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Department of Sociology

  LSE Sociology provides outstanding education in the changing social world, and state-of-the-art, public-facing research on social issues. Our areas of international expertise include: economic sociology; politics and human rights; social inequalities; knowledge, culture and technology; and urban sociology. Introduction About us

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Ronda Daniel

November 22nd, 2016, the undergraduate dissertation.

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

  LSE Sociologists, it is final year- that means dissertation!

This blog is to provide some reassurance, and hopefully answer any questions you may have about the sociological dissertation. This is for you to refer back to as you progress throughout your dissertation course. Course convenor Fran Tonkiss provided an interview and some advice about the sociological dissertation project. To find out more about Fran’s work, click here.

  What is a dissertation?

A dissertation is a small-scale independent project exploring a clear issue, problem or question, drawing on theory and research from sociology and related fields.

This project can draw on different research methods, including qualitative and/or quantitative techniques:

  • Ethnographic observations/fieldwork
  • Textual analysis
  • Documentary analysis
  • Focus groups
  • Secondary analysis
  • Visual analysis
  • Policy analysis
  • Online analysis (you may use many of the above techniques to research the online world).

The way you decide to work is up to you – it depends on your topic, and where you stand in relation to your topic. You can start with a theory or hypothesis that you may wish to explore or test, or you can work backwards and let the theory emerge from the data. Some dissertation researchers are more interested in exploring a particular theorist’s work in a substantive social context; others want to engage closely with a social issue or problematic and then work through the critical themes that come out of that engagement. Please note that both ways of working are equally valid, and you are not penalised for favouring either way.

What did you do for your undergraduate dissertation?

Fran: I didn’t do a Sociology degree. I actually did a Politics degree – there wasn’t a Sociology department at my university and I didn’t really know that Sociology existed! I did my first degree in Australia, where you have three-year programmes with an option of a fourth year to get an honours degree; it’s similar to a one-year Master’s in the UK. My dissertation was called The End of the Political: an analysis of the theory of Jean Baudrillard . I didn’t have to do my own original research, as we expect from a Sociology dissertation; it was a critical analysis of his work. I did well in the dissertation but I remember one of my examiners definitely didn’t like it – those kinds of post-structuralist arguments were not popular with all academics at the time, and I think it was a bit of a phase for me as well.

Although this wasn’t based on empirical research, I chose this topic because I was interested in real-world debates. I did my degree in the late-1980s, when there was a lot of debate about the decline of class politics – it was the Reagan/Bush era in the US and Thatcher was still in power in the UK, and for many commentators, the relationship of class to politics had dissolved. I remember reading Andre Gorz’s Farewell to the Working Class, and Zygmunt Bauman’s Memories of Class in particular at the time. I discovered politics in new ways at university; I had a strong political formation at home, but using theory to make sense of politics was really exciting for me as a student. Coming from the background I did, I was interested in class politics but also in new social movements; in the late ‘80s, there were a lot of solidarity movements such as the Latin American solidarity movements and the anti-apartheid movement, as well as the anti-nuclear movement, which I got involved in. Feminism was also very important: I actually came to feminist theory largely through doing a minor in English literature and reading feminist literary theory, and then began thinking about this in relation to politics – and life – more generally. When I was speaking to my teachers about where to go and what I wanted to do after my first degree, several of them said “that sounds like Sociology”- that’s how I ended up doing a Master’s in Sociology in the UK. And the rest is history! My Master’s supervisor was the late John Urry.

My experience of the dissertation was very different – in a way, you had a more directive relationship with your advisor (it was my supervisor who suggested I study Baudrillard, whom he referred to as “boring Baud”); what we are doing now is much more about giving you the space to choose your own topic, and then working with you to craft and develop it. I definitely see my role as helping students to clarify what it is they want to study, and then helping them to realise that project, and I think that’s generally how colleagues work in the department: we really can’t tell you what dissertation you should write. It’s just important to remember that your project, and your degree, is worth it – it can be hard to keep that focus when you’re in the middle of doing it, and juggling everything else you have to do.

A reminder of the workshops:

  • Introduction- formulating a research question
  • Engaging with literature on your topic
  • Reviewing past dissertations
  • Research ethics
  • Data collection

After the Christmas break, Kay will be facilitating the dissertation workshops. These will cover:

  • Data analysis
  • Working closely with academic advisors

Some final tips to take away:

  • If you read a dissertation that is on your topic, remember there is no gold standard. The dissertation is yours and yours alone: an independent project. You can draw on someone else’s work for guidance, but not as a model. Anyone who reads your work, including the examiners, is most interested in the original work you’re doing on the topic. If you do look at others’ work, you will notice that there is a real variety, and no single way of doing a dissertation.
  • It can be helpful to look at research-based journal articles in your area – they are about the same length as a dissertation, and meet the same kind of objectives: identifying a topic for investigation; situating it both in the social world and in relation to existing literature and research; describing the methods they’ve used for data collection; presenting and analysing research material; and coming back to reflect on the original problem in light of their own analysis and argument. That can sometimes be more helpful than using a textbook on doing a research project or writing a dissertation.
  • Use the workshops to help you structure your project, but remember that – while we have a broad structure in which first term is about research design and the second term is about data collection and analysis, followed by writing up – everyone is working to different plans and encountering different obstacles, so you can only assess your own progress against your own (flexible) schedule, not in relation to where other people are at.

Some helpful texts and textbooks:

  • Gibson, W., & Brown, Andrew. (2009). Working with Qualitative Data . London: SAGE Publications.
  • Broder Sumerson, J. (2013) Finish Your Dissertation, Don’t Let it Finish You!
  • Thomas, G. (2013) How to Do Your Research Project. London: SAGE Publications.

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dissertation header

Create a great dissertation

A dissertation is a big project. It’s a piece of independent research, but that doesn’t mean you’re supposed to do it alone! There is plenty of support in your department, among your classmates, and at LSE LIFE—across the entire academic year. We're here to help you get a head start – whether it’s developing skills for writing, reading, and critical thinking; coming up with ideas for research topics; or learning about how to plan and conduct research. Interesting ideas and well-honed research skills make for the most rewarding Master’s dissertations. These require both time and collaboration with others. LSE LIFE is here to help you start early and progress steadily, from Autumn Term all the way to your submission date! (...and don’t worry if you don’t know precisely what you’d like to research right now! Think about it: you haven't even studied half your programme - maybe your inspiration hasn’t revealed itself yet. Book a one-to-one session with an  LSE LIFE Study Adviser  to discuss your ideas.)

Check out some of our suggestions about getting started on your dissertation , or carry on reading below for an outline of the resources we have available. 

One-to-one sessions

Lse life study advisers.

LSE LIFE  study advisers  are available to talk with you about key skills like reading, making notes, essay writing, research, exam revision, managing your time and other study-related matters. 

Sessions can be booked via the  Student Hub , and are available Monday - Friday, 10am - 6pm (London Time). All of our sessions are currently taking place online via  Microsoft Teams .

Bookings open one week in advance and we're currently offering about 30 appointments every day. If you find no appointments available to book in the coming week, or if you have difficulties making use of this resource, please contact us by email at  [email protected] . In order to ensure that personalised advice is available to as many students as possible, we ask that you do not book more than one appointment per day with a Study Adviser. 

Research data management team

Are you collecting data as part of your dissertation or thesis? Have you ever wondered how best to organise and back up your data so you don’t have to worry about lost or corrupted files? Whatever questions you have, get in touch with experts on data management who can provide you with guidance and top tips, during the  Research data support one-to-one sessions  every Thursday 4-5pm.

