Examples

Bridge Sentences

Ai generator.

what is the bridge in an essay examples

Imagine a world without bridges, and we mean the bridges that connect pieces of land together for us to travel from one place to another. The bridge could be as short as those build over rivers or as long as the Golden Gate Bridge along the Pacific, yet their purpose remains the same. In a similar sense, bridge sentences in writing and speech serve as transitions to connect two similar or opposing ideas together. In this article, we will discuss the basic function of bridge sentences in communication.

What are Bridge Sentences – Defining

A bridge sentence, also known as a paragraph bridge, is a type of topic sentence that helps connect an old paragraph or idea to a new one. It conveys what the new paragraph is about and how it relates to the one introduced prior to it. The trick to doing so is to create a smooth shift of thoughts by bringing these ideas closer together. If the bridge isn’t constructed properly, then it will fail to convey the right message to its readers. These transitions can sometimes be found in the first line of the paragraph, but you can also find them at the end of a paragraph in some cases.

Short Bridge Sentences

  • Moving from historical context to current applications, it’s clear that this technology has evolved significantly.
  • On a related note, this brings us to another significant aspect.
  • However, this perspective changes when we look at the situation from a different angle.
  • Furthermore, this development has implications for both our short-term strategies and long-term goals.
  • Conversely, critics argue that this approach may overlook some fundamental concerns.
  • Building upon this point, we can see how it directly influences other trends in the field.
  • Despite these advancements, several challenges remain unresolved.
  • Next, let’s turn our attention to the effects of these changes.
  • To better understand this phenomenon, a closer examination of the data is necessary.

Simple Bridge Sentences

  • Let’s now consider another aspect of the same issue.
  • This leads us to the next point.
  • Similarly, we see a related pattern emerging in other areas.
  • Contrasting with this idea, another perspective highlights a different issue.
  • With this in mind, we can further explore the implications.
  • This sets the stage for understanding the broader impact.
  • Moreover, this connection is crucial for our discussion.
  • This example clearly illustrates the main point.
  • Turning to a different example, we can see how this applies in other contexts.
  • To delve deeper, let’s examine a specific case.

Words to Start Bridge Sentences

AdditionallyFurthermoreMoreoverConverselySimilarly
As a resultSubsequentlyThereforeThusHence
On the other handConsequentlyNeverthelessHoweverNext
Following thisMeanwhileThenAccordinglyTo illustrate
In contrastOn a similar noteLeading on fromIn addition toBefore moving on
FinallyInitiallyIn conclusionAs previously statedMoreover

What is the Purpose of Bridging Paragraphs?

While writing an essay or any academic or business paper, using transitional devices such as bridge sentences is essential in connecting similar thoughts together. This serves as an escort from a previous topic being discussed to a new one.

Bridging Paragraphs

For example, the bridge sentence of an introductory paragraph is typically found between the ‘hook’ and the thesis statement . The hook is crafted to draw attention, while the bridge sentence is used to slowly introduce the thesis statement to readers. They serve as a clue for readers to understand what was being mentioned in a given article or study, what will be discussed next, and how the two topics relate to one another.

The function of a bridge sentence within multiple paragraphs of an essay writing is also similar to the one previously stated. But, instead of starting each paragraph with a topic sentence, the bridge is used to create a smooth transition of thoughts. Here, the speaker briefly discusses the previous point given in order to tie it to a new point.

Types of Transitions

When it comes to writing a paper, bridge sentences are generally referred to as transitional statements. These statements may consist of a few words or they can make up a whole sentence outline or paragraph. But, keep in mind that these transitions would depend on the relationship being conveyed in the write-up. To understand the proper use of these transitions, you can study the following types:

  • Sequential Transitions –  Bridge sentences with sequential transitions that demonstrate a logical flow of ideas in a write-up. For example, words such as ‘thus’, ‘therefore’, and ‘then’ show a relationship between the past and the current point being discussed.
  • Comparative Transitions –  This type of transitional words and phrases can come in handy, especially when the relationship between two ideas isn’t so obvious. These words serve as an effective instrument in drawing analogies that are difficult to comprehend at first. Examples of such include words and phrases like ‘also’, ‘just as’, ‘like’, and ‘similarly’.
  • Contrastive Transitions – For instances when you’re neither looking at similarities nor describing relationships but instead focusing on contrasting qualities, these transitions can be extremely useful. Not only can these transitions help emphasize central ideas in a compare-and-contrast essay, but they can also help debunk a claim or point out the opposite side of an issue. Examples that fall under this category include ‘though’, ‘but’, ‘however’, ‘nevertheless’, ‘nonetheless’, ‘then again’, ‘on the other hand’, and ‘at the same time’. You may also see Short Sentence Example .
  • Summing Up Transitions –  After proving your point, you’d want to throw in that one last thought, to sum up, every important detail provided. To ensure that readers don’t miss the main idea of your paragraph or article, these transitional sentences can help in introducing your final thought in a quick yet appropriate manner. Transitional words in this category include ‘essentially’, ‘basically’, ‘ultimately’, ‘in short’, and ‘in other words’.

Examples of Bridge Sentences

Listed below are brief samples of paragraphs consisting of bridge sentences. The bridge sentence in these examples have been  italicized  for your reference: You may also see Cumulative Sentence Example .

Sandra and her father played out in the rain despite the strong protest coming from her mother. They danced to the tune of the rain and watched as each droplet fell from the dark skies. She smiled, thinking of the days when she and her father listened helplessly to the endless rants of her mother as their soaking bodies form small puddles of water inside the house. You may also see Balanced Sentence Examples .

Now, thirty years later, Sandra looks back to these memories with tears filling her baby blues.

The documentary concluded its feature with North Korean soldiers dumping corpses onto a military truck.

Why would any news program carry such gruesome footage? Surely they knew what the consequences were for doing so… Instead, representatives from the news network considered it newsworthy because the clips featured exclusive content and startling visual images that viewers were interested in . You may also see Complex Sentence Example .

The World Health Organization began forming a highly-classified group of scientists to study the outpouring origins and effects of disease X. Though the disease remains unknown to society, it is likely to be a hybrid of past diseases that have been carried by animals. The team of scientists was tasked to discover the possible symptoms of the disease, along with the regions it is likely to spread in first. You may also see Compound Sentence Examples .

In other words, disease X is an existing, scientifically-generated epidemic that is yet to sweep a mass number of the earth’s population in the near future. 

what is the bridge in an essay examples

Ultimately, the main objective of a bridge sentence is to help promote clear communication. By defining the relationship between two separate ideas, readers are able to grasp the connection that exists between them. This creates a smooth flow of thoughts to provide an exceptional reading experience for individuals. You may also see Parallel Sentence Example .

Bridge Sentences for Class 1

  • Now, let’s talk about something else.
  • Next, we are going to learn about…
  • Let’s move on to our next fun fact.
  • After that, we did… Now, we will do…
  • First we learned about A, now let’s look at B.
  • Do you remember what we did yesterday? Today, we’re going to learn more about it.
  • We finished our story, now let’s draw a picture of our favorite part.
  • We counted apples before. Now, let’s count oranges.
  • Let’s put away our books and get out our art supplies.
  • We sang a song about the weather, now let’s look outside to see what the weather is doing today.

Bridge Sentences for Class 2

  • We just read about animals. Now, let’s write our own story about a lion.
  • We finished our math worksheet. Next, we’ll use blocks to show what we learned.
  • We learned how plants grow. Let’s draw pictures of a plant’s life cycle.
  • After playing our counting game, now we will count all the chairs in our classroom.
  • We talked about the weather yesterday. Today, we’ll make a weather chart.
  • First, we learned about addition. Now, let’s try some subtraction problems.
  • Now that we’ve cleaned up our area, let’s gather around for story time.
  • We’ve just finished learning our new words. Let’s use them in sentences now.
  • We colored pictures in the morning; now, let’s write about the pictures after lunch.
  • We talked about healthy foods; next, we will cut out pictures of foods to make our own healthy meal.

Bridge Sentences for Class 3

  • Now that we’ve read about dinosaurs, let’s compare them to animals living today.
  • We just learned about multiplication. Let’s apply it by calculating how many apples are in these baskets.
  • After discussing the water cycle, let’s create a mini water cycle model in class.
  • We’ve written our own fairy tales. Now, let’s read them aloud to the class.
  • We’ve explored maps of our country. Next, let’s look at maps of other countries and find the differences.
  • Now that we know how to measure length, let’s find objects around the classroom to practice measuring.
  • We learned about ancient Egypt; now let’s write a day in the life of an Egyptian child.
  • After our lesson on planets, let’s use balls of different sizes to create a model of the solar system.
  • We discussed the importance of recycling; now, let’s sort these materials into recyclables and non-recyclables.
  • We’ve practiced fractions with pizza slices; next, let’s use the same idea with a chocolate bar.

Types of Bridge Sentences

1. continuation bridges.

  • These sentences extend the thought from the previous paragraph or introduce additional information that complements the preceding ideas.
  • Example: “Furthermore, continuing this program will not only benefit current participants but also future generations.”

2. Contrast Bridges

  • Used to introduce a contrasting or opposing viewpoint to the one just discussed, helping to highlight differences.
  • Example: “However, despite the previous success of the initiative, recent reports suggest a decline in its effectiveness.”

3. Cause and Effect Bridges

  • These bridge sentences explain the cause and effect relationships between ideas, showing how one event leads to another.
  • Example: “Consequently, the sudden drop in temperature last winter caused significant damage to the crop yields.”

4. Similarity Bridges

  • They draw parallels between two ideas, emphasizing similarities and connections.
  • Example: “Similarly, the economic policies of Country X have mirrored the early stages of economic development seen in Country Y.”

5. Clarification Bridges

  • These are used to clarify or further explain a point or idea that might not have been fully understood.
  • Example: “To clarify, the new policy does not replace the old one but rather expands upon the existing regulations.”

6. Emphasis Bridges

  • Emphasis bridges are employed to stress the importance or critical nature of a point just discussed.
  • Example: “Indeed, this evidence highlights the urgent need for reform within the sector.”

7. Conclusion Bridges

  • Used to signal that a conclusion or summary is forthcoming, wrapping up the discussion.
  • Example: “In conclusion, the multiple benefits of this approach clearly outweigh its drawbacks.”

8. Time Sequence Bridges

  • These help organize narratives or processes by marking the progression of time or steps.
  • Example: “Subsequently, after the initial trials were successful, the next phase of the project commenced.”

How to Write Bridge Sentences

1. understand the purpose of bridge sentences.

  • Transition: Bridge sentences help readers move from one paragraph or section to another seamlessly.
  • Prediction: They can set the stage for what is coming next, preparing the reader for a shift in tone, argument, or topic.
  • Reflection: Bridge sentences can also reflect on the content just covered, making a connection between the previous information and new ideas.

2. Identify the Connection

  • Start by clearly understanding the content of both the preceding and following paragraphs.
  • Identify the key elements that connect these two paragraphs. This could be a shared theme, a contrasting point, or a cause-and-effect relationship.

3. Choose the Right Type of Transition

  • Continuation transitions (furthermore, moreover, additionally) are used when adding similar information or expanding on a point.
  • Contrast transitions (however, on the other hand, conversely) introduce an opposing viewpoint or a shift in direction.
  • Cause and effect transitions (therefore, as a result, thus) demonstrate the relationship between actions and outcomes.
  • Chronological transitions (next, then, after) are useful in narrative or process writing to show the progression of time or steps.

4. Craft the Sentence

  • Keep the bridge sentence concise and to the point.
  • Use it to gently guide the reader from one idea to the next, ensuring the sentence fits the tone and style of your writing.
  • Make sure it incorporates key terms or concepts that are central to both paragraphs, enhancing the thematic continuity of your text.

5. Evaluate its Effectiveness

  • After writing your bridge sentence, read the transition aloud to see if it naturally guides you from one idea to the next.
  • Check if the bridge sentence helps clarify the relationship between paragraphs. If the connection still feels jarring or abrupt, consider revising the sentence.

Why are bridge sentences used?

Bridge sentences connect paragraphs or sections, ensuring a smooth transition in writing, aiding coherence, and guiding readers from one idea to another seamlessly.

What is a bridge sentence in analogies?

In analogies, a bridge sentence explains the relationship between two seemingly unrelated topics, clarifying how one idea or example parallels or contrasts with another.

How to use the verb bridge in a sentence?

The verb “bridge” denotes the act of making connections or overcoming gaps; e.g., “This meeting aims to bridge the communication gap between departments.”

What are good bridge sentences?

Good bridge sentences effectively link ideas, clarify transitions, and maintain the flow of text, often incorporating transitional phrases like ‘furthermore’, ‘however’, or ‘consequently’.

Twitter

Text prompt

  • Instructive
  • Professional

10 Examples of Public speaking

20 Examples of Gas lighting

Home ➔ Essay Structure ➔ Body Paragraphs ➔ Topic Sentence ➔ What is a bridge sentence in an essay?

What is a bridge sentence in an essay?

A bridge in an essay is a tool that helps the author to connect ideas and to transition smoothly from one point to another. It can be used to clarify a point that has been made, to introduce a new idea, or to sum up the main points of the essay. A well-written bridge can help keep the reader’s attention focused on the essay and make the writing style more fluid.

Let’s refresh our memory a bit regarding the essay structure :

The first section is the introductory paragraph , in which you present your thesis statement or main argument. The body paragraphs are where you develop your argument, and each body paragraph should focus on a single point. The conclusion is where you wrap up your essay, and it should rephrase your thesis statement.

A bridge sentence —also known as a bridge statement—is a type of topic sentence typically found and used at the start of a body paragraph. The key functions of this transition sentence are to show the direction of the paragraph’s main idea and how it is related to the previous paragraph.

There are a few things to keep in mind when writing a bridge sentence:

  • Make sure the bridge is relevant to the two ideas or concepts you are connecting.
  • Keep the bridge brief and to the point.
  • Use such words and phrases that will help create a smooth transition between ideas.

Bridge sentence types and examples

Among bridge sentences, three main types are usually used: a classic bridge sentence, a question-answer bridge, and a complication bridge. They all have three things in common:

  • The use of a “pointer” word that directs the reader’s attention to the previous paragraph
  • A part of the sentence that serves as a reference to that previous point
  • And a part that is related to the topic of the current paragraph

These three things are the main elements of most bridge sentences.

Now let’s look at each type’s examples to see the common points and the differences. First, we will present the last sentence of a previous paragraph and then a color-coded bridge of each type.

Let’s consider this as the last sentence of our previous paragraph of an essay that discusses various printers:

The inkjet printer is the most popular type of printer for home use. It is less expensive than a laser printer and produces good-quality prints.

Here’s an example of a classic bridge sentence:

This advantage makes an inkjet printer one of the best choices for home offices. But besides reasonable prices and printing quality , it is also worth mentioning how easy it is to use inkjet printers .

We start by pointing to the previous passage (this advantage) and then introduce the topic for a new paragraph (how easy it is to use).

Here’s an example of a question-answer bridge:

But does this price and quality advantage make inkjet printers the best choice? Surely not, because laser printers would not be on the market in such a case. When comparing the two, inkjet printers lose in terms of printing speed and ink usage .

This example has a question that serves as the “pointer” to the previous paragraph. And the answer to this question introduces the main point of the current paragraph.

And here’s an example of a complication bridge:

Such an advantage of inkjet printers might be decisive for many; however, inkjet printers are not as fast as laser printers, and they use more ink .

As you can see, the example above has a “pointer” word (such) that refers to the previous paragraph. It has a transition word (however) that signals to the reader that it is not that simple. Then, it also provides a reference to the previous paragraph (the inkjet printer’s better price advantage), and it states the main point of the current paragraph (laser printers are faster and more economical).

