SCARPA Phantom 6000 Review: From Techy Mt. Huntington Terrain to the Denali Summit

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2022 Scarpa Phantom 6000 Boots

I had the opportunity to review SCARPA’s latest update of its famed Phantom 6000 mountaineering boot during the spring climbing season in the Alaska Range.

My trip would encompass Mt. Huntington in pursuit of some technical objectives at lower elevations. Then a 25-day patrol with Denali Climbing Rangers of the West Buttress as a volunteer for the Denali Rescue Volunteers program.

This was the perfect itinerary to review the newest upgrades to the boots in both technical terrains as well as at high altitudes.

In short:  The updated SCARPA Phantom 6000 proved wholly capable of climbing technical terrain and keeping feet warm up to the summit of Denali. The boot had the comfort and agility of a single boot but proved warm at higher elevations.

SCARPA Phantom 6000 Testing Grounds

Mt. huntington.

Author Christian Black on Mt. Huntington

For the first part of our trip, two friends and I flew in to set up a base camp for 10 days at the base of the west face of Mt. Huntington. With a less-than-ideal forecast and ambitious goals, I was skeptical of success but nonetheless excited to climb in the Alaska range for the first time.

After a few days at camp, we set off to attempt a route called Polarchrome. It’s a route with little information and only two known previous ascents. Being new to the range and the less experienced mixed climber of the group, I followed the first four mixed crux pitches.

We found “heads-up” terrain up to M6/7 R in difficulty with less-than-desirable gear and poor snow conditions. From there, we made the decision to bail, as the weather was deteriorating. And the unstable forecast for the next few days didn’t seem promising.

After a few days in camp waiting out a small storm, my partner and I only had one decent weather day before our flight out. We opted to try the classic West Face Couloir. It’s an ice-climbing route mostly, with some steep snow and moderate mixed terrain sprinkled in.

With only one full day, our plan was to climb as far as possible before retreating to make sure we made our plane out the next morning. During our long day out, we slogged through thigh-deep snow for 3 hours on the approach and up more than 1,000 feet of steep snow. We then ascended six pitches of ice up to WI4 before descending and flying out early the next morning.

Denali West Buttress

For the second part of the trip, I geared up with the Denali Climbing Rangers to accompany them on a 25-day West Buttress search-and-rescue patrol. This is part of the Denali Rescue Volunteers program.

Our itinerary was to spend about a week making our way up from base camp to the 14k-foot camp before spending 10 days acclimatizing there. From there, we made a push to the 17k-foot camp and had a successful summit day thanks to amazing splitter weather.

I had the chance to use the SCARPA Phantom 6000 boots on all of the terrains from the 14k-foot camp upward. I was pleasantly surprised with the boot’s performance. Below are my thoughts after spending roughly 28 days this spring season using the new Phantom 6000.

SCARPA Phantom 6000 Boot Review

2022 Scarpa Phantom 6000 Boots - Review

Sizing and Fit

My foot is a typical U.S. men’s size 8.5/9, and the 43s fit perfectly. I had previously tried on the 42s in the old model of the Phantom 6000. But I found them slightly too small length-wise.

During the technical ice climbing on Mt. Huntington, I never experienced any toe-bang. And I had plenty of wiggle room to keep my toes warm. I would describe the fit of the boots as quite wide. But in my opinion, that is probably better for most people rather than too narrow.

The extra width allowed me to wear thicker and warmer expedition-style socks. I did experience a bit of heel lift that was hard to combat, possibly from the bootie/outer boot interface. I’m not sure if that was related to my foot width or just sizing, but it was noticeable. Overall, I would say the heel lift was on par with other double boots I have tried.

I was impressed with how well the lace lock system worked. I didn’t have to adjust the laces nearly as much as I thought. Typically, I would need one initial adjustment at the base of the climb to tighten them up after the approach. They always stayed taut after that.

However, having to fiddle with the small laces was challenging with gloves. It was frustrating to remove my gloves to adjust them. But luckily, the boots required minimal fussing, and I was impressed with the comfortable fit.

Crampon Compatibility

Scarpa Phantom 6000 - crampon compatability

During both my outings, I used fully automatic Petzl Darts as well as Petzl Sarken crampons . I used the Petzl Sarken steel heel component with both. I found the boots’ and crampons’ curves to match perfectly.

The heel piece of the Sarkens was slightly narrow and sometimes made it difficult to get an initial tight fit. I had to work a bit to get it seated, but once it was set, it proved very secure. The standard toe-bails were adequate. I didn’t need to swap them for the narrower versions.

During our lower-elevation technical climbs, we climbed steep snow and ice up to WI4 in 15-degree Fahrenheit highs at 8,000-11,000 feet in elevation. On the long snow trudge and steep snow climbing to the base of the West Face Couloir route on Mt. Huntington, my toes did get a little cold.

The 1-3-plus-foot deep snow on the approach and standing belays produced some chill. However, I was impressed at how the boots seemed to warm back up after a little movement, and they never stayed cold for long.

I was particularly impressed with the inner booties of the Phantom 6000. I was skeptical of how warm the sock-like knit structure would be, but the Aerogel material of the soles did a great job insulating against the snow. I often wore the inner booties inside my down booties at camp because the Aerogel sole kept the cold out when standing around.

High on the West Buttress route on Denali, I wore the boots from the 14k-foot camp and up all the way to the summit. We had unseasonably stable and sunny weather with no wind, so warmth never became an issue.

I never experienced cold feet, except for briefly early in the morning on summit day, leaving the 17K-foot camp. However, in the typical windier and colder Denali conditions, I would want an overboot.

Climbing Ability

2022 Scarpa Phantom 6000 Boots - climbing

Climbing on Mt. Huntington, I was able to try the boots in technical terrain up to ~M7 and WI4. They performed well, and I was surprised at how similar they felt to a single boot. They were adequately stiff when I was front-pointing on small granite edges in my Dart crampons.

The boot climbed well on the technical ice with a small but manageable amount of heel lift. Maybe adding some material or a footbed below the bootie would take up some volume and help.

On the West Buttress of Denali, there is not much technical terrain, but my feet were comfortable during the long hours of hiking with heavy packs. Other team members complained of sore feet from their stiff boots after the long 14-hour summit day. But not me.

This was a surprise because I usually experience sore feet climbing in my Phantom Techs, but not with the new 6000. I suspect it was the Aerogel material that added a nice amount of cushion to the ball of the foot.

I really like this material for use in climbing boots. It feels like having a super-insulative gel insole rather than the rock-hard underfoot feel of other boots.

Overall, the new SCARPA Phantom 6000 climbed well. I’m excited to have them for more big mountain days in addition to cold cragging days in places like Hyalite.

During the course of my 6-week trip, the boots held up well, with no major signs of wear. The one area I noticed an issue was the gaiter zipper. After a cold day and having gotten wet from snow and then freezing, it got stuck in the middle.

It wasn’t until the boots thawed out that the zipper functioned normally. During a multiday outing, I might be concerned about breaking the zipper trying to get the boot off if it’s frozen at the end of the day or vice versa in the morning. I felt like I was going to break it at one point, so I waited until they melted to take them off.

I did not get the chance to test the boots extensively on any rocky terrain or approaches, so I can’t attest to the long-term durability of the soles. However, the Vibram Durstep rubber still looked new after the trip.

SCARPA Phantom 6000 Boots: Conclusion

I was impressed with the Phantom 6000. They climbed and felt like a single boot but were noticeably warmer and caused less soreness for my feet at the end of the day. I thank the Aerogel soles.

Durability was adequate. The one slight concern was the long-term durability of the gaiter zipper. The boots were much warmer than one might guess at first glance. I’m excited to have them for future outings. They are a great addition to the SCARPA line of boots.

Check Price at Backcountry Check Price at SCARPA

Army Chinook

Meet the Army Helicopter Crew That’s Helped Set Up Denali Basecamp for 4 Decades

Almost every year since the '80s, an Army unit loads up helicopters with gear to drop off on Denali, helping the National Park Service and climbers alike. Read more…

Christian Black

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scarpa phantom 6000 test

Ben Tibbetts Guiding

Scarpa Phantom 6000 (p)review

by ben | Nov 19, 2015 | Alpinism , Climbing

scarpa phantom 6000 test

This is a review of a pair of pre-production samples of next seasons Scarpa Phantom 6000 mountaineering boot.

I’ll say straight up that I don’t know much about boots except than how to use them. Secondly I work with Scarpa (France) as an ‘ambassador’ and photographer, hence I was given these boots to test out on an expedition to Kyrgyzstan that I was guiding back in September for ISM. I will try and provide mostly facts and images so you can draw your own conclusions. Feelings are pretty subjective anyway. I am going to compare these boot with the nearest boot on the market – their predecessor, the current Phantom 6000.

_DSC9334PkMinaretstorm_web

4500m on a new summit in the Kyrgyz Zaalay range. Adrian Nelhams (IFMGA, ISM Director) and clients in pretty gnarly conditions!

_DSC4393phantom 6000

Current and next generation of Phantom 6000. Each pair of photos will have the new version on the right. (Click to enlarge images on most browsers)

Since getting these boots in August I have used them for about 30 days. Most of this was in Kyrgyzstan Pamirs between 3500m and 5500m. The terrain was mostly sharp sandstone and limestone moraine, snow and ice slopes with broken rock ridges. They have also had a bit of use in Chamonix this autumn. The boots are photographed as such with about 30 days wear in unforgiving abrasive terrain.

_DSC4402phantom 6000

The first thing one notices is a style makeover, and that the sturdy Tizip running straight up has been replaced by a lighter but longer YKK zip that winds its way round the outside of the foot to terminate inside the ankle. The idea behind this is to avoid the pressure point created where the old Tizip creased at the ankle joint. In this respect it worked fine and didn’t create any pressure on the front of ankle, though I had never really noticed it as a problem before. If anything it feels as though one has more flexibility to rotate and bend the ankle in any direction. On the flip side I don’t think I have ever re-lubricated the Tizip on my Phantom Guides that are 5 years old, yet the new YKK felt like it needed some lubrication after a couple of weeks use. The teeth are not as deep and hold less lubricating goo in I guess.

_DSC8625ZaalayABC2_web

Advanced Base Camp in the Zaalay Range, Kyrgyzstan

_DSC4394phantom 6000

Both the sole and midsole unit have changed quite a bit. The new midsole seems to be a lower density construction, and likewise some of the sole is a soft orange rubber that seems light/lower density. The tall wraparound rand also seems to be a thinner rubber. Likewise the heavyweight crampon patch on the instep has gone, and all the upper fabrics seem a bit lighter. Most of the instep is now a light fabric (lined, like the rest of the boot with “OutDry” waterproof membrane) that has small plastic abrasion resistant bobbles. Needless to say when arriving at the Kyrgyzstan basecamp and seeing the terrain we had to cover I fully expected the boots to be shredded within a week. The 6000 boot is deigned for mid/high altitude mountaineering which is primarily snow covered. The range we were in went up to 6800m but unstable weather kept us occupied with the lower peaks. Even then at this latitude there were surprisingly routes up to 5500m that were largely free of snow.