Research ethics team

Does your research involve human participants or personal data through which individuals could be identified? If so, you’ll need to think about ethics of working with participants, informed consent, and protecting data. Visit the  Research data support one-to-one sessions  every Thursday 4-5pm for personalised advice on any of these aspects. 

Events and resources

The  LSE LIFE Moodle page  has resources to help you with many of the tasks you'll encounter in completing your dissertation project. Look for all our resources under the Create a great dissertation heading. Some highlights include:

  • Planning your dissertation research. An introduction to some key project management techniques, including anticipating problems, to help you plan your dissertation research, work out your schedule and keep your research on track.
  • Planning and conducting interviews.  Practical tips on recruiting interviewees, using audio/video recording, and developing interview questions.
  • Tips for conducting thematic analysis . You've collected your qualitative data, now you want to analyse the underlying themes. Get practical advice on how to prepare your data and proceed with identifying, analysing, and reporting the patterns you find.
  • Structuring your dissertation.  “How many words should the literature review have?” There is no one correct way to put together the written presentation of your research and discoveries, but you can think about what belongs in the various sections of a dissertation and build the foundation for your dissertation.

We offer a number of events to help you with your dissertation work throughout the academic year. Remember, you can also book a one-to-one meeting for personalised support with your dissertation. 

What we've got happening about dissertations in LSE LIFE

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lse sociology dissertations

SO499 MSc Sociology Dissertation

Course info, fetching learning content....

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BSc Sociology

Introduction, preliminary readings.

What drives social inequality? How do we tackle poverty and racial prejudice? How do we create more inclusive societies? These are some of the big questions we explore on this fascinating BSc Sociology programme.

You’ll develop a firm grasp of the main principles of contemporary sociology – examining theoretical ideas that help us better understand the society we live in.

Delving deep into the subject, you’ll compare different societies, look at social processes and institutions, and examine theories about the nature of social existence. Right from the start, you’ll develop practical skills to prepare for your future career – learning how to think critically and examining different methods of social research.

Here at LSE, you’ll be studying at one of the top sociology departments. Ours was the first sociology department in the UK – shaping the discipline nationally and globally. So, you’ll be joining a department with an internationally renowned team and world-class research credentials.

You can also add a language specialism to your degree award – see the "Programme content" section for details.

If you wish to gain further insight into sociology, we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books:

  • N Abercrombie Sociology: a short introduction (Polity Press, 2004)
  • A Giddens and P W Sutton Sociology (7th edition, Polity Press, 2012)
  • S Lawler Identity: sociological perspectives (2nd edition, Polity, 2013)
  • S Punch et al Sociology: making sense of society (5th edition, Pearson, 2013)
  • K Woodward Questioning Identity: gender, class, ethnicity (2nd edition, Routledge, 2004)

Entry requirements

Here, you can check our entry requirements for GCSEs, A-levels (please read them alongside our information about subject combinations) and the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. We also consider applications from students with a range of other UK qualifications and from overseas. Please select the overseas button below and choose your country from the dropdown list to find the equivalency to A-levels of your qualification.

For GCSEs, you’ll need a strong pre-16 academic profile such as several GCSE grades of A (or 7) and A* (or 8-9).

We also ask for a good set of GCSE grades or equivalent across a broad range of subjects, with a minimum of grade B (or 6) in GCSE English and Mathematics.

We also consider your AS grades, if available.

Contextual admissions A-level grades

Read our undergraduate admissions information to learn more about contextual admissions.

A-level subject combinations

  • We consider your combination of subjects as well as your grades.
  • A broad mix of traditional academic subjects provides the best preparation for studying at LSE. We expect applicants to have at least two full A-levels (or equivalent) in these subjects.
  • There is no set subject combination, although typical choices include Sociology, Psychology, History, Government and Politics, Religious Studies, and English. Sociology is not a required subject.
  • Good grades in English Language and/or English Literature, in particular, are highly desirable.
  • If you’ve taken Mathematics, Further Mathematics and one other subject at A-level, this may be considered a less competitive combination than a broader mix of essay-based and quantitative subjects.

Find out more about A-level subject combinations .

37 points overall, with 666 at higher level  

Contextual admissions IB grades

36 points overall, with 665 at higher level

We welcome students from all walks of life at LSE. We want to recruit students with the very best academic merit, potential and motivation. So, whatever your background, please do apply. Get all the details on our general  entry requirements .

Competition for places at LSE is high. We cannot guarantee you an offer of a place even if you’re predicted or achieve our standard entry requirements.

Our standard offer requirements are intended only as a guide and, in some cases, you’ll be asked for different grades.

Programme content

Why study with us.

Discover more about our students and department.

Student stories

Meet the department.

Portrait photo of student Ellie Flaherty

The Department of Sociology conducts world-class research and teaching on some of the most challenging social and ethical issues facing society today.

Founded in 1904, our academics have contributed to shaping research and thinking in the field nationally and internationally.

We are committed to research and scholarship that is socially and politically relevant. The department’s research is organised into five clusters: economic sociology; politics and human rights; social inequalities; knowledge, culture and technology; and urban sociology. We engage in major debates at the intersection of economics, politics and society on issues such as migration, urban ecology and climate change.

With a thriving research community, we play an active role in several research centres and institutes, including LSE Cities , LSE Human Rights and the LSE International Inequalities Institute . Our research has a global impact, informing decision-making and policy for numerous governments, NGOs and international organisations.

Our research expertise is reflected in our teaching curriculum. The department offers undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, with 500 students engaged in learning and research at any one time.

We’re a lively department, with a regular programme of events involving workshops, conferences and collaborations with internal and external partners. We’re also home to the British Journal of Sociology , the UK’s leading publication in the field.

Learn more about our programmes and research .

Department of Sociology

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2nd In Europe

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5th In the world

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1st We're ranked top university in London for the 12th year running

Carbon neutral in 2021 lse became the first carbon neutral verified university in the uk, your application, who attends.

We consider each application carefully, taking into account all the details you’ve included on your UCAS form, such as:

  • academic achievement , including predicted and achieved grades (also see specific information about this programme in the "entry requirements" above)
  • subjects and subject combinations  (also see specific information about this programme in the "entry requirements" above)
  • your personal statement
  • your teacher’s reference
  • educational circumstances

You may also have to provide evidence of your English proficiency, although this is not needed at the application stage.  See our English language requirements page .

We’re looking for students who demonstrate:

  • an interest in relationships between people and society
  • social awareness
  • an ability to ask incisive questions
  • an ability to work independently
  • a willingness to read widely
  • great communication skills (written and oral)
  • a creative and flexible mindset for academic study
  • intellectual curiosity
  • self-motivation and a willingness to work hard.

Fees and funding

The table of fees shows the latest tuition fees for all programmes.

You're charged a fee for each year of your programme. Your tuition fee covers registration and examination fees payable to the School, lectures, classes and individual supervision, lectures given at other colleges under intercollegiate arrangements and, under current arrangements, membership of the Students' Union. It doesn't cover living costs or travel or fieldwork.

Your tuition fees, and eligibility for any financial support, depend on whether you’re classified as a home or an overseas student – known as your fee status. We assess your fee status based on guidelines from the UK Government’s Department for Education.

Learn more about fee status classification .