Ways of making logical connections and transitions

There are many ways in which you can connect two ideas. It depends on the essay types : whether you are comparing, arguing, classifying things, etc. Let’s take a look at some schematic examples:

  • Making an example: (The next point) clearly illustrates that (the previous point) by…
  • Showing cause-effect relationship: (The previous point) led to / has allowed/ directly caused / was the reason / results in (the next point)…
  • Giving a counterexample: Even though (the previous) is normally the case, (the next point)…
  • Emphasizing a point: (The previous point) is essential / is vital / cannot be omitted because (the next point)…
  • Contrasting: (The previous point) differs from (the next point) in how…
  • Comparing: (The previous point) is similar to / can be compared with / has some similarities with (the next point)…
  • Sequencing: (The previous point) comes before / comes after / is the next (the next point)…
  • Proving: (The previous point) means / indicates / proves / implicates that (the next point)…
  • Complicating: Yes, (the previous point), but because of that, (the next point)…
  • Adding precision: The researchers explain in more detail (the previous point) in their paper regarding (the next point)…
  • Clarifying: Yes, (the previous point) is sometimes the case, but it doesn’t mean (the next point)…

Transitional keywords to use

Words that can help you introduce the next paragraph are called “transitional keywords.” Here is a list of some common transitional keywords:

  • accordingly, as a result, consequently, for this reason, hence, subsequently, therefore
  • according to, as previously stated, before, initially, formerly, earlier, previously
  • finally, in conclusion, in brief, in sum, in summary, on the whole, thus, in short
  • also, similarly to, likewise, in the same way, as well as, too, much like
  • conversely, alternatively, on the other hand, by contrast, in contrast, on the contrary, in contrast to, opposite to, but, however
  • for instance, for example, such as, take the case of, to illustrate, imagine, to show you what I mean, suppose that
  • according to, as a result of, because, due to, for this reason, since, therefore, thus
  • after, afterward, before, subsequently, then, while, whenever
  • above, adjacent, below, beyond, here, in front of, nearby, opposite

Key takeaways

  • When writing an essay , it is crucial to ensure a logical connection and a smooth flow between the paragraphs.
  • This logical connection can be created in various ways, for example, by using a bridge statement.
  • A bridge is an opening statement that connects two ideas by “pointing” to the previous paragraph and introducing the topic of the next paragraph.
  • There are many ways to create a logical connection between two ideas, and it depends on the type of essay you are writing.

Now that you know what a bridge sentence is and how to use it, try incorporating it into your next essay!

  • California State University Northridge – Transitional Words and Phrases
  • The College of Saint Rose – Transition Sentences
  • University of Colorado – Transitions: Building Bridges Between Ideas

Was this article helpful?

HelpForHomeWork

what is a Bridge in Essay: Examples?

A pivotal skill for any essay writer is mastering the art of transitioning seamlessly between ideas. Transitions are the linguistic bridges that connect disparate thoughts, enhancing the flow and coherence of your narrative.

A particularly potent tool in your essay arsenal is the bridge sentence .

This type of sentence acts as a connector between paragraphs or sections, effectively summarizing what has been discussed and hinting at what’s to come. Not only can it counter potential objections, but it also opens the door to new viewpoints.Utilizing bridge sentences can fortify the structure of your essay and smoothly lead your reader through your arguments.

Need help doing your assignment?

Understanding the Concept of a Bridge in Essay Writing

A bridge sentence is a type of transition that connects two ideas or paragraphs in a logical and smooth way. It can help you create a strong structure for your essay and guide your reader through your argument.

Definition of a Bridge

A bridge sentence, also known as a paragraph bridge or a bridge statement, is a sentence that links two paragraphs or sections of an essay. It usually appears at the beginning of a new paragraph, and it serves as a summary of the previous point and a preview of the next point. It can also address a counterargument or introduce a new perspective.

A bridge sentence can be composed of three elements: a pointer word that directs the reader’s attention to the previous paragraph, a part that refers to the previous point, and a part that relates to the current point. For example, consider this bridge sentence:This advantage makes an inkjet printer one of the best choices for home offices. But besides reasonable prices and printing quality, it is also worth mentioning how easy it is to use inkjet printers.The pointer word “this” points to the previous paragraph, where the advantage of an inkjet printer was discussed.

The part “makes an inkjet printer one of the best choices for home offices” summarizes the previous point. The part “but besides reasonable prices and printing quality, it is also worth mentioning how easy it is to use inkjet printers” introduces the topic of the current paragraph, which is the ease of use of inkjet printers.

The Purpose of a Bridge in an Essay

The purpose of a bridge sentence in an essay is to help the writer connect ideas and transition smoothly from one point to another. A bridge sentence can have several benefits for the essay and the reader, such as :

  • It can clarify a point that has been made, by restating it in a different way or providing more details.
  • It can introduce a new idea, by showing how it is related to the previous idea or how it differs from it.
  • It can sum up the main points of the essay, by highlighting the most important arguments or evidence.
  • It can keep the reader’s attention focused on the essay, by creating a logical flow of ideas and avoiding abrupt changes of topic.
  • It can make the writing style more fluid and coherent, by using words and phrases that create a smooth transition between ideas.

Examples of Bridges in Different Types of Essays

Whether you are composing a rhetorical analysis essay , a double spaced essay , a problem and solution essay , or any other genre, the incorporation of a bridge sentence is elemental in its function and purpose. Subsequent examples will illustrate their usage in different contexts.

Argumentative Essays

Rooted in debate, the argumentative essay forwards a claim, backing it with solid evidence and logical reasoning . Its ultimate goal? To sway the reader toward the writer’s perspective or spur them into action.

Take this bridge sentence as an example: “While social media serves as a formidable platform for communication and learning, it’s not without its drawbacks on mental health and personal well-being.” This sentence acknowledges social media’s benefits before transitioning to its adverse effects, the essay’s primary focus. It even suggests moderation and responsible use as potential remedies, paving the way for further discussion.

Expository Essays

The expository essay enlightens its audience, offering a clear, factual account of its subject. It’s the educator among essays.

A bridge sentence here might encapsulate the preceding paragraph’s main point, link two related concepts, or unveil a new topic. For instance: “The Golden Gate Bridge, an engineering wonder, stands as an iconic beacon across the San Francisco Bay, bridging the gap between San Francisco and Marin County.” This sentence transitions smoothly from discussing the bridge’s construction to its emblematic value, maintaining the informative tone crucial to expository essays.

Narrative Essays

A narrative essay’s charm lies in its storytelling, inviting readers into the writer’s personal experiences and associating them with the emotional journey detailed.

Consider this bridge sentence for generating anticipation or segueing scenes: “Crossing the narrow bridge, the stunning view below—sunlit river, rustling trees—filled me with an elation, blissfully ignorant of the impending peril beyond.” It not only builds suspense but also serves as a seamless transition, enriching the narrative flow.

Descriptive Essays

Descriptive essays paint a picture, detailing subjects so vividly that readers can visually experience the discussed topic. A bridge sentence in this form sharpens focus, draws comparisons, or highlights transitions.

For example: “Beside the ancient, graffiti-laden bridge, a testament to years passed, stood its modern counterpart—sleek, shimmering, an architectural marvel—promising a new era.” This bridge sentence contrasts the two structures effectively, using evocative language to kindle the readers’ imagination while signaling a transition in time and technology.

How to Craft an Effective Bridge: Tips and Techniques

A bridge sentence can help you create a strong connection between your hook and your thesis statement, ensure a smooth transition and cohesion between your paragraphs, and avoid some common mistakes that can weaken your essay.

Linking the Hook and the Thesis Statement

A hook is the first sentence of your essay that grabs the reader’s attention and makes them want to read more. A thesis statement is the last sentence of your introduction that states the main argument or purpose of your essay.

A bridge sentence can help you link these two elements by summarizing the hook and introducing the thesis statement. For example, consider this hook, bridge, and thesis statement: Hook: Have you ever wondered why some people are afraid of spiders, while others are fascinated by them? Bridge: Spiders are among the most diverse and intriguing creatures on the planet, but they also evoke different emotions and reactions from humans. Thesis statement: In this essay, I will explore the reasons behind the fear of spiders, the benefits of overcoming this phobia, and the ways to cope with it. The bridge sentence connects the hook and the thesis statement by providing some background information on spiders and their relationship with humans. It also creates a smooth transition from a general question to a specific topic.

Ensuring Smooth Transition and Cohesion

A smooth transition and cohesion between your paragraphs can make your essay more clear and logical. A bridge sentence can help you achieve this by linking the main idea of the previous paragraph to the main idea of the next one.

You can use different types of transitions, such as sequential, contrastive, causal, or additive, depending on the relationship between your ideas. You can also use words and phrases that create a smooth transition, such as but, and, besides, even so, further, moreover, nevertheless, still, therefore, thus, although, and yet . For example, consider this bridge sentence: Although the fear of spiders is a common and natural response, it can also have negative consequences for the individual and the society. This bridge sentence uses a contrastive transition ( although ) to show the difference between the previous paragraph, which explained the causes of the fear of spiders, and the next one, which will discuss the effects of this fear.

Common Mistakes to Avoid when Writing a Bridge

When writing a bridge sentence, you should avoid some common mistakes that can weaken your essay and confuse your reader. Here are some of them :- Do not repeat the same idea or information that you have already stated in the previous paragraph or the thesis statement.

Instead, restate it in a different way or provide more details.- Do not introduce a new idea or topic that is not related to the previous or the next paragraph. Instead, focus on the connection between the two ideas or topics.- Do not make the bridge too long or too short.

A good bridge should be brief and to the point, but also clear and informative.- Do not use vague or ambiguous words or phrases that can confuse the reader or create a weak transition. Instead, use specific and precise words or phrases that create a strong transition .

How do you write a bridge in an essay?

To write a bridge in an essay, it’s important to connect the main idea of the previous paragraph with the main idea of the next paragraph . This is achieved by employing a pointer word or phrase that references the previous point, followed by introducing the new point with a relevant word or phrase.

For example: “The inkjet printer is the most popular type of printer for home use. It is less expensive than a laser printer and produces good-quality prints.”

This advantage makes an inkjet printer an excellent choice for home offices. Besides reasonable prices and printing quality , it’s also essential to highlight the ease of use of inkjet printers. Here, the bridge sentence uses “ this advantage ” to reference the previous paragraph, while “ but besides reasonable prices and printing quality, it is also worth mentioning ” introduces the new point.

What is an example of a bridge sentence?

An example of a bridge sentence connects two paragraphs or ideas by summarizing the previous one and introducing the next. For instance, “ While the inkjet printer is a popular choice for home use, it has some drawbacks that make it unsuitable for large-scale printing. ”

How is the word bridge used in the essay?

The word bridge in an essay refers to a transitional device that connects two ideas or paragraphs . It aids the author in maintaining a smooth flow of thoughts and in illustrating the relationship between points.

What is a bridge used for in writing?

In writing, a bridge is used to link two separate ideas together and to ensure a smooth transition between them. A bridge can manifest as a sentence or a phrase that summarizes the previous idea, introduces the new idea, or contrasts the two ideas .

Homework Help Service: Help for Homework

As the best homework help service available, we at helpforhomework pride ourselves on delivering top-notch essays that guarantee success. Our team of experienced writers is dedicated to providing you with high-quality, well-researched, and custom-written papers that meet your unique requirements. Whether you need assistance with a challenging topic or a tight deadline, HelpForHomework is here to support you every step of the way. Don’t settle for mediocre results – place your order with us today and experience the difference of working with the best homework help service for all your essay needs.

Recent Posts

  • The Role of Peer Reviews in Enhancing Your Graduate Essays
  • Do You Say Masters or Master’s?
  • Writing A Case Conceptualization
  • Degree Accelerator Guide: Fast-Track Your College Education
  • Care Plan Approaches

You cannot copy content of this page

What Is a Bridge Sentence and How to Write a Transition in an Essay

Author Avatar

  • Icon Calendar 18 May 2024
  • Icon Page 3028 words
  • Icon Clock 14 min read

Bridge sentences are important in connecting two independent phrases, expressions, word combinations, or arguments in a paragraph or an essay. Basically, this guideline on how to write a good bridge sentence in an essay or a research article is worth reading because it entails practical ways to write connecting statements. Moreover, the article entails examples of various types of bridge statements, which mean linking phrases that provide concise information on how to ensure a proper flow of ideas in any paper using connecting statements. They allow writers to communicate effectively throughout their essays. The different types of bridge statements include topic, transitional, and concluding sentences with pointers. In this case, topic phrases introduce the main ideas in a passage, while transitional statements create a unique connection between ideas or thoughts. Besides, concluding sentences contain a clear flow of concepts and link them to other sections. However, one must select appropriate transitioning words to create appropriate bridge sentences.

General Aspects of How to Write an Outstanding Bridge Sentence in an Essay

Good essays must have a permanent quality to their content, with a unique flow of ideas and concepts. In this case, bridge sentences are useful in connecting two independent clauses, phrases, word combinations, statements, or claims. Hence, the guideline focuses on how to write a bridge sentence with its definition and meaning and provides clear examples that one can follow to create different types of essays. In turn, people should bother reading this guideline as it focuses on crucial aspects of creating various types of papers, reports, and articles. Because essays are central to advancing knowledge, one must use bridge sentences effectively to ensure effective communication.

What Is a Bridge Sentence and How to Write a Transition in an Essay or a Research Paper

Definition of a Bridge Sentence and Its Meaning

From a simple definition, a bridge sentence is a general term that refers to a set of phrases that link ideas and create a smooth transition between concepts in an essay or a research paper. Some examples of bridging phrases include topic, transitional, concluding statements, and pointers. In turn, a single essay or research paper may contain all these types of connecting phrases. Hence, a bridge sentence means many phrases that enable readers to relate all ideas presented in a paper because of an enhanced flow of information and logical order of ideas. A deeper explanation of different types of bridge sentences includes:

  • Topic Sentence : Topic sentences reveal the main message explained in a single paragraph and its relationship to a central thesis statement. Every paragraph must begin with a single topic sentence that relates to an initial argument of a paper as a sub-theme. This bridge sentence must contain a single main concept discussed in the section.   
  • Transitional Sentence: Transitional sentences create a smooth connection between ideas presented in one passage. A good paragraph in an essay should have a chronological and logical flow of ideas. These bridge sentences allow a sequential presentation of thoughts.     
  • Concluding Sentence: Concluding sentences summarize information and provide a link between two paragraphs, such as a current passage and a next one. In this case, good paragraphs contain a clear summary of all presented ideas. A concluding statement should appear at the end of a single passage as a bridge sentence to tie all the thoughts together.    
  • Pointer Sentence : Pointers are useful in clarifying the main claim by guiding readers through the structure and argument of an essay or a research paper. For example, pointers refer readers to the previous claim, paragraph, argument, or thesis statement. In this case, they allow the audience to relate concepts and gain better insights into the presented ideas.  

Experience a seamless writing process with Wr1ter Team, where plagiarism is never a concern.

Unique Features of Writing Bridge Sentences in Essays or Research Papers & Examples

Bridge sentences are different, with unique features. What comes after a hook in an essay introduction is a transitional word. For example, a scholarly article or an academic essay may have various connecting statements. Their features depend on the purpose and location within a particular passage. Besides, authors may choose linking phrases to invoke unique thoughts or create desirable emotions. The following are descriptions and examples of different bridge sentences. 

🔹 Transitional Sentences & Bridge Example

Transition sentences are unique because they show readers how different sections of an essay connect. Transition sentences are useful in linking the college essay introduction, body, and conclusion paragraphs to create a well-organized flow of information. Placing this bridge claim at the beginning of a new paragraph helps to link it to the previous one. An example of a transition sentence is:

Further evidence supporting the hypothesis is that psychological well-being promotes student performance due to increased concentration levels.

This sentence contains information that complements the previous paragraph by providing more support for the same concept.

🔹 Topic Sentences & Bridge Example

Topic sentences are unique because they indicate the paragraph’s subject and central point. Every paragraph in an essay must begin with a topic sentence. This opening statement in a paragraph may provide a connection between the main ideas and indicate how they connect to one of three themes of a 3-point thesis. Besides, this bridge sentence forms the foundation of the supporting evidence. An example of a topic sentence is:

Existing research has consistently shown that the meat industry is unsustainable due to its detrimental environmental impacts.

This phrase introduces the passage’s main point and focuses on the meat industry’s negative environmental impacts, like other thesis statement examples. The entire paragraph should expound on this issue by using and citing credible sources.

🔹 Concluding Sentences & Bridge Example

A concluding sentence is unique because it acts as an indicator that a specific paragraph is coming to an end. This bridge sentence contains a summary of the information presented in a section. However, a conclusion does not include any new information. A practical example of a concluding statement to end a paragraph in an essay is:

Evidently, the meat industry contributes to greenhouse emissions due to methane released from animal manure.

This assertion summarizes the facts presented in a single paragraph on how the meat industry affects the environment.  

