art history phd writing sample

Doctor of Philosophy

The Institute's PhD program is designed for students who are eager to investigate the role of the visual arts today and in the past. Through detailed, object-based study and historical and theoretical interpretation, our degree program provides a rigorous experience supported by interaction with the leading scholars of the Institute, New York University and exceptional access to museums, curators, conservators, and archaeologists in New York and world-wide.

To speak to someone about the PhD program or to learn more about the admissions process, contact: [email protected] .

Curatorial Studies

Students enrolled in the PhD program at the Institute can apply to receive the Certificate in Curatorial Studies offered jointly by the Institute and The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The curatorial studies program prepares students for curatorial careers in specialized fields in leading art institutions. The program requires two courses, led by Met curators in the museum, Exhibitions and Collection and Curating , and culminates in a nine-month residency in a curatorial department in the Met or at another local museum. Curatorial Studies Alumni have held leadership positions at some of the world’s foremost art institutions. Complete program information is available here .

Requirements for Admission

Each year the Institute receives over 200 applications to our PhD program, for an entering class of a maximum of twelve funded students.

• Candidates for a degree from the Institute of Fine Arts should have an excellent background in the liberal arts, normally including at least four courses of undergraduate art history. A major in art history is not required.

• Starting with the Fall 2022 admissions cycle, the Institute of Fine Arts will no longer accept GRE scores as part of the application. Candidates should not send their GREs scores as they cannot be recorded or included as part of the application.

• Applicants will submit a focused, 2-4 page, double-spaced Statement of Academic Purpose. Applicants must also submit a CV.

• The Institute requires at least three letters of recommendation that speak to the applicant's research and writing skills.

• One art history writing sample is required. Those PhD applicants who already hold an MA in art history must provide a copy of their thesis or another substantial research paper to be read by an appropriate member of the IFA faculty.

• The Graduate School requires applicants who are not native English speakers to submit official TOEFL or IELTS score results. The TOEFL/IELTS requirement is waived if your baccalaureate or master’s degree was (or will be) completed at an institution where the language of instruction is English.

Candidates wishing to be considered for admission to the Institute for Fall 2024 should submit their applications by December 1st, 2023 .

Applications are processed electronically by NYU's Graduate School of Arts and Science (GSAS) Office of Admissions,  [email protected] , 212-998-8050.

Applications to the Institute are submitted electronically here .

Prospective Students

Apply Online

Frequently Asked Questions Faculty Directory Faculty & Fields of Study Visiting Students

PhD Program

Admission Requirements Degree Requirements

Conservation Program

Special programs.

Institute Opportunities Curatorial Studies Archaeological Excavations Global Study Opportunities

Financing Graduate Study

Tuition and Costs NYU Financial Aid GSAS Dean's Student Travel Grant

Contact the Institute

Building Hours Contact Information

If you wish to receive information on our upcoming events, please subscribe to our mailing list .

Twitter

Accessibility

We strive to provide excellent digital access to all. Read the University's statement on accessibility .

We held a webinar for prospective students on  Thursday, November 9th. If you would like to receive a recording of the webinar, please send a request to Sara Enfield at [email protected] .

The University of Minnesota uses a paperless application system. All application materials, including unofficial transcripts, are to be submitted online via the University of Minnesota Graduate School's online application . Admission decisions will also be communicated to the applicants using this system.

For more information on graduate admissions at the University of Minnesota, check the Graduate School Office of Admissions . Information on undergraduate admissions is available from the Undergraduate Admissions Office .

The Department of Art History invites applicants to its graduate program for Fall 2024. Please read our Call for Applications.

Application Checklist

1. Applicants should communicate with their potential advisor prior to applying. The faculty member's willingness to serve as advisor is essential for acceptance. A roster of current faculty can be viewed on our People page .

2. University of Minnesota Online Graduate Application . This web page provides important links for prospective applicants, including a link for starting or resuming your online application.

3. Application Fee. Please check with the Graduate School Office of Admissions for the current rate.  We regret that we have reached capacity for fee waivers for the Fall 2024 admission cycle. Thank you for your understanding.

4. Transcripts. Include transcripts from every post-secondary institution attended, including study abroad programs and community colleges. If the institution uses a non-traditional grading system, include any available information that would allow for comparison to an A-F grading scale. Include current and prospective course registration information, if available. Unofficial transcripts or academic records should be uploaded directly to the online application. Please do not mail in paper copies of your transcripts; there is no need for official transcripts or academic records for initial review. If you are admitted, the University will then request official copies of this material. More information about transcripts and credentials .