_DSC87785311 ZAALAY

Heading up to a new summit at 5300m, Zaalay Range, Kyrgyzstan

What is curious however is that when I weighed the new and current  boots they seem to be nearly identical at 1100g. (According to Scarpa the new one should be lighter, so maybe the production version will be trimmed further). So with all these lighter materials how do they come out at the same weight? It seems that the weight saving has been invested in a slightly thicker insulation. Feeling around with the fingers on both the outer and inner boot suggests this.

_DSC4398phantom 6000

The design of the inner has been modified slightly. The heel cup has been sculpted more securely in leather, as opposed to the original construction that was quite ‘boxy’ and prone to wear (see below)

_DSC4399phantom 6000

Also a thin layer of inner lining material has been added to the foam, which on the previous version was bare sticky grey stuff from below the cuff.

_DSC8070ZaalayABC2_web

Other than that things like the lacing system haven’t changed much. The crampon welts have changed colour, but design is similar to previously and should work with a similar range of crampons.

All in all I was impressed. I expected them to fall apart with all the sharp shredding rocks, especially the soft patch of sole. They held up well and don’t show much wear despite very light construction. Most importantly they kept my feet warm, and the removable inner boot let me dry the inner in my bag at night. Walking through lots of streams I never got any ingress of water through seams or zip etc. I haven’t yet done any harder technical climbing in them as conditions have been poor this autumn in Chamonix. As with their predecessor, for a double boot, they feel very precise. The new version feels more flexible at the ankle due to lighter outer fabrics and zip construction and I think they will be great for technical mixed climbing, but don’t expect much rest from calf burning snow slopes! I also think it is slightly better insulated and warmer than the previous version though may be a little less durable. I get cold feet quite easily and will use them for Autumn, winter and spring climbing in the Alps.. when of course I don’t have ski boots on!

I’m off to the Antarctic in December for a couple of months and though I have an older pair of 8000s for deep south work I will see how these feel in the deep freeze.

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Scarpa Phantom Tech or Phantom 6000

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Scarpa Men’s Phantom 6000 Mountaineering Boot Review

scarpa phantom 6000 test

Scarpa Men’s Phantom 6000 Mountaineering Boot is an exceptional boot. One of its outstanding features is the below-knee length built. That is why; Scarpa sells it as a mountaineering boot. It offers maximum protection to the whole leg as one climbs over rocky cliffs. It is also built with excellent features, which improves its comfort including the midsole and the inner cushioning. If you are looking for a boot for mountain climbing, you should pick this mountaineering boot for the following reasons:

Cordura sleek design

This mountaineering boot from Scarpa has an amazing design. It has a fitting construction, which covers your feet and goes up all the way to reach below the knee. The entire boot is made of rubber-like material but yet breathable, which features two colors black and orange. Every inch of the boot, exhibit the ingenuity of the manufacturer. Although it is made to be functional, its sense of style is evident.

Ergofit mechanism

Since the mountaineering boots are high, the manufacturer has employed an Ergofit system, which ensures that the boots fit without challenges. The material is flexible to allow your feet to move around naturally when you are walking on the technical terrain.

scarpa phantom 6000 test

Strong Vibram sole

The high-length boot is supported by a strong rubber outsole. The sole is made of tough rubber, which does not give in to the abrasion from the rocks. The rubber adds comfort to the boots, by absorbing the shock effects. It is also hard to be pricked by thorns or sharp stone flakes. Owing to the high quality of the rubber, the boots can last for a very long time.

Randing locks at the rear

At the back of the mountaineering boots, is an important feature, the randing locks. This helps to keep you supported as you climb up the mountain. Besides, it is a safety feature, which keeps your ground on the cliff and prevents you from falling off.

scarpa phantom 6000 test

Waterproof gaitor

The hiking boots have a waterproof gaiter, which makes it suitable for use in different weather conditions. Whether it is raining or it is dewy, this pair of boots will keep your feet dry. Usually, the mountains are characterized by cold temperatures. The Scarpa Men’s Phantom 6000 Mountaineering Boot, is insulated against cold weather. Hence, you are completely covered to concentrate on climbing the mountain, rather than on fighting the cold.

Advanced midsole

The midsole is designed to offer comfort and stability to your feet. It is positioned in a way; it pulls off pressure from the front sole and the heel.

Scarpa Men’s Phantom 6000 Mountaineering Boot is the leading boot for the mountains. If you are an avid mountain climber, you really need to try on this pair of boots. They are comfortable in every sense and they are designed to keep your feet protected from sharp objects. It is also a light boot, which makes it comfortable to wear to higher grounds. Furthermore, it is warm. Hence, it helps a lot when you are climbing snowy mountains. It is time; you invested in your own pair.

Scarpa Men's Phantom 6000 Mountaineering,Orange,39 M EU /6 1/2 M US Men

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La Sportiva G2 SM vs. Scarpa Phantom 6000

by ClimbingChic237 » Tue Feb 09, 2016 8:20 pm

Re: La Sportiva G2 SM vs. Scarpa Phantom 6000

by ExcitableBoy » Tue Feb 09, 2016 9:31 pm

by buckie06 » Wed Feb 10, 2016 3:34 am

by buckie06 » Wed Feb 10, 2016 6:06 pm

by JP » Sun Nov 06, 2016 5:55 pm

ClimbingChic237 wrote: Hello guys, I am a bit torn between these two boots for my upcoming Denali trip. G2 SM is a fairly new boot with minimal (to none) cust reviews. Therefore, I am not totally sold on that. Is it going to keep my feet warm without the overboots? Does anyone tried it yet? Does it run large or small? I already tried Scarpa 6000 (in my living room only) and the fit is a bit tight so have to up-size, which now might be a bit large. Anyway, with SCARPA I am planning to wear overboots. But if G2 SM is warmer than 6000 and won't need the overboots, then I would rather get that. If anyone tried any of these two boots (especially G2 SM) please let me know your thoughts. I appreciate!!! Thanks.

by TheBootfitter » Wed Dec 07, 2016 4:29 am

JP wrote: The name for G2 SM for your info is from Gasherbrum 2. Much higher, much tougher climb than Denali.

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Best Mountaineering Boots of 2023

From lightweight models to double boots built for the world’s highest mountains, we break down the top mountaineering footwear.

Mountaineering boots

Switchback Travel ( Clint Helander )

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No piece of gear is more critical to summiting high peaks than footwear. A great mountaineering boot fills countless roles: It offers support while carrying heavy loads, grips confidently over slick rock and snow, keeps your feet warm when the mercury dips, and allows for the attachment of crampons and skis. Our picks for the best mountaineering boots of 2023 below are broken down into three categories: extreme cold/high-altitude boots for the world’s tallest mountains, 4-season technical alpine boots for keeping your feet warm while moving fast and light, and lightweight mountaineering boots for less technical and lower-elevation routes. For more background information, see our comparison table  and buying advice  below the picks.  

Our Team's Mountaineering Boot Picks

  • Best Overall Mountaineering Boot: La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX
  • Best 3-Season Mountaineering Boot:  La Sportiva Aequilibrium ST GTX
  • Best Boot for Technical Ice Climbing: Scarpa Phantom Tech HD
  • Best High-Altitude Mountaineering Boot:  La Sportiva Olympus Mons Cube

Best Overall Mountaineering Boot

1. la sportiva nepal cube gtx ($649).

La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX mountaineering boot

With advancements in gear, weather forecasting, access, and more, the sport of mountaineering has been awash with change in recent years. Nothing reflects this more than La Sportiva’s Aequilibrium series, which comes in four versions: the synthetic ST, the leather LT , the premium Top , and the minimalist Speed . Many climbers will opt for the Aequilibrium ST GTX, which is most comparable to the Scarpa Charmoz HD below (a boot that used to hold our top 3-season spot). The ST is ridiculously lightweight (over half a pound lighter than the Charmoz); versatile on trail, snow, and rock; and both comfortable and durable. For Lower 48 missions that start in the trees and end on a snowy summit, it’s Sportiva’s best effort yet. 

What do you give up with such a lightweight design? The Aequilibrium doesn’t offer a ton of insulation, so we don’t recommend pushing it into particularly cold temperatures. What’s more, the sticky outsole rubber is a double-edged sword: It offers fantastic traction on rock, but the compound will wear away quite quickly, especially if you frequent hard surfaces more than snow. Gripes aside, after a thorough test of the Aequilibrium Top —which adds an integrated gaiter and Boa lacing system—we still think the Aequilibrium collection is about as good as it gets for a lightweight mountaineering boot. And at $349 for the ST GTX here, it’s competitively priced, too. See the Men's La Sportiva Aequilibrium ST    See the Women's La Sportiva Aequilibrium ST

Best Boot for Technical Ice Climbing

3.  scarpa phantom tech hd ($899).

Scarpa Phantom Tech HD mountaineering boot

Scarpa’s entire Phantom line looks so similar that it can be hard to tell the Tech apart from the 6000 and 8000. To summarize, the Tech HD is the race car of the Phantom family and one of the most popular models for technical ice and mixed ascents. It’s lightweight, streamlined for precision, and warm for a single boot. You get PrimaLoft Gold and OrthoLite O-Therm insulation, Scarpa’s proprietary HDry waterproof membrane, and a durable Vibram sole that can hold its own on icy or rocky approaches. Rounding out the build, an integrated gaiter is secured by a watertight zipper along the side of the boot (not interfering with the foot’s flex), and the newest version adds a Recco reflector to aid in search efforts. Overall, the Phantom Tech HD is about as sleek as it gets among technical ice climbing designs, and it’s priced competitively at $899. 

The Phantom Tech HD is most similar to the La Sportiva G5 Evo below in terms of warmth, features, and design. Both offer a nice mix of precision and performance for steep ice and mixed ascents, but the Tech is the lighter of the two at about 4 ounces less for the pair. On top of that, the G5 does not have a waterproof zipper, which can make a big difference on approaches where you have to splash across creeks or on warm days when things get drippy. All in all, for a technical climbing boot that’s warm and durable but still responsive and precise, it’s hard to go wrong with the Phantom Tech HD. Editor's note: At the time of publishing, the new Tech HD can only be found through Scarpa's website; the outgoing version  ($859) is still available in a wide range of sizes on Backcountry. See the Scarpa Phantom Tech HD

Best High-Altitude Mountaineering Boot

4. la sportiva olympus mons cube ($1,299).