🔹 Pointers & Bridge Example

Pointers refer to information that enables readers to understand a situation or a piece of information. These bridge statements work as topic sentences for entire sections of an essay or a research paper. In this case, they inform readers that a paper is taking a turn in its core argument. For instance, a pointer may indicate that the writer is delving into a related topic, like a counterargument, stepping up its claims with complex details, or pausing to give important historical or scholarly background. Moreover, these bridge sentences remind readers about what an essay is about and why it is written. An example of a pointer is:

For people to understand the causes of riots, it would be useful to apply sociological theories, like psychoanalytical social contagion.

This sentence points the readers to a change in the explanation strategy to include sociological theories to understand the main subject.  

🔹 Classical Bridge Sentences & Bridge Example

A classic bridge sentence is unique because it helps authors to point to previous paragraphs and introduce the topics for a new paragraph. This bridge statement is useful when writing texts with multiple passages having related information. An example of a classic bridge sentence structure is:

This advantage makes transformational leadership effective in promoting employee collaboration. However, besides enhancing communication and cooperation, it is important to mention that transformational leadership allows people to set goals and higher expectations, eventually achieving higher performances.

This phrase, which consists of two sentences, points to the previous paragraph by mentioning the advantage of transformational leadership. Furthermore, this bridge claim introduces the theme for the next passage by mentioning how this leadership style empowers employees to create achievable goals.

🔹 Question-Answer Sentences & Bridge Example

Question-answer bridge is unique because it points to the previous paragraph and introduces the main argument of the next passage. In this case, questions serve as the pointer to the previous section, and the answer connects and introduces the theme for the current passage. An example of a question-answer bridge sentence structure is:

But does transformational leadership promote employee collaboration? Surely yes, because this leadership enhances communication and cooperation among employees. When comparing transformational leadership to other management strategies, it allows people to set goals and higher expectations to achieve higher performances.

🔹 Reiteration Sentence & Bridge Example

A reiteration bridge sentence is unique because it allows writers to use repetition to transition between ideas. This type of bridge statement allows people to emphasize important concepts that the audience should acknowledge in an essay. For instance, a reiteration bridge sentence may involve the incorporation of opposite meanings. An example of a reiteration bridge is:

Demonstrations and picketing lead to unity and victory on the one hand and defeat and loss of life on the other.

This bridge sentence has phrases with contrasting meanings that point to the previous passage and provide a link to the current one. The first part points to the previous passage on the advantages of protests and strikes. The second part introduces the information presented in the current paragraph, which relates to the negative impacts of the dissent march.    

🔹 Complication Sentence & Bridge Example

A complication bridge sentence is unique since it contains a pointer, a transition word, a reference to a previous paragraph, and states the main point of the current paragraph. An example of this bridge sentence structure is:

Such advantages of transformational leadership encourage employees to cooperate in making important decisions; however, it is not as effective in democratic governance in enabling leaders to engage their subordinates in addressing emerging and existing issues.

This example has a pointer, “such,” as a bridge claim that refers to the previous paragraph. The transition word, “however,” signals to readers that transformational leadership is ineffective compared to other governance styles. Finally, it references the previous paragraph and states the main argument for the current passage that democratic leadership is better.

Schematic Examples for Writing Purposeful Bridge Sentences in an Essay

  • Making an example: (The next idea) clearly illustrates / indicates / suggests / means / underlines that (the previous idea) by / in / from / on / with / within … (explanation).

Enhanced employee productivity clearly illustrates that management by walking around is better than autocratic governance because it enables leaders to identify and address problems.

  • Showing a cause-effect relationship: (The previous idea) led to / results in / has allowed / improved / significantly impacted / directly caused / was the reason / (the next idea) … (explanation).

Implementing peer support to new employees improved department cooperation and innovation .

  • Giving a counterexample: Even though / although / even if (the previous idea) is ‘describing the situation,’ (the next idea ) … (explanation).

Even though rewarding employees is the accepted way to enhance productivity, allowing them free time to work on interesting concepts promotes innovativeness and efficiency.

  • Emphasizing a point: (The previous idea) is important / significant / crucial / essential / vital / or cannot be omitted / denied / ignored because / since (the next idea) … (explanation).

Engaging workers in identifying and addressing problems is essential in management because it enables them to feel acknowledged by the company’s top leadership.

  • Contrasting: (The previous idea) differs from / can be contrasted with / is not the same as (the next idea) in how / because / since … (explanation).

Disciplining children through corporal punishment differs from empowering them because it instills fear instead of encouraging them to engage in constructive behaviors.

  • Comparing: (The previous idea) is similar to / can be compared with / is the same as / has some vivid similarities with (the next idea) because / since … (explanation).

Brachytherapy resembles external beam radiotherapy because it mainly aims to shrink cancerous tumors.

  • Bridge sequencing: (The previous idea) comes before / starts with / comes after (the next idea) … (explanation).

Establishing strategic goals for a company comes before performance appraisals and signing performance contracts.

  • Proving: (The previous idea) means / suggests / indicates / proves / states / implicates that (the next idea) … (explanation).

Declining academic performance among adolescents indicates an inability to cope with emerging social challenges.

  • Complicating: Yes / sure / arguably / indeed, (the previous idea), but because of that / however / on the other hand, (the next idea) … (explanation).

Yes, academic advancements among staff members should lead to promotions, but because of that, many people may obtain academic papers fraudulently.

  • Adding a bridge precision: The researchers / authors / scholars / experts / professionals explain in more detail / provide more insight / analyzed / included (the previous idea) in their paper / article / work / investigation / study / research regarding (the next idea ) … (explanation).

The authors explain in more detail that using renewable energy sources lowers the cost of manufacturing products in their paper regarding sustainable management.

  • Clarifying: Yes / sure / arguably / indeed, (the previous idea) is sometimes ‘describing the situation,’ but this aspect / feature / concept / element / characteristic doesn’t mean / work / result in (the next point) … (explanation).

Poor prognosis is sometimes the case in chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments, but this aspect does not mean cancer is incurable.

Get professional writing assistance that ensures your paper stands out among the rest.

Writing Types of Transition Elements in Bridge Sentences

💠 sequential bridge transitions.

Bridge sentences that contain statements on order and sequence of information should have sequential transitions. These transitioning words or bridge phrases allow one to organize essays or research papers by numerical sequence. Moreover, they indicate a continuation of thoughts or actions by referring to previously mentioned information, indicating excursions, and concluding or summing up ideas. Sequential connecting words allow readers to understand the logical development of concepts presented in an essay. Some examples of sequential transitions include:

  • further on,
  • consequently,
  • incidentally.    

💠 Comparative Bridge Transitions

Comparison transition words in an essay establish a relationship between things or ideas. In this case, comparative bridge words and phrases are essential in explaining what two things have in common. Writers can use comparison words to demonstrate similarities between thoughts, objects, or concepts. Moreover, these bridge elements focus on similitudes only as opposed to variations in a sentence. Some examples of comparative transitions include:

  • in the same way,
  • regardless,
  • at the same time,
  • in like manner,
  • compared to,
  • nonetheless.

💠 Contrastive Bridge Transitions

Contrastive bridge words indicate the difference between ideas or objects. These bridge sentence transitions are important when presenting polar, different, or conflicting ideas. Contrastive transitions allow authors to connect opposing ideas and thoughts understandably. Including conflicting thoughts or ideas in an essay can enhance its quality by allowing readers to evaluate them critically. In an essay, contrastive bridge elements become crucial in presenting contradictory thoughts and opinions. Some examples of contrastive transitions include:

  • in contrast,
  • conversely,
  • dissimilarly,
  • on the contrary,
  • nevertheless,
  • on the one hand,
  • contrasted with,
  • even though,
  • alternatively.

💠 Summing-Up Bridge Transitions

Summing-up bridge transitions are useful in drawing the reader’s attention to the main argument. In this case, one must use appropriate transitions to summarize a discussion or a paragraph. For instance, outstanding essays should have a summary of the main ideas in their conclusions. Summing-up bridge sentences are common when writers use statements to conclude a paragraph or summarize an essay. Some examples of summing-up transitions include:

  • essentially,
  • in conclusion,
  • summing up,
  • in other words,
  • the main point is,
  • this boils down to,
  • in this case,
  • as a result,
  • for that reason,
  • conclusively.

Examples of Transition Elements

  • Introduce the next idea: as such, essentially, therefore, for instance, basically, in particular, notably, hence.
  • Referring to the previous idea: indeed, moreover, furthermore, also, according to, additionally, so.
  • Introducing a conclusion paragraph: in summary, in conclusion, thus, summing up, to conclude.
  • Showing a similarity: in like manner, equally, likewise, at the same time.
  • Showing a contrast : contrarywise, opposite to, dissimilarly, nonetheless, but, instead.
  • Giving an example: such as, perhaps, for example, to demonstrate, to suppose, to consider.
  • Showing a bridge causation: consistent with, because of, owing to, by reason of, subsequently, given that.
  • Showing time relations: subsequently, then, later, next, formerly, each time, whereas.
  • Showing space relations: directly above, flanking, under, outside, at this point, opposite, neighboring, reverse.

Summing Up on How to Write a Perfect Bridge Sentence in an Essay or a Research Paper

  • Bridge sentences help to connect two independent phrases, expressions, or arguments.
  • Writers must provide concise information to ensure the organic flow of information in an essay using connecting sentences.
  • Effective use of bridge statements allows writers to communicate effectively throughout their essays or research papers.
  • Topic sentences reveal the main message explained in a single paragraph and its relationship to a central thesis statement.
  • Transitional sentences create a smooth connection between ideas presented in one passage.
  • Concluding sentences summarize information and provide a link between two paragraphs.
  • Bridge sentences require an appropriate selection of transitioning words for writing an essay.

To Learn More, Read Relevant Articles

Causes and Effects of Climate Change on Global Food Production

Causes and Effects of Climate Change on Global Food Production

  • Icon Calendar 18 August 2023
  • Icon Page 828 words

How Does Animal Behavior Inform Human Psychology?

How Does Animal Behavior Inform Human Psychology?

  • Icon Calendar 17 August 2023
  • Icon Page 843 words

The Classroom | Empowering Students in Their College Journey

What Is a Bridge Statement in English Homework?

How to Write a Thesis & Introduction for a Critical Reflection Essay

How to Write a Thesis & Introduction for a Critical Reflection Essay

A writer uses a bridge statement, or bridge sentence, to link one idea to another and create a smooth transition between ideas. John Trimble explains in "Writing with Style: Conversations on the Art of Writing" that essays should maintain a steady flow by "bridging" ideas for the reader. Instead of starting each paragraph with a topic sentence, you can use a bridge sentence to show how the previous idea relates to the idea your article is about to introduce.

Using Bridge Statements

One of the most important bridge statements in an essay, within the introductory paragraph, sets the scene for the reader. The opening statement usually functions as a "hook" or attention grabber to draw in the reader. After this comes your bridge statement, which explains how the opening is relevant to the thesis. The last sentence of the introductory paragraph contains the thesis statement, which demonstrates or sets the stage for what the reader can expect from the rest of your paper.

Paragraph Bridges

Instead of starting with a topic sentence for each paragraph, the writer uses a bridge to make a smooth transition into a new paragraph. Also called a transition idea or transition sentence, it usually discusses the previous point and how it ties in to the new point. The goal is to weave words and ideas together to create a seamless rhetorical tapestry. Your essay should not be a patchwork quilt of jumbled ideas. Bridge sentences provide the chain link between one concept and the next.

Purpose of Bridge Sentences

Bridge sentences resemble topic sentences in the essay structure. They clue in the reader to what the article just mentioned and what will come up next, and how the two topics relate to each other. Expository essays -- the most common essay assigned to students -- inform the reader or give an explanation of a topic based on fact. Persuasive or argumentative essays aim to convince the reader to agree with your point of view by addressing both sides of an argument and refuting the opposition, often in a bridge statement. All essay types make use of bridge statements. For instance, bridge statements in expository essays build a foundation of knowledge by slowly adding on to what has already been presented. Persuasive essays may use bridge statements to introduce a counter argument to hold the reader's attention.

Transitional Keywords

The words you use in your bridge sentences help define the relationship between the paragraphs or ideas you seek to connect. Words such as "consequentially," "therefore" or "accordingly" demonstrate a cause-effect relationship. Words like "whereas," "although" or "nevertheless" establish a contrast between concepts, while "furthermore," "in addition" or "similarly" help you further expand an idea.

Related Articles

How to Write an Introduction to a Reflective Essay

How to Write an Introduction to a Reflective Essay

How to write an essay with a thesis statement.

The Functions of Conjunctions in English Argumentative Writing

The Functions of Conjunctions in English Argumentative Writing

Ideas for an Imaginative Essay

Ideas for an Imaginative Essay

Comparative Phrases for Essays

Comparative Phrases for Essays

How to Write an Introduction to an Analytical Essay

How to Write an Introduction to an Analytical Essay

What Is a Diagnostic Paragraph?

What Is a Diagnostic Paragraph?

How to Write a Comparative Analytical Essay

How to Write a Comparative Analytical Essay

  • Writing Center at Harvard University; Topic Sentences and Signmosting; Elizabeth Abrams; 2000
  • The University of Oklahoma: Bridge Sentences
  • Long Beach City College: Writing Introductory Paragraphs For Essays
  • Purdue University Online Writing Laboratory: Writing Transitions
  • DeAnza College: Writing with Style by John R. Trimble

what is the bridge in an essay examples

The Barker Underground

Writing advice from the harvard college writing center tutors, building bridges between your paragraphs.

by Kenneth Mai

Your essay doesn’t flow. Add some transitions.

Those words – along with comments such as “Needs better transitions,” “Where’s the transition?,” or simply “TRANSITION!!!” – plague many a paper that may perhaps otherwise be brilliant.

See, it’s like this. Pretend that the many ideas you’re churning out within a paper are islands in the ocean. (That’s a metaphor! Sometimes metaphors work nicely in papers! ) Some islands are bigger than others. Some are closer to each other, whilst some may seem to be drifting off far away from all the others. Similarly, some ideas are smaller bits a cohesive whole, while others require a bit more effort to reel in. Your task is to  gather these islands into a sort of kingdom that you rule. But in order  to make sure that you have full control over everything, you need to connect the islands to each other. Now, it’s fine that each island isn’t directly connected to every other island, especially when they’re far enough away from each other to not really be related at all. But ultimately you want all the islands connected to make up a unified whole. So what do you do?

You build bridges!

In the context of writing a paper, these bridges are your transitions. You have two ideas that are related— islands that are close enough that you can build a bridge between them—but ultimately distinct. In order to help your readers across that gulf, then, you need to put in a transition.

But what exactly is a transition? Is it one of the sequential words – “first,” “second,” “finally,” etc. – that were the gold standard of midde school writing? Well…perhaps. But you have many more options now.    The kind of transition you use depends on the relationship that you’re trying to build between two ideas, and those relationships can be quite complex.  Transitions can be as short as a word or a couple of words to something as long as a sentence or even an entire paragraph. What’s important isn’t so much the shape of the transition as the underlying connection that is being made.

Here are a few useful types of transitions to keep in mind.

  • Sequential Transitions: Here, we’re not talking so much about “first, second, third.” Rather, this kind of transition points more towards the ideas that logically follow each other. Words such as “therefore” or “then,”  or phrases like “This indicates that…”, show a relationship between the ideas.  These transitions are used when one idea is the premise on which the next idea depends or when the second idea comes as a deduction from the first. Examples: Thus, Therefore, Then; It follows that, This indicates that, This implies that; From this we can see that, What this means is that…
  • Comparative Transitions : Sometimes, it’s not so much that one idea is derivative of another, but rather that they share some sort of property. This is especially useful when the relationship between the two ideas isn’t obvious. This type of transition is useful in comparative essays (for obvious reasons) but also instrumental when you are using analogies to make a point about some sort of topic (such as talking about islands to make a point about transitions!) Examples: Like, Also, Similarly; Just as, In the same vein; This idea can also be seen in…, A similar phenomenon is found in …
  • Contrastive Transitions: There are times when you’re neither describing premise-conclusion relationships nor looking at similarities, but instead focusing on contrasts: “This author says this, but that author says that.” “This appears to be the case, but in reality, it’s something else.” These transitions are useful not only in compare-and-contrast essays, but also whenever you’re trying to debunk a claim or to show another side of an issue. These words can also help you to move on to an entirely different issue. Examples: But, Though, However, Nevertheless/Nonetheless; Then again, On the other hand, At the same time; This ignores, It’s not…but rather, The difference between…and…is that…
  • Summing Up Transitions : You’ve established an idea and thrown lots of brilliant evidence our way. Now what? In order to make sure your readers won’t miss important information, it’s a good idea provide the quick and dirty version of the ideas you just laid out before introducing your big, final insight. Examples: Essentially, Basically, Ultimately; In short, In other words, That is to say; This boils down to, The main point is…

Ultimately, the goal of these tools is to bring a sense of cohesion to your paper by showing the logical progression of your thoughts; they’re signposts telling your reader which bridge to cross and what the two islands linked by that bridge have to do with each other. These signposts ought to be everywhere within your paper, moving your reader between phrases and sentences in addition to paragraphs or larger chunks. Sometimes multiple signposts are needed to guide a reader across the bridge, because of the complex relationship of those two ideas. The primary goal to keep in mind, though, is to make sure your reader has a smooth trip. That’s how you make your paper flow.