5. TOEFL Scores. Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores are required for international students by the Graduate School. The minimum acceptable score on the paper exam is 550; the Internet based exam is 79 total (21 writing, 19 reading); the computer based exam is 213. Review the Graduate School's English Language Proficiency web page for additional information, including other options available to provide proof of English language proficiency. 

6. Personal Statement. This, along with your writing sample, is the most important part of your application. Please provide a statement outlining your interest in pursuing a PhD in Art History.  Outline as specifically as possible the proposed area of study within the discipline of art history. Indicate the faculty member(s) with whom you are interested in working. Describe the general research interests you intend to pursue and explain how the department and university can support these goals. Give the committee a sense that you are conversant in the scholarly debates in your intended field and the larger discipline of art history.  Indicate immediate educational and long-range career objectives. You may also wish to include other information, such as any undergraduate research experience, internships, or other experiences you may have had to document your preparation for advanced study in your chosen field. Personal statements should be no more than 1,000 words.

7. Letters of Recommendation. Solicit three letters of recommendation from individuals best able to comment on your potential to succeed in an academic graduate program. Letters from art history instructors or supervisors are most suitable. Letters from business supervisors often do not provide sufficient indication of graduate study potential. Letters must be submitted electronically through the online application. Applicants are strongly encouraged to follow-up with recommenders to ensure timely arrival of the letters of recommendation.

8. Writing Sample. Include one substantial research paper (10+ pages), preferably in the area of art history. There is no page limit and you may submit an entire BA or MA thesis, but we would suggest submitting a shorter, denser paper with a tighter argument over a longer work. If one substantial paper is not available, submit two smaller research papers. The work will be evaluated for the skill and promise it demonstrates in the areas of research, writing, and critical analysis. You may upload your paper(s) under the "Writing Sample" portion of the online application. 

9. Resumé/ C.V.. Include an up-to-date record of your scholarly preparation (post-high school), as well as any additional professional and/or personal experiences that are especially relevant to your future graduate training in art history. Please include links for publications, podcasts, exhibitions, etc. 

OPTIONAL: Diversity Statement. Enrolling and graduating a diverse student body is central to the University of Minnesota's mission. Although we do not require it, the Art History department regards the Diversity Statement as an opportunity to understand how your personal experiences connect to your scholarly mission. This statement would identify the distinctive qualities, characteristics, and life experiences you would contribute to your graduate program and to the education of fellow students. Alongside information supplied elsewhere in your application, this statement may be used as a basis on which to nominate you for on-campus scholarships, such as the Diversity of Views and Experiences (DOVE) fellowship. However, you will not be disqualified from any scholarship, including the DOVE, if you opt against including this statement with your application.

OPTIONAL: Additional Writing Sample. For some applicants, traditional art historical writing does not best reflect their past experience or future trajectory. Moreover, the discipline enables many other genres of writing: art criticism, creative writing, public-facing educational writing, etc. You may include one additional writing sample, beyond the required traditional research-based paper, to round out your application. 

OPTIONAL: Extenuating Circumstances Statement. If you would like to provide an explanation of circumstances that contributed to your test scores or GPA, please do so.

  • Utility Menu

University Logo

0b914002f2182447cd9e906092e539f3

Admissions - graduate, prospective students.

  • Application online
  • Statement of Purpose
  • Transcripts
  • Writing sample that should not exceed 20 pages; do not send a longer sample with instructions to read a particular section. Make sure that your file is in PDF format and does not exceed 2.5 MB (2,500 kb) in size.
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • TOEFL scores (for students who have received their undergraduate degree at a non-English-speaking institution)

Program Overview

Program of study, model graduate program, fields of research.