La Sportiva Oly Mons Cube high-altitude mountaineering boot

The La Sportiva Olympus Mons Cube is perhaps the most popular double boot on the market for extreme cold. It’s the go-to model for mountaineers looking to stay warm in extreme places like Denali’s West Buttress, Mount Everest, and Antarctica’s Mount Vinson. The uber-comfortable, heat-moldable inner boot accommodates a wide range of foot sizes, and the outer boot’s dual Boa closures (which tighten the lower and upper halves separately) can be adjusted with one hand and don’t require any tying (perfect when you’re wearing bulky gloves or mittens). On top of it all, a durable, wraparound zipper and Velcro strap seal off your feet from the frozen elements of the world’s biggest mountains.

Past versions of the Oly Mons were plagued by reports of the outsole wearing out quickly, but the “Cube” update addressed this with a more durable (and impressively light) Vibram Litebase compound. Many will also appreciate the tech inserts at the toe, which eliminate the need for ski boots when approaching your objective on skis (alternatively, the “Cube S” version has a standard toe). It’s true that the Oly Mons Cube will cost you a pretty penny at $1,299, but for a bombproof boot made to withstand the worst weather on earth, you probably won’t regret the investment. See the La Sportiva Olympus Mons Cube

Best of the Rest

5. scarpa charmoz hd ($399).

Scarpa Charmoz HD mountaineering boot

Along with the La Sportiva Aequilibrium ST above, the Scarpa Charmoz HD is a great option when you need one piece of footwear to get you from the car to the summit. From long approaches through treeline to crossing glacier-polished granite slabs and cramponing up icy summit pyramids, the Charmoz will keep your feet dry and agile. It is decidedly a 3-season boot—the light insulation, quasi-flexible sole, and high rocker mean that the Charmoz is not an ideal choice for technical ice climbing or mountaineering in cold conditions. But for spring-to-fall weekend missions into the Cascades, Bugaboos, Rockies, or Sierra, it is an excellent choice.

The Charmoz HD used to be one of the lightest options here, but for a half-pound less the Aequilibrium ST above proves you can drop considerable weight without compromising performance. What's more, the $50-cheaper Aequilibrium tacks on premium Gore-Tex waterproofing, while the Charmoz sticks to Scarpa’s in-house HDry. It is worth noting that the Scarpa’s durability is proven—mountaineers have trusted the Charmoz for years now—while the La Sportiva's sole is known to degrade all too quickly when used on rock and other hard surfaces. If covering miles and vertical versatility are what you are looking for, the Charmoz HD is a nice synthetic boot with a great track record. For a warmer and more durable leather option, check out Scarpa’s Manta Tech GTX ($399). See the Men's Scarpa Charmoz HD    See the Women's Scarpa Charmoz HD

6. Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX ($629)

Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX mountaineering boot

Of all the technical double boots on this list, the Scarpa Phantom 6000 HD offers the best performance, construction, and overall feel. This is Scarpa’s go-to model for giant ice routes in the Canadian Rockies and technical Alaskan ascents, and we feel confident in saying that it’s also a great option for many mid-season Denali climbers (Scarpa’s Phantom 8000 is even warmer but significantly heavier). And at only 4 pounds 10 ounces for the pair (size 42), the Phantom 6000 HD is one of the lightest in its class, right alongside the premium La Sportiva G2 Evo below.

In terms of construction, a PrimaLoft Black and Gold Eco insulated liner provides ample padding and warmth, and the OrthoLite/Aerogel insole is a great defense against cold ground. On the outside, burly Schoeller fabric offers bombproof protection for your foot from weather and sharp objects alike. And although the wraparound zipper concept can feel weird at first, we appreciate the fact that this design almost entirely protects the zipper from being scuffed by the passing point of a crampon. Finally, with the most recent update, the Phantom 6000 is now made with more environmentally friendly materials, so you can explore your home planet with less impact. See the Scarpa Phantom 6000 HD

8. Lowa Alpine Expert II GTX ($470)

Lowa Alpine Expert II GTX Mountaineering Boots

The Lowa Alpine Expert II GTX is an incredibly versatile option, falling somewhere in between our lightweight mountaineering and 4-season technical alpine categories. As a result, it’s a reliable choice for a wide range of activities and a great quiver-of-one option for those looking to save money. With a relatively lightweight build, the Lowa gets the job done on the trail, but automatic crampon compatibility and ample stiffness underfoot mean it can also tackle steep ice and precise footwork on hairy mixed leads. Tack on a burly leather upper and 400-gram PrimaLoft insulation, and you have a warm single boot that’s hard to kill. To top it off, the Alpine Expert II GTX is priced aggressively at $470.

Keep in mind that with the Alpine Expert’s jack-of-all-trades design, it verges on being master of none. You don’t get quite as much warmth and stiffness as a dedicated 4-season boot like the Nepal Cube or Mont Blanc Pro above. At the other end of the spectrum, it features slightly less rocker than most lightweight mountaineering boots, which can get in the way of comfort on the approach—although the most recent design does boost flex at the ankle. And while it’s one of the most affordable options among boots that feature a toe welt, you can save even more with a model like the La Sportiva Makalu (below). All gripes aside, for a durable and versatile boot that can handle most everything you throw at it, the Alpine Expert GTX II is one of the best values on this list. See the Mens's Lowa Alpine Expert II GTX   See the Women's Lowa Alpine Expert II GTX

9.  Scarpa Ribelle HD ($399)

Scarpa Ribelle HD mountaineering boot

In 2023, it feels like everyone wants to move a bit faster, whether you’re mountain running, climbing, or mountaineering. Answering the call for mountaineers is the Scarpa Ribelle HD, a design that offers the stable platform of a leather mountain boot alongside the easy-moving feel of a running shoe. Scarpa accomplishes this wild combination through their Dynamic Tech Roll System, a fancy name for a rockered sole that helps you efficiently spring off the ball of your foot. We were at first skeptical of the Ribelle HD, but all signs point to it being a comfortable and relatively uncompromised boot for 3-season mountaineering and backpacking alike.

The Ribelle HD is a great boot for objectives that contain equal parts trail, rock, and snow (and even ice), but we don’t recommend it for routes predominantly made up of snow (such as PNW volcanoes). Scarpa’s HDry membrane can’t compete with more premium Gore-Tex, and the suede upper will absorb water unless treated with a repellant or seal. What’s more, you simply don’t need the running-shoe-inspired rocker on snow—to reap the most benefits from the Ribelle’s design, you’ll want to be spending a considerable amount of time on trail. And a final note: The Ribelle HD has a fairly roomy toe box, which is great news for those with wide or finicky feet. If you want to go even lighter, Scarpa also offers the Ribelle Lite HD , which drops about 1.5 ounces off each boot with a lighter and more flexible upper. See the Men's Scarpa Ribelle HD   See the Women's Scarpa Ribelle HD

10. La Sportiva G2 Evo ($999)

La Sportiva G2 Evo mountaineering boot

The original G2 was a radical shift in La Sportiva’s double-boot lineup, shaving an impressive 8 ounces per boot from the technically charged Spantik. And with insulation almost on par with the Everest-ready Oly Mons Cube above, it certainly doesn’t make any compromises in terms of warmth either. In addition to the G2’s impressive specs, you also get a dual Boa lacing system for quick adjustments that eliminate the need to tie laces in the extreme cold, and the built-in super gaiter keeps your inner boot dry and toasty. It all adds up to a warm, lightweight, and easy-to-operate boot, ideal for those with their sights set on 5,000- to 7,000-meter peaks in the greater ranges.

The G2 was recently updated to the G2 Evo, with a few revisions to the outer boot’s materials and design (and a price increase). In addition to a more durable and water-repellant upper, Sportiva moved the top Boa dial from the inner boot to the outside, which is a big improvement for on-the-go adjustments. Compared to the Scarpa Phantom 6000 above, the G2 Evo checks in at the same weight for $150 less, and some will appreciate the added tech you get with the Boa closure (while others will remain dubious about their durability). It's worth noting that we have read reports of the G2 Evo having a fairly high-volume fit; in the end, we recommend trying both boots on and settling for the model that fits you best. See the La Sportiva G2 Evo

11. La Sportiva Trango Tech GTX ($299)

La Sportiva Trango Tech GTX mountaineering boot

The Phantom 8000 is the durable workhorse for extreme cold in Scarpa’s line. From the ground up, Scarpa designed a serious boot here, and a recent upgrade means it’s now warmer, lighter, and cheaper, too. You get a waterproof, PrimaLoft 200-lined gaiter as the first line of defense, while a PrimaLoft 600-insulated liner with a simple pull-down speed lace keeps your foot tight and toasty. The Vibram Zero Gravity Lite sole can stand up to the abuse of kicking up scree, and Aerogel (used in space boots) keeps you warm from the ground up. Finally, zippers always are a cause for concern—it only takes one misstep with sharp crampons to shred a zipper—but Scarpa’s new placement on the outside of the foot should help alleviate that issue.

If you’re looking for the best high-altitude mountaineering boot, it’s a close call between the Scarpa Phantom 8000 and the La Sportiva Olympus Mons Cube above. Both boots are extremely warm and well made with huge attention to detail. But the Phantom 8000 is over a pound heavier for the pair, we much prefer the dual Boa closure on the Oly Mons (we’ve experienced slipping with Scarpa’s lacing system), and La Sportiva’s new tech binding compatibility could tip the scales for some. In the end, you can’t go wrong with either boot (it doesn’t hurt that the Scarpa is $300 cheaper), and your final decision likely will come down to fit. Editor’s note: The Phantom 8000 is currently out of stock, but keep an eye out for the updated Phantom 8000 Thermic HD, which adds the option of removable heated insoles. See the Scarpa Phantom 8000

13. Arc’teryx Acrux LT GTX ($400)

Arc'teryx Acrux LT mountaineering boot

We’ve learned to trust Arc’teryx for their top-shelf hardshell jackets, but were admittedly a bit dubious when they started making footwear. The now-discontinued Acrux AR well exceeded our expectations with its innovative design, proving that the BC-based company can indeed make a solid boot. Building off the AR’s success is the new LT, a single boot that’s primed for most mountain climbing in the Lower 48. Notably, its low-profile design offers great precision for scrambling on rock, and the stiff carbon-plated sole gives you a lot of assurance on snow, with or without a crampon. And with a strong SuperFabric upper and the exceptional workmanship we’ve come to expect from Arc’teryx, the LT is incredibly durable for its weight. 

The Acrux LT joins the ranks of models like the Aequilibrium ST and Charmoz HD above as one of the best lightweight mountaineering boots in the game. At $400 it's a good bit pricer than the La Sportiva, and falls between the two designs in terms of weight. Keep in mind that the stiff build that makes the Acrux so stable on rock and snow doesn’t provide a ton of cushion or rocker—designs like the Aequilibrium and Ribelle above offer a plusher feel for those who spend a lot of time on trail. It’s also worth noting that Arc’teryx footwear has a tendency of running quite narrow, and the Acrux LT is only offered in unisex sizes. But for a stiff, stable, and lightweight mountaineering boot, it’s hard to beat the performance of Arc’teryx. See the Arc'teryx Acrux LT GTX

14. La Sportiva G5 Evo ($849)

La Sportiva G5 Evo mountaineering boot

The little brother of the G2 above, the G5 is a highly technical single boot that excels on steep ice and mixed terrain at lower elevations. Like our chart-topping Nepal Cube, the G5 receives its stiffness and support from a Nepal last, and a Vibram Matterhorn sole provides great traction in slick conditions. But with much greater technical intentions, it drops weight and increases precision with a synthetic upper, increased ankle flex, and a Boa lacing system that allows you to tweak the fit depending on your activity (e.g., loose for the approach and tight for the climb). The net result is a design that gives the Scarpa Phantom Tech a run for its money as one of the best ice climbing boots on the market.