In my next post, I’ll offer some examples of transitional sentences and paragraphs.

Share this:

Leave a comment.

' src=

  • Already have a WordPress.com account? Log in now.
  • Subscribe Subscribed
  • Copy shortlink
  • Report this content
  • View post in Reader
  • Manage subscriptions
  • Collapse this bar

Topic sentences and signposts make an essay's claims clear to a reader. Good essays contain both.  Topic sentences   reveal the main point of a paragraph. They show the relationship of each paragraph to the essay's thesis, telegraph the point of a paragraph, and tell your reader what to expect in the paragraph that follows. Topic sentences also establish their relevance right away, making clear why the points they're making are important to the essay's main ideas. They argue rather than report.  Signposts , as their name suggests, prepare the reader for a change in the argument's direction. They show how far the essay's argument has progressed vis-ˆ-vis the claims of the thesis. 

Topic sentences and signposts occupy a middle ground in the writing process. They are neither the first thing a writer needs to address (thesis and the broad strokes of an essay's structure are); nor are they the last (that's when you attend to sentence-level editing and polishing). Topic sentences and signposts deliver an essay's structure and meaning to a reader, so they are useful diagnostic tools to the writer—they let you know if your thesis is arguable—and essential guides to the reader

Forms of Topic Sentences

 Sometimes topic sentences are actually two or even three sentences long. If the first makes a claim, the second might reflect on that claim, explaining it further. Think of these sentences as asking and answering two critical questions: How does the phenomenon you're discussing operate? Why does it operate as it does?

There's no set formula for writing a topic sentence. Rather, you should work to vary the form your topic sentences take. Repeated too often, any method grows wearisome. Here are a few approaches.

Complex sentences.   Topic sentences at the beginning of a paragraph frequently combine with a transition from the previous paragraph. This might be done by writing a sentence that contains both subordinate and independent clauses, as in the example below.

 Although  Young Woman with a Water Pitcher  depicts an unknown, middle-class woman at an ordinary task, the image is more than "realistic"; the painter [Vermeer] has imposed his own order upon it to strengthen it. 

This sentence employs a useful principle of transitions: always move from old to new information.  The subordinate clause (from "although" to "task") recaps information from previous paragraphs; the independent clauses (starting with "the image" and "the painter") introduce the new information—a claim about how the image works ("more than Ôrealistic'") and why it works as it does (Vermeer "strengthens" the image by "imposing order"). 

Questions.   Questions, sometimes in pairs, also make good topic sentences (and signposts).  Consider the following: "Does the promise of stability justify this unchanging hierarchy?" We may fairly assume that the paragraph or section that follows will answer the question. Questions are by definition a form of inquiry, and thus demand an answer. Good essays strive for this forward momentum.

Bridge sentences.   Like questions, "bridge sentences" (the term is John Trimble's) make an excellent substitute for more formal topic sentences. Bridge sentences indicate both what came before and what comes next (they "bridge" paragraphs) without the formal trappings of multiple clauses: "But there is a clue to this puzzle." 

Pivots.   Topic sentences don't always appear at the beginning of a paragraph. When they come in the middle, they indicate that the paragraph will change direction, or "pivot." This strategy is particularly useful for dealing with counter-evidence: a paragraph starts out conceding a point or stating a fact ("Psychologist Sharon Hymer uses the term Ônarcissistic friendship' to describe the early stage of a friendship like the one between Celie and Shug"); after following up on this initial statement with evidence, it then reverses direction and establishes a claim ("Yet ... this narcissistic stage of Celie and Shug's relationship is merely a transitory one. Hymer herself concedes . . . "). The pivot always needs a signal, a word like "but," "yet," or "however," or a longer phrase or sentence that indicates an about-face. It often needs more than one sentence to make its point.

Signposts operate as topic sentences for whole sections in an essay. (In longer essays, sections often contain more than a single paragraph.) They inform a reader that the essay is taking a turn in its argument: delving into a related topic such as a counter-argument, stepping up its claims with a complication, or pausing to give essential historical or scholarly background. Because they reveal the architecture of the essay itself, signposts remind readers of what the essay's stakes are: what it's about, and why it's being written. 

Signposting can be accomplished in a sentence or two at the beginning of a paragraph or in whole paragraphs that serve as transitions between one part of the argument and the next. The following example comes from an essay examining how a painting by Monet,  The Gare Saint-Lazare: Arrival of a Train,  challenges Zola's declarations about Impressionist art. The student writer wonders whether Monet's Impressionism is really as devoted to avoiding "ideas" in favor of direct sense impressions as Zola's claims would seem to suggest. This is the start of the essay's third section:

It is evident in this painting that Monet found his Gare Saint-Lazare motif fascinating at the most fundamental level of the play of light as well as the loftiest level of social relevance.  Arrival of a Train  explores both extremes of expression. At the fundamental extreme, Monet satisfies the Impressionist objective of capturing the full-spectrum effects of light on a scene.

 The writer signposts this section in the first sentence, reminding readers of the stakes of the essay itself with the simultaneous references to sense impression ("play of light") and intellectual content ("social relevance"). The second sentence follows up on this idea, while the third serves as a topic sentence for the paragraph. The paragraph after that starts off with a topic sentence about the "cultural message" of the painting, something that the signposting sentence predicts by not only reminding readers of the essay's stakes but also, and quite clearly, indicating what the section itself will contain. 

Copyright 2000, Elizabeth Abrams, for the Writing Center at Harvard University

The Enlightened Mindset

Exploring the World of Knowledge and Understanding

Welcome to the world's first fully AI generated website!

What is a Bridge in Writing? A Comprehensive Guide to Crafting Effective Writing Bridges

' src=

By Happy Sharer

what is the bridge in an essay examples

Introduction

Writing bridges are an essential tool for connecting ideas and creating transitions in your written work. A bridge in writing is a sentence or phrase that links two separate ideas together. They can also be used to emphasize the importance of one idea over another, or to add emphasis to an argument. Writing bridges can help to make your writing clear, concise, and captivating.

A Comprehensive Guide to Writing Bridges

Writing bridges can be used to connect ideas within a single sentence, between sentences, or even between paragraphs. Here’s a comprehensive guide on how to use them effectively:

How to Use Bridges to Connect Ideas in Your Writing

When writing a bridge, you want to start by identifying the two ideas you want to link together. Once you’ve identified the two ideas, you can begin crafting your bridge. To create an effective bridge, you should consider the following:

  • The purpose of your bridge: Is it to emphasize an idea? To introduce a new idea? To provide a contrast between two ideas?
  • The tone of your bridge: Will it be formal or informal? Will it be lighthearted or serious?
  • The structure of your bridge: Should it be a single sentence or multiple sentences? Should it include a rhetorical question?

Crafting Creative and Effective Writing Bridges

Once you’ve considered the purpose, tone, and structure of your bridge, it’s time to start crafting it. Here are some tips for crafting creative and effective writing bridges:

  • Start with a strong transition word or phrase: Transition words and phrases can help to make your writing more fluid and help to emphasize the connection between two ideas. Examples of transition words and phrases include “in contrast,” “on the other hand,” “similarly,” and “nevertheless.”
  • Provide a summary of the previous idea: Summarizing the previous idea can help to make your bridge more effective and will help to remind readers of the context. This can be done in a single sentence or with a few sentences.
  • Introduce the new idea: After summarizing the previous idea, you can then introduce the new idea. This can be done in a single sentence or with a few sentences.
  • Conclude with a strong statement: Finally, conclude your bridge with a strong statement. This will help to emphasize the connection between the two ideas and will leave readers with an impactful impression.

Examples of Writing Bridges Used in Literature

Now that you’re familiar with how to craft effective writing bridges, let’s take a look at some examples of writing bridges used in literature. These examples will help to illustrate the different types of writing bridges and how they can be used in your own writing.

Three Types of Bridges and How to Use Them in Writing

There are three main types of writing bridges: explicit bridges, implicit bridges, and rhetorical bridges. Explicit bridges are direct statements that explicitly state the relationship between two ideas. Implicit bridges use language to imply the relationship between two ideas. Rhetorical bridges use questions or statements to draw attention to a particular idea or to emphasize an argument.

Bridging the Gap: Writing Bridges for Smooth Transitions

Writing bridges can also be used to create smooth transitions in your writing. When transitioning from one idea to another, it’s important to provide a bridge that clearly states the connection between the two ideas. This will help to ensure that readers understand the context and follow the flow of your writing.

Harnessing the Power of Writing Bridges to Enhance Your Storytelling

Finally, writing bridges can be used to enhance your storytelling. By using bridges to emphasize key points, add tension, and create suspense, you can take your storytelling to the next level. Doing so will keep readers engaged and will help to create a captivating story.

Writing bridges are a powerful tool for connecting ideas and creating smooth transitions in your writing. They can be used to emphasize the importance of one idea over another, to add emphasis to an argument, and to enhance your storytelling. By following the tips outlined in this guide, you can craft effective writing bridges and use them to improve your writing.

With practice, you can learn to use writing bridges to capture your readers’ attention and engage them in your work.

(Note: Is this article not meeting your expectations? Do you have knowledge or insights to share? Unlock new opportunities and expand your reach by joining our authors team. Click Registration to join us and share your expertise with our readers.)

Hi, I'm Happy Sharer and I love sharing interesting and useful knowledge with others. I have a passion for learning and enjoy explaining complex concepts in a simple way.

Related Post

Unlocking creativity: a guide to making creative content for instagram, embracing the future: the revolutionary impact of digital health innovation, the comprehensive guide to leadership consulting: enhancing organizational performance and growth, leave a reply cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Expert Guide: Removing Gel Nail Polish at Home Safely

Trading crypto in bull and bear markets: a comprehensive examination of the differences, making croatia travel arrangements, make their day extra special: celebrate with a customized cake.

Study.com

In order to continue enjoying our site, we ask that you confirm your identity as a human. Thank you very much for your cooperation.

Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Organizing Your Argument

OWL logo

Welcome to the Purdue OWL

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice.

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

How can I effectively present my argument?

In order for your argument to be persuasive, it must use an organizational structure that the audience perceives as both logical and easy to parse. Three argumentative methods —the  Toulmin Method , Classical Method , and Rogerian Method — give guidance for how to organize the points in an argument.

Note that these are only three of the most popular models for organizing an argument. Alternatives exist. Be sure to consult your instructor and/or defer to your assignment’s directions if you’re unsure which to use (if any).

Toulmin Method

The  Toulmin Method  is a formula that allows writers to build a sturdy logical foundation for their arguments. First proposed by author Stephen Toulmin in  The Uses of Argument (1958), the Toulmin Method emphasizes building a thorough support structure for each of an argument's key claims.

The basic format for the Toulmin Method  is as follows:

Claim:  In this section, you explain your overall thesis on the subject. In other words, you make your main argument.

Data (Grounds):  You should use evidence to support the claim. In other words, provide the reader with facts that prove your argument is strong.

Warrant (Bridge):  In this section, you explain why or how your data supports the claim. As a result, the underlying assumption that you build your argument on is grounded in reason.

Backing (Foundation):  Here, you provide any additional logic or reasoning that may be necessary to support the warrant.

Counterclaim:  You should anticipate a counterclaim that negates the main points in your argument. Don't avoid arguments that oppose your own. Instead, become familiar with the opposing perspective.   If you respond to counterclaims, you appear unbiased (and, therefore, you earn the respect of your readers). You may even want to include several counterclaims to show that you have thoroughly researched the topic.

Rebuttal:  In this section, you incorporate your own evidence that disagrees with the counterclaim. It is essential to include a thorough warrant or bridge to strengthen your essay’s argument. If you present data to your audience without explaining how it supports your thesis, your readers may not make a connection between the two, or they may draw different conclusions.

Example of the Toulmin Method:

Claim:  Hybrid cars are an effective strategy to fight pollution.

Data1:  Driving a private car is a typical citizen's most air-polluting activity.

Warrant 1:  Due to the fact that cars are the largest source of private (as opposed to industrial) air pollution, switching to hybrid cars should have an impact on fighting pollution.

Data 2:  Each vehicle produced is going to stay on the road for roughly 12 to 15 years.

Warrant 2:  Cars generally have a long lifespan, meaning that the decision to switch to a hybrid car will make a long-term impact on pollution levels.

Data 3:  Hybrid cars combine a gasoline engine with a battery-powered electric motor.

Warrant 3:  The combination of these technologies produces less pollution.

Counterclaim:  Instead of focusing on cars, which still encourages an inefficient culture of driving even as it cuts down on pollution, the nation should focus on building and encouraging the use of mass transit systems.

Rebuttal:  While mass transit is an idea that should be encouraged, it is not feasible in many rural and suburban areas, or for people who must commute to work. Thus, hybrid cars are a better solution for much of the nation's population.

Rogerian Method

The Rogerian Method  (named for, but not developed by, influential American psychotherapist Carl R. Rogers) is a popular method for controversial issues. This strategy seeks to find a common ground between parties by making the audience understand perspectives that stretch beyond (or even run counter to) the writer’s position. Moreso than other methods, it places an emphasis on reiterating an opponent's argument to his or her satisfaction. The persuasive power of the Rogerian Method lies in its ability to define the terms of the argument in such a way that:

  • your position seems like a reasonable compromise.
  • you seem compassionate and empathetic.

The basic format of the Rogerian Method  is as follows:

Introduction:  Introduce the issue to the audience, striving to remain as objective as possible.

Opposing View : Explain the other side’s position in an unbiased way. When you discuss the counterargument without judgement, the opposing side can see how you do not directly dismiss perspectives which conflict with your stance.

Statement of Validity (Understanding):  This section discusses how you acknowledge how the other side’s points can be valid under certain circumstances. You identify how and why their perspective makes sense in a specific context, but still present your own argument.

Statement of Your Position:  By this point, you have demonstrated that you understand the other side’s viewpoint. In this section, you explain your own stance.

Statement of Contexts : Explore scenarios in which your position has merit. When you explain how your argument is most appropriate for certain contexts, the reader can recognize that you acknowledge the multiple ways to view the complex issue.

Statement of Benefits:  You should conclude by explaining to the opposing side why they would benefit from accepting your position. By explaining the advantages of your argument, you close on a positive note without completely dismissing the other side’s perspective.

Example of the Rogerian Method:

Introduction:  The issue of whether children should wear school uniforms is subject to some debate.

Opposing View:  Some parents think that requiring children to wear uniforms is best.

Statement of Validity (Understanding):  Those parents who support uniforms argue that, when all students wear the same uniform, the students can develop a unified sense of school pride and inclusiveness.

Statement of Your Position : Students should not be required to wear school uniforms. Mandatory uniforms would forbid choices that allow students to be creative and express themselves through clothing.

Statement of Contexts:  However, even if uniforms might hypothetically promote inclusivity, in most real-life contexts, administrators can use uniform policies to enforce conformity. Students should have the option to explore their identity through clothing without the fear of being ostracized.

Statement of Benefits:  Though both sides seek to promote students' best interests, students should not be required to wear school uniforms. By giving students freedom over their choice, students can explore their self-identity by choosing how to present themselves to their peers.

Classical Method

The Classical Method of structuring an argument is another common way to organize your points. Originally devised by the Greek philosopher Aristotle (and then later developed by Roman thinkers like Cicero and Quintilian), classical arguments tend to focus on issues of definition and the careful application of evidence. Thus, the underlying assumption of classical argumentation is that, when all parties understand the issue perfectly, the correct course of action will be clear.

The basic format of the Classical Method  is as follows:

Introduction (Exordium): Introduce the issue and explain its significance. You should also establish your credibility and the topic’s legitimacy.