  • Greek and Roman
  • Latin American
  • Medieval/Byzantine/Armenian
  • Modern (eighteenth and nineteenth centuries)
  • Modern (twentieth century) and Contemporary
  • Renaissance and Baroque (fifteenth through eighteenth centuries)
  • South Asian

ESL Language Requirements/Language Requirements

  • TOEFL iBT speaking score of 28 and above; have met the GSAS oral English language requirement.
  • TOEFL iBT speaking score between 23 and 27; are required to schedule an oral proficiency interview in their first term of study with language specialists at the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. The interview will determine the student’s oral proficiency level. If students are not at the required level, they will be required to take either an English course at the Institute for English language (IEL) or the Classroom Communication Skills course at the Bok Center. After taking a course, students will be eligible for re-screening.
  • TOEFL iBT speaking score of 22 and below; are required to 1) schedule an oral proficiency interview in their first term of study with language specialists at the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and learning, and 2) take either an English course at the Institute for English language (IEL) or the Classroom Communication Skills course at the Bok Center. After taking a course, they will be eligible for re-screening.

Art History Logo

Graduate Admissions

The Department welcomes applications from candidates with a BA degree in art history or other related disciplines with demonstrated intellectual investment in the advanced study of art and its histories. We also welcome applications from those with a MA degree from UCLA or other institutions. Academic preparation and professional accomplishments should reflect capacity and/or potential for original academic research as well as strong interpretive and writing skills. Applicants are encouraged to become familiar with not only the faculty’s fields of teaching and research but also other departments and programs on campus that may be relevant to his or her future studies. In addition to the University-wide graduate admissions minimum requirements , applicants must show evidence of having taken and passed with a grade of B or better at least three courses (upper division and/or graduate) in the history of art or allied fields that address material culture.

The Department offers a two-stage graduate program toward the PhD. Students are not admitted for a terminal master’s (MA) degree. The MA is awarded in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the PhD and is granted with the successful completion of the first stage of the program, typically at the end of the second year (6th quarter) in residence. The admissions Graduate Review Committee may waive the M.A. requirements, at the time of admission, for students matriculating with a M.A. degree in Art History or adjacent discipline from another institution. Following Academic Senate policy on duplication of degrees, a student who enters the program with a M.A. degree in Art History from another institution is not eligible to receive a second M.A. degree in Art History from UCLA.

In addition to the University-wide graduate admissions minimum requirements , applicants must show evidence of having taken and passed with a grade of B or better at least three courses (upper division and/or graduate) in the history of art or allied fields.

Application Process

Fall Quarter admission only; t he next deadline is November 30, 2024.

The UCLA Graduate Division utilizes an on-line application through Slate , with online letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, and the capacity for the upload of other documents. The Graduate Division application, including supporting material, will ONLY be accepted electronically. If you do not submit all materials online, you will not be considered for admission.

For questions regarding the admissions process,  please contact the Student Affairs Officer, Annie Carpenter .

The UCLA Art History department is exercising caution with regard to novel coronavirus (COVID-19), and accordingly, our staff are working remotely for the time being. If you need academic counseling from our Student Affairs Officer,  Annie Carpenter , we encourage you to email her during regular business hours, which are 9 am-12:30 pm, and 1:30pm-6pm Mondays through Fridays (excluding holidays). The SAO is also available for calls or virtual meetings (on Zoom) but kindly ask for you to email her beforehand to set up a time to talk during regular business hours. Thank you for your patience.

Click here to access the online application.

Application Checklist

  • Basic Information  including your academic history and the program to which you wish to apply, as well as the $135 non-refundable application fee (for US citizens and permanent residents) or $155 for all other applicants.
  • Statement of Purpose  of approximately 500 words
  • Personal Statement  of approximately 500 words (serves as Diversity Statement for certain fellowships, such as the Cota-Robles)
  • Three Letters of Recommendation  from those who can evaluate the applicant’s preparation and potential for academic success in a doctoral program. Letters to be uploaded/submitted by referee.
  • Writing Sample  of two 10-15 page or one longer research paper, or MA thesis if applicable (or sample chapter if length is sufficient). Limit 30 pages; please note that the  bibliography does  not  count towards the 30 page limit.
  • Transcripts , one from each institution attended, uploaded online, and may be  unofficial transcripts .  NOTE:  An official copy of transcripts is only required if you are offered admission to our program. If you need to send in an official transcript,  Transcript Request Forms  are available to be printed and submitted to your college or university registrar(s). Official transcripts must be delivered in sealed envelopes by mail to the Department, either sent directly from the institution or mailed by the applicant.
  • Foreign Language Survey : Please fill out the Foreign Language Survey form using  Adobe Acrobat Reader . Using other programs, such as Preview on Mac OS X, can cause your form data to be corrupted.   Please upload the survey to your online application under the Supplemental Documents section.
  • GRE scores  ( not older than 3 years/36 months to the month of the application deadline ): admissions due to complications surrounding COVID-19. GRE Scores must be sent directly from ETS. The institutional code for UCLA is R4837. Use 2301 (Art History) as the Department/Major Field Code. GRE score requirement has been WAIVED FOR FALL 2024.
  • TOEFL or IELTS scores  ( required of international applicants  only whose first language is not English). Official Score Reports can be ordered from ETS. The institution code for UCLA is 4837. The department code is 26.