Scholarships, bursaries and loans

We recognise that the cost of living in London may be higher than in your home town or country. LSE provides generous financial support, in the form of bursaries and scholarships, to UK, EU and overseas students.

Additionally, the UK Government provides loans to UK and some EU students. Some overseas governments also offer funding.

Further information on tuition fees, living costs, loans and scholarships .

Learning and assessment

How you learn, how you're assessed.

Format and contact hours: most courses include lectures and seminars in small groups to explore lecture topics in more depth. Some courses involve group work, projects and outside visits. Hours vary depending on the course. Get a broad idea of the study time involved in the Calendar within the Teaching section of each course guide .

Independent study: y ou’ll be expected to complete independent study outside your classes. This varies depending on the course. You’ll need to manage your study time effectively. Typically, this will include research, reading and note-taking.

LSE teaching: LSE is internationally recognised for teaching and research and our academics have wide-ranging expertise. Courses may be taught by our faculty staff, guest teachers and visiting members of staff, LSE teaching fellows and graduate teaching assistants, who may be doctoral research students. Learn about the teacher responsible for each course in the relevant  course guide .

Academic support

Academic mentor: you’ll meet with your academic mentor regularly to discuss your work. Your mentor can provide advice and guidance on academic issues and, where appropriate, personal concerns.

Other academic support: at LSE, we offer lots of opportunities to extend your learning outside the classroom.

LSE LIFE is a great place to get advice and practise the skills you’ll need during your studies and beyond.

Through LSE LIFE, you can:

  • attend workshops on developing leadership skills, finding the right study/work/life balance and preparing for the world of work
  • develop your reading, academic writing and critical-thinking skills
  • gain experience of working in study groups and develop your cross-cultural communication and teamwork skills.

Disability and Mental Health Service: we want all LSE students to achieve their full potential. Students can access free, confidential advice through our Disability and Mental Health Service . This is the first point of contact for students.

Your timetable

  • The standard teaching day runs from 9am to 6pm, Monday to Friday. Undergraduate teaching is not normally scheduled for Wednesdays after 12 noon to allow for sports, volunteering and other extra-curricular activities.
  • The lecture and seminar timetable is published in mid-August and the full academic timetable (with information on classes) is published by mid-September via the LSE timetables web pages .
  • All personal undergraduate timetables are published in LSE for You (LFY) . For personal timetables to appear, you must be registered at LSE, be signed up for courses in LFY and ensured that there are no unauthorised clashes in your course selections. We try our best to minimise changes once personal timetables have been published. However, you’ll be notified about any changes by email.

Formative coursework

All taught courses include formative coursework, which is not assessed. This helps prepare you for summative assessment. We use a range of formative assessment methods, such as essays, case studies, reports, quizzes and mock exams. Feedback on coursework is an essential part of the learning experience. Class teachers mark formative coursework and give feedback within three weeks – provided it’s submitted on time.

Summative assessment

This assessment counts towards your final course mark and degree award.

Most courses are assessed by examinations at the end of the year. Some courses are examined partially or wholly by essays and/or projects.

You’ll receive feedback on summative coursework as part of the assessment for individual courses (except on final submitted dissertations). Feedback is normally provided before the examination period.

Assessment on individual courses can change from year to year. Read more about the current formative coursework and summative assessment for each course in the relevant course guide .

Find out more about LSE’s teaching and assessment methods .

Graduate destinations

Career support.

We train our undergraduates to the highest standards and the critical thinking skills they develop are valued by employers. Our students go into a wide variety of professions including teaching, research, politics, public administration, the media, social and health services, advertising, journalism, law, publishing, industry, accounting, marketing, personnel and management.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme

Median salary of our undergraduate students 15 months after graduating:

Top 4 sectors our students work in:.

From CV workshops through to careers fairs, LSE offers lots of information and support to help you make that all-important step from education into work.

Many of the UK’s top employers give careers presentations at the School during the year and there are numerous workshops covering topics such as job hunting, managing interviews, writing a cover letter and using LinkedIn.

See LSE Careers for further details.

Discover Uni

Every undergraduate programme of more than one year duration will have Discover Uni data. The data allows you to compare information about individual programmes at different higher education institutions.

Programmes offered by different institutions with similar names can vary quite significantly. We recommend researching the programmes you're interested in and taking into account the programme structure, teaching and assessment methods, and support services available.

Find out more

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Fujikawa, Kentaro (2020) Serving peace and democracy? The rationales and impact of post-conflict self-determination referendums in Eritrea, East Timor, and South Sudan. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Elizalde, Pilar (2020) Human rights promotion, contestation, and politicisation in international human rights institutions: a study of the Universal Periodic Review 2008-2016. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bonnet, Tyler Alexander (2020) Russia and the rise of China: an analysis of Russian foreign policy towards China under Putin. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Shams Lahijani, Alireza (2020) Iran’s idea of Europe (1501-2015): identity, concepts, and international society. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Leigh, Joseph (2020) The emergence of global power politics: imperialism, modernity, and American expansion 1870-1914. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Winrow, Marc Sinan (2020) Reconstituting sovereignty: the Young Turks’ efforts to secure external recognition and the transition from the Ottoman Empire to the Republic of Turkey, 1908 - 1923. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Murray, Christopher Patrick (2020) Anti-imperial world politics: race, class, and internationalism in the making of post-colonial order. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wenas Inkiriwang, Frega Ferdinand (2020) The interplay between grand strategy and defence diplomacy: examining Indonesia’s post-new order period. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Alsayed, Wafa (2019) Foreign policy making in the small Gulf states: state formation processes, ideas and identities in Kuwait and Bahrain. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Spanke, Till (2019) Nurturing dependence: the role of patron states in the state and institution building processes of de facto states. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Rogstad, Adrian (2019) Stigmatisation in international relations: Russia, the West and international society from the Cold War to Crimea. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

De Moraes Achcar, Helena (2019) The politics and anti-politics of south-south cooperation: the case of Brazil-Mozambique ProSavannah and antiretroviral factory. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Sverdrup-Thygeson, Bjørnar (2019) The identity factor in Chinese Europe policies: China’s European quest for ontological security. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Aula, Ilari (2019) Consuming conflicts: consumer responsibility for armed conflicts in DR Congo and Nigeria. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kalhousová, Irena (2019) Our Jews, our Israel! Origins of the foreign policy of Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary towards Israel. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ho, Benjamin Tze Ern (2019) Chinese exceptionalism: an interpretive framework to understanding China’s rise and relations with the world. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Phull, Kiran K. (2019) Polling and the pursuit of Arab public opinion. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Goettlich, Kerry (2019) From frontiers to borders: the origins and consequences of linear borders in international politics. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Garnizova, Elitsa (2018) The new political economy of trade: understanding the treatment of non-tariff measures in European Union trade policy. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Freeman, Jonathan (2018) Military assistance as a tool of 20th Century American grand strategy: the American experience in Korea and Vietnam after World War II. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pauls, Evelyn (2018) Unravelling the poster child: the international norm against child soldiering in Sierra Leone and Myanmar. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ciflikli, Gokhan (2018) Learning conflict duration: insights from predictive modelling. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hartnett, Liane (2018) Love in a time of empire: an engagement with the political thought of Tolstoy, Tagore and Camus. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Carrozza, Ilaria (2018) Securing the way to power: China’s rise and its normative peace and security agenda in Africa. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Haspeslagh, Sophie (2018) The effect of proscription on pre-negotiation: a comparative analysis of making peace with Colombia’s FARC before and after 9/11. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Danewid, Ida (2018) Race, capital, and the politics of solidarity: radical internationalism in the 21st century. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wang, Ziyuan (2018) The political logic of status competition: cases from China, 1962-1979. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dessí, Andrea T. (2018) Normalizing the Israel asset. The Reagan administration and the second cold war in the Middle East: leverage, blowback and the institutionalization of the US-Israel 'Special Relationship'. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Sharma, Rahul (2018) American civil religion and the puritan antecedents of American foreign policy. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Blanc, Emmanuelle (2018) The EU in quest for the recognition of its institutional identity: the case of the EU-US dialogues. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bareis, Luka (2018) Interstate resource conflicts: international networks and the realpolitik of natural resource acquisition. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