With a recent update to the “Evo,” the G5 now features a thin layer of Gore-Tex Infinium Thermium insulation for added warmth, an internal gusset for better water resistance, and an ultrasonic welded upper (read: no stitching) that makes it more durable and protective than its predecessor. That said, it’s important to know your end use before opting for a boot with such a technical skill set. If all-around mountaineering is your main objective (including routes that involve a combination of hiking, snow travel, and maybe some moderate ice or mixed climbing), you’ll get noticeably more ankle support and durability from a leather boot like the La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX or Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX. But for decidedly steep and technical terrain, the G5 Evo offers excellent precision in a well-insulated package. See the La Sportiva G5 Evo

15. Scarpa Zodiac Tech GTX ($379)

Scarpa Zodiac Tech GTX mountaineering boot_

Like the La Sportiva Trango Tech above, Scarpa’s Zodiac Tech GTX is a stripped-down design that hits a nice middle ground between mountaineering boot and approach shoe. Its intentions are very similar, with a sticky Vibram Mulaz Z outsole, a heel welt for semi-automatic crampon compatibility, and a proven Gore-Tex membrane for water protection. It’s at the upper where we see the Zodiac and Trango Tech take diverging paths: while the Sportiva uses synthetic materials, the Scarpa boasts more durable, 1.8-millimeter suede. And impressively, the Zodiac manages to pull this off for the same exact weight as the Trango Tech.

In trying both boots on, there are some clear fit-related nuances to be aware of. In particular, the Trango Tech has a narrower profile that feels slightly more technical, while those with wider feet will appreciate the Zodiac Tech’s roomier build. Importantly, both are stiffer and noticeably less cushioned than your standard hiking boot (again, more along the lines of an approach shoe), which could be a deterrent depending on your objectives and what you’re used to. If the shoe fits, we give the edge to the Trango Tech for its considerably more affordable price tag. If you’re looking for more comfort for covering a lot of miles on trail, check out Scarpa’s Ribelle HD above... Read in-depth review See the Men's Scarpa Zodiac Tech GTX   See the Women's Scarpa Zodiac Tech GTX

16. La Sportiva Makalu ($349)

La Sportiva Makalu mountaineering boot

4-Season Technical Alpine For giant ice routes in the Canadian Rockies, alpine-style ascents of lower mountains in the Alaska Range, and even mid-season climbs of Denali, a 4-season technical alpine boot may be your best bet. These boots come in double and single varieties and are made for both walking and technical ice climbing (some excel at one better than the other), with the commonality being that they sacrifice the highest levels of warmth for technical prowess (they can handle the cold, just not extreme cold). Leading models in this category include the Scarpa Phantom 6000 HD and La Sportiva G5 Evo . Lightweight Mountaineering For lower-elevation climbs and more moderate temperatures, lightweight boots should do the trick. These boots are a technical step up in construction from a hiking boot and built to handle long approaches. Lightweight single boots are commonly used for trips such as Cascade peaks and volcanoes or a car-to-summit adventure starting below treeline and ending with basic to moderate mountaineering. Most are 3-season boots with light insulation, a quasi-flexible sole, and high rocker, which means that they are not an ideal choice for technical ice climbing or frigid conditions. Popular lightweight mountaineering boots include models like those from La Sportiva's Aequilibrium series (including the ST, LT, Top, and Speed) and Scarpa Charmoz HD .

Lightweight mountaineering boot

Nothing is more frustrating or potentially dangerous than cold feet, and toes can go from cold to numb to frostbitten in a matter of minutes. That is why it’s imperative to have the proper boot design for your objective. Single boots lack a removable liner and therefore are the lightest and least warm type of mountaineering footwear. Double boots, on the other hand, have more insulation along with a removable liner, making them warmer and better suited for multi-day trips. The ability to remove the liner and dry it out at night is imperative on big mountains—nothing is worse than shoving your feet into frozen boots in the frigid, pre-dawn darkness of an alpine start.

For spring and summer ascents in lower altitude ranges like the Cascades or Canadian Rockies, a single boot should provide enough warmth. It will be light enough to wear on a lengthy approach, but offer enough support to keep your feet comfortable under the weight of a heavy pack. Single boots almost always have more of a next-to-skin feel, meaning they feel more technical and lower profile than their double-walled brethren.

Testing the La Sportiva Olympus Mons mountaineering boot (Mt. Denali)

Double boots are built for cold weather, multi-day expeditions, and climbing the world’s highest peaks. They often are significantly heavier than single boots and less sensitive overall, but some models like the Scarpa Phantom 6000 HD and La Sportiva G2 Evo  offer a nice combination of the two (reasonably lightweight boots with technical features). For the tallest peaks and coldest climates—think places like the high Himalaya, Antarctica, and Denali—look toward the top of each brand’s collection. The La Sportiva Olympus Mons and Scarpa Phantom 8000, for example, are built specifically for these types of places.

Boot selection is not always a cut and dry choice, and depends as much on your objective and style of ascent as it does on conditions. For example, during an austral summer in Patagonia, one of our testers attempted Cerro Torre in single boots but found that weren’t adequate for the icy flanks of that impressive tower. They were, however, completely sufficient on his ascent of the nearby Fitz Roy a few weeks later (different aspect, different weather, moderate rock climbing vs. ice climbing), and offered more of the streamlined build and rock prowess that he needed. If it’s a toss-up, we do recommend erring on the side of warmth, and the good news is that many modern boots offer great insulation alongside performance.

La Sportiva Aequilibrium Top GTX mountaineering boot (up close)

Shell Materials: Synthetics, Leather, and Plastic 

The shell is your first line of defense against the harsh conditions of a mountain environment. It needs to be durable (able to stand up to abrasion from rocks, crampons, and skis), and also must keep out snow, water, and mountain grit. In addition, much of a boot’s stiffness comes from the shell, which is important when it’s time to ice climb or do a little survival skiing on the way down. The vast majority of boot shells are now entirely synthetic or a combination of synthetics and leather. 

Many climbers prefer modern synthetic boots, namely because they weigh less, offer more precision with less bulk, and don’t stretch out of shape like leather. However, the downside comes in the form of durability—almost without exception, leather boots will last longer. For example, our La Sportiva Trango Tech GTX took a beating during a two-week traverse in the Alaska Range, whereas a leather model might have just started to feel broken in. If you do opt for a leather boot (such as the La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX or Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX), we recommend adding an aftermarket snow and water seal to keep moisture from soaking through and weighing you down. 

Mountaineering (on summit)

A decade ago, plastic boots were a popular way to go. Compared to soft leather or synthetics, plastic feels more clunky and less precise when technical footwork is needed. But it does have its benefits: not only is plastic significantly cheaper, it’s also much more durable. If you are an occasional mountaineer on a budget or only intend to climb a few mountains, plastic may be a good option. Adding an  Intuition Denali liner  ($185 plus potential custom molding fees) will make them warmer while dropping almost a pound of weight in the process. For big mountains like Denali, a Forty Below Purple Haze overboot ($220) will be necessary as well, which may require that you purchase a different crampon to fit over the boot. In 2023, however, you will see very few plastic boots, and the leather and synthetic alternatives are far superior. Further, if you customize your plastic boot as described above, it will end up costing over $800, which isn't much less than the price of a high-end synthetic double boot of equal warmth and superior technical precision.

Big mountains require big boots, often with a big price tag. Some of the extreme cold/high-altitude models on the list like the Scarpa Phantom 8000 are over 5 pounds for the pair and take up a decent chunk of your duffel bag. On the other end of the spectrum, you can go with a lightweight single boot like the La Sportiva Aequilibrium ST GTX for just 2 pounds 12.4 ounces total. To be sure, it’s harder to move fast with more weight, but serious mountaineering typically does not involve highly technical climbing for extended stretches. It’s more steep walking and basic ice/rock moves, so shaving ounces is not as important as warmth. If your aim is technical climbing—pitch after pitch of near vertical climbing—size and weight will likely be a deciding factor in your boot purchase.

The good news is that high-end mountaineering boots have cut excessive frills, and although still heavy and bulky, are lighter than even a decade ago. A few ounces or grams may not seem like a big deal, but imagine post-holing through steep snow for 20,000 steps. To quantify this comparison, a 1-ounce difference in boot weight means that each leg will lift an additional 1,250 pounds during that time. The old adage that “ounces makes pounds and pounds are heavy” is especially true in regard to your feet.

Mountaineering Boots (lightweight La Sportiva Trango Tech GTX hanging)

Cold feet can mean the difference between sending or going home early, so finding a boot that will keep you warm in the coldest conditions you’ll encounter is key. Double boots like the La Sportiva Olympus Mons Cube and Scarpa Phantom 8000 are the warmest models on the market, with features like thickly insulated inner boots and thermo-reflective liners on the outer boot. On the other hand, single boots run the gamut from insulated designs like Scarpa’s Phantom Tech or Lowa’s Alpine Expert GTX, to stripped-down builds that forgo insulation, such as the La Sportiva Aequilibrium and Trango Tech. Keep in mind that warmth usually comes at a cost—a more insulated boot will be heavier, less precise, and suffer in terms of breathability—and you’ll want to be sure to find the right balance for your particular objectives.

When looking at a single boot’s warmth, one of the main specs to pay attention to is the lining, which will either be insulated or non-insulated. For summer objectives that involve a mix of trail, rock, and snow or ice, we recommend opting for a non-insulated design, as the added warmth will be overkill (especially on the approach) and you likely won’t want to carry the extra weight either. Alternatively, insulated single boots are great for all-season use and snowy summer objectives (like Mt. Rainier, for example), when temperatures are below freezing or your feet might not see dry land all day. And in the end, if you plan on doing a wide range of climbing from winter or high-altitude ascents to technical summer scrambling, you’ll ultimately want to invest in at least two pairs of boots. 

Ice climbing (Scarpa Phantom Tech)

Depending on the double boot (remember that single boots don’t have removable liners), liners may provide a significant portion of a boot’s warmth and support. This is the part of the boot that you will want to remove at night during a multi-day trip, and the ability to dry the liner by stuffing it into your jacket or sleeping bag is imperative. Heavy, thick liners made of water-absorbing materials will not dry completely throughout an alpine evening, which is why most modern boot liners are constructed of hydrophobic materials like closed-cell foam. Single boots, on the other hand, feature a built-in liner, which often is made up of a waterproof membrane and a layer of insulation (as we learned in the “warmth” section above, some single boots do not have insulation). Because these liners can’t be removed, they feature thin constructions that wick moisture, whether your boot is on or off your foot.