Statement of Background (Narratio): Present vital contextual or historical information to the audience to further their understanding of the issue. By doing so, you provide the reader with a working knowledge about the topic independent of your own stance.

Proposition (Propositio): After you provide the reader with contextual knowledge, you are ready to state your claims which relate to the information you have provided previously. This section outlines your major points for the reader.

Proof (Confirmatio): You should explain your reasons and evidence to the reader. Be sure to thoroughly justify your reasons. In this section, if necessary, you can provide supplementary evidence and subpoints.

Refutation (Refuatio): In this section, you address anticipated counterarguments that disagree with your thesis. Though you acknowledge the other side’s perspective, it is important to prove why your stance is more logical.  

Conclusion (Peroratio): You should summarize your main points. The conclusion also caters to the reader’s emotions and values. The use of pathos here makes the reader more inclined to consider your argument.  

Example of the Classical Method:  

Introduction (Exordium): Millions of workers are paid a set hourly wage nationwide. The federal minimum wage is standardized to protect workers from being paid too little. Research points to many viewpoints on how much to pay these workers. Some families cannot afford to support their households on the current wages provided for performing a minimum wage job .

Statement of Background (Narratio): Currently, millions of American workers struggle to make ends meet on a minimum wage. This puts a strain on workers’ personal and professional lives. Some work multiple jobs to provide for their families.

Proposition (Propositio): The current federal minimum wage should be increased to better accommodate millions of overworked Americans. By raising the minimum wage, workers can spend more time cultivating their livelihoods.

Proof (Confirmatio): According to the United States Department of Labor, 80.4 million Americans work for an hourly wage, but nearly 1.3 million receive wages less than the federal minimum. The pay raise will alleviate the stress of these workers. Their lives would benefit from this raise because it affects multiple areas of their lives.

Refutation (Refuatio): There is some evidence that raising the federal wage might increase the cost of living. However, other evidence contradicts this or suggests that the increase would not be great. Additionally,   worries about a cost of living increase must be balanced with the benefits of providing necessary funds to millions of hardworking Americans.

Conclusion (Peroratio): If the federal minimum wage was raised, many workers could alleviate some of their financial burdens. As a result, their emotional wellbeing would improve overall. Though some argue that the cost of living could increase, the benefits outweigh the potential drawbacks.

what is the bridge in an essay examples

Home » Writers-House Blog » English Homework: Bridge Statements

English Homework: Bridge Statements

Writers use bridge sentences, or bridge statements, to connect ideas and to create a smooth transition between them. To make an essay easy to read, you need to connect your ideas, ensuring a smooth flow. Bridge sentences can be used instead of topic sentences at the beginning of a paragraph to explain how previous ideas relate to the new idea that you’re going to introduce in the next paragraph. Learn more about bridge statements with WritersHouse expert opinion.

How to Use Bridge Statements

A bridge statement in the introductory paragraph is especially important because it sets the context for your readers. Usually, the opening statement acts as a hook that grabs attention and makes your audience want to read more. A bridge statement follows the hook, explaining why the opening is relevant to your thesis statement. The last sentence of the introduction must contain the thesis statement, explaining what your readers should expect from the rest of the paper.

Paragraph Bridges

You can start each paragraph with a topic sentence, or you can use a bridge to create a smooth transition to the next paragraph. It is also called a transition sentence or transition idea. Usually, it focuses on the previous point and leads readers to the next point, connecting them logically. Your goal is to make a seamless transition so that your essay will look natural and be easy to read. Bridge sentences help connect different concepts so that you can make sure that your essay makes sense.

The Purpose of Bridge Sentences

Bridge sentences are similar to topic sentences because they perform the same functions in the essay structure. They help readers remember what the writer has mentioned before, connecting this information to the new facts and ideas that will come up next. Simply put, these sentences help explain how different topics relate to each other. Bridge sentences can be used in different essays. For example, expository essays are one of the most common types of writing assignments that are aimed to inform readers or to explain a certain topic based on facts. Argumentative or persuasive essays should convince the audience to agree with the author’s opinion by addressing different perspectives and refuting the opposite opinion. Quite often, writers do it in a bridge statement. When writing an expository essay, your bridge statement may simply add some new information to what you have already presented. In persuasive essays, bridge statements can address a counterargument.

Transitional Keywords

Various transitional words can help you indicate the relationship between different ideas. For example, such words as “accordingly,” “therefore,” and “consequently” illustrate a cause-effect relationship. “Similarly,” “in addition,” and “furthermore” can help you expand your idea, while “nevertheless,” “although,” and “whereas” can establish a contrast.

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

avatar

Place your order

  • Essay Writer
  • Essay Writing Service
  • Term Paper Writing
  • Research Paper Writing
  • Assignment Writing Service
  • Cover Letter Writing
  • CV Writing Service
  • Resume Writing Service
  • 5-Paragraph Essays
  • Paper By Subjects
  • Affordable Papers
  • Prime quality of each and every paper
  • Everything written per your instructions
  • Native-speaking expert writers
  • 100% authenticity guaranteed
  • Timely delivery
  • Attentive 24/7 customer care team
  • Benefits for return customers
  • Affordable pricing

esssaypop logo

Hooking Things Together With Bridges

essaypop bridge 0

“In the moment of crises, the wise build bridges and the foolish build dams.” – Nigerian Proverb

Mini bridges to introduce research details.

Bridges are like the glue that connects everything in the essay together. Bridges create order and cohesion and allow phrases and ideas to transition together. Without bridges, your writing would feel stiff and awkward.  Bridges are often very short; some are just a brief phrase; some are a single word.   

In the short response, there are two types of bridges: The first is the simple bridge phrase that connects the thesis statement to the first research detail and, thereafter, research details to accompanying interpretations . Sentence starters that provide these bridge phrases are available via the pull-down curtains located in the bottom-left of each writing frame. Bridge phrases such as, “Consider the following” and “According to” allow writers to smoothly transition into their quotes, facts, and other evidence. Without them, research details land gracelessly and awkwardly onto the paper. Not pretty. 

Introducing such information without a bridge would make this information seem abruptly placed and would disrupt the flow of the essay. A basic short response with just one research detail will just have this one transitional bridge. Keep in mind that you don’t need to add a new bridge writing frame in this circumstance because, again, you access it for the research detail frame.

Including additional Bridges

Responses that feature more than one research detail or interpretation usually require another short bridge. In this case, you may want to add a new bridge writing frame using the action icon. Again, without some transition, the flow of the paper will be compromised and the new information will seem awkwardly placed.  

One option the writer has in this situation is to simply begin with a research detail sentence starter, using the pull-down described earlier. Just choose a starter that you like and then proceed with the new evidence or commentary. In this case, adding the extra bridge writing frame is not necessary.  

If, however, you wish to include a more extensive bridge, you can do so by clicking on the action icon and adding a bridge. This will cause a bridge writing frame to appear and you can write as much as you would like in the box (although we recommend that you keep your bridges to one or two sentences).  

Keep in mind that if you feel the need to add more than two or three additional bridges, then you are probably going to want to add a paragraph break or two. Again, this is easily done by adding a paragraph break available in the action icon.  What’s ironic is that your “short response” can quickly grow to 750 to 1,000 if you have a lot to say.  If you do begin a new paragraph, adding a quick bridge is a great way to start the transition.

Also, keep in mind that if you feel you are moving away from short response territory and moving into writing a more complicated paper,  want to consider creating a multiple-paragraph essay instead of a short response.

Bridge Models

These first models feature a short transitional bridge located just after the thesis statement and just before the research detail. The bridges These bridges are shown in context and are in bold underlined text. Keep in mind that these bridges do not require you to open a separate bridge writing frame because they are selected from the sentence starters that are accessed from the research detail writing frame.

Type of essay: short response / response to literature The prompt: In Denise Levertov’s poem, “Moon Tiger”, what is the moon tiger really?  Use textual evidence to justify your answer.

…In her poem, “Moon Tiger”, Denise Levertov provides the reader with some very interesting clues as to the true and literal identity of the work’s creeping tiger. Consider the following  lines from the poem : “Look. Its white stripes/ In the light that slid/Through the jalousies”. Levertov is inviting us to…

The transitional bridge, “Consider the following lines from the poem” is taken directly from the sentence starter menu located in the pulldown menu of the research detail writing frame.

Type of essay: Expository / Argument The prompt: We just read the Atlantic Monthly article, “How Two Common Medications Became One $455 Million Specialty Pill” by Marshall Allen. In a 300-500 word short essay, discuss whether you believe the Horizon Pharmaceutical Company is justified in selling the drug Vimovo at the price that they do.

…Marshall Allen’s Atlantic monthly article, “How Two Common Medications Became One $455 Million Specialty Pill” brings up two fairly balanced perspectives regarding the cost of their drug, Vimovo.  After careful consideration, however, it seems clear that there is no way to justify this company charging such exorbitant prices for this drug . According to this journalist , It seems that Horizon simply takes two very common medications, a pain reliever, and a stomach-upset medicine, and combines them into one pill, because pain relievers cause some people stomach discomfort. Not a bad idea I guess, but at what cost? “Of course I did the math”, says the Allen. “You can walk into your local drugstore and buy a month’s supply of Aleve and Nexium for about $40. For Vimovo, the pharmacy billed my insurance company $3,252.” This is a staggering markup in price.  And what’s worse is…

Type of essay: Expository / Argument / Short Response The prompt: We just read the Atlantic Monthly article, “How Two Common Medications Became One $455 Million Specialty Pill” by Marshall Allen. In a 300-500 word short essay, discuss whether you believe the Horizon Pharmaceutical Company is justified in selling the drug Vimovo at the price that they do.

…$455 Million Specialty Pill” brings up two fairly balanced perspectives regarding the cost of their drug, Vimovo. After careful consideration, however, it seems clear that there is no way to justify this company charging such exorbitant prices for this drug. According to this journalist, it seems that Horizon simply takes two very common medications, a pain reliever and a stomach-upset medicine, and combines them into one pill, because pain relievers cause some people stomach discomfort. Not a bad idea I guess, but at what cost? “Of course I did the math”, says the Allen. “You can walk into your local drugstore and buy a month’s supply of Aleve and Nexium for about $40. For Vimovo, the pharmacy billed my insurance company $3,252.” This is a staggering markup in price. And what’s worse is they seem to be getting away with it. Vimovo, according to Allen, has netted the company $455 million since 2014 and shows no signs of slowing down. They seem to be able to get away with this with a series of sales tricks and backroom deals with insurance companies that the doctors and patients prescribing and using the drugs are seldom aware of. And they don’t stop there.

Based on Allen’s research, Vimovo isn’t Horizon’s only such drug. It has brought in an additional $465 million in net sales from Duexis , a similar convenience drug that combines ibuprofen and famotidine, aka Advil and Pepcid. So, they’ve taken a successful…

This is an augmented version of model 2. Two research details are included and both are bridged into with phrases taken from the research-detail-writing-frame sentence starter menu in the respective research writing frames. Here they are both underlined and in bold. The writer chose to indent the second transitional bridge as it is a somewhat new thought.

Adding an Additional Bridge

Sometimes transitions between essay elements require a bit more context and elaboration than a sentence starter allows for.  When this is the case, it is sometimes advisable to add a new and distinct bridge. This is easily done using the action icon. The following models feature more elaborate bridges. For ease of identification, these added bridges are highlighted in darker blue .

Type of essay: expository/ argument The prompt: Based on the documents we reviewed in class today that assign blame for the Titanic tragedy to several different individuals, who, in your opinion, is most responsible for the sinking of the RMS Titanic and the deaths of over 1,500 passengers?

…Certainly, many people played a role in the tragedy, but one person seems more culpable than all the others.  Based on the documents we have reviewed, it seems clear that Captain Edward J. Smith is the individual most responsible for the sinking of the Titanic and the deaths of all of those unfortunate passengers. Robert Ballard, who is considered one the most-renowned Titanic experts confirms this in his research.   Consider the following evidence taken from Ballard’s “Exploring the Titanic”:  “In all Captain Smith received seven ice warnings the afternoon and evening of the disaster.  Of those, only 3 were posted for anyone to see.” (367) Ignoring this many ice warnings just seems like a recipe for disaster. To use a car/driver analogy, this would be like…

This bridge begins by providing some important contextual information about Robert Ballard; it is important that we know why Mr. Ballard is worthy of listening to. The bridge then transitions to the sentence starter, “Consider the following evidence…”. Together, these create a smooth transition into the research detail.

Type of essay: research/expository The prompt: Are rattlesnakes a bane or a benefit to mankind? Respond in a structured, evidence-based short constructed response that is 300-350 words in length.

… According to the Queensland Department of Environment, “The feeding habits of rattlesnakes act as a natural form of pest control. Snakes are predators and feed on a variety of creatures. Small snakes feed on many harmful bugs and insects. Larger ones eat mice, rats, and other small mammals that can destroy crops or damage personal property.” (Dept. of Environment)  It is clear that if we were to eliminate rattlesnakes from our environment to make ourselves “safe”, we would inadvertently and ironically create the opposite effect. An increase in insects and rodents would most certainly lead to such  adverse effects as bites, feces in food supplies and the diseases that accompany these conditions. So as you can see, these creatures do have some beneficial qualities Recent research by other scientists supports this idea. In fact, “New research by a team of University of Maryland biologists shows the timber rattlesnake indirectly benefits humankind by keeping Lyme disease in check.”  (Kabay) Lyme disease is a very deadly illness that can…

The first transitional bridge beginning with the phrase, “According to…”, comes directly from the research detail sentence starter menu.  The second bridge, highlighted in darker blue , sets up the next research detail. Since it is a bit longer, the writer added a bridge writing frame to the mix using the action icon. This bridge allows the next research detail and subsequent interpretation to flow smoothly within the paper. The sentence starter, “In fact”, is used here as well.

Type of Essay: response to literature The prompt: In a multiple-paragraph composition analyze and compare the recurring theme about the nature of love that can be found in William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 130” and Rodgers and Hart’s jazz classic, “My Funny Valentine”.

…What if instead of being sarcasm or even a celebration of a lover’s “perfect imperfections”, these words were literal descriptions of loved ones who are ill and at the end of their days?   As an illustration of this, take these lines from Shakespeare’s Sonnet 130: “I have seen roses damasked, red and white/But no such roses see I in her cheeks;/And in some perfumes is there more delight/Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks”.   One could easily read these words as sarcastic jesting or a loving acknowledgment of a few physical flaws. One the other hand, they can also be construed as true depictions of illness and age. The cheeks lose their color because of some sickness and the breath becomes malodorous due to internal disease. Meanwhile, the speaker can only observe helplessly as his lover slowly fades away.   Rodgers and Hart seem to be on the same page as the bard, and we see this dark possibility again in “My Funny Valentine” when the singer mournfully asks, “Is your figure less than Greek?/Is your mouth a little weak?/ When you open it to speak, are you smart?” Again, these rhetorical questions could easily be…

The first transitional bridge beginning with the phrase, “As an illustration of this…”, comes directly from the research detail sentence starter menu.  The second bridge, highlighted in darker blue , sets up the next research detail. Since it is a bit longer, the writer added a bridge writing frame to the mix using the action icon. This bridge allows the next research detail and subsequent interpretation to flow smoothly within the paper.

Related Posts

Short Response Essay

Style Guide

What is a Short Response Essay?

ramon-kagie-GVCQU_YxBeU-unsplash

Closer – Let’s Land This Thing!

Child chooses a donut with sprinkles!

Mastering the Short Response Hook

Leave a reply cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get the Reddit app

This subreddit was banned due to being used for spam.

You agree that use of this site constitutes acceptance of Reddit’s User Agreement and acknowledge our Privacy Policy .

Home — Essay Samples — Literature — Plays — A View From The Bridge

one px

Essays on A View from The Bridge

"a view from the bridge": exploring the role of alfieri, explore how the theme of love is portrayed in "a view from the bridge"., made-to-order essay as fast as you need it.

Each essay is customized to cater to your unique preferences

+ experts online

The Imagery of a View from The Bridge's Tragedy and How The Main Characters Are Unable to Show Their Feelings

A critique of a view from the bridge, a play by arthur miller, the balance of power in a view from the bridge and the lion and the jewel, a juxtapositioning of the opening in a streetcar named desire and a view from a bridge, let us write you an essay from scratch.

  • 450+ experts on 30 subjects ready to help
  • Custom essay delivered in as few as 3 hours

Analysis of The Movie Version Of, a View from The Bridge by Arthur Miller

A view from the bridge: themes of immigration and tragedy.