George, Rachel (2018) From contestation to convergence? A constructivist critique of the impact of UN Human Rights Treaty ratification on interpretations of Islam in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kaushal, Sidharth (2018) Reconceptualising strategic culture as a focal point: the impact of strategic culture on a nation’s grand strategy. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Lee, Sohyun (2017) A step toward East Asian regionalism? Comparing the negotiation approaches of South Korea and Japan in their preferential trade agreements with ASEAN. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Feist, Marian Johannes (2017) Learning in international negotiations: the strategic use of lessons in post-agreement climate finance politics. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

McKeil, Aaron (2017) Searching for a world polity: the world after international anarchy question. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hamilton, Scott (2017) Governing through the climate: climate change, the anthropocene, and global governmentality. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Suleimanova, Neal (2017) Why keep protecting the few without external incentives? Compliance with minority rights norms after attaining IO membership in Latvia and Georgia. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hemmings, John (2017) Quasi-alliances, managing the rise of China, and domestic politics: the US-Japan-Australia trilateral 1991-2015. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Meibauer, Gustav (2017) Doing something: neoclassical realism, US foreign policy and the no-fly zone, 1991-2016. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Schäfer, David (2017) Explaining the creation of the EU Banking Union: the interplay between interests and ideas. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Himmrich, Julia (2017) Germany’s recognition of Kosovo as an independent state in 2008. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Shaoulian-Sopher, Efrat (2017) Israeli foreign policy towards Iran 1948-1979: beyond the realist account. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

De Simone, Carolina (2017) Italy and the community of Sant’Egidio in the 1990s. ‘Coopetition’ in post-Cold War Italian foreign policy? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Nøhr, Andreas Aagaard (2017) Tyrants of truth: a genealogy of hyper-real politics. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Delatolla, Andrew (2017) The state as a standard of civilisation: assembling the modern state in Lebanon and Syria, 1800-1944. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Papagaryfallou, Ioannis (2016) The history/theory dialectic in the thought of Herbert Butterfield, Martin Wight and E. H. Carr: a reconceptualisation of the English School of international relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Stroikos, Dimitrios (2016) China, India in space and the orbit of international society: power, status, and order on the high frontier. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Brenner, David (2016) Insurgency as a social process: authority and armed groups in Myanmar’s changing borderlands. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Yao, Yuan (2016) Constructing the ideal river: the 19th century origins of the first international organizations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Schade, Daniel (2016) The European Union’s Latin America policy: a study of foreign policy change and coordination. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Morita-Jaeger, Minako (2016) Services trade integration in East Asia and political economy impediments in domestic decision-making: a case study of Japan-ASEAN bilateral free trade agreements. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wang-Kaeding, Heidi (2016) Strategic concepts and interest groups in China’s environmental foreign relations (1984-2015). PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Susler, Bugra (2016) Turkey's foreign policy cooperation with the European Union during the Arab Spring, 2011-13. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Lacatus, Corina (2016) The design of national human rights institutions: global patterns of institutional diffusion and strength. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hearson, Martin (2016) Bargaining away the tax base: the north-south politics of tax treaty diffusion. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Linsi, Lukas (2016) How the beast became a beauty: the social construction of the economic meaning of foreign direct investment inflows in advanced economies, 1960-2007. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Fotou, Maria (2016) Ethics of hospitality: envisaging the stranger in the contemporary world. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hoeffken, Jana Ulrike (2016) Competition provisions in EU regional trade agreements: consequences for domestic reform in developing countries. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Jiang, Lu (2016) Beyond ODA: Chinese way of development cooperation with Africa: the case of agriculture. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Procopio, Maddalena (2016) Negotiating governance: Kenyan contestation, cooperation, passivity toward the Chinese. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Andersen, Morten Skumsrud (2016) A genealogy of the balance of power. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

von Weitershausen, Inez (2016) Europe between interests, institutions and ideas: crisis cooperation during the 2011 uprisings in Libya. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Frielingsdorf, Per-Axel (2016) “Machiavelli of Peace”: Dag Hammarskjöld and the political role of the Secretary-General of the United Nations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mueller, Benjamin (2015) At cold war’s end: complexity, causes, and counterfactuals. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Guijarro Usobiaga, Borja (2015) European sanctions reconsidered: regime type, strategic bargaining, and the imposition of EU sanctions. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Terry, Jillian (2015) Towards a feminist ethics of war: rethinking moral justifications for contemporary warfare. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dittrich, Viviane (2015) Present at the completion: creating legacies at the International Criminal Tribunals. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Nair, Deepak (2015) Saving the states’ face: an ethnography of the ASEAN secretariat and diplomatic field in Jakarta. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Koluksuz, Melissa (2015) A critical geopolitics of American “imperialism" and grand strategy (Post-9/11): the role of language and ideology. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

de Merich, Diego (2015) Empathy at the intersections of care: articulating a critical approach to the ethics of international development. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Falkiner, Daniel (2015) The erotics of empire: love, power, and tragedy in Thucydides and Hans Morgenthau. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bohnenberger-Rich, Simone (2015) China and Kazakhstan: economic hierarchy, dependency and political power? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Crossley, Noële (2015) Humanitarian intervention: from le droit d'ingérence to the responsibility to protect. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ussar, Margit (2014) Ethics, aid, and organisational characteristics: are multilateral aid organisations more likely to be driven by ethical considerations than their bilateral counterparts? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Sibal, Rajeev (2014) Varieties of capitalism and firm performance in emerging markets: an examination of the typological trajectories of India and Brazil. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Basedow, Johann (2014) The European Union’s international investment policy Explaining intensifying Member State cooperation in international investment regulation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Zheng, Yixiao (2014) Complex interdependence and China’s engagement with Australia: navigating between power and vulnerability. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ohlers, Curtis (2014) Interstate warfare and the emergence of transnational insurgencies. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kramer, Reik (2014) Network-centric peace: an application of network theory to violent conflicts. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Anderson, Emily (2014) States of extraction: impacts of taxation on statebuilding in Angola and Mozambique, 1975-2013. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Muravska, Julia (2014) The institutionalisation of the European defence equipment market. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Makarem, Hadi (2014) Actually existing neoliberalism: the reconstruction of downtown Beirut in post-civil war Lebanon. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Flynn, Curran (2014) Hans Morgenthau’s scientific man versus power politics and politics among nations: a comparative analysis. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pavese, Carolina B. (2014) Level-­linkage in European Union – Brazil relations: an analysis of cooperation on climate change, trade, and human rights. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Yu, Jie (2014) Partnership or partnerships? An assessment of China-EU relations between 2001 and 2013 with cases studies on their collaborations on climate change and renewable energy. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Datzberger, Simone (2014) Peacebuilding and the depoliticisation of civil society: Sierra Leone [2002 – 2013]. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Brodersen, Rupert (2014) Rage, rancour and revenge: existentialist motives in international relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wirajuda, Muhammad (2014) The impact of democratisation on Indonesia’s foreign policy: regional cooperation, promotion of political values, and conflict management. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Schleifer, Philip (2014) Whose rules? The institutional diffusion and variation of private participatory governance. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Klingler-Vidra, Robyn (2014) All politics is local: sources of variance in the diffusion of venture capital policies. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Côté, Christine (2014) A chilling effect? The impact of international investment agreements on national regulatory autonomy in the areas of health, safety and the environment. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Lamprecht, Jens (2014) Bargaining power in multilateral trade negotiations: Canada and Japan in the Uruguay Round and Doha development agenda. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Barber, Laura (2014) Chinese foreign policy in the 'Going Out' era: confronting challenges and 'Adaptive Learning' in the case of China-Sudan and South Sudan Relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Izzuddin, Mustafa (2014) Ethnic politics and Malaysia’s China Policy: from Tun Abdul Razak to Abdullah Ahmad Badawi: a neoclassical realist interpretation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