Please send any non-electronic materials to: UCLA Art History Admissions Attention: Student Affairs Officer Dept. of Art History 405 Hilgard Avenue, 100 Dodd Hall Los Angeles, CA 90095-1417

Why pursue a PhD in Art History? The UCLA PhD program in Art History prepares students for careers as college-level teachers, writers, curators, and museum or art world professionals. It is designed to encourage interdisciplinary critical thinking and engagement with a variety of approaches to art history, and supports close interaction between students and faculty.

How do I apply? UCLA’s Graduate Division has launched a new online application process in recent years. Complete the Graduate Division’s online application, which can be accessed on their website, and upload supporting documents. Please consult the guideline provided above, “Application Process” and “Application Checklist,” for important details.

When are applications due? November 30th of each year.

How many students apply each year; how many are accepted? The UCLA Department of Art History is highly competitive. On average, 100 applicants apply each year. On average, we accept approximately 6-8 students each year.

What makes a strong application for graduate school? The Graduate Review Committee (GRC) values applications that reflect a serious engagement with art historical questions and problems, a focused intellectual direction, and a strong scholarly record. Preparatory training in foreign languages is also highly desirable.

What makes a strong Statement of Purpose? A strong statement of purpose is concise, clearly written, and provides a substantive account of the applicant’s intellectual and research interests as well as aspirational direction in Art History.

Do I have to identify which faculty I would like to work with in my application material? No.

What GPA do I need to be accepted? The Graduate Review Committee (GRC) expects a GPA of 3.5 or better.  However, students are accepted on the basis of the entire admissions package and not on any one element.

Can I apply if I don’t have a BA in Art History? Yes.  The minimum requirement to be considered for our graduate program is that you have taken 3 art history courses at the undergraduate or graduate level with a grade of B or better in each.

What if I haven’t taken the 3 Art History courses required for entry into the program? At the discretion of the Graduate Review Committee (GRC), applicants demonstrating exceptional promise who are short on the 3 required courses in art history could still be admitted to the program. In some cases, additional coursework in the field may be required upon admission.

Does the Department offer just the MA degree? No. The Department does not offer a terminal MA.  The MA degree   is awarded only as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the PhD and is   granted with the successful completion of the first stage of the program.

If I already have a MA, can I apply directly to the PhD program? Yes. Students with a MA degree in art history or another discipline can apply for admission to the PhD program. The Graduate Review Committee (GRC) will determine the equivalency of the MA on an individual basis.

How long does the PhD program take to complete? The normative time to degree for the PhD is  seven years  from the term of admission. For students entering at the PhD level (i.e., with a MA in hand), the normative time to degree is  five years  from the term of admission.

Can my Letters of Recommendation be sent electronically? Yes, the three recommendation letters should be submitted online by your referees.

What should my GRE test scores be? GRE score requirement has been WAIVED FOR FALL 2024.  admissions due to complications surrounding COVID-19. Although no minimum score has been established for admission, successful applicants in recent years have scored on average between 160-165 on verbal reasoning.  GRE scores may not be older than 3 years/36 months to the month of the application deadline.

When should I take the GRE exam? Please consult the  GRE website  for details about where and when the test is administered.  It takes approximately 4-6 weeks for the Department to receive your scores.  The GRE score should not be older than three years at time of application.

What are the institution and department/major codes for the GRE exam? Institution code: 4837 Department/major code: 2301

Can my writing sample be a chapter of my thesis?  In a language other than English? Yes to both.

Can prospective students arrange for a campus/department visit, including sitting in on a class? Yes.  For campus visits, go to  this Graduate Division link .  To sit in on a class, you must obtain permission from the professor teaching the class.  For contact information, go to  Faculty  and click on the names of individual professors.