September 29, 1955

Arthur Miller

Eddie Carbone, Beatrice, Catherine, Alfieri, Marco, Rodolpho, Louis, Mike, Tony, Immigration Officer 1,Immigration Officer 2

Relevant topics

  • Macbeth Guilt
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • Antigone Tragic Hero
  • A Streetcar Named Desire
  • To Be Or Not to Be
  • An Inspector Calls

By clicking “Check Writers’ Offers”, you agree to our terms of service and privacy policy . We’ll occasionally send you promo and account related email

No need to pay just yet!

We use cookies to personalyze your web-site experience. By continuing we’ll assume you board with our cookie policy .

  • Instructions Followed To The Letter
  • Deadlines Met At Every Stage
  • Unique And Plagiarism Free

what is the bridge in an essay examples

what is the bridge in an essay examples

How to Write a Discursive Essay: Awesome Guide and Template

what is the bridge in an essay examples

The term "discursive" comes from the Latin word "discursus," meaning to move around or traverse. A discursive essay reflects this by exploring multiple viewpoints and offering a thorough discussion on a specific topic.

In this article, our term paper writing service will define what a discursive essay is, distinguish it from an argumentative essay, provide practical tips on how to write one effectively, and examine essay examples to illustrate its structure and approach.

What Is a Discursive Essay

A discursive essay is a type of essay where you discuss a topic from various viewpoints. The goal is to provide a balanced analysis by exploring different perspectives. Your essay should present arguments on the topic, showing both sides to give a comprehensive view.

Features of discursive essays typically include:

  • Thesis Statement: Clearly states your position or argument on the topic.
  • Discussion of Perspectives: Examines different viewpoints or aspects of the issue.
  • Evidence and Examples: Supports arguments with relevant evidence and examples.
  • Counterarguments: Addresses opposing viewpoints to strengthen your position.
  • Logical Organization: Structured to present arguments coherently and persuasively.

Ready to Transform Your Essays? 

From discursive writing to academic triumphs, let your words soar with our essay writing service!

How to Write a Discursive Essay

Writing a discursive essay involves examining a topic from different angles and presenting balanced viewpoints. Whether you're tackling a controversial issue or analyzing a complex subject, following these steps will help you craft a well-structured discursive essay.

discursive essay aspects

1. Understand the Topic

Before you start writing, make sure you grasp the topic thoroughly. Identify key terms and concepts to clarify what you need to discuss. Consider the different aspects and perspectives related to the topic that you will explore in your essay.

2. Research and Gather Evidence

Research is crucial for a discursive essay. Gather information from reliable sources such as books, academic journals, and reputable websites. Collect evidence that supports various viewpoints on the topic. Note down quotes, statistics, and examples that you can use to strengthen your arguments.

3. Plan Your Structure

Organize your essay effectively to ensure clarity and coherence. Start with an introduction that states your thesis or main argument. Outline the main points or perspectives you will discuss in the body paragraphs. Each paragraph should focus on a different aspect or viewpoint, supported by evidence. Consider including a paragraph that addresses counterarguments to strengthen your position.

4. Write the Introduction

Begin your essay with a compelling introduction that grabs the reader's attention. Start with a hook or an intriguing fact related to the topic. Clearly state your thesis statement, which outlines your position on the issue and previews the main points you will discuss. The introduction sets the tone for your essay and provides a roadmap for what follows.

5. Develop the Body Paragraphs

The body of your essay should present a balanced discussion of the topic. Each paragraph should focus on a different perspective or argument. Start each paragraph with a clear topic sentence that introduces the main idea. Support your points with evidence, examples, and quotes from your research. Ensure smooth transitions between paragraphs to maintain the flow of your argument.

6. Conclude Effectively

Wrap up your essay with a strong conclusion that summarizes the main points and reinforces your thesis statement. Avoid introducing new information in the conclusion. Instead, reflect on the significance of your arguments and how they contribute to the broader understanding of the topic. End with a thought-provoking statement or a call to action, encouraging readers to consider the complexities of the issue.

If you find this kind of writing challenging, simply say ' write my paper ', and professional writers will handle it for you.

Discursive Guide Checklist

Aspect 📝 Checklist ✅
Understanding the Topic Have I thoroughly understood the topic and its key terms?
Have I identified the different perspectives or viewpoints related to the topic?
Research and Evidence Have I conducted comprehensive research using reliable sources?
Have I gathered sufficient evidence, including quotes, statistics, and to support each perspective?
Structuring the Essay Have I planned a clear and logical structure for my essay?
Does my introduction include a strong thesis statement that outlines my position?
Introduction Does my introduction effectively grab the reader's attention?
Have I clearly stated my thesis statement that previews the main arguments?
Body Paragraphs Do my body paragraphs each focus on a different perspective or argument?
Have I provided evidence and examples to support each argument?
Counterarguments Have I addressed potential counterarguments to strengthen my position?
Have I acknowledged and responded to opposing viewpoints where necessary?
Conclusion Does my conclusion effectively summarize the main points discussed?
Have I reinforced my thesis statement and the significance of my arguments?
Clarity and Coherence Are my ideas presented in a clear and coherent manner?
Do my paragraphs flow logically from one to the next?
Language and Style Have I used clear and concise language throughout the essay?
Is my writing style appropriate for the academic context, avoiding overly casual language?
Editing and Proofreading Have I proofread my essay for grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors?
Have I checked the overall structure and flow of my essay for coherence?

Discursive Essay Examples

Here, let’s take a look at our samples and see how different topics are discussed from different viewpoints in real discursive essays.

If you found these examples helpful, you can order custom essay now and receive one on any topic you choose.

Discursive Essay Topics

Here are a range of topics that encourage exploration of different perspectives and critical analysis. Choose a topic that interests you and allows for a balanced analysis of arguments and evidence.

  • Should governments impose higher taxes on sugary drinks to combat obesity?
  • Is homeschooling beneficial for children's education?
  • Should the use of drones for military purposes be restricted?
  • Should the legal drinking age be lowered or raised?
  • Is online education as effective as traditional classroom learning?
  • Should parents be held legally responsible for their children's actions?
  • Is artificial intelligence a threat to human employment?
  • Are video games a positive or negative influence on young people?
  • Should the voting age be lowered to 16?
  • Should schools teach mindfulness and meditation techniques?
  • Is cultural diversity in the workplace beneficial for companies?
  • Should prisoners have the right to vote?
  • Is social media addiction a real problem?
  • Should plastic packaging be replaced with eco-friendly alternatives?
  • Is it ethical to clone animals for agricultural purposes?
  • Should the government provide subsidies for electric vehicles?
  • Is privacy more important than national security?
  • Should school uniforms be mandatory?
  • Is renewable energy the future of our planet?
  • Should parents have access to their children's social media accounts?

By the way, we also have a great collection of narrative essay topics to inspire your creativity.

What is the Difference Between a Discursive and Argumentative Essay

Discursive essays and argumentative essays share similarities but have distinct differences in their approach and purpose. While both essay types involve critical thinking and analysis, the main difference lies in the writer's approach to the topic and the overall goal of the essay—whether it aims to explore and discuss multiple perspectives (discursive) or to argue for a specific viewpoint (argumentative). Here’s a more detailed look at how they differ:

Key Differences 📌 Discursive Essay 📝 Argumentative Essay 🗣️
Purpose 🎯 Provides a balanced discussion on a topic Persuades the reader to agree with a specific viewpoint.
Approach 🔍 Examines multiple perspectives without taking a definitive stance Takes a clear position and argues for or against it throughout the essay.
Thesis Statement 📜 Often states a general overview or acknowledges different viewpoints. States a strong and specific thesis that outlines the writer's position clearly.
Argumentation 💬 Presents arguments from various angles to provide a comprehensive view. Presents arguments that support the writer's position and refute opposing views.

Types of Discursive Essay

Before writing a discursive essay, keep in mind that they can be categorized into different types based on their specific purposes and structures. Here are some common types of discursive essays:

purpose of discursive essay

Opinion Essays:

  • Purpose: Expressing and supporting personal opinions on a given topic.
  • Structure: The essay presents the writer's viewpoint and provides supporting evidence, examples, and arguments. It may also address counterarguments to strengthen the overall discussion.

Problem-Solution Essays:

  • Purpose: Identifying a specific problem and proposing effective solutions.
  • Structure: The essay introduces the problem, discusses its causes and effects, and presents possible solutions. It often concludes with a recommendation or call to action.

Compare and Contrast Essays:

  • Purpose: Analyzing similarities and differences between two or more perspectives, ideas, or approaches.
  • Structure: The essay outlines the key points of each perspective, highlighting similarities and differences. A balanced analysis is provided to give the reader a comprehensive understanding.

Cause and Effect Essays:

  • Purpose: Exploring the causes and effects of a particular phenomenon or issue.
  • Structure: The essay identifies the primary causes and examines their effects or vice versa. It may delve into the chain of events and their implications.

Argumentative Essays:

  • Purpose: Presenting a strong argument in favor of a specific viewpoint.
  • Structure: The essay establishes a clear thesis statement, provides evidence and reasoning to support the argument, and addresses opposing views. It aims to persuade the reader to adopt the writer's perspective.

Pro-Con Essays:

  • Purpose: Evaluating the pros and cons of a given issue.
  • Structure: The essay presents the positive aspects (pros) and negative aspects (cons) of the topic. It aims to provide a balanced assessment and may conclude with a recommendation or a summary of the most compelling points.

Exploratory Essays:

  • Purpose: Investigating and discussing a topic without necessarily advocating for a specific position.
  • Structure: The essay explores various aspects of the topic, presenting different perspectives and allowing the reader to form their own conclusions. It often reflects a process of inquiry and discovery.

These types of discursive essays offer different approaches to presenting information, and the choice of type depends on the specific goals of the essay and the preferences of the writer.

Discursive Essay Format

Writing a discursive essay needs careful planning to make sure it’s clear and flows well while presenting different viewpoints on a topic. Here’s how to structure your discursive essay:

Introduction

  • Start with an interesting opening sentence to catch the reader's attention. Give some background information on the topic to show why it’s important.
  • Clearly state your main argument or position on the topic, and mention that you’ll be discussing different viewpoints.

"Should genetically modified foods be more strictly regulated for consumer safety? This question sparks debates among scientists, policymakers, and consumers alike. This essay explores the different perspectives on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to give a complete view of the issues."

Body Paragraphs

  • Begin each paragraph with a sentence that introduces a key point or perspective about GMOs.
  • Present arguments, evidence, and examples to support each perspective. Consider the benefits, risks, and ethical issues around GMOs.
  • Address possible objections or opposing viewpoints to show a balanced analysis.

"Supporters of GMOs argue that genetically engineered crops can help solve global food shortages by increasing crop yields and resistance to pests. For example, studies have shown that GMOs like insect-resistant corn have reduced the need for chemical pesticides, which benefits both farmers and the environment."

Counterarguments

  • Recognize the counterarguments or concerns raised by opponents of GMOs.
  • Provide reasoned responses or rebuttals to these counterarguments, acknowledging the complexity of the issue.

"However, critics of GMOs worry about potential long-term health effects and environmental impacts. They argue that there isn’t enough research to ensure the safety of eating genetically modified foods over long periods."

  • Summarize the main points discussed in the essay about GMOs.
  • Reinforce your thesis statement while considering the different arguments presented.
  • Finish with a thought-provoking statement or suggest what should be considered for future research or policy decisions related to GMOs.

"In conclusion, the debate over genetically modified foods highlights the need to balance scientific innovation with public health and environmental concerns. While GMOs offer potential benefits for global food security, ongoing research and transparent regulation are essential to address uncertainties and ensure consumer safety."

Formatting Tips

  • Use clear and straightforward language throughout the essay.
  • Ensure smooth transitions between paragraphs to maintain the flow of ideas.
  • Use headings and subheadings if they help organize different perspectives.
  • Properly cite sources when referencing research findings, quotes, or statistics.

Remember, besides writing compositions, you’ll also need to do math homework , something we can assist you with right away.

Yays and Nays of Writing Discourse Essays

In learning how to write a discursive essay, certain do's and don'ts serve as guiding principles throughout the writing process. By adhering to these guidelines, writers can navigate the complexities of presenting arguments, counterarguments, and nuanced analyses, ensuring the essay resonates with clarity and persuasiveness.

Yays 👍 Nays 👎
Conduct thorough research to ensure a well-informed discussion. Don’t express personal opinions in the body of the essay. Save personal commentary for the conclusion.
Explore various arguments and viewpoints on the issue. Don't introduce new information or arguments in the conclusion. This section should summarize and reflect on existing content.
Maintain a balanced and neutral tone. Present arguments objectively without personal bias. Don’t use overly emotional or subjective language. Maintain a professional and objective tone.
Structure your essay with a clear introduction, body, and conclusion. Use paragraphs to organize your ideas. Ensure your arguments are supported by credible evidence. Don’t rely on personal opinions without sufficient research.
Include clear topic sentences at the beginning of each paragraph to guide the reader through your arguments. Don’t have an ambiguous or unclear thesis statement. Clearly state the purpose of your essay in the introduction.
Use credible evidence from reputable sources to support your arguments. Don’t ignore counterarguments. Address opposing viewpoints to strengthen your overall argument.
Ensure a smooth flow between paragraphs and ideas with transitional words and phrases. Don’t use overly complex language if it doesn’t add to the clarity of your arguments. Aim for clarity and simplicity.
Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different arguments and viewpoints. Don’t present ideas in a disorganized manner. Ensure a logical flow between paragraphs and ideas.
Recap key points in the conclusion, summarizing the main arguments and perspectives discussed. Don’t excessively repeat the same points. Present a variety of arguments and perspectives to keep the essay engaging.
Correct any grammar, spelling, or punctuation errors by proofreading your essay. Don’t ignore the guidelines provided for your assignment. Follow any specific instructions or requirements given by your instructor or institution.

Wrapping Up

Throughout this guide, you have acquired valuable insights into the art of crafting compelling arguments and presenting diverse perspectives. By delving into the nuances of topic selection, structuring, and incorporating evidence, you could hone your critical thinking skills and sharpen your ability to engage in informed discourse. 

This guide serves as a roadmap, offering not just a set of rules but a toolkit to empower students in their academic journey. As you embark on future writing endeavors, armed with the knowledge gained here, you can confidently navigate the challenges of constructing well-reasoned, balanced discursive essays that contribute meaningfully to academic discourse and foster a deeper understanding of complex issues. If you want to continue your academic learning journey right now, we suggest that you read about the IEEE format next.

Overwhelmed by Essays? 

Let professional writers be your writing wingman. No stress - just success!

What is a Discursive Example?

What is the difference between a discursive and argumentative essay, what are the 2 types of discursive writing.

Daniel Parker

Daniel Parker

is a seasoned educational writer focusing on scholarship guidance, research papers, and various forms of academic essays including reflective and narrative essays. His expertise also extends to detailed case studies. A scholar with a background in English Literature and Education, Daniel’s work on EssayPro blog aims to support students in achieving academic excellence and securing scholarships. His hobbies include reading classic literature and participating in academic forums.

what is the bridge in an essay examples

is an expert in nursing and healthcare, with a strong background in history, law, and literature. Holding advanced degrees in nursing and public health, his analytical approach and comprehensive knowledge help students navigate complex topics. On EssayPro blog, Adam provides insightful articles on everything from historical analysis to the intricacies of healthcare policies. In his downtime, he enjoys historical documentaries and volunteering at local clinics.

  • Updated old sections including definition, outline, writing guide.
  • Added new topics, examples, checklist, FAQs.
  • Discursive writing - Discursive Writing - Higher English Revision. (n.d.). BBC Bitesize. https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/zpdwwmn/revision/1  
  • Prepare for Exam Success: C1 Advanced self-access learning Writing Part 1 -the discursive essay Lesson summary. (n.d.). Retrieved June 28, 2024, from https://www.cambridgeenglish.org/Images/583526-c1-advanced-self-access-learning-writing-part-1-discursive-essay.pdf  
  • Tomeu. (n.d.). Advanced C1.1: How to write a DISCURSIVE ESSAY. Advanced C1.1. Retrieved June 28, 2024, from https://englishadvanced2.blogspot.com/2013/10/speakout-advanced-p-25-examples-of.html  

How to Write a 5 Paragraph Essay

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • How to write an expository essay

How to Write an Expository Essay | Structure, Tips & Examples

Published on July 14, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

“Expository” means “intended to explain or describe something.” An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a particular topic, process, or set of ideas. It doesn’t set out to prove a point, just to give a balanced view of its subject matter.