de Felice, Damiano (2014) Explaining variation in the degree of internalisation of political conditionality: the cases of France and the United Kingdom. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kersten, Mark (2014) Justice in conflict: the ICC in Libya and Northern Uganda. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hellmeyer, Monika (2014) The impact of the Central and Eastern European EU member states on the EU’s foreign policy, 2004 to 2013. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Schwarz, Elke (2013) The biopolitical condition: re-thinking the ethics of political violence in life-politics. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dueben, Bjoern (2013) China-Russia relations after the Cold War: the process of institution-building and its impact on the evolution of bilateral cooperation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Srnicek, Nick (2013) Representing complexity: the material construction of world politics. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Cheeppensook, Kasira (2013) The development of the ASEAN Charter: origins and norm codification. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bowen, Andrew (2013) Syrian-American relations, 1973 - 1977: a study of security cooperation in regional conflicts. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Tardelli, Luca (2013) When elites fight: elites and the politics of U.S. military interventions in internal conflicts. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Rahbek-Clemmensen, Jon (2013) Beyond ‘the soldier and the state’ - the theoretical framework of elite civil-military relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Voltolini, Benedetta (2013) Lobbying in EU foreign policy-making towards the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: exploring the potential of a constructivist perspective. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Parakilas, Jacob Christopher (2013) The Mexican drug “war”: an examination into the nature of narcotics linked violence in Mexico, 2006-2012. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Laker, Frederick (2013) Rethinking internal displacement geo-political games, fragile states, & the relief industry. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Zhang, Shuxiu (2013) The dragonomic diplomacy (De)code: a study on the causal relationship between Chinese economic diplomacy preference formation and the influence of multilateral economic regimes. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Verma, Rajneesh (2013) The tiger and the dragon: a neoclassical realist perspective of India and China in the oil industry in West Africa. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wielopolska, Anna (2013) Causes and consequences of ambivalence in Germany’s policy towards the Eastern enlargement of the European Union. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Palma, Oscar (2013) Transnational networks of insurgency and crime: explaining the spread of the revolutionary armed forces of Colombia beyond national borders. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kuroki, Maiko (2013) Nationalism in Japan’s contemporary foreign policy: a consideration of the cases of China, North Korea, and India. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pham, Gia Son (2013) A political economy approach to the impact of the WTO’s accession process on Vietnam’s economic reform: a case of compliance? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Niemetz, Martin (2013) Promoting a deliberative system for global peace and security: how to reform the United Nations’ decision-making procedures. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Keränen, Outi (2013) Acts of contention: local practices and dynamics of negotiated statebuilding in Bosnia and Herzegovina 1995-2010. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dombrowski, Kathrin Irma (2013) Bridging the democratic gap: Can NGOs link local communities to international environmental institutions? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Parks, Bradley (2013) Brokering development policy change: the parallel pursuit of millennium challenge account resources and reform. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Smith, Janel (2013) Civil society, human security, and the politics of peace-building in victor’s peace Sri Lanka (2009-2012). PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kruesman, Monika (2013) Digging for compliments: Rio Tinto Group, corporate social responsibility and the diffusion of international norms. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

de Heredia, Marta Iñiguez (2013) Everyday resistance in post-conflict statebuilding: the case of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Evangelopoulos, Georgios (2013) Scientific realism in the philosophy of science and international relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pepino, Silvia (2013) Sovereign risk and financial crisis: the international political economy of the Euro area sovereign debt crisis. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Cho, Young (2013) Why do countries implement Basel II? An analysis of the global diffusion of Basel II implementation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Edwards, Alex (2013) A neoclassical realist analysis of American ‘dual containment’ policy in the Persian Gulf: 1991-2001. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Jillions, Andrew (2012) From faith in rules to the rule of law: constitutional responsibilities in international society. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Orsi, Roberto (2012) Rethinking the concept of order in international politics: Carl Schmitt and Jürgen Habermas. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Markakis, Dionysius (2012) US democracy promotion in the Middle East: the pursuit of hegemony? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Chung, Chih-tung (2012) The evolution of Taiwan’s grand strategy: from Chiang Kai-shek to Chen Shui-bian. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Fisher, Kathryn (2012) From 20th Century troubles to 21st Century international terrorism: identity, securitization, and British counterterrorism from 1968 to 2011. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Friedman, Rebekka (2012) Hybrid TRCs and national reconciliation in Sierra Leone and Peru. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Varin, Caroline (2012) Mercenaries and the state: how the hybridisation of the armed forces is changing the face of national security. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bloomfield, Michael (2012) Power, profit, and principles: industry opportunity structures and the political mobilisation of jewellers. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kirby, Paul (2012) Rethinking War/Rape: feminism, critical explanation and the study of wartime sexual violence, with special reference to the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Petersen, Alexandros (2012) Integration in energy and transport amongst Azerbaijan, Georgia and Turkey. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Méndez, Álvaro (2012) Negotiating intervention by invitation: how the Colombians shaped US participation in the genesis of Plan Colombia. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