What kind of funding is available? The Department makes every effort to support all incoming art history graduate students with multi-year funding packages.  Additionally, there is  Graduate Division funding , as well as funding from state, federal, and private sources.  For more information about funding, subscribe to the  Grad Fellowship List .

Where should additional application materials be sent? Non-electronic supplementary materials should be sent to:

UCLA Art History Admissions Attention: Student Affairs Officer Dept. of Art History 100 Dodd Hall Los Angeles, CA  90095-1417

Who should I contact if I have questions about admissions to the program? Anne Carpenter, Student Affairs Officer OR Professor Bronwen Wilson, Director of Graduate Studies .

css.php

Department of History of Art

PhD/MPhil in History of Art

Work in a supportive and stimulating research environment alongside staff who are experts in art history.

Pursue your research ambitions among passionate colleagues in one of the largest postgraduate art history communities in the UK.

We welcome students from all backgrounds, with a great range of intellectual interests. This includes students who are seeking an academic career and those who require a further professional qualification. We also welcome applicants who wish to extend their art-historical interests while pursuing other kinds of employment, as well as those who are seeking to develop an academic interest in their retirement.

Your research

The PhD requires a dissertation of not more than 90,000 words, to be submitted by full-time students after three years' study (full-time) or six years (part-time). We also offer a distance-learning variant if you're unable to travel to or in live York.

histart-admissions​@york.ac.uk

Related links

  • Research degree funding
  • Accommodation
  • International students
  • Life at York
  • How to apply

Partnerships with museums and galleries

support your learning and research through collaborative expertise and enhanced access to collections and studentship opportunities.

=79th in the world

for the broad subject of arts and humanities (QS World University Rankings by subject, 2024).

1st in the UK

for research impact and environment in history of art - the support we give to researchers (Times Higher Education’s ranking of the latest REF results, 2021).

Humanities Research Centre

provides a fantastic research environment for postgraduate students in the humanities, and for postdoctoral scholars. The postgraduate work space is open 24/7.

art history phd writing sample

Explore funding for postgraduates in the Department of History of Art.

art history phd writing sample

Supervision

Explore the expertise of our staff and identify a potential supervisor.

Training and support

As an art history researcher at York, you'll have access to a range of training and resources to support you with your work. There are  plenty of innovative research activities for you to get involved in. These include research seminars, conferences, activities organised by our departmental research schools, study days and reading groups.

You'll also benefit from the rich array of research and training sessions at the  Humanities Research Centre .

art history phd writing sample

Course location

This course is run by the Department of History of Art. You will be based on Campus West, with some teaching taking place at King's Manor. 

If you're studying by distance learning, you'll be required to attend campus at least twice a year for registration, training, meetings with the thesis advisory panel and the annual PhD conference.

Careers and skills

Our dedicated careers team offer specific support including a programme of professional researcher development and careers workshops , and 1:1 career support sessions. They will help you to develop your employability portfolio and to engage in activities that will build up your skills and experience within and outside your research work.

Career opportunities

  • art sales specialist
  • museum educator
  • conservator

Entry requirements

You should have a 2:1 or first-class undergraduate degree, or equivalent. For the PhD, you should also have or be currently completing an MA degree, and we normally require an MA dissertation mark, where one is awarded, of at least 65 or equivalent.

Exceptions can be made if you've had an unusual career profile, but still have substantial related experience.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language, you must provide evidence of your ability.

Check your English language requirements

Apply for the PhD in History of Art

Apply for the PhD in History of Art (distance learning)

Apply for the MPhil in History of Art

Find a supervisor

Before you apply, you should contact a potential supervisor for your research. We welcome enquiries and encourage you to get in touch as early as possible. However, a scattershot approach - emailing all staff members regardless of the relationship between their research interests and yours - is unlikely to produce positive results. You're advised to make your research proposals as specific and clear as possible.

Sample of writing

You should submit a 1,500-word sample of academic writing. Where possible, the subject should concern art history, but if your background lies in other areas, we would welcome work in another field such as literature or history.

Personal statement

We are keen to hear about your academic and other experience. Please explain your interest in the subject, which may include approaches as well as periods or artists. Explain what has attracted you to our programme and what you would like to do here. If possible, please tell us your cohort position in your previous degree, based on your final award mark (for example, 2nd in a cohort of 50).