Expository essays are usually short assignments intended to test your composition skills or your understanding of a subject. They tend to involve less research and original arguments than argumentative essays .

Instantly correct all language mistakes in your text

Upload your document to correct all your mistakes in minutes

upload-your-document-ai-proofreader

Table of contents

When should you write an expository essay, how to approach an expository essay, introducing your essay, writing the body paragraphs, concluding your essay, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about expository essays.

In school and university, you might have to write expository essays as in-class exercises, exam questions, or coursework assignments.

Sometimes it won’t be directly stated that the assignment is an expository essay, but there are certain keywords that imply expository writing is required. Consider the prompts below.

The word “explain” here is the clue: An essay responding to this prompt should provide an explanation of this historical process—not necessarily an original argument about it.

Sometimes you’ll be asked to define a particular term or concept. This means more than just copying down the dictionary definition; you’ll be expected to explore different ideas surrounding the term, as this prompt emphasizes.

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

An expository essay should take an objective approach: It isn’t about your personal opinions or experiences. Instead, your goal is to provide an informative and balanced explanation of your topic. Avoid using the first or second person (“I” or “you”).

The structure of your expository essay will vary according to the scope of your assignment and the demands of your topic. It’s worthwhile to plan out your structure before you start, using an essay outline .

A common structure for a short expository essay consists of five paragraphs: An introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Like all essays, an expository essay begins with an introduction . This serves to hook the reader’s interest, briefly introduce your topic, and provide a thesis statement summarizing what you’re going to say about it.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a typical introduction works.

In many ways, the invention of the printing press marked the end of the Middle Ages. The medieval period in Europe is often remembered as a time of intellectual and political stagnation. Prior to the Renaissance, the average person had very limited access to books and was unlikely to be literate. The invention of the printing press in the 15th century allowed for much less restricted circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.

The body of your essay is where you cover your topic in depth. It often consists of three paragraphs, but may be more for a longer essay. This is where you present the details of the process, idea or topic you’re explaining.

It’s important to make sure each paragraph covers its own clearly defined topic, introduced with a topic sentence . Different topics (all related to the overall subject matter of the essay) should be presented in a logical order, with clear transitions between paragraphs.

Hover over different parts of the example paragraph below to see how a body paragraph is constructed.

The invention of the printing press in 1440 changed this situation dramatically. Johannes Gutenberg, who had worked as a goldsmith, used his knowledge of metals in the design of the press. He made his type from an alloy of lead, tin, and antimony, whose durability allowed for the reliable production of high-quality books. This new technology allowed texts to be reproduced and disseminated on a much larger scale than was previously possible. The Gutenberg Bible appeared in the 1450s, and a large number of printing presses sprang up across the continent in the following decades. Gutenberg’s invention rapidly transformed cultural production in Europe; among other things, it would lead to the Protestant Reformation.

Here's why students love Scribbr's proofreading services

Discover proofreading & editing

The conclusion of an expository essay serves to summarize the topic under discussion. It should not present any new information or evidence, but should instead focus on reinforcing the points made so far. Essentially, your conclusion is there to round off the essay in an engaging way.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a conclusion works.

The invention of the printing press was important not only in terms of its immediate cultural and economic effects, but also in terms of its major impact on politics and religion across Europe. In the century following the invention of the printing press, the relatively stationary intellectual atmosphere of the Middle Ages gave way to the social upheavals of the Reformation and the Renaissance. A single technological innovation had contributed to the total reshaping of the continent.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

  • Ad hominem fallacy
  • Post hoc fallacy
  • Appeal to authority fallacy
  • False cause fallacy
  • Sunk cost fallacy

College essays

  • Choosing Essay Topic
  • Write a College Essay
  • Write a Diversity Essay
  • College Essay Format & Structure
  • Comparing and Contrasting in an Essay

 (AI) Tools

  • Grammar Checker
  • Paraphrasing Tool
  • Text Summarizer
  • AI Detector
  • Plagiarism Checker
  • Citation Generator

An expository essay is a broad form that varies in length according to the scope of the assignment.

Expository essays are often assigned as a writing exercise or as part of an exam, in which case a five-paragraph essay of around 800 words may be appropriate.

You’ll usually be given guidelines regarding length; if you’re not sure, ask.

An expository essay is a common assignment in high-school and university composition classes. It might be assigned as coursework, in class, or as part of an exam.

Sometimes you might not be told explicitly to write an expository essay. Look out for prompts containing keywords like “explain” and “define.” An expository essay is usually the right response to these prompts.

An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2023, July 23). How to Write an Expository Essay | Structure, Tips & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved July 5, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/expository-essay/

Is this article helpful?

Jack Caulfield

Jack Caulfield

Other students also liked, academic paragraph structure | step-by-step guide & examples, how to write topic sentences | 4 steps, examples & purpose, how to write an argumentative essay | examples & tips, "i thought ai proofreading was useless but..".

I've been using Scribbr for years now and I know it's a service that won't disappoint. It does a good job spotting mistakes”

An illustrated montage of workers, chat windows, and emojis riffs on the theme of in-person versus remote and hybrid forms of interaction

In-Person Time

In the Changing Role of the Office, It’s All about Moments That Matter

New research highlights three key times when bringing employees and teams together in person creates lasting connection

Illustration by Zara Picken

T Three years into flexible work, we’re entering a new phase: structured flexible work. While every organization approaches flexibility differently, leaders are looking to establish norms and best practices with their employees, particularly around when—and how much—to come into the office. At Microsoft, our structured flexible work model empowers individuals and teams to intentionally decide what works for them, within company and team guidelines. “We enable managers and employees to do what they believe is best for each individual’s unique needs, as well as each team’s success,” says Karen Kocher, global general manager, Future of Work, Workforce of the Future, and talent & learning experiences at Microsoft. Study after study shows that employees want the best of both worlds—flexible work and in-person connection. Back in 2021, the Work Trend Index uncovered what we call the hybrid paradox: over 70% of workers wanted flexible work to stay, and over 65% were craving more in-person time with their teams. While the amount of flexibility might differ by role—data center employees or hardware engineers might spend more time on-site, for example—we’ve seen this trend persist in both our external research and in our Microsoft employee surveys. How can leaders bring structure to flexible work and help employees get the in-person connection they crave? New research shows it’s not about the number of days people are in the office, it’s about creating moments that matter. hree years into flexible work, we’re entering a new phase: structured flexible work. While every organization approaches flexibility differently, leaders are looking to establish norms and best practices with their employees, particularly around when—and how much—to come into the office. At Microsoft, our structured flexible work model empowers individuals and teams to intentionally decide what works for them, within company and team guidelines. “We enable managers and employees to do what they believe is best for each individual’s unique needs, as well as each team’s success,” says Karen Kocher, global general manager, Future of Work, Workforce of the Future, and talent & learning experiences at Microsoft. Study after study shows that employees want the best of both worlds—flexible work and in-person connection. Back in 2021, the Work Trend Index uncovered what we call the hybrid paradox: over 70% of workers wanted flexible work to stay, and over 65% were craving more in-person time with their teams. While the amount of flexibility might differ by role—data center employees or hardware engineers might spend more time on-site, for example—we’ve seen this trend persist in both our external research and in our Microsoft employee surveys. How can leaders bring structure to flexible work and help employees get the in-person connection they crave? New research shows it’s not about the number of days people are in the office, it’s about creating moments that matter.

Our internal data points to three specific moments when in-person time is most beneficial:

Strengthening team cohesion

Onboarding to a new role, team, or company

Kicking off a project

1. Strengthening team cohesion

There’s no going back to 2019. Over the past four years, organizations have become increasingly distributed, and for many of them, a large-scale return to the office is no longer a feasible way to create meaningful connections between individuals and teams. This is certainly true of Microsoft. “We’re not the same company that we were prior to the pandemic,” says Dawn Klinghoffer, head of people analytics at Microsoft. Back then, 61% of teams at the company were all in the same location; today that number is 27%. And research shows that 70% of managers at Fortune 100 companies have at least one remote team member.

Fewer Teams Are Fully Co-Located Than in 2020

New research shows that teams are more geographically dispersed than before the pandemic, and fewer teammates all live within the same city.*

Bar graph demonstrates how teams have become more graphically dispersed, comparing statistics before 2020 with those in April 2023. For all teams, 61% were fully co-located before 2020, and 27% were in April 2023; 34% were partially co-located before 2020 and 56% were in April 2023; 5% were no t co-located before 2020 and 7% were in April 2023. For engineering teams, 77% were fully co-located before 2020, and 32% were in April 2023; 21% were partially co-located before 2020 and 63% were in April 2023; 2% were not co-located before 2020 and 5% were in April 2023.  For corporate teams, 44% were fully co-located before 2020, and 25% were in April 2023; 43% were partially co-located before 2020 and 63% were in April 2023; 13% were not co-located before 2020 and 12% were in April 2023.

And employees say that flexibility is going well: In our latest Microsoft employee engagement survey, 92% of our employees say they believe the company values flexibility and allows them to work in a way that works best for them. An even higher 93% are confident in their ability to work together as a team, regardless of location. At the same time, the survey shows people are craving more connection. When we looked at the comments from employees who did not rate their quality of connection with co-workers as favorable (only neutral or unfavorable), 29% of those comments said that remote work has made it difficult to create meaningful connections and relationships. We know that people come into an office for each other—whether it’s once a week or once a year—and in the same engagement survey, employees made it clear they’re looking for time together spent connecting, not just co-working. When asked what in-person activities Microsoft should offer to support teams’ success, 37% of comments were about social and team-building activities—the number one theme overall.

Just ask Maryleen Emeric, who organized a recent team week for the Microsoft Modern Work and Business Applications group. (Team week brings together far-flung colleagues who would otherwise rarely see each other.) And after a long day of meetings and workshops during team week, she brought down the house with a karaoke cover of Bonnie Tyler’s “Total Eclipse of the Heart.” “Those sorts of social connections are not something that you can create over a screen,” she says. “Allowing people to get to know each other and find those common interests outside of work—I don’t think that can happen if you don’t bring people together once in a while.”

We see this sentiment in our external surveys too. According to the September 2022 Work Trend Index report , about 85% of people were motivated to go into the office for socializing with co-workers; just as many also said they’d be motivated by a desire to rebuild team bonds.

“You have to think of your social capital like a battery,” Emeric says. “The longer you go without having in-person interaction, the lower the charge gets on your battery. These moments that matter—like a team week—allow us to recharge the battery.” In fact, Microsoft employees who spent six days or more a month in the office with their team had a slightly higher thriving score than those who did not spend any time in the office. (Thriving is our outcome for engagement at Microsoft, defined by a combination of three tenets: being “ empowered and energized to do meaningful work .”) While even more days together raises scores for feeling energized and for alignment on goals, it also starts to push down scores for flexibility and satisfaction.

In-person time can also remind the individual employee of the role they play in the success of the broader team and the organization. Team week culminated in an “ask me anything” style conversation with organization leader Jared Spataro, CVP of Modern Work & Business Applications, during which he spoke openly about the company’s vigorous focus on AI. “It made people feel very connected to our mission, very connected to our goals, and very connected to our culture,” Emeric says. “It got people very energized. And it felt like people were recommitting to the cause. Like, ‘Yeah, we’re all in.’” We know from the Work Trend Index report that high-quality connections pay off for both people and businesses: Employees who have positive relationships with their immediate team members report better wellbeing than those with poor relationships. They also report higher productivity, and are less likely to change employers in the year ahead. Strengthening networks outside of the immediate team matters, too, according to the Work Trend Index. Employees with positive relationships beyond their immediate team members say they’re more satisfied with their employer, more fulfilled by work, and have a more positive outlook on workplace stress than those with weak organizational networks. Or, in the immortal words of Ms. Bonnie Tyler: “ Together we can take it to the end of the line …”

2. Onboarding to a new role, team, or company

Our research showed that when starting a new role—whether at a new company or in an internal switch—meeting your manager or onboarding buddy in person makes certain things easier. Compared with employees who didn’t meet their managers in person within the first 90 days, employees who did were more likely to seek feedback, be asked for input by their team, build strong relationships with colleagues, feel supported when discussing tough issues with their manager, and get effective coaching and feedback. (However, there are no differences in how these new hires feel about other outcomes in the survey, including driving impact, finding the support they need, being supported by their colleagues and feeling included, knowing their stakeholders, and getting to know the culture.) Meeting your onboarding “buddy”—a teammate assigned to support your transition to the new team—in person within 90 days makes a difference too. Those who did were more likely to seek feedback, feel included, feel trusted by their team, and report they had clarity about how to drive impact—and have the necessary tools to do so. (But meeting their onboarding buddy in person did not meaningfully affect new hires’ scores in other areas, such as finding the support they need, understanding their organization’s vision, or knowing their stakeholders.) The quicker that new hires develop trust with their managers and teammates, the quicker they can become productive contributors and collaborators with the team and the company. “Understanding the priorities and feeling a sense of belonging is just really a goodness for both the organization and the individual,” Kocher says.

Meeting In Person Has Clear Benefits for New Hires

For new employees, connecting with their manager or onboarding “buddy“ in person has a measurable short-term effect on how well they integrate with their new teams.

Data viz TK

Source: Onboarding Research Survey at 90 Days, Microsoft, Sept. 7 to Dec. 31, 2022

Stretches of in-person training also help new hires understand their tasks and priorities with less friction. They can receive close guidance and immediate feedback, with easy access to assistance, clarification, and tacit knowledge. “It helps you get more quickly up to speed,” Kocher says. “And when you can deliver at your maximum capacity much more quickly, it helps you become more intrinsically motivated and energized.” Another internal survey showed that early-in-career employees felt slightly more energized when they worked regularly in the same building with their team members. In-person time also gives employees the opportunity to observe company norms and team dynamics—subtleties that are difficult to pick up on virtually and that can be especially important for early-in-career employees. All that said, as Klinghoffer notes, once you’ve onboarded, in-person one-on-one meetings are not necessarily mission critical, which is good news for distributed teams. It’s a balance: “Meeting one’s manager early on is a moment that matters and has some great outcomes, but down the road, you don’t necessarily have to be in person regularly.”

3. Kicking off a project

In-person time is useful in the earliest stages of a project life cycle for the same reason it’s useful during the onboarding process: getting people on the same page. When respondents of our employee engagement survey shared specific examples of moments that matter to be in person for, they included initial customer engagements and planning sessions—one respondent even said it “would be a significant boost to team collaboration, culture, and execution.” The Microsoft 365 Copilot project kickoff , which assembled teams from diverse departments for the company’s most ambitious project in a decade, happened in person, for example. Physical proximity simply helps people feel like their colleagues understand them. “Everyone likes to feel heard by others,” Kocher says. “And it’s easier to feel heard when you’re right next to somebody having a conversation.” With mutual trust and alignment in place, the creative juices can start flowing. In-person time helps spark innovation and outside-the-box thinking. In fact, studies show that while it’s easiest to choose the best idea virtually, in-person pairs generated 18% more creative ideas and 14% more ideas overall compared with virtual pairs in the same hour—so you can have better choices to pick from. “If you want the best and most ideas, you do it in person,” Kocher says. “When you’re in a big room with a lot of people, your mind perceives an expansion. Compare that to when you’re at a computer and you’re talking to people online: your mind goes very narrow very quickly.” Aside from boosting brainstorming power, being together in person at the beginning of a project allows a team to more efficiently share tacit knowledge, get clarity, establish individual roles, and coordinate their efforts. “Get to know people, build the trust, have some initial brainstorming sessions,” Klinghoffer says. “Then, once you’ve built that social capital, go back to your home offices or separate locations and keep on moving the project forward.”

Key Takeaway

While flexible work looks different for every organization, it’s clear that it’s here to stay. As organizations embrace this transformative model, they unlock their capacity to increase productivity, enhance employee satisfaction, and create a more inclusive workforce. Remote work has benefits, and in-person time does too. Every team is different, but one thing is clear: finding this balance must be approached with intentionality. Rather than considering the office as a one-size-fits-all solution, teams should consider the type of work they do and determine key points in time or reasons to gather in person. What’s more, the benefits of in-person time—whether it’s for a weeklong on-site or a day here and there—should be weighed against things like travel and expenses, commuting, and creating space for deep work. As Klinghoffer says, “Ask yourself and your team: What are the moments that matter for us?”