O’Casey, Elizabeth (2012) A theory of need in international political theory: autonomy, freedom, and a global obligation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ghulam, Faisal (2012) Accession to the World Trade Organization: factors shaping the case of Saudi Arabia’s accession (1985-2005). PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Förster, Annette (2012) Decent peace, stability and justice: John Rawls’s international theory applied. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Campanaro, Richard (2012) Socio-ecological coevolution: an ecological analysis of the historical development of international systems in the circumpolar Arctic. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Minsat, Arthur (2012) Making EU foreign policy towards a 'Pariah' state: consensus on sanctions in EU foreign policy towards Myanmar. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kaya, Zeynep (2012) Maps into nations: Kurdistan, Kurdish Nationalism and international society. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Strong, James (2012) More spinn’d against than spinning?: public opinion, political communication, and Britain’s involvement in the 2003 invasion of Iraq. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Woolfson, Alexander F. (2012) The discourse of exceptionalism and U.S. grand strategy, 1946–2009. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dalgaard, Klaus (2012) The energy statecraft of Brazil: promoting biofuels as an instrument of Brazilian foreign policy, 2003-2010. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bennett, Hanna (2012) Leverage and limitations of the EU’s influence in the eastern neighbourhood : a study of compliance with the EU’s justice and home affairs' standards in Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Roccu, Roberto (2012) Gramsci in Cairo: neoliberal authoritarianism, passive revolution and failed hegemony in Egypt under Mubarak, 1991-2010. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Castro e Almeida, Manuel (2012) Defective polities: a history of an idea of international society. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Raimundo, Antonio Joaquim (2012) The Europeanisation of national foreign policy: Portuguese foreign policy towards Angola and Mozambique, 1978-2010. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bird, Annie (2012) US foreign policy on transitional justice: case studies on Cambodia, Liberia and Colombia. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Al Toraifi, Adel (2012) Understanding the role of state identity in foreign policy decision-making: the rise of Saudi-Iranian rapprochement (1997-2009). PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pagliari, Natali (2012) Why are we running? Political economy of bank runs and an analysis on the 2007-09 banking crisis in the United Kingdom. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bettiza, Gregorio (2012) The global resurgence of religion and the desecularization of American foreign policy, 1990-2012. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Sabaratnam, Meera (2011) Re-thinking the liberal peace: anti-colonial thought and post-war intervention in Mozambique. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Gani, Jasmine K. (2011) Understanding and explaining US-Syrian relations: conflict and cooperation, and the role of ideology. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pallaver, Matteo (2011) Power and its forms: hard, soft, smart. MPhil thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Masraff, Naz (2011) Why keep complying?: compliance with EU conditionality under diminished credibility in Turkey. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Dionigi, Filippo (2011) The impact of international norms on Islamist politics: the case of Hezbollah. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Homkes, Rebecca (2011) Analysing the role of public-private partnerships in global governance: institutional dynamics, variation and effects. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Moore, Candice Eleanor (2011) Governing Parties and Southern Internationalism: a neoclassical realist approach to the foreign policies of South Africa and Brazil, 1999-2010. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Topgyal, Tsering (2011) The insecurity dilemma and the Sino-Tibetan conflict. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Alves, Ana Cristina (2011) China’s oil diplomacy: comparing Chinese economic statecraft in Angola and Brazil. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Poulsen, Lauge N. Skovgaard (2011) Sacrificing sovereignty by chance: investment treaties, developing countries, and bounded rationality. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hoover, Joseph (2011) Reconstructing human rights: a pragmatic and pluralist inquiry in global ethics. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