Scarpa Charmoz mountaineering boot

In some ways, mountaineering boots need to do their best impersonation of a “quiver of one” type of footwear. In addition to the warmth and protection they provide, they need to be part rock climbing shoe , part hiking boot, and even maybe an occasional ski boot. Having the ability to tighten the boot down when ice climbing or skiing and then loosening it when hiking is essential. Mountaineering boots don’t have lock-down modes like backcountry ski boots, but many now feature an upper and lower lacing system to isolate tightness to specific parts of the boot (like the La Sportiva Oly Mons Cube).

Sole stiffness, or stiffness underfoot, also is an important factor to consider—different types of climbing require varying sole stiffness. For low-altitude mountaineering where you won’t be technical ice climbing, you may want a boot with a ¾-shank sole (one that has some flex). These boots will feel like a stiff hiking boot and are better suited for long approaches, technical scrambling, or lower fifth-class rock climbing (like the Cascade’s classic Torment-Forbidden Traverse, for example). On the other size of the spectrum, full shank soles (with no flex) are optimal for technical ice climbing and advanced mountaineering with a step-in/automatic crampon.

Mountaineering Boots (hiking in the La Sportiva Nepal Evo)

Tightening your boots down doesn’t just involve basic laces anymore. Modern boots have a wide array of tightening systems including standard tie laces, pull-down cinch laces, or even the high-tech Boa lacing system. Many companies have moved away from standard laces because they are hard to tie and untie in extreme weather. In addition, having the ability to easily tighten or loosen your boots (maybe with only one hand) while wearing thick gloves or mittens is critical. Lacing systems should be simple, but efficient. The Boa system probably is the easiest to use, but it may be the most susceptible to breaking in an alpine environment (because of this, we love that Sportiva integrated dual Boa closures into their new Oly Mons Cube —when one goes, your entire boot functionality doesn’t go with it). Luckily, Boa sells repair kits for very cheap and they can be reinstalled in about the same amount of time as it would take to replace a shoelace.

Mountaineering boots (lacing leather La Sportiva Nepal Evo)

Automatic (Step-In) Crampons For each boot, we’ve specified whether or not it is compatible with an automatic crampon. An automatic crampon—also known as a step-in crampon—uses a wire toe bail and heel clip to provide the most secure attachment, ideal for ice climbing or technical mountaineering (the Petzl Dart , for example). If we’re climbing anything that is remotely approaching vertical, we want an automatic crampon. In order to be compatible with this style of crampon, a boot must have toe and heel welts and a fairly stiff build that provides a stable structure for the crampon. Every double boot on this list is compatible with an automatic crampon.

La Sportiva Spantik (step-in crampons)

Semi-Automatic (Hybrid) Crampons More flexible, streamlined single boots often forgo the toe welt and otherwise shave weight by having a thinner last. The majority of these models—such as the La Sportiva Aequilibrium ST GTX —still have a heel welt, which is essential for compatibility with a semi-automatic crampon (also known as a hybrid crampon). A semi-automatic crampon combines the front plastic loop of a strap-on crampon (see below) and the heel clip of a step-in crampon. While less secure than a step-in crampon, semi-automatic crampons are a far better choice for lightweight or flexible boots as they have more of an ability to move with the boot.

Strap-On Crampons The last type of crampon is a full strap-on crampon (plastic loops in front and back with webbing to tighten). Strap-on crampons are highly adaptable, and even are capable of fitting on  approach shoes  or trail runners (our favorite lightweight design is the Petzl Leopard FL). They do have limited technical performance, however, as they do not secure as tightly to the boot as a step-in or semi-automatic crampon. Strap-on crampons can be attached to any sort of boot, although they would have very compromised functionality when paired with a stiff build, and are not appropriate for ice climbing or technical mountaineering. The lesson here is: make sure your boot can accommodate the type of crampon you need, and don’t forget to check compatibility and fit before any big trip.

La Sportiva Trango Ice Cube (crampons)

If you ever plan on climbing a mountain like Denali where you may use your mountaineering boots with skis (utilizing bindings such as the Silvretta 500), it’s essential that your boot has both a heel and toe welt. These are the same flat rails on the front and back of the boot that serve as the connection point for automatic crampons (see above). Bindings like the Silvretta aren’t made for aggressive skiing, but they do allow you to use skis (skinning tends to be faster than snowshoeing) without needing to bring along your ski boots . And now, mountaineers approaching on skis have a whole new option in the La Sportiva Olympus Mons Cube, which features tech fittings at the toe for compatibility with pin bindings (standard on most backcountry skis ).

Different companies use different lasts for their mountaineering boots. Some tend to be slightly narrower (La Sportiva and Arc’teryx) while others routinely have a slightly boxier feel (Scarpa). Just because you wear a size 44.5 street shoe doesn’t mean that it will translate directly into a big mountaineering boot. You may be a 44.5 in La Sportiva, a 44 in Scarpa, and a 45 with a thick insole in Arc’teryx, for example. And every boot has a unique fit and it can take some work to dial it in. Always try on your boots well before a trip—a little extra heel room quickly can develop into a show-stopping blister that keeps you from reaching the summit. Or a tight toe box can restrict blood flow and lead to frostbite. Your feet swell as you stand on them, so we recommend trying boots on in the afternoon after you have been walking around for a few hours.

La Sportiva Baruntse mountaineering boots

Mountaineering involves long days (often back to back for a week or more) carrying heavy packs and using your feet in dynamic ways. Accordingly, an insole is the first line of support in your boot. Custom boot fitters will say, “If you buy a $1,000 boot, throw away the $0.10 insole.” Often that is true, although companies like La Sportiva and Scarpa seem to have taken note. Many of their boots now come with quality insoles that not only offer support and comfort, but a bit of additional warmth as well. A good insole should support your foot, both in terms of supporting your arch and cupping your heel.

If the included insole doesn’t work for you, consider spending another $40 to 50 for a heat-molded insole from a reputable brand like Sole or Superfeet. Aside from providing additional warmth, these insoles come in a variety of thicknesses that can take up space if there is a little too much room (or even work out tight spots). And when making a boot purchase, it’s always better to go slightly bigger as opposed to going too tight—it’s easier to take up room than to make it.

La Sportiva Aequilibrium Top GTX mountaineering boot (approaching Torre Valley 2)

As with other types in climbing footwear, the most important thing in choosing a mountaineering boot is fit. Most of the models listed above technically are unisex, while a few like the La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX , Scarpa Charmoz, and Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX also come in women’s-specific versions. It’s extremely common for women to wear unisex boots—again, it’s all about fit and only a handful of models are even available in women’s versions. It’s also worth noting that La Sportiva and Arc’teryx tend to run narrow, which—at least in theory—should be more akin to the shape of a women’s-specific design.

Mountaineering Boots (men's and women's La Sportiva Trango Tech GTX)

There’s an old adage in the outdoor gear world: “between light, durable, and cheap, you can pick two of the three.” Over the last decade or so, mountaineering boots have seen a tremendous jump in precision and technical design while also cutting some weight. Unfortunately, this has come at the expense of durability to some extent. Plastic boots were almost indestructible, but at the same time, could feel rather clunky. Leather boots are heavy and can get even more weighed down when wet, but they’re also built to last. And then there are new-age synthetic boots like the Scarpa Phantom series, which manage to be warm, lightweight, and technical climbing machines. This is attained by using ultralight polyurethanes, foam, and synthetic fabrics, but these materials are much less durable than the plastic and leather boots of old.

Mountaineering boots (Denali)

For most modern climbers, the tradeoff is well worth it. One of our Alaska testers has found that his high-altitude double boots last him about three years (he averages 60 days of abusive use per season), and the average mountaineer will get many more years of use out of their boots. Further, chances are that when you have them on your feet, you’ll be thinking much more about the greater flexibility, technical prowess, and lower weight than mulling over how long they’ll last. Of course, there is a balance, and we’ve found that some of today’s most stripped-down designs (like the Sportiva Trango Tech and Aequilibrium ST GTX) go a little too far for most uses. The good news is that for those who prize durability above all else, there’s always trusted workhorses like the leather Nepal Evo or plastic Scarpa Inverno . Back to Our Mountaineering Boot Picks   Back to Our Boot Comparison Table

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FTRE CRAMPS ICON

  • K2 NORTH SIDE EXPEDITION
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  • WHO IS THIS FOR?
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  • MAKING IT HAPPEN. EXPEDITIONS 102 TIME
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SCARPA PHANTOM 8000 HD & 6000 BOOTS

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SCARPA BROUGHT THE TRIED & TRUSTED TRADITIONAL HIGH ALTITUDE BOOT DESIGN TO FRUITION. UNLIKE SOME BRANDS THAT VEERED OFF INTO EXPERIMENTING WITH NEW IDEAS AND GIMMICKS, SCARPA SAW THROUGH A DESIGN CONCEPT THAT EVERYBODY ALREADY KNEW WAS WORKING. BOTH THE 6000 & 8000 VERSIONS HAVE ALL THE BITS YOU EXPECT TO SEE IN THESE SORT OF BOOTS, DONE WELL AND WITH NOTHING LEFT OUT. IT’S NICE TO KNOW THERE’S NO QUESTION MARKS ABOUT YOUR FOOTWEAR WHEN HEADING OFF.

IN THE LAST DECADE THESE SORTS OF BOOTS HAVE COME DOWN A LOT IN WEIGHT AS WELL AS BECOME WARMER AND NICER TO WEAR. SCARPA HAS DONE THIS BY INVESTING A LOT INTO THEIR INNER BOOTS, AND DESPITE THE TREND OF SLIMMING DOWN INNERS, SCARPA HAS RETAINED A GOOD SOLID INNER BOOT THAT CAN COPE WITH BEING WORN AROUND HIGH CAMPS. LIKE A FEW OTHER COMPANIES, USING AEROGEL GETS RESULTS, AS HAS REMOVING ALMOST ALL LEATHER, CREATING A BOOT THAT HOLDS LITTLE MOISTURE AND IS LESS EFFECTED BY MATERIAL COMPRESSION.

EVERYONE SEEMS TO OBSESS OVER THE OUTER ZIPS, ESPECIALLY THE CURRENT 6000’s, BUT WE DON’T FIND IT’S A BIG DEAL SO LONG AS THE ZIP DOESN’T HAVE A COVER. THESE DAYS EXPOSED ZIPS ARE WEATHER-PROOF ENOUGH TO SLIDE OK. SUPER GAITERS IN THIS GENERATION OF 8000m BOOTS ARE MUCH LIGHTER THAN BEFORE, WITH THE LOWER SECTION’S INSULATION THESE DAYS ADDING LITTLE BULK. IF YOUR LAST HIGH ALTITUDE BOOTS WERE MORE THAN 5 YEARS AGO YOU WILL BE IMPRESSED, THEY CLIMB MUCH BETTER.