Stay in the AI know with WorkLab

Sign up for the WorkLab newsletter to get the latest AI research, insights, and trends delivered straight to your inbox.

A close up of stacked wooden blocks. Instead of featuring letters or numbers, the blocks are emblazoned with abstract symbols that evoke hybrid work: a mug of tea, a pie chart, a home, three people sitting around a conference table, an artist’s palette, a lightbulb, and map coordinates.

Better Meetings

How to Get Hybrid Meetings Right

A colorful illustration of people working asynchronously.

3 Ways Hybrid Collaboration Can Bridge Both Space and Time

The Case for Marriage Equality: a Path to Acceptance and Rights

This essay is about the importance of marriage equality as a fundamental civil right and its broader social and legal implications. It argues that denying same-sex couples the right to marry perpetuates inequality and undermines the universal values of love and commitment. The essay discusses the 2015 U.S. Supreme Court decision international perspectives and the benefits of marriage equality for individuals and society while addressing concerns about traditional values and religious beliefs.

How it works

In recent decades a stimulus for marriage equality appeared how visible social and political reason. Supporters deny that allowing to the such sexual pairs to marry is the fundamental producing of civil laws and equality doing an accent then loves and obligation are universal values deserving of legal recognition without regard to a kind. Progress in the direction of marriage equality removes more wide social moving in the direction of acceptance and dismantling of discriminatory practices that long considered second-rate society of Lgbtq.

Central to the argument because marriage equality is principle of even defence in accordance with a right. The denial of marriage rights on such sexual pairs immortalizes the system of inequality treating individuals other pawned on their sexual orientation. Legal recognition of sex marriages guarantees that these pairs have rights and defence also their ace heterosexual doublets. Then includes critical legal payments for example successions of rights tax payments and medical privileges of making decision for that often undertakes it is given przeciwnie-pod?og? married pairs.

After legal considerations marriage equality carries deep social and emotional values. Marriage – not only legal contract; he – love public confirmation and obligation. When such sexual pairs are declined messages then then their mutual relations are less than real or deserve from recognition. Then can assist a spot and discrimination strengthening harmful stereotypes about the individuals of Lgbtq. Allowing sex marriage society acknowledges a competence and value of these mutual relations moving forward a greater acceptance and abbreviating warning.

A trip in the direction of marriage equality was marked substantial legal battles and social debates. One considerable moment was 2015 U.S. The greatest Court decision in Obergefell of v. of Hodges that legalized sex marriage in a national scale. This management was culmination of decades of activity and legal calls removing replacement of public relations to the rights for Lgbtq. Decision underscored that shortage is a main right that it does not follow to decline pawned on a sexual orientation leveling with principles freedoms and equality kept in Constitution.

Internationally the recognition of same-sex marriage varies widely with some countries leading the way in granting full marriage rights while others continue to resist change. Nations like Canada Spain and South Africa have legalized same-sex marriage setting examples for others to follow. These countries have demonstrated that marriage equality does not undermine the institution of marriage but rather strengthens it by making it more inclusive. However in many parts of the world same-sex couples still face legal and social barriers highlighting the ongoing need for advocacy and education to promote acceptance and equality.

Critics of marriage equality often raise concerns about the potential impact on traditional values and religious beliefs. However it is essential to distinguish between civil and religious marriage. Legalizing same-sex marriage does not compel religious institutions to perform or recognize these unions if they conflict with their beliefs. Instead it ensures that all citizens have equal access to the legal benefits and societal recognition that marriage provides. Respecting religious freedom while upholding civil rights is a delicate balance but it is both possible and necessary in a diverse society.

The benefits of marriage equality extend beyond the couples directly involved. Research indicates that children raised by same-sex parents fare just as well as those raised by opposite-sex parents in terms of psychological well-being social functioning and academic performance. Legal recognition of their parents’ marriage provides stability and security contributing positively to their development. Furthermore marriage equality fosters a more inclusive and accepting society where diversity is celebrated and all individuals are afforded the same opportunities to thrive.

In conclusion marriage equality is a vital step towards achieving broader social justice and human rights. It affirms the dignity and worth of LGBTQ+ individuals ensuring that love and commitment are recognized and valued regardless of gender. As societies continue to evolve it is imperative to embrace policies and practices that promote equality and acceptance for all. Legal recognition of same-sex marriage is not merely a legal formality but a powerful statement about the kind of society we aspire to be—one that values love equality and human dignity for all its members.

owl

Cite this page

The Case for Marriage Equality: A Path to Acceptance and Rights. (2024, Jul 06). Retrieved from https://papersowl.com/examples/the-case-for-marriage-equality-a-path-to-acceptance-and-rights/

"The Case for Marriage Equality: A Path to Acceptance and Rights." PapersOwl.com , 6 Jul 2024, https://papersowl.com/examples/the-case-for-marriage-equality-a-path-to-acceptance-and-rights/

PapersOwl.com. (2024). The Case for Marriage Equality: A Path to Acceptance and Rights . [Online]. Available at: https://papersowl.com/examples/the-case-for-marriage-equality-a-path-to-acceptance-and-rights/ [Accessed: 7 Jul. 2024]

"The Case for Marriage Equality: A Path to Acceptance and Rights." PapersOwl.com, Jul 06, 2024. Accessed July 7, 2024. https://papersowl.com/examples/the-case-for-marriage-equality-a-path-to-acceptance-and-rights/

"The Case for Marriage Equality: A Path to Acceptance and Rights," PapersOwl.com , 06-Jul-2024. [Online]. Available: https://papersowl.com/examples/the-case-for-marriage-equality-a-path-to-acceptance-and-rights/. [Accessed: 7-Jul-2024]

PapersOwl.com. (2024). The Case for Marriage Equality: A Path to Acceptance and Rights . [Online]. Available at: https://papersowl.com/examples/the-case-for-marriage-equality-a-path-to-acceptance-and-rights/ [Accessed: 7-Jul-2024]

Don't let plagiarism ruin your grade

Hire a writer to get a unique paper crafted to your needs.

owl

Our writers will help you fix any mistakes and get an A+!

Please check your inbox.

You can order an original essay written according to your instructions.

Trusted by over 1 million students worldwide

1. Tell Us Your Requirements

2. Pick your perfect writer

3. Get Your Paper and Pay

Hi! I'm Amy, your personal assistant!

Don't know where to start? Give me your paper requirements and I connect you to an academic expert.

short deadlines

100% Plagiarism-Free

Certified writers

IMAGES

  1. How to Write a Bridge in an Introduction Paragraph

    what is the bridge in an essay examples

  2. PPT

    what is the bridge in an essay examples

  3. Essay Writing

    what is the bridge in an essay examples

  4. Bridges: Most Important Things In Structure: [Essay Example], 585 words

    what is the bridge in an essay examples

  5. Types of bridges essay sample

    what is the bridge in an essay examples

  6. What Is A Bridge In Writing An Essay

    what is the bridge in an essay examples

VIDEO

  1. 15 Lines on Howrah Bridge/ Essay on Howrah Bridge in english/ About Howrah Bridge

  2. KUTTIPPURAM BRIDGE കുറ്റിപ്പുറം പാലം

  3. Bridge Course 9th English 39-Acitvity

  4. 10 Lines Essay on Bridge || English Essay on Bridge 🌉 || Write Easy

  5. Railway Bridge Construction || Truss Bridge ||

  6. 10 lines essay on "Padma Bridge" in english //essay on bridge//english essay on bridges

COMMENTS

  1. Bridge Sentences

    What is the Purpose of Bridging Paragraphs? While writing an essay or any academic or business paper, using transitional devices such as bridge sentences is essential in connecting similar thoughts together. This serves as an escort from a previous topic being discussed to a new one. For example, the bridge sentence of an introductory paragraph is typically found between the 'hook' and the ...

  2. Bridge Sentence ⇒ Definition, Types, and Examples

    Bridge sentence types and examples. Among bridge sentences, three main types are usually used: a classic bridge sentence, a question-answer bridge, and a complication bridge. They all have three things in common: The use of a "pointer" word that directs the reader's attention to the previous paragraph. A part of the sentence that serves ...

  3. What is a bridge in essay: Examples

    A bridge sentence, also known as a paragraph bridge or a bridge statement, is a sentence that links two paragraphs or sections of an essay. It usually appears at the beginning of a new paragraph, and it serves as a summary of the previous point and a preview of the next point. It can also address a counterargument or introduce a new perspective ...

  4. What Is a Bridge Sentence and How to Write a Transition in an Essay

    From a simple definition, a bridge sentence is a general term that refers to a set of phrases that link ideas and create a smooth transition between concepts in an essay or a research paper. Some examples of bridging phrases include topic, transitional, concluding statements, and pointers. In turn, a single essay or research paper may contain ...

  5. What Is a Bridge Statement in English Homework?

    Using Bridge Statements. One of the most important bridge statements in an essay, within the introductory paragraph, sets the scene for the reader. The opening statement usually functions as a "hook" or attention grabber to draw in the reader. After this comes your bridge statement, which explains how the opening is relevant to the thesis.

  6. Transition Sentences

    Clear transitions are crucial to clear writing: They show the reader how different parts of your essay, paper, or thesis are connected. Transition sentences can be used to structure your text and link together paragraphs or sections. Example of a transition sentence for a new paragraph. In this case, the researchers concluded that the method ...

  7. Building Bridges Between Your Paragraphs

    These signposts ought to be everywhere within your paper, moving your reader between phrases and sentences in addition to paragraphs or larger chunks. Sometimes multiple signposts are needed to guide a reader across the bridge, because of the complex relationship of those two ideas. The primary goal to keep in mind, though, is to make sure your ...

  8. Topic Sentences and Signposting

    Bridge sentences. Like questions, "bridge sentences" (the term is John Trimble's) make an excellent substitute for more formal topic sentences. ... The following example comes from an essay examining how a painting by Monet, The Gare Saint-Lazare: Arrival of a Train, challenges Zola's declarations about Impressionist art. The student writer ...

  9. What is a Bridge in Writing? A Comprehensive Guide to Crafting

    Examples of transition words and phrases include "in contrast," "on the other hand," "similarly," and "nevertheless." Provide a summary of the previous idea: Summarizing the previous idea can help to make your bridge more effective and will help to remind readers of the context.

  10. Essay Introduction

    The essay introduction is the first part of an essay, and it contains a hook, a bridge, and a thesis.It also functions to provide an overview of the rest of the essay. It might not be the most ...

  11. Organizing Your Argument

    The basic format for the Toulmin Method is as follows: Claim: In this section, you explain your overall thesis on the subject. In other words, you make your main argument. Data (Grounds): You should use evidence to support the claim. In other words, provide the reader with facts that prove your argument is strong.

  12. English Homework: Bridge Statements

    Bridge sentences can be used in different essays. For example, expository essays are one of the most common types of writing assignments that are aimed to inform readers or to explain a certain topic based on facts. Argumentative or persuasive essays should convince the audience to agree with the author's opinion by addressing different ...

  13. Hooking Things Together With Bridges

    Bridges are like the glue that connects everything in the essay together. Bridges create order and cohesion and allow phrases and ideas to transition together. Without bridges, your writing would feel stiff and awkward. Bridges are often very short; some are just a brief phrase; some are a single word. In the short response, there are two types ...

  14. Strong Bridges Connect the Hook and Thesis Lesson

    Strong Bridge: Connects Hook to Thesis. According to the Dalai Lama, "Our prime purpose in this life is to help others.". Yet in Jeff Kinney's Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Greg believes that his prime purpose is to take care of himself. Though he is occasionally friendly to his classmates, Greg only helps others when it benefits him.

  15. Academic Paragraph Structure

    Step 1: Identify the paragraph's purpose. First, you need to know the central idea that will organize this paragraph. If you have already made a plan or outline of your paper's overall structure, you should already have a good idea of what each paragraph will aim to do.. You can start by drafting a sentence that sums up your main point and introduces the paragraph's focus.

  16. How to Write an Essay Introduction

    Table of contents. Step 1: Hook your reader. Step 2: Give background information. Step 3: Present your thesis statement. Step 4: Map your essay's structure. Step 5: Check and revise. More examples of essay introductions. Other interesting articles. Frequently asked questions about the essay introduction.

  17. PDF Cllaassssiicc iAAnnaallooggyy BBrriddggeess

    Cllaassssiicc iAAnnaallooggyy BBrriddggeess. lishforeveryone.orgClassic Analogy BridgesThe best strategy to use when completing analogi. s problems is the bridge sentence strategy. Bridge sentences are helpful because they enable the student to instantly recognize the answer pair by plugging it into the bridge.

  18. Examples of a Bridge in an Essay : r/IndianaCollegeTips

    A bridge, also known as a transition sentence or transition sentence, acts as a link between ideas or paragraphs in your essay. It's like a solid bridge that helps your reader transition smoothly from one point to another, giving your writing coherence and meaning.

  19. 5 Ways to Make Your Scholarship Essay Stand Out

    Start writing essays early to allow time for research and editing. Grab the reader's attention immediately with a compelling story. Answer questions directly with sound grammar and style. With so ...

  20. Bridges: Most Important Things in Structure

    The Arch bridge is the safest bridge when it comes to traffic and weather. Its the safest bridge because it can hold the most weight out of all the other bridges. Engineers have to know what materials to use in order to make the safest bridge possible. They have to know the width of the bridge, make safety rails and walkways.

  21. Essays on A View from The Bridge

    2 pages / 1000 words. Introduction In the late 1940s, Arthur Miller penned the iconic play, "A View from the Bridge", drawing inspiration from the Italian immigration community at the Brooklyn docks. This work, akin to a Greek tragedy, introduces Alfieri as the chorus, offering a unique perspective on the... A View From The Bridge.

  22. How to Write a Discursive Essay with Impact and Authority

    Compare and Contrast Essays: Purpose: Analyzing similarities and differences between two or more perspectives, ideas, or approaches. Structure: The essay outlines the key points of each perspective, highlighting similarities and differences. A balanced analysis is provided to give the reader a comprehensive understanding. Cause and Effect Essays:

  23. Bureaucratic Agencies: Pillars of Effective Governance

    In his kernel a bureaucratic agency serves as a bridge between governmental politics and practical implementation. For example agencies like National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the united states or European Center for Distraction of Illness and Control (Ecdc) in Europe are an example this role looking after the submission of ...

  24. Mary J. Blige: Bridging the Gap between 80s R&B and 90s Hip-Hop

    Essay Example: Mary J. Blige often hailed as the "Queen of Hip-Hop Soul" represents a transformative figure in the music industry bridging the gap between 80s R&B and 90s hip-hop. Her unique blend of soulful melodies with gritty hip-hop beats created a new genre that resonated deeply with

  25. How to Write an Expository Essay

    The structure of your expository essay will vary according to the scope of your assignment and the demands of your topic. It's worthwhile to plan out your structure before you start, using an essay outline. A common structure for a short expository essay consists of five paragraphs: An introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

  26. The Enduring Relevance of Jane Eyre in the Digital Age

    Essay Example: Charlotte Brontë's "Jane Eyre" first published in 1847 is still a book that grabs folks and won't let go. It's got love independence and moral stuff that keep it in the big leagues of literature. In today's digital world "Jane Eyre" has found new life online reaching more.

  27. The Ingenious Inventions of Leonardo Da Vinci

    This essay is about Leonardo da Vinci's remarkable contributions to technology and engineering. It discusses his visionary inventions such as flying machines an armored vehicle innovative bridge designs and early concepts of robotics.

  28. In the Office, It's All About Moments That Matter

    When respondents of our employee engagement survey shared specific examples of moments that matter to be in person for, they included initial customer engagements and planning sessions—one respondent even said it "would be a significant boost to team collaboration, culture, and execution." ... 3 Ways Hybrid Collaboration Can Bridge Both ...

  29. The Challenge of Achieving a Living Wage in Texas: Realities and

    Essay Example: The idea of a living wage has sparked a lot of talk across the United States and Texas is right in the middle of it. Being one of the biggest states with a diverse economy Texas offers a unique backdrop for talking about fair pay. A living wage isn't just about numbers; it's about. Writing Service;

  30. The Case for Marriage Equality: a Path to Acceptance and Rights

    Essay Example: In recent decades a stimulus for marriage equality appeared how visible social and political reason. Supporters deny that allowing to the such sexual pairs to marry is the fundamental producing of civil laws and equality doing an accent then loves and obligation are universal. Writing Service;