McFate, Sean (2011) Durable disorder: the return of private armies and the emergence of neomedievalism. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Gayoso Descalzi, Carmen Amelia (2011) Russian hegemony in the CIS region: an examination of Russian influence and of variation in consent and dissent by CIS states to regional hierarchy. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Renouf, Jean S. (2011) Understanding how the identity of international aid agencies and their approaches to security are mutually shaped. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Beaugrand, Claire Beatrix Marie (2010) Statelessness and transnationalism in northern Arabia: biduns and state building in Kuwait, 1959-2009. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Gartzke, Ulf (2010) The Boeing / McDonnell Douglas and EADS mergers: ethnocentric vs. regiocentric consolidation in the aerospace and defence industry and the implications for international relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Oskanian, Kevork (2010) Weaving webs of insecurity: fear, weakness and power in the post-Soviet South Caucasus. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Radice, Henry (2010) The politics of humanity: humanitarianism and international political theory. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Reeves, Jeffrey (2010) Mongolian state weakness, foreign policy, and dependency on the People’s Republic of China. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Barnes, Karen (2010) Engendering peace or a gendered peace? The UN and liberal peacebuilding in Sierra Leone, 2002-2007. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Phillips, Christopher (2010) Everyday Arabism: The daily reproduction of nationalism and supranationalism in contemporary Syria and Jordan. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wann, Joy (2010) Global financial governance and the question of influence: Examining the role private actors play in international financial standardisation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Matsumoto, Emma (2010) Japan and the UN peace operations in the post-Cold War era: Their challenges and choices. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pinfari, Marco (2010) Time to agree: time pressure and 'deadline diplomacy' in peace negotiations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Charnoz, Olivier (2010) The local power effects of a global governance discourse: 'Community participation' in the protection of biodiversity. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kitchen, Nicholas (2009) American power: for what? ideas, unipolarity and America’s search for purpose between the 'wars', 1991-2001. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mills, James Robert (2009) The challenge of self-determination and emerging nationalism: the evolution of the international community’s normative responses to state fragmentation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bulloch, Douglas (2009) Carl Schmitt: A conceptual exegesis and critique of IR theory. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Zhang, Feng (2009) Chinese primacy in East Asian history: Deconstructing the tribute system in China's early Ming Dynasty. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ankersen, Christopher (2009) Civil-military cooperation in the Canadian Army. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Henriksen, Rune (2009) Does the West still need warriors? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Curtis, Simon J (2009) Global cities and the transformation of the international system. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Gocer, Derya (2009) Interaction between the international and the domestic: The case of the 1908 Constitutional Revolution in the Ottoman Empire. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Lennox, Corinne (2009) Mobilising for group-specific norms: Reshaping the international protection regime for minorities. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bolten, Annika (2009) Pegs, politics and petrification: exchange rate policy in Argentina and Brazil since the 1980s. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Van Criekinge, Tine (2009) Power asymmetry between the European Union and Africa? A case study of the EU's relations with Ghana and Senegal. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Cullen, Patrick Jerome (2009) Private security in international politics: Deconstructing the state's monopoly of security governance. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pearson, John (2009) Republicanism beyond borders? Preventing domination in the absence of the state. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Barrios, Cristina (2009) Rival universalisms? American and European democracy promotion in post-Cold War international relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hughes, Annika Katherine (2009) World power -- to be taken (f)or granted?: The concept of political power and its significance for an analysis of power in international relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Markarian, Tatoul (2009) The dynamics of the domestic-foreign policy relationship in transition studies. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mahmoud, Yasser Mohamed Elwy Mohamed (2009) A political economy of Egyptian foreign policy: State, ideology, and modernisation since 1970. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kofmehl, Scott Eric (2009) The second act of victory: U.S. foreign policy and post-conflict state-building. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Vardi, Gil-li (2008) The enigma of German operational theory: the evolution of military thought in Germany, 1919-1938. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Stein, Ewan (2008) Conceptions of Israel and the formation of the Egyptian foreign policy: 1952-1981. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Singh, Rashmi (2008) Conceptualising suicide bombings and rethinking international relations theory: The case of Hamas 1987-2006. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Quinn, Adam (2008) Conquest of spirits: Ideological history as an explanatory factor in the Bush administration's resistance to balance-of-power thinking. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Wright, Christopher (2008) Environmental governance in international banking: exploring the emergence of the Equator Principles. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Stuart, Jill (2008) Exploring the relationship between outer space and world politics: English School and regime theory perspectives. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Berenskotter, Felix Sebastian (2008) From friends to strangers: A theory of interstate security cooperation applied to German-American relations, 1945-1995. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Balfour, Rosa (2008) Human rights and democracy in EU foreign policy: The cases of Ukraine and Egypt. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mullin-Lery, Corinna (2008) Political Islam and the United States' new "Other": An analysis of the discourse on political Islam (2001-2007). PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kantz, Carola (2008) Precious stones, black gold and the extractive industries: Accounting for the institutional design of multi-stakeholder initiatives. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Fournier, Philippe (2008) Rationalities of government in contemporary America: A Foucaultian study of domestic and foreign policy (1960-2008). PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ortmann, Stefanie (2008) Re-imagining Westphalia: Identity in IR and the discursive construction of the Russian state. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Arnold, Matthew Byron (2008) The collaboration problematique: Managing frontiers of insecurity through state building interventionism. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Manea, Simona Florina (2008) A critique of the anthropomorphic conception of the state: The Romanian state as a relational, network and emergent actor. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Chitranukroh, Krirkbhumi (2008) The dynamics of preferential trade agreements and domestic institutions---an alternative route towards Asian regionalism: A case study of Singapore and Thailand's preferential trade agreements. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kamlani, Deirdre Shay (2008) The four faces of power in sovereign debt restructuring: Explaining bargaining outcomes between debtor states and private creditors since 1870. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Daehnhardt, Patricia (2008) The remaking of identity: The question of normative power in German foreign policy (1997-2007). PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Cui, Shunji (2007) Beyond rivalry?: Sino-Japanese relations and the potential for a ‘security regime’ in Northeast Asia. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Gross, Eva (2007) The Europeanization of foreign policy? The role of the EU CFSP/ESDP in crisis decision-making in Macedonia and Afghanistan. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kelley, John Robert (2007) From monologue to dialogue?: U.S. public diplomacy in the post-9/11 era. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Tosti, Padideh (2007) Global illicit sectors: An analysis of drugs in international relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Teo, Victor E. (2007) Memories and the exigencies of national interest: an analysis of post Cold War Sino-Japanese and Sino-Russian strategic relations and perceptions. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Vinci, Anthony John (2007) Warlords in the international order: a neorealist approach. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hinds, Kristina (2007) The activism and inclusion of civil society organisations in CARICOM on trade negotiating matters: a look at three cases. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ainley, Kirsten (2006) Rethinking agency & responsibility in contemporary international political theory. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Partrick, Neil (2006) Kuwait's foreign policy (1961-1977): Non-alignment, ideology and the pursuit of security. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Vlcek, William B. (2006) Small states and the challenge of sovereignty: Commonwealth Caribbean offshore financial centers and tax competition. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Muxagata de Carvalho Vieira, Marco Antonio (2006) Southern Africa's response(s) to international HIV/AIDS norms: The politics of assimilation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Kissack, Robert Eoghan (2006) Who speaks for Europe in the ILO? Member state coordination and European Union representation in the International Labour Organisation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Yuzawa, Takeshi (2005) Japan's security policy and the ASEAN Regional Forum: The search for multilateral security in the Asia Pacific. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Moghalu, Kingsley Chiedu (2005) Justice as policy and strategy: A study of the tension between political and juridical responses to violations of international humanitarian law. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Tamura, Kentaro (2005) Preference formation, negotiations and implementation: Japan and the Basle Capital Accord. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Vaquer i Fanes, Jordi (2005) Spanish policy towards Morocco (1986-2002): The impact of EC/EU membership. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Sunayama, Sonoko (2005) Syria and Saudi Arabia, 1978-1990: A study of the role of shared identities in alliance-making. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Fokas, Efterpe (2004) The role of religion in national-EU relations: the cases of Greece and Turkey. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Johnson, Rebecca (2004) The 1996 Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty: a study in post Cold War multilateral arms control negotiations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Catellani, Nicola (2004) The European Union's northern dimension: A case of foreign policy "by the backdoor"? PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Yordan, Carlos L (2004) Strategic versus communicative approaches to peacemaking: A critical assessment of the Dayton Peace Initiative. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Jayman, Jayantha (2004) A critical understanding of Japan's improved late 20th century relations in Eastern Asia. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Neves, Miguel (2003) Autonomous non-central governments in the international system: the case of Hong Kong. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Donley, Patrick Harrison (2003) Population protection in the 1990s: Managing risk in the new security environment. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Doebler-Hagedorn, Franziska (2003) The state at its borders: Germany and the Schengen negotiations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Qureshi, Saqib (2002) US Foreign Policy to Pakistan, 1947-1960: Re-constructing strategy. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Isaac, Grant E (2001) Agricultural biotechnology and transatlantic trade: An international political economy analysis of social regulatory barriers. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Correia Marques de Almeida, Joao (2001) Between anarchy and empire: An analysis and reformulation of the concept of international society in the light of the republican political tradition. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Elbe, Stefan Heinz Edward (2001) European nihilism and the meaning of the European idea: A study of Nietzsche's 'good Europeanism' in response to the debate in the post-Cold War era. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Michaels, Kevin Patrick (2001) Opening skies: The political economy of the air cargo industry in the Philippines and Taiwan. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Drossopoulos, Constantinos-John (2001) The politics of monetary integration in the European Community: Theory, practice and prospects. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Hesse, Brian Joseph (2000) Grand aims and modest means: The parallel evolution of US and South African foreign policies towards Africa in the 1990s. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Idowu, Stephen Babatunde (2000) Namibia from colonisation to statehood: The paradoxical relationship between law and power in international society. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Stubb, Alexander (1999) Flexible integration and the Amsterdam Treaty: negotiating differentiation in the 1996-97 IGC. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Viola, Donatella (1999) European foreign policy and the European Parliament in the 1990's. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Crow, Suzanne Marie (1999) Fragmented diplomacy: The impact of Russian governing institutions on foreign policy, 1991-1996. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Styan, David A. (1999) Franco-Iraqi relations and Fifth Republic foreign policy, 1958-1990. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Valde-Ugalde, Jose Luis (1999) Intervening in revolution: The US exercise of power in Guatemala, 1954. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Jacquin-Berdal, Dominique (1999) Nationalism and secession in the Horn of Africa: a critique of the ethnic interpretation. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Osman, Mohamed Awad (1999) The United Nations and peace enforcement with special reference to Kuwait, 1990-91. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Colas Krauter, Alejandro (1999) The expansion of international civil society: The case of Tunisia. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ebata, Joanne Michi (1999) The transition from war to peace: politics, political space and the peace process industry in Mozambique, 1992-1995. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Keene, Edward (1998) The colonising ethic and modern international society: A reconstruction of the Grotian tradition of international theory. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Brown, Susan (1998) The institutional evolution of the WTO Government Procurement Agreement: towards an understanding of the peripheries of domestic economic policies. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bettcher, Douglas (1997) A psychoanalytic approach to the study of international relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Smith, Karen Elizabeth (1996) The making of foreign policy in the European Community/Union: the case of Eastern Europe, 1988-1995. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

van Walsum-Stachowicz, Judith Margaretha (1995) Corporate diplomacy and European Community information technology policies: The influence of multi-nationals and interest groups, 1980-1993. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Pinheiro, Leticia de Abreu (1995) Foreign policy decision-making under the Geisel government: The president, the military and the foreign ministry. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Khonsari, Mehrdad (1995) The National Movement of the Iranian Resistance 1979-1991: The role of a banned opposition movement in international politics. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Vervain Evans, Carol (1994) Defence industrialisation in the NICs : case studies from Brazil and India. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Taillon, Joseph Paul de Boucherville (1993) International co-operation in the use of elite military forces to counter terrorism: The British and American experience, with special reference to their respective experiences in the evolution of low-intensity operations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Chife, Aloy Chinedu (1993) The political economy of north-south relations: Japan's relations with Nigeria, 1960-1985. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Rowlands, Ian (1992) International regime formation: the politics of ozone layer depletion and global warming. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Almadhagi, Ahmed Noman Kassim (1992) YAR-US relations 1962-1990: a case study of a superpower-small state relationship. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Joao da Costa Cabral Andresen Guimaraes, Fernando (1992) The origins of the Angolan civil war. International politics and domestic political conflict 1961-1976. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Ming, Dong (1991) The principles and flexibility in China's external relations: The case of Hong Kong. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Bello, Ghaji Ismaila (1990) The international politics of famine relief operations in Ethiopia: A case study of the 1984-86 famine relief operations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Williams, Marc Andrew (1987) The group of 77 in UNCTAD: anatomy of a Third World coalition. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Suganami, Hidemi (1986) Domestic analogy in proposals for world order, 1814-1945: the transfer of legal and political principles from the domestic to the international sphere in thought on international law and relations. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Linklater, Andrew (1978) Obligations beyond the state: the individual, the state and humanity in international theory. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science.