We'll invite you for an interview at York with your potential supervisor and the Director of Research Programmes, either before or after your submission.

You should be prepared to discuss the research proposal in depth, although we recognise that details may change over the course of your degree. You should be prepared to be flexible in adapting your interests to the sources and expertise available to you.

Overseas applicants will be interviewed by phone or Zoom.

If you need guidance, please email   [email protected] .

Have a look at the supporting documents you may need for your application.

Find out more about how to apply .

Discover York

art history phd writing sample

We offer a range of campus accommodation to suit you and your budget, from economy to deluxe.

art history phd writing sample

Discover more about our researchers, facilities and why York is the perfect choice for your research degree.

art history phd writing sample

Graduate Research School

Connect with researchers across all disciplines to get the most out of your research project.

Meet us online or on campus

Find out all you need to know about applying to York

Scholarships

Find scholarships to support your studies [Add dept funding page link]

  • School Events
  • Resources for Current Students
  • Job Announcements
  • Give a Gift
  • Search the website
  • Bachelor’s Programs
  • Master’s Programs
  • Doctoral Programs
  • All Our Minors
  • Admissions & Funding
  • Schedule a Visit
  • Student Work
  • Faculty Work
  • Alumni Work
  • Labs & Studios
  • Meet Our Students
  • University Resources
  • Alumni Listings
  • Alumni News
  • Alumni Profiles
  • Alumni Tributes to Faculty
  • Land Acknowledgment Statement
  • Our Mission & Strategic Plan
  • Faculty Directory
  • Staff Directory
  • Resources for Faculty & Staff

Graduate Art History Programs

The application deadline is December 15, 2024, 11:00pm CST.

Online forms for application are expected to open on September 1, 2024.

The admissions process is administered entirely online. Please do not send any application materials by regular mail (they will not be reviewed.) Applications and any supporting materials submitted after the deadline will not be reviewed for admission. All application materials will be reviewed by the Graduate Admissions Committee of the program to which the candidate has applied. Reviews will be finalized by mid-March 2025. Applicants will be notified by email shortly after.

Apply via the Graduate College. Test scores should be electronically forwarded to school code 1836.

Eligible minority applicants may request an application fee waiver via FreeApp .

The Graduate College provides important application information for international students .

Required Application Materials

Please be prepared to upload the following:

  • Transcripts : Upload (unofficial) scans of transcripts/academic records (and diplomas or certificates of degrees if your degree is awarded).
  • Letters of Recommendation : Three letters of recommendation are required. All letters should be submitted online by the recommenders. In addition to evaluating the applicant’s scholarly achievements and potential, letters should also address the applicant’s maturity, dependability, and potential for teaching.
  • Resume : Include relevant employment, internships and teaching and research experience, awards, record of scholarship and publications.  Add where and when you attended high school. This information will assist in consideration for graduate fellowship awards and graduate appointment positions.
  • Personal Statement : This statement of 1000 words or less should describe your academic background and other relevant experience in relation to your academic interests and goals.
  • Writing Sample : The Art History Program requires a sample of academic writing for both MA and PhD applicants. The writing sample should be a recent example of scholarly work demonstrating the applicant’s strengths as a researcher and writer. Please limit the sample to 25 pages.
  • GRE Scores : Submitting GRE Scores is  optional for Fall 2024 admissions . 
  • The School of Art & Design’s English proficiency standards are higher than the general campus requirements: for Limited Status Admission we require a minimum total TOEFL score of 96 iBT or a 6.5-7.0 IELTS score.
  • Test score results have to be dated after August 25, 2023.
  • Test scores results have to be received by the application deadline of December 15, 2024.
  • Students admitted on limited status will be required to take an  English Placement Test (EPT)  shortly after arrival on campus. Depending on the results of this test, Limited Status students may be asked to take additional English as a Second Language (ESL) classes.

Financial Aid and Funding

Funding packages are available for students in most programs.International and/or non-native English speakers are considered for a funding package only when

  • They submit a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) speaking subsection test score of at least 24, or an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) speaking subsection test score of at least 8.0, with tests dated after August 25, 2023. Test scores need to be submitted to school code 1836 by the deadline of December 15, 2024. This is required even when the applicant is exempt from showing these scores for admission purposes. Duolingo test results will not be considered for funding consideration. For more details and exemptions, please go  here
  • Their admission application includes completed proof of funding paperwork , submitted by the deadline of December 15, 2024.