INSIDE, BOTH BOOTS HAVE THE WELL KNOWS CINCH LACES AND ‘POWER’ STRAP AROUND THE ANKLE WHICH WORK FINE AND ALLOW FOR ENDLESS TWEAKING TO NEEDS. SCARPA HAS DONE WELL TO MAKE THE BOOTS REALLY OPEN OUT AND EASY TO GET INTO (DON’T TRIM THE LACES TO HASTILY), AN ADVANTAGE OVER THE BOA SYSTEMS SEEN ELSEWHERE. AS A SHELL TO HANDLE THE BRUNT OF KICKING & POINTING UP THOUSANDS OF STEEP METERS THEY ARE TOTALLY RIDGID, AND THE NEW GENERATION LOW BULK MEANS THEY ARE ALMOST AS PRECISE AS SINGLES, WITH MID-SOLE INSULATION GIVING MUCH BETTER CRAMPON INTERFACE, AND AEROGEL AROUND THE FRONT ALLOWING A TOE BOX GETTING VERY CLOSE TO A SINGLE BOOT NOW. NOT ALL CRAMPONS WILL PERFECTLY FIT ALL SIZES THOUGH, SO BE PREPARED TO PLAY ABOUT AND MAYBE SHAVE SOME RUBBER OFF THE HEELS (THE GRIVEL G20/22 PLUS’ WE RECOMMEND SEEM FINE).

AS ALWAYS THOUGH, IT’S THE INNER BOOT THAT MATTERS MOST, BEING WHERE THE REAL WARMTH IS AND YOUR FOOT HAS TO INTERFACE. SCARPA HAS NAILED THIS WITH THERMOFORMABLE INNERS, ARGUABLY THE BEST ON THE MARKET. A DEPARTURE A WHILE AGO, THESE INNERS DON’T HAVE LACES – PRO’S BEING LESS BULK, CON’S BEING HARDER TO PUT ON AND PERFECT THE FIT – BUT THE ALL-ROUND INSULATION AND STREAMLINED WORKS. FORMING THEM IS WELL WORTH YOUR TIME, ESPECIALLY IF YOU’RE ON THE EDGE OF SIZE INCREMENTS. BE AWARE THAT ONLY A THINNISH OR EMDIUM SOCK IS NEEDED, ANYTHING MORE JUST TRAPS MOISTURE YOU NEED TO THEN DRY OUT SOMEHOW. SCARPA’S INNERS HAVE A GOOD DEGREE OF STRUCTURE TO THEM – FAR MORE THAN THE FLOPPY NEOPRENE INNERS SOME BOOTS HAVE – SO THEY DON’T LOSE INTEGRITY AND CREATE DEAD AIR SPACE, AND FORMING ONLY ENHANCES THIS.

WE LIKE THE INNERS SO MUCH WE USE THEM WITH OTHER BRANDS OF BOOTS AND HAVE ARRANGED TO SECURE THEM FOR OUR TEAM MEMBERS TO DO THE SAME.

ALL UP, THE SCARPA’S CLIMB AMONG THE BEST OF ANY BOOTS WE’VE TRIED DUE TO THEIR WELL INTEGRATED AND ADJUSTABLE DESIGN. ALL THE EMERGING TECH AND THE ABSENCE OF GADGETS, THE PRECISE TOE PROFILE AND THE LIGHT WEIGHT ADD UP TO MAKE A BOOT THAT CLIMBS LIKE WE ALL WANTED THEM TO A DECADE AGO.

scarpa phantom 6000 test

GLOBAL RESCUE

scarpa phantom 6000 test

FEEDING THE RAT EXPEDITIONS

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  • Climbing Gear Reviews
  • Mountaineering Gear Reviews

The 3 Best Mountaineering Boots

gearlab tested logo

Mountaineers, ice climbers, and alpinists have never seen more options in boots. We researched 25 mountaineering boots before purchasing the top 9 for testing. All of these models will work with any crampon binding system, though some fit better than others. Some of these boots are agile and light, perfect for technical mixed climbing, while others provide more calf support, great for sustained front-pointing. We tested each boot while crushing tall mountains loaded with rock and ice. Some protected our feet from the elements, while others didn't perform as well. No matter your climbing style or budget, we've included a variety of models to fit most needs.

We've got the scoop on all the useful gear for your big mountain objectives , like the best 4-season tents , durable and lightweight mountaineering backpacks , and our top picks for ice axes . Don't forget our comparative review of the best climbing helmets as well!

Editor's Note: This review was updated on March 13, 2023, with a focus on assessing our lineup and ensuring the products tested are still current.

Top 9 Product Ratings

Best overall mountaineering boot, asolo eiger xt gv evo.

Editors' Choice Award

  • Climbing 8.0
  • Weather Resistance 7.0

The Asolo Eiger XT Evo GV is a category-bending boot. It has what we expect from a super-gaiter boot: it climbs ice, rock, and snow well, is reasonably warm, and protects our feet from the elements. The surprising thing about it is the weight; it's approaching that of a three-season mountain boot.

However, it's not flawless. Although the lacing method is very straightforward, it lacks a lace lock, making it impossible to separate the tension in your forefoot from that in your heel or ankle. The gaiter zipper isn't waterproof, which slightly reduces the waterline. It's also less toasty than some of the rival boots we tested, though only cold-footed climbers in the depth of winter might notice. Nevertheless, this is our favorite mountain boot, and the pair our testers preferred for challenging ascents.

Read more: Asolo Eiger XT Evo GV review

best overall mountaineering boot

Best Bang for the Buck

La sportiva trango tower extreme gtx.

Best Buy Award

  • Climbing 6.0
  • Weather Resistance 4.0

Mountaineering boots get better every year, and the models in this review are a testament to that. Even though the La Sportiva Trango Tower Extreme GTX scores squarely in the middle of our group, it is still a great boot. Its low price and weight caught our eye. We loved it on the approach and for climbing technical rock with and without crampons. It sports a simple and secure lacing system. The fact that it's not as heavily insulated as the competition gives it some year-round versatility.

Most climbers will find the boot warm enough in the winter, but it's not the warmest. While the ankle flexibility was great for some terrain, our testers missed it on sustained steep ice. This is an excellent boot for the warm-footed on fast and light climbs or for spring, summer, and fall alpinists who need full shank performance.

Read more: La Sportiva Trango Tower Extreme GTX review

mountaineering boot - best bang for the buck

Best for Overnight Trips

Arc'teryx acrux ar.

Top Pick Award

  • Climbing 5.0
  • Weather Resistance 9.0

In some ways, the Arc'teryx Acrux AR is in a category by itself. While it weighs about the same as some of the single boots in our test, it's a double boot, which means that climbers on overnight trips can bring the inner boot into their sleeping bag to dry out at night. It is fully waterproof. The lacing system is simple but provides some nice options on the approach and when things get steep.

The sole has an ever-so-slight flex, though we think only heavier climbers, or those with the weakest calves, will be able to detect this. These boots are also pretty pricey. However, for those who are getting high (but less than 6000m) or are spending a night (or more) out in cold weather, this boot is an excellent choice.

Read more: Arc'teryx Acrux AR review

mountaineering boot - the acrux was a favorite boot on colder days.

Compare Products

mountaineering boot - a good fit and calf support are crucial for leading ice. cody sending.

Why You Should Trust Us

We've tested nearly two dozen mountaineering boots throughout the last decade. From South to North America, we truly put in the miles testing these boots throughout a range of conditions. Our biggest scoring criteria was, of course, climbing. We tested each boot with and without crampons from various different brands, climbing both ice and rock. We weighed each boot on our own scales, and we spent hours hiking up and down steep terrain. We tested using core criteria , in an unbiased way, to provide you with some of the best feedback out there.

  • Climbing tests ( 25% of overall score weighting )
  • Weight tests ( 20% weighting )
  • Weather Resistance tests ( 20% weighting )
  • Warmth tests ( 15% weighting )
  • Hiking tests ( 10% weighting )
  • Lacing tests ( 10% weighting )

Lead tester Ian McEleney is an AMGA certified Alpine Guide. He spends over 100 days a year in mountaineering boots approaching objectives, leading technical pitches of rock, ice, and snow, and shivering at the belay. To give a well-rounded idea of how these boots performed for multiple users, other guides and experienced alpine partners who also wear size 43 gathered additional, sometimes contrasting, testing data.

The Mont Blanc Pro in its element.

Analysis and Test Results

If it's true that our security in the mountains begins with our own movement and our movement is rooted in our feet, then boots might be the single most important piece of gear you bring with you on a climb. A good mountain boot keeps feet dry in cold conditions, protects them from precipitation, supports the musculature in our feet and legs, doesn't inhibit efficient hiking on approaches and descents, is easy to adjust, and doesn't burden us with unnecessary weight. Sounds like an impossible mission! Modern mountain boots do these things better than they ever have in the past. In our test, instead of sorting the good from the bad, we tease out the differences between a field of good products.

To ensure that our test was as fair as possible, we restricted our selection to full-shank boots that have some insulation and a toe welt for automatic crampon compatibility. We excluded double boots that are designed for extreme cold and high altitudes (these are sometimes referred to as "6000-meter boots"). We also left out ¾ shank summer boots without a toe welt, the type of boot you might use for a simple snowy approach to a rock route. All of the boots in our review are suitable for use on winter ice and alpine climbs in the lower 48 states, Canada, Europe, and beyond. They are compatible with all crampon binding types.

Even with these restrictions, there are significant differences between products. This is in part because climbing mountains is more popular than ever before, and this growing economy allows manufacturers to create products that may have been too niche to be economically viable in the past. What this means for us lucky climbers is that we can find a boot designed specifically for the climbing we want to do!

Quality mountaineering gear is a major investment. While some may not hesitate to pay top dollar for a pair of boots, others are looking to walk the line between price and performance. In scoring and ranking these boots, we kept value in mind and identified boots that offer the performance you need at a price that is easier to swallow. Most notably, the La Sportiva Trango Tower Extreme offers great performance at a more approachable price point. We also suggest that value-conscious shoppers consider the Lowa Alpine Expert GTX , Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro GTX , and La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX .

Climbing performance is the most important thing we're after in this review. After all, if the boot can't handle the route, it doesn't matter if it can keep your feet warm or lace up easily. However, readers should be aware that of all of our metrics, climbing performance is most affected by fit. Also worth noting is that while these boots work with all crampon binding systems, not all crampons fit all boots well. Most of our testers prefer a fully automatic crampon binding, as it gives a better and more secure fit. It seems that the boots with less rocker, particularly the Asolo Eiger XT , Scarpa Phantom Tech , and Mont Blanc Pro , are the easiest to fit with crampons.