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  1. Browse by Sets

    Lieutaud, Marion (2021) Paths of inequality: migration, inter-relationships and the gender division of labour. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science. Amini, Babak (2021) "Council democratic" movements in the First World War era: a comparative-historical study of the German and Italian cases.

  2. SO302 The Sociological Dissertation

    Dissertation (90%, 10,000 words): Two hard copies of the dissertation, with submission sheets attached to each, to be handed in to the Sociology Hub, STC.S116, no later than 4.00pm on the second Thursday of Summer Term. An additional electronic copy to be uploaded to Moodle no later than 4.00pm on the same day.

  3. Welcome to LSE Theses Online

    Welcome to LSE Theses Online, the online archive of PhD theses for the London School of Economics and Political Science. LSE Theses Online contains a partial collection of completed and examined PhD theses from doctoral candidates who have studied at LSE. Please note that not all print PhD theses have been digitised.

  4. MPhil/PhD Sociology

    Tuition fees 2024/25 for MPhil/PhD Sociology. Home students: £4,786 for the first year. Overseas students: £22,632 for the first year. The fee is likely to rise over subsequent years of the programme. The School charges home research students in line with the level of fee that the Research Councils recommend.

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    Vandemoortele, Milagros (2024) Parental socioeconomic status and children's academic achievement: longitudinal evidence from Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science. Williams, Gemma A. (2024) Essays on the relationship between unemployment and worklessness across the life course and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the United Kingdom.

  6. SO499 MSc in Sociology Dissertation

    SO499MSc in Sociology Dissertation. SO499. MSc in Sociology Dissertation. This information is for the 2020/21 session. This course is compulsory on the MSc in Sociology. This course is not available as an outside option. These workshops will guide students through the process of conducting an independent dissertation project on the MSc Sociology.

  7. MSc Sociology

    Location: Houghton Street, London. The MSc Sociology provides rigorous and in-depth training in sociological theory, methodology, and key areas of sociological research. These areas reflect the Department's commitment to understanding and analysing global challenges. For instance, we make important contributions to the analysis of escalating ...

  8. PDF MSc Handbook

    The Sociology Hub (STC S116) is located on the first floor of St Clements Building and is open to queries from students. Please see the relevant Sociology MSc programme Moodle page or our website for opening hours: lse.ac.uk/sociology/people Reading Week Recycling The School has a "zero waste" strategy: zero percent of LSE waste goes to ...

  9. SO499 MSc in Sociology Dissertation

    Dissertation (100%, 10000 words) in August. Two hard copies of the dissertation, with submission sheets attached to each, to be handed in to the Sociology Hub, STC.S116, no later than 4.00pm on Thursday 17th of August 2023. An additional electronic copy to be uploaded to Moodle no later than 4.00pm on the same day.

  10. Towards a sociology of happiness: examining social ...

    This dissertation contributes to a Sociology of Happiness by examining the social context of subjective well-being. It follows in Emile Durkheim's footsteps, whose study Le Suicide initially proposed that being connected is beneficial for human beings. The empirical evidence on the relationship between social capital and subjective well-being has indeed grown considerably over the last years.

  11. Get off to a good start

    There are different ways to approach social science research, different ways to do a dissertation, and specific requirements differ across departments. Be sure you have all the basic information about what is required and when it is required in your department. You can find this information from your dissertation supervisor, course convenor for ...

  12. Department of Sociology

    LSE Sociology provides outstanding education in the changing social world, and state-of-the-art, public-facing research on social issues. Our areas of international expertise include: economic sociology; politics and human rights; social inequalities; knowledge, culture and technology; and urban sociology.

  13. Language and the social: investigations towards a new sociology of

    This thesis investigates sociological understandings of language in texts deeply resonant for sociology today. It offers a comparative and analytical investigation of social-language projects written before the discipline was established. Sociologists have struggled to establish a field investigating arguably the most social arena of social life, namely, language as witnessed by insubstantial ...

  14. The Undergraduate Dissertation

    A dissertation is a small-scale independent project exploring a clear issue, problem or question, drawing on theory and research from sociology and related fields. This project can draw on different research methods, including qualitative and/or quantitative techniques: Online analysis (you may use many of the above techniques to research the ...

  15. Your Master's dissertation with LSE LIFE

    A research project has many stages and the end product - a dissertation - is a major piece of writing. There's a lot to think about, but LSE LIFE can help you find your way with resources, events, and one-to-one advice at every step of the way! We're open and doing things every weekday, throughout the whole academic year and summer break, until ...

  16. Studying in the Department of Sociology

    LSE's Department of Sociology was the first to be established in the UK, founded in 1904, and we host a leading peer-reviewed academic journal in sociology, The British Journal of Sociology, established at LSE in 1950. We expand our vital commitments to the role of sociology and the social sciences in forwarding public debate at LSE through ...

  17. Assessment and Feedback

    Apart from dissertations, feedback for graduating students is not usually provided, in line with LSE's Academic Code. Feedback on dissertations and capstone projects will normally be provided within four term weeks of the final mark being made available to students.

  18. Create a great dissertation

    Create a great dissertation. A dissertation is a big project. It's a piece of independent research, but that doesn't mean you're supposed to do it alone! There is plenty of support in your department, among your classmates, and at LSE LIFE—across the entire academic year. We're here to help you get a head start - whether it's ...

  19. About LSE Sociology

    LSE Sociology embraces a fundamentally international sociology critically interrogating theoretical claims about the relationships between economic, political, social, spatial and cultural change. We achieve this by supporting and promoting academic diversity within the School. LSE Cities and LSE Human Rights are formally affiliated to the ...

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    PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science. Majinge, Charles Riziki (2013) The United Nations, the African Union and the rule of law in Southern Sudan. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science. Gallo, Zelia (2013) The penality of politics, penality in contemporary Italy 1970-2000.

  21. Summary of SO499 MSc Sociology Dissertation

    LSE For You Library Reading Lists ... SO499 MSc Sociology Dissertation. No summary. Enter course. Course info. Drag your blocks to here. This is a 2023/24 course page. To view and edit course pages fo r 2024/25, access 'My Courses' or use the 'Search Courses' function.

  22. BSc Sociology

    Sociology at LSE is very broad and we cover many interesting topics, from studying the original texts of Durkheim and Marx, to debating the causes and impact of growing inequality in the UK. There is also a strong emphasis on developing independent critical and reasoning skills. ... (except on final submitted dissertations). Feedback is ...

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    Colas Krauter, Alejandro (1999) The expansion of international civil society: The case of Tunisia. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science. Ebata, Joanne Michi (1999) The transition from war to peace: politics, political space and the peace process industry in Mozambique, 1992-1995.