code to act in compliance with the law, which includes international law, said the FDA.

General secretary Dave Penman said it was not a decision the union had taken lightly, adding: "The government has had plenty of time to include an explicit provision in the act regarding breaking international law commitments which would have resolved this but it chose not to.

"Civil servants should never be left in a position where they are conflicted between the instructions of ministers and adhering to the Civil Service Code, yet that is exactly what the government has chosen to do.

"This is not an accident, or down to poor drafting. It's a political choice from the government, made not for the good of the country but to avoid upsetting either of the warring factions within its own party."

Mr Penman said the union had to protect the interests of its members and the integrity of the Civil Service Code.

A government spokesperson said: "The Home Office already sought advice from the director general of proprietary and ethics in the Cabinet Office on the issue of the Civil Service Code and claims over the legality of implementing the Rwanda deportation scheme under the new legislation."

The week has kicked off with a huge political story - the resignation of Humza Yousaf - and will end with another, as voters across England and Wales turn out for the local elections.

Sky's political reporter Alexandra Rogers   has looked ahead to a potentially defining night for Rishi Sunak's premiership, when hundreds of council seats, police and crime commissioner jobs, and mayoral posts will be up for grabs.

Read her full explainer below:

The Tory mayor of the West Midlands is sending voters an endorsement from Boris Johnson which urges people to "forget about the government", Sky News can reveal.

Andy Street's campaign website makes no mention of Rishi Sunak on its homepage and is coloured in green rather than Conservative blue, suggesting the mayor is trying to run on his credentials as an independent campaigner rather than under the unpopular Tory brand.

Other campaign literature - including the front page of a campaign "newspaper" seen by Sky News - makes no mention of the Conservative leader.

You can read more from Sky News below:

The Sky News live poll tracker - collated and updated by our Data and Forensics team - aggregates various surveys to indicate how voters feel about the different political parties.

With the local election campaign well under way, Labour is still sitting comfortably ahead, with the Tories trailing behind.

See the latest update below - and you can read more about the methodology behind the tracker  here .

By Sam Coates , deputy political editor

More than 2,600 seats are up for election in 107 English councils on Thursday.

Now, YouGov has made its final calls for some key contests using the MRP polling method after interviewing almost 9,000 people over two weeks.

Here, exclusively on Sky News, are the headlines. 

We'll start with two key battlegrounds...

By Tomos Evans , Wales reporter

Calls for an investigation into a £200,000 donation to Welsh First Minister Vaughan Gething have intensified in recent weeks.

A motion calling for an independent probe into the money was debated in the Senedd on Wednesday and defeated by 27 votes to 25.

But former deputy climate change minister Lee Waters said Mr Gething should do "the right thing" and return the donation.

Mr Gething was elected leader of Welsh Labour in March and succeeded Mark Drakeford as Wales's first minister.

Opposition parties launched a bid to appoint an independent advisor to check whether there was any conflict of interest over the donation during the leadership campaign.

Be the first to get Breaking News

Install the Sky News app for free

how to write a personal statement for a cv uk

IMAGES

  1. 16+ Personal Summary Examples

    how to write a personal statement for a cv uk

  2. How Do You Start A Personal Statement For A Job

    how to write a personal statement for a cv uk

  3. Cv Good Personal Statement

    how to write a personal statement for a cv uk

  4. How To Write A Strong Personal Statement For Cv

    how to write a personal statement for a cv uk

  5. Uk Cv Personal Statement Examples

    how to write a personal statement for a cv uk

  6. 14 CV personal statement examples 2022

    how to write a personal statement for a cv uk

VIDEO

  1. How to Write a Great Personal Statement: 5 Tips

  2. How to Write Personal Statement

  3. Personal Statement and CV Review

  4. MY GKS PERSONAL STATEMENT + TIPS

  5. Applying for a Masters Degree UK

  6. 5 Golden Tips to write a CV personal statement نصائح ذهبية لمقدمة تعريفية ملفتة

COMMENTS

  1. Writing a personal statement for your CV

    Tailor your CV personal statement (and CV in general) to each application. Be honest. Untruths are easy to uncover and lying on your CV is a criminal offence. Provide evidence of skills and experience but remember to keep it brief. For example, 'experienced event manager, who led a team to organise a charity ball for 150 people, raising £5,000 ...

  2. 9 winning personal statement examples for a job

    A personal statement, also known as a 'professional summary' or a 'CV summary', is one of the most important components of an application for universities or a job. Having an exceptional personal statement can increase your chances of being accepted or receiving a job offer. It shows a potential employer or university that your skills ...

  3. How To Write an Eye Catching Personal Statement

    Generally, a small paragraph is enough in the body of your personal statement for an employer or recruiter. Related: 10 best skills to include on a CV. 6. Conclude your statement. End with a strong conclusion that summarises what you have already discussed and will leave a lasting impression on your reader.

  4. How to write a personal statement

    To write a persuasive personal statement, consider following this structure: Start with an opening sentence that hooks the reader. Put the most important information at the beginning of your personal statement (e.g. why you're applying for the role and what makes you suitable) Mention any skills and experience you have that are relevant to ...

  5. CV Personal Statement Examples and Tips

    The personal statement on your CV is the one place where it's okay to talk about yourself in the third person. However, using pronouns, for example, "he is a conscientious worker with 12 years of experience..." is a step too far. Instead, drop the pronouns, so that would become "A conscientious worker with 12 years of experience…".

  6. 17 CV personal statement examples 2024

    CV templates 17 CV personal statement examples. To start this guide, I have included 10 examples of good personal statements, to give you an idea of how a personal statement should look, and what should be included.. Note: personal statements are generally used by junior candidates - if you are experienced, check out our CV profile examples instead.