Our testing team tried to evaluate climbing performance as objectively as possible by climbing with the boots in three different media: water ice, mixed/dry tooling, and rock climbing without crampons. For ice climbing, we sought materials and construction in the upper of the boot that gave good support to fatiguing calves on steep ground. The La Sportiva Nepal Cube really shined here. We also wanted a sole that was perfectly rigid. Most of the models are rigid, but we found the Arc'teryx Acrux a little lacking here. Those with big burly calves won't notice, but chicken-legged ice climbers may prefer something stiffer underfoot.

mountaineering boot - kevin testing boots on easy ice.

For mixed climbing and dry tooling, we want a rigid sole, just like for ice, but we prefer it to be a bit thinner. We also want a lot of freedom in the ankle for fancy footwork. The Asolo Eiger XT and Scarpa Phantom Tech came through in all of these criteria, and the La Sportiva Trango Tower Extreme is just behind with a slightly thicker sole. Some of our testing team was pleasantly surprised with the La Sportiva G5 Evo on mixed ground because the velcro power strap could quickly be loosened for more ankle articulation.

mountaineering boot - jared leaving the granite for the snow on a cold day.

On bare rock with no crampons, we also like a lot of range of motion in the ankle and a thinner sole to keep our toes closer to the rock. To our surprise, we also found that we like a boot with a bit more rocker in the sole for climbing rocks. As with mixed climbing, the Asolo Eiger XT and Sportiva Trango Tower Extreme were favorites. We also liked the Lowa Alpine Expert for standard rock climbing.

Weight is an important consideration for almost any piece of gear we use in human-powered activities. For footwear, this is even truer. "A pound on your feet equals five on your back" is a classic adage from the backpacking world. It turns out that this has been validated by a number of scientific studies, including two conducted by the US Army (in 1985 and 1986). While the studies vary slightly in the exact amount of additional work required by heavy footwear, five pounds remains a good reference. For numbers a climber can understand, an additional pound of footwear is like adding four #6 Camalot C4s to your pack, or twelve 22cm steel ice screws, or ½ gallon of water.

In general, mountain boots are becoming lighter. In the past, there would be significant performance differences between heavier and lighter boots. Today, over half the boots in our review weigh two pounds or less. Among these are super-gaiter boots made for cold and gnarly conditions, as well as boots with more of an all-year mountain focus. The Asolo Eiger XT is the lightest boot in our test, but it can still go toe-to-toe with other models for warmth and weather resistance.

mountaineering boot - weight matters. the lighter boots in our test weigh under 2 pounds.

While the warmest boots are among the heaviest, modern insulation and construction technologies have disrupted that connection — a boot doesn't have to be heavy to be warm. The La Sportiva Trango Tower Extreme GTX is one of the lightest boots in our review. Not surprisingly, it's also one of the least warm. However, two of the warmest mountaineering boots in our review, the La Sportiva G5 Evo and Scarpa Phantom Tech , are also very light.

mountaineering boot - your boots better be light if you're gaining this much elevation in...

While light by old single boot standards, the La Sportiva Nepal Cube is pretty hefty by modern standards. What extra weight gets you is a high-top leather boot that's great for steep ice. Slightly lighter but much warmer is the Arc'teryx Arcux AR. Both of the Lowa offerings in our test are a bit heavier than comparable models.

Weather Resistance

Dry feet are warm feet, so the ability of a boot to protect our feet from water in all of its forms enhances the warmth and overall performance of our mountaineering boots. Wet feet are also more prone to blisters, which are a surefire way to spoil your trip. However, it's rare for climbers to ever stand in more than an inch or two of liquid water. Close readers of this review will notice that we avoid using the word "waterproof" to describe a boot. Step in a deep enough puddle with any of these boots, and you'll take on water fast.

There are many ways our feet can get wet on an alpine or ice climb. Snow can come in the top of the boot while we're post-holing. Seams in the upper can be weak points that let moisture in while we're belaying in sloppy wet snow. A creek crossing can be deeper than it looks. We can punch through the top layer of ice on a pitch to find water pooled beneath. It even rains in the mountains! While these boots have varying "water lines" that climbers should be aware of, our testers think how well they deal with snow in all of its forms is more important.

mountaineering boot - post-holing is something to be hated and feared, but at least a good...

Our testing team looked at several factors when examining weather resistance. First, we looked at the construction and materials of the boot. Boots with an integrated gaiter score more highly, especially those with a super-gaiter. This includes models like the Asolo Eiger XT , Lowa Alpine Ice GTX , and the Arc'teryx Acrux , which will keep out any and all moisture to a depth of 11 inches. La Sportiva's Nepal Cube and Trango Tower Extreme and the Scarpa Mont Blanc Pro all lacked a proper gaiter, but the boot cuff was designed to hug our calves. We found this design to be quite effective. Taller boots allowed us to step into deeper streams before water came rushing in over the top. They also helped when engaged in serious post-holing.

In the past, some popular super-gaiter models achieved weather resistance by making the gaiter itself completely waterproof, with waterproof fabrics and a waterproof zipper. These days companies seem to be moving away from this. Three of the five super-gaiter models in our review do not have a waterproof zipper. Water is kept out with a waterproof flap sewn in behind the zipper or by the boot itself. Climbers should think of the gaiter as something that enhances the weather resistance without necessarily connoting waterproofness.

mountaineering boot - though our favorite form of water in the winter is frozen, it can...

Varying designs can make it hard to tell where exactly the "water line" of a boot is. On several of these boots, the material used in the very top of the cuff let water in near our Achilles tendon. To discover these weaknesses, we filled a plastic tub with 6 inches of water and stood in it with each boot for 5 minutes. While this test might not have the most real-world crossover, it served to quickly reveal any weakness in a boot's design.

Mountain environments present many hazards, and when we're distracted, we may not notice or respond to these hazards effectively. Cold feet are a serious distraction and a challenge for any mountain boot. Not only do we sometimes stand still for extended belays, but we're also standing on the snow or ice, and with metal strapped to our feet conducting the heat away. Additionally, our feet are located far from our heart and core (the source of warm blood) and are a relatively low priority for our hypothalamus (the part of our brain that regulates body temperature).

A good mountaineering boot keeps our feet warm in several ways. It traps heat with insulation in the upper of the boot. Boots with a thicker and higher cuff generally keep our feet warmer. As a bonus, this type of construction often lends more calf support for steep ice climbing. However, sometimes the cost is decreased range of motion in the ankle and lessened performance on mixed terrain, rock climbing, and hiking. Boots also insulate our feet from the cold surfaces we stand on and from crampons. A thicker midsole and outsole help with this, but depending on the materials used in construction, can also add weight to the boot and compromise climbing precision.

mountaineering boot - whether its a sunny summit on a cold, windy day or a shady valley...

The Arc'teryx Acrux and Lowa Alpine Ice are the warmest boots in our review, but they are also among the heaviest and bulkiest. An integrated super-gaiter can boost warmth. Notable is the G5 Evo . Because the lacing system is so fast and easy to use, we could snug the boot up when it was time to send, then instantly loosen it at the belay or around camp. We felt this helped our feet stay warmer than they might otherwise, without added insulation.

How warm a given boot is will be of different importance to different climbers. Those heading out in the winter who have a history of cold feet, a cold injury, or compromised circulation would do well to prioritize boot warmth. Climbers seeking a boot for technical alpine and ice climbs in the summer months (think as couloirs in the Sierra, ridges in the Cascades, and big faces in the Canadian Rockies) may seek something with a bit less insulation to avoid sweaty feet.

mountaineering boot - the three warmest boots in our review, each has a super gaiter.

Many climbers tend to favor the vertical, but like it or not, hiking is an intrinsic part of mountaineering and alpine climbing. We often hike to approach and descend from even the most technical routes. On easy mountaineering routes, the movement is basically hiking! Since hiking performance often isn't the main thing we're looking for in a mountaineering boot, we don't weight this metric heavily. However, it's still worth considering.

The sought-after qualities when hiking are not too far off from those we look for in rock climbing performance. A rockered sole leaves room for a more natural stride. Fore-to-aft ankle freedom contributes to this as well. Our favorite hiker is the La Sportiva Trango Tower Extreme . It is the boot we reached for when the approach was long, especially when it was on dry ground. This was one area where the slightly less rigid sole of the Arc'teryx Acrux AR shone. This boot performed better than expected for a double boot on the hard, frozen ground of early-season approaches and the unforgiving ice of glaciers in late-season conditions.

mountaineering boot - approaches over varying terrain with big packs ask a lot of a boot...

The way we put the boot on our feet and get a good fit has evolved quite a bit from the simple shoelace. Some of the models in our review stand in testament to this fact. While boot closure systems don't make or break our selection of one model over another, they are relevant, so we gave them some consideration in our metrics.

We've gotten used to lacing systems that let us dial in different tensions on our forefoot and ankle. Our testers think this is crucial for a good fit and one of the tricks that help us keep our feet warm when climbing steep ice. Every boot allows us to do that. We appreciated simplicity in a closure system. The fewer steps we had to take when putting on the boot, the better.

mountaineering boot - comparing lacing systems on the acrux (left foot, now discontinued)...

Most anybody who has worn a boot could pull the La Sportiva Nepal Cube or Lowa Alpine Ice out of the box and immediately know how to put it on. The same can be said of the Asolo Eiger XT and Scarpa Phantom Tech , though we missed the lace lock, a feature that allows us to isolate the tension between our forefoot and heel/ankle.

mountaineering boot - the ever-popular nepal cube sports a simple lacing system.

The La Sportiva G5 Evo was the fastest boot to put on, take off, or adjust, and it earned some points for this. We really liked the Boa knob on the outside of the boot, which let us make adjustments without unstrapping our crampons or unzipping the gaiter. We appreciated the power strap on the G5 Evo and Acrux because it provided the fastest adjustments to upper boot fit.

mountaineering boot - if you're wearing an appropriate pair of good fitting boots, you...

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PHANTOM 6000 HD

Low profile, high insulation.

PHANTOM 6000 HD     -     Low profile, high insulation     -     Black-Bright Orange

  • The warmest, lightest and technical high altitude boot on the market
  • More searchable thanks to the RECCO reflector
  • Green technology and performance

Innovative upper and sole construction system to obtain an ergonomic fit and maximum performance sinergy. Dynamic Tech Roll system combines multiple innovative and light materials, enhancing comfort, performance and ensuring optimum anti-torsion efficiency.

scarpa phantom 6000 test

The tongue and Flex Point are constructed in a single piece of elastic fabric: breathable, waterproof and resistant.

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This shoe can be resoled in an offical SCARPA resoler. Take your shoe/boot resoling before it's too damaged. Discover the list on store locator.

scarpa phantom 6000 test

Vibram® is the most specialized brand in the study and production of rubber soles dedicated to sport and in particular outdoor. The research focuses on grip, performance, durability.