The School of Art and Design offers several types of financial support:

Graduate Fellowships are competitive awards granted by either the School of Art & Design or the University of Illinois Graduate College to new incoming degree candidates who have demonstrated especially strong academic achievement and have outstanding future potential. Fellowship stipends range from $10,000 to $25,000 for the academic year and include a full waiver of tuition and a partial waiver of university campus fees.

Graduate Assistantships include Teaching Assistant and Research Assistant positions and are available to students in good standing. Art History graduate students who are appointed as TAs usually receive either a 33% FTE graduate appointment position with a yearly stipend of at least $14,572.80 (before taxes), or a 50% FTE graduate appointment position with a yearly stipend of at least $22,080.00. These graduate appointments include a full waiver of tuition and a partial waiver of university campus fees .

Secondary Menu

  • How to Apply

Application Procedures

  • Ph.D. in Art History & Visual Culture

Application deadline: December 14, 2023 Fall admissions only.

Students must have distinguished undergraduate academic records with either a major in Art History or a demonstrated interest in visual culture. It is highly recommended that students acquire the necessary language skills for their research before they begin their graduate work. Students are required to demonstrate their ability to read those languages necessary to their research fields as determined by their faculty advisors; exams must be passed in at least two foreign languages before taking the preliminary examinations. GRE scores must be submitted; foreign students must have minimum TOEFL scores of 90. Please note that your 10-page writing sample should now be uploaded directly with your online application in the Writing Sample section – the department no longer requests a hard copy. (Read: How to submit your writing sample )  

The GRE is optional for prospective students applying for Fall 2024 admission

The Graduate Bulletin is available online at:  https://registrar.duke.edu/university-bulletins/graduate-school

Open Electronic Application

MFA in Experimental & Documentary Arts

Application to the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts consists of two main components, the Graduate School application form and a portfolio of work.

JD / MA Program in Law and History of Art

JD/MA candidates do not need to apply separately to the Graduate School - the regular law school application is all that's required. In addition, the Graduate School waives the GRE requirement for JD/MA and JD/MA applicants, so there's no need for an additional standardized test.

MA in Digital Art History and Computational Media

Application deadline: March 5, 2024

The GRE is optional for prospective students applying for Fall 2024 admission To apply, prospective students must submit an online application through the Duke University Graduate School . Applications must include a statement of purpose, three letters of recommendation, writing sample as well as transcripts. For the 2023 application cycle, scores from the GRE General exam are optional. International applicants must submit English language proficiency test scores if English is not their first language.

Learn More The PhD in Computational Media, Arts and Cultures program is not accepting applications for admissions in Academic Year 2024-2025

  • Mission Statement
  • Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Initiatives
  • Learning Outcomes
  • Local Arts Links
  • ARTHIST 345
  • ARTHIST 383
  • Art History
  • Art History: Architecture
  • Art History: Museum Theory & Practice
  • Art History & Visual Arts
  • Computational Media: Interdepartmental Major in Computer Science and Visual and Media Studies
  • Visual Arts
  • Visual & Media Studies
  • Visual and Media Studies: Cinematic Arts
  • Computational Media: Interdepartmental Minor in Computer Science and Visual and Media Studies
  • Photography
  • Cinematic Arts Minor
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Where Our Students Go
  • Capstone Projects
  • Graduation with Distinction
  • Global Education
  • Independent Study & Research
  • Senior Portfolio
  • Undergrad Grants & Resources
  • Student Funding
  • Trinity Ambassadors
  • Ph.D. in Computational Media, Arts & Cultures
  • MA in Computational Media
  • MA in Digital Art History
  • MFA in Experimental & Documentary Arts
  • Financial Aid
  • Meet Our Graduate Students
  • Living in Durham
  • MA in Digital Art History/Computational Media Students: 2015-2021
  • PhD in Art History & Visual Culture Students: 2008-2021
  • PhD in CMAC: Retrospective Booklet 2016-2021
  • Advising Statement of Expectations
  • Dissertation
  • Independent Study
  • Language Requirement
  • Preliminary Exam
  • Progress Toward the Degree
  • Professional Development
  • Historical & Cultural Visualization
  • Cinematic Arts
  • Computational Media, Arts & Cultures
  • Fall 2024 Core Courses
  • Primary Faculty
  • Secondary Faculty
  • Instructors, Adjunct and Visiting Faculty
  • Emeriti Faculty
  • Post Docs & Researchers
  • Graduate Students
  • Student Visual Arts Projects
  • Faculty Visual Arts Projects
  • Faculty Art History Projects
  • Student Visual & Media Studies Projects
  • Faculty Visual & Media Studies Projects
  • Selected Faculty Books
  • Related Programs
  • Smith Warehouse Art Exhibition Space Request
  • Alumni Profiles
  • For Our Students
  • Assisting Duke Students

students studying old masters painting

Welcome Prospective Graduate Students!