  7. How to write a personal statement for your CV

    Get straight to the point: avoid lengthy descriptions and make your testimonies punchy and informative. Keep it between 50 to 200 words maximum. If you have enough space, use 1.5 line spacing to ...

  8. How to Write a Personal Statement for Your CV

    First, your personal statement should be short — think: two or three sentences, max. Remember, you don't have a lot of time to interest a potential employer — and going on and on won't keep them interested. Personal statements also highlight your professional attributes — your experience, hard and soft skills and past accomplishments.

  9. Craft a winning personal statement for your CV to stand out

    Here are some expert-backed tips for writing a good personal statement on your CV. 1. Keep it short and on point. Keep your personal statement clean and concise. It's typically around four sentences long, or about 50 to 200 words. If you're overshooting that word count, see which nonessential parts can be omitted. 2.

  10. How to create a CV: Personal Statement

    Tips for achieving success with your personal statement. - Keep it short: write less than 200 words. - Have a consistent 'voice'. Decide whether to write about yourself in the first or third person and stick to it. - There are companies who offer to write a personal statement for you (usually at a high cost!)

  11. How to write a CV personal profile (with 14 examples)

    Keep your CV statement short. Keep your CV profile to one paragraph comprised of three to six sentences. A hiring manager scans your CV for key terms to determine if they want to interview you for the role. Use simple sentence structures to ensure they can easily understand the message you're trying to convey. 3.

  12. Personal statement examples

    University personal statement First things first: personal statements aren't just for your CV. They're also a key part of the UCAS application process, and a way to sell yourself to prospective universities. However, they will be much more detailed - and longer - than the one you write for a job application.

  13. How To Write A Personal Statement

    A personal statement is usually situated at the top of a cv under your personal information and is one of the first sections of a cv that the reader will come across. You have a limited amount of time to make an impact on the reader (no more than 30 seconds to be precise) therefore the effect has to be immediate.

  14. Personal Statement for CV: Examples & Tips

    Here are some CV personal statement examples demonstrating that: Nurse "Maintained medical needs for 20 residents, leading in times of high-stress, administering high-level medical care to all individuals.". Electrician "Responsible for Hightrees development which was given an industry award for low energy consumption.".

  15. How to Write a Personal Statement: Examples of a CV Profile

    2. Show what you know and what you can do. If you worked in a relevant role, refer to it. Connect with a power verb, and go into your most notable achievement, or the thing that will impress your new employer the most. Explain how that benefited your past employer — to allow them to imagine what you can do for them.

  16. 9 Great CV Personal Statement Examples

    Bullet 3: How you can help the business achieve their objectives, in relation to the role. Bullet 4: A strong, relevant and recent deliverable. 5. Personal Statements for Graduates and Students. Students and graduates may struggle with creating a personal statement due to a lack of professional experience.

  17. How To Write a Personal Statement on a CV (with Examples)

    Therefore, it should be compelling, attention-grabbing and tailored to the particular position. Here are three steps to take to create a compelling and effective personal statement: 1. State who you are. Start with a statement detailing where you are in your career. This should communicate your current position in your profession and field of ...

  18. 20+ Good CV Personal Statement Examples (& How to Write)

    Here's a personal statement from an administrative assistant's CV that shows you how to write your own: 2. Customer service CV personal statement. This personal statement for a customer service CV underscores the applicant's years of experience with strategic bolding and showcases their customer service skills: 3.

  19. 18 CV Personal Profile Examples & How to Write One

    Don't write a generic personal profile for a CV. Write it specifically for the job you're applying to. Mention the name of the company and show that you know what they need. Refer to the job requirements and state that you've got the skills they seek. 3. Offer value to the employer.

  20. How to Write a CV Personal Statement [+4 Real-life Examples]

    Do not switch between first- and third-person as that will get confusing to the hiring manager. Writing a personal statement for your CV in first-person does not mean you need to start every sentence with "I.". There are ways to craft your personal statement to sound snappy, concise and personal, and here are a few examples to help inspire ...

  21. How to Write a CV Personal Statement [20 Examples Included]

    Here's how to write a CV personal statement and pitch yourself to a hiring professional: #1. Introduce Yourself. The very first sentence of your personal statement should indicate that you're a serious candidate for the position. Describe yourself and your work experience using strong adjectives and action verbs.

  22. How To Write Your Undergraduate Personal Statement

    Just start by showing your enthusiasm for the subject, showcasing your knowledge and understanding, and sharing your ambitions of what you want to achieve. Avoid cliches! Remember, this opening part is simply about introducing yourself, so let the admissions tutor reading your personal statement get to know you. Keep it relevant and simple.

  23. How To Write Your Postgraduate Personal Statement

    Just start by showing your enthusiasm for the subject, showcasing your knowledge and understanding, and sharing your ambitions of what you want to achieve. Avoid cliches . Remember, this opening part is simply about introducing yourself, so let the admissions tutor reading your personal statement get to know you. Keep it relevant and simple.

  24. 10 best skills to include on a CV

    Related: How to write a CV with a basic CV template (and tips) 1. List your skills on a functional CV. If you are changing careers or industries and do not have extensive professional experience, you might decide to feature them at the top of your CV. This type of CV is called a functional CV.

  25. Politics latest: Next Scottish FM tipped to be 'crowned with no contest

    In third is Reform UK on 12.4%, followed by the Lib Dems on 9.5%. The Green Party stands at 6.2%, and the SNP on 3.0%. See the latest update below - and you can read more about the methodology ...

  26. How To Write a School Leaver CV (With Template and Example)

    CV example for school leaver Consider using the CV as a guide when creating your own document: Anna Evans [email protected] 01234 567890 Professional summary Following the recent completion of my GCSE studies, I am looking for an entry-level full-time role in accounting. Applicable strengths include an A in Maths and previous work experience at a local diner.