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SCHOELLER® specializes in sustainable development and production of innovative textiles and textile technology. The company meets the specific demands of its customers, offering them a distinct added value.

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PRIMALOFT® is a reference point for the performance of all synthetic thermal insulation. It sets the standards of comfort in any situation and provides footwear the needed warmth without increasing the volume, lightweight and soft, water-resistant and elevated compressibility.

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Technology makes you searchable in the event of an avalanche. The two-part technology consists of RECCO® reflectors that are integrated into SCARPA ski boots; and RECCO® detectors that are used by more than 800 organized rescue groups worldwide. The technology enables directional pinpointing of a victim’s precise location using harmonic radar without interfering with avalanche transceivers. RECCO® technology facilitates a faster organized search and increases the chance of being found in time. On the Maestrale’s family models, the RECCO® reflector is installed underneath on the Velcro® strap of the right boot.

scarpa phantom 6000 test

Thanks to the HDry® quality standard, the shoes built with this system possess the highest level of waterproofness, breathability and insulation. The waterproof and breathable membrane is firmly laminated to the upper inner side and there are no seams and no gaps where water can penetrate: rain and cold are blocked on the shoe’s outer surface and a large volume of dry air keeps your feet warm and comfortable. The ultra-thin waterproof membrane and the unique lamination method provides a precise fit and keep your shoes dry and light all day.

scarpa phantom 6000 test

OrthoLite® provides the single most cost effective solution to enhance the comfort, performance, and long term cushioning while creating a cooler drier, healthier environment in every shoe.

scarpa phantom 6000 test

  • 1. BOTTOM VIEW
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  • 3. FRONT TPU CRAMPON INSERT with differentiated thickness, minimal, for maximum lightness
  • 4. LOW-DENSITY PU for foot control, cushioning and lightness
  • 5. EXTERNAL SIDE Design for cushioning
  • 6. OUTSOLE VIBRAM® exclusive design by SCARPA, DURASTEP rubber compound for durability
  • 7. INTERNAL SIDE Vertical grooves design for support on the heel

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LOW VOLUME,

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PHANTOM 6000 HD

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THE CREATION OF THE NEW

PHANTOM 6000 HD IS THE RESULT

OF COUNTLESS HOURS ON GLACIERS

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PROTECTIVE GAITER

No needs to worry about the resistance of the gaiter because is realized in S-TECH Schoeller Ecorepel® Bio fabric. Moreover a combination of PU TEK highly technical and breathable with an HDry membrane will assure anti-abrasion

WARM INNER SHELL

Stay super warm with the multilayer lining and a stratified upper made of Wintherm® Technology, that prevents heat dispersion thanks to an aluminium film.

WEARABLE LINER

This removable inner boot can be kept at your feet all the time, thanks to the anti-slip sole. It's soft, fast-drying and resistant due to the PrimaLoft® Black Performance Yarn. Lightness and warm are guranteed by Ortholite® O-Therm.

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Be searchable from professional rescuers in the event of an avalanche accident or injury, thanks to RECCO reflector.

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The new PHANTOM 6000 HD is designed for extreme mountaineering with a focus on agile, fast walking and technical ice climbing. It is the warmest, lightest and most technical mountainboot on the market, a mix of new generation technologies, developed with our partners, maintaining high standards of performance, through sustainable materials. It is perfect for winter ascents in the Alps, the mountains of Alaska and South America in alpine style and technical expeditions in the Himalayas.

HIGHLIGHTS: • The warmest, lightest and technical high altitude boot on the market • More searchable thanks to the RECCO® • Green technology and performance

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COMMENTS

  1. SCARPA Phantom 6000 Review: From Techy Mt. Huntington Terrain to the

    In short: The updated SCARPA Phantom 6000 proved wholly capable of climbing technical terrain and keeping feet warm up to the summit of Denali. The boot had the comfort and agility of a...

  2. Scarpa Phantom 6000 Hd 2023 Review

    . 8000m INTELLIGENCE IN A 6000m BOOT THE NORTH FACE WAS THE FIRST TO REALLY DO THIS WITH THE VERTO EXTREMES - SCALE DOWN AN 8000m BOOT RATHER THAN SCALE UP AN ICE CLIMBING ONE - AND IT WORKED. ALL THE BITS OF AN 8000m DESIGN TWEAKED TO BE MORE STREAMLINED AND SOME OF THE INSULATION DIALLED BACK A BIT.

  3. Scarpa Phantom Tech Review

    Price: $859 List Manufacturer: Scarpa By Ian McEleney ⋅ Review Editor ⋅ Sep 14, 2022 68 OVERALL SCORE RANKED #3 of 9 Climbing - 25% 8.0 Weight - 20% 8.0 Weather Resistance - 20% 6.0 Warmth - 15% 6.0 Hiking - 10% 6.0 Lacing - 10% 5.0 RELATED: Best Mountaineering Boots Our Verdict

  4. Scarpa Phantom 6000 (p)review

    The 6000 boot is deigned for mid/high altitude mountaineering which is primarily snow covered. The range we were in went up to 6800m but unstable weather kept us occupied with the lower peaks. Even then at this latitude there were surprisingly routes up to 5500m that were largely free of snow.

  5. Scarpa Phantom Tech vs Phantom 6000

    Techs are about as warm as other 1.5 boots (I've had Baturas and Acrux, the latter is technically a double boot but warmth wise more comparable to a supergaiter boot) and they feel a bit more nimble while climbing than the 6000. I wear the Techs most of time.

  6. Scarpa Phantom Tech or Phantom 6000

    <?xml encoding='utf-8' ?> Hi Everyone I demoed the Scarpa Phantom Tech's at the Ouray Ice Fest last weekend and liked they way they felt and climbed. I'm thinking of buying a pair and will be using them with Cassin Blade Runner crampons. However, now I'm trying to decide between the Phantom 6000's or the Tech's.

  7. The NEW Scarpa Phantom 6000

    The SCARPA Phantom 6000 falls into the latter category. As a lightweight, trimmed-down version of the Phantom 8000L HD, this alpine climbing boot is equally at home on high altitude peaks...

  8. SCARPA Phantom 6000 HD: For Extreme Mountaineering

    The Phantom 6000 is the warmest, lightest and most technical boot on the market, with a mix of innovation and new generation technologies, and maintaining hi...

  9. Scarpa Men's Phantom 6000 Mountaineering Boot Review

    Assurance. 4.9. Scarpa Men's Phantom 6000 Mountaineering Boot is an exceptional boot. One of its outstanding features is the below-knee length built. That is why; Scarpa sells it as a mountaineering boot. It offers maximum protection to the whole leg as one climbs over rocky cliffs. It is also built with excellent features, which improves its ...

  10. Scarpa Phantom 6000

    0:00 / 9:11 Scarpa Phantom 6000 ProLiteGear 22.6K subscribers Subscribe 58 22K views 9 years ago http://www.ProLiteGear.com reviews the Scarpa Phantom 6000... a very light double boot for...

  11. La Sportiva G2 SM vs. Scarpa Phantom 6000 : Gear

    Scarpa Phantom 6000 clocks in at $740 and is still not warm enough for Denali so you need an over boot that adds $160. Right there you have $900 in boots. Over boots are a PITA, BTW. The La Sportiva boot weighs in at $825. If you need over boots, I don't know if these boots are warm enough without them, then you are looking at $985.

  12. Best Mountaineering Boots of 2023

    Best Boot for Technical Ice Climbing: Scarpa Phantom Tech HD Best High-Altitude Mountaineering Boot: La Sportiva Olympus Mons Cube Best Overall Mountaineering Boot 1. La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX ($649) Category: 4-season technical alpine Body design: Single leather Weight per pair: 3 lb. 15 oz. Crampon: Automatic

  13. Scarpa

    The SCARPA Phantom 6000 falls into the latter category. As a lightweight, trimmed-down version of the Phantom 8000L HD, this mountaineering boot is perfect for high altitude peaks up to 6000 meters in elevation. Redesigned to tell a more sustainable story, we used more environmentally-friendly materials while still offering the same great ...

  14. Scarpa Phantom 8000 Hd & 6000 Boots

    8000 HD. . SCARPA BROUGHT THE TRIED & TRUSTED TRADITIONAL HIGH ALTITUDE BOOT DESIGN TO FRUITION. UNLIKE SOME BRANDS THAT VEERED OFF INTO EXPERIMENTING WITH NEW IDEAS AND GIMMICKS, SCARPA SAW THROUGH A DESIGN CONCEPT THAT EVERYBODY ALREADY KNEW WAS WORKING. BOTH THE 6000 & 8000 VERSIONS HAVE ALL THE BITS YOU EXPECT TO SEE IN THESE SORT OF BOOTS ...

  15. The 3 Best Mountaineering Boots

    Overview Compare Buying Advice How We Tested The 3 Best Mountaineering Boots We took to the mountains, testing mountaineering boots from La Sportiva, Scarpa, Arc'teryx, and more to find the best models By Ian McEleney ⋅ Review Editor Monday March 13, 2023 Mountaineers, ice climbers, and alpinists have never seen more options in boots.

  16. Phantom 6000 HD, Low profile, high insulation, SCARPA

    phantom 6000 hd is the result. of countless hours on glaciers. and icefalls, with the goal to set. a new standard in high altitude. the research lasted 3 years, with the suppport of reliable. technical partners.

  17. La Sportiva G2 Evo vs. Scarpa Phantom 6000 : r/Mountaineering

    La Sportiva G2 Evo vs. Scarpa Phantom 6000 Hello, planning to climb Aconcagua in Jan and wanted to know which boots amongst the 2 (or any other double boots) are the best? Asking because when reading reviews about each of the boots, I am getting some conflicting reviews.

  18. PHANTOM 6000 HD

    Item 87409-500-1 Range 37-49 no ½ sizes Search in store highlights The warmest, lightest and technical high altitude boot on the market More searchable thanks to the RECCO reflector Green technology and performance

  19. Scarpa Phantom Tech for 6000m? : r/Mountaineering

    5 el_gabriel • 2 yr. ago I have used the Scarpa Phantom 6000 on 6000m Peaks in Bolivia and Ecuador and they were great. But I think I could have gone with the smaller but more technical and agile Phantom Tech, especially if bought with an extra half-size for heavy socks.

  20. Phantom 6000 HD

    PHANTOM 6000 HD. € 900,00. undefined color options. PHANTOM 6000 HD PHANTOM FAMILY. The new shoe for high mountain expedition sets a new standard in high altitude. Low volume, high insulation. Fast delivery free of charge. Order now.

  21. Scarpa Phantom 6000

    1050g ½ pair size 42. The new PHANTOM 6000 HD is designed for extreme mountaineering with a focus on agile, fast walking and technical ice climbing. It is the warmest, lightest and most technical mountainboot on the market, a mix of new generation technologies, developed with our partners, maintaining high standards of performance, through ...