History of art application deadline: december 4, 2023.

We look forward to your inquiries about our program and your applications to work with faculty in a diverse, global range of fields in the arts and visual cultures.

  • We’re here to answer questions and help you to envision joining our community, develop a program of advanced study and research, and join in our creation of a vibrant, inclusive environment.
  • We’re ready to assist you with the application process alongside the Graduate Division and Office for Graduate Diversity.

Contacting Faculty:  We encourage you to reach out directly to the individual members of our faculty with whom you might be interested in working. These communications are a customary component of the application process. They offer an opportunity for you to quickly communicate who you are, share your research interests, and convey why you are reaching out (i.e. why you are especially interested in seeking their mentorship). Even if the faculty member has insufficient time to meet with prospective applicants in advance, they still appreciate receiving introductory emails of this kind.

Department-specific questions about the application process:  Please contact [email protected]

General questions about graduate admissions:  Please see the following sites.

Steps to Apply, UC Berkeley Graduate Division,  https://grad.berkeley.edu/admissions/steps-to-apply/

Office for Graduate Diversity,  https://grad.berkeley.edu/graduate-diversity/

Applying to the Doctoral Program 

The Department welcomes applications for advanced study in the fields, periods, and specializations of the faculty in History of Art. We encourage prospective applicants to read carefully the graduate program description, familiarize themselves with the teaching and research areas of the faculty and related departments, and adhere precisely to application deadlines and requirements.

Applications are reviewed by the Graduate Admissions Committee, which is comprised of five faculty members assisted by the Graduate Affairs Officer, in consultation with the faculty at large and in accordance with UC Berkeley’s Graduate Division. Applicants awarded admission, with or without fellowship support, will be notified by the University’s Graduate Division by late March, and must accept or decline any award by April 15. 

Your application will be kept on file in the Department for two years. Please note that supporting materials cannot be returned and will not be retained beyond the two-year limit. For information on reapplying, or reactivating a past application, please consult the  Graduate Division .

line

Important Factors  

  • The faculty seeks exceptional candidates whose academic and professional preparation and achievement demonstrate that they will be able to make rapid progress toward a doctorate degree in History of Art and to complete their studies with distinction.
  • We do prefer previous study in a discipline in the humanities or social sciences, involving historical content and the acquisition of research and interpretive skills, as well as effective writing abilities
  • We welcome applications from those with B.A. degrees who have a strong foundation in the humanities and a set of clear intellectual interests in History of Art.
  • We also welcome applications from students who have received an M.A. at UC Berkeley or other universities.

PLEASE READ AND CONSIDER BEFORE SUBMITTING AN APPLICATION: 

The Department does not offer a terminal master’s program , and students who have yet to establish a field or fields of proposed study, who lack previous study in fields with historical content, or who have yet to begin study of a primary research language may be better served by applying to an MA program at another University or an MA program in a cognate department at UC Berkeley.

Admission to this program follows a thorough review of each applicant’s complete dossier; no individual component, score, or statement will ensure admission. The Department does not report on the results of prior admissions. 

After careful review of this page, the graduate program description, as well as their own prior study and experience, prospective applicants may wish to contact individual faculty with specific questions regarding the doctoral program. Please keep in mind that faculty may not respond in detail to such inquiries due to the volume of applications.

Application Materials 

  • All applications for Fall 2023 admission (with or without fellowship consideration) must be submitted online by  December 4, 2023 at 8:59pm PST . 
  •  We will only accept applications for the Fall semester.
  • Please note that the Department will not review your application until we have received all documents along with the $120 application fee for U.S. citizens or permanent residents, or $140 for all other applicants (payable online).
  • Applicants must complete the  online application  which will open September 15, 2021
  • If you wish to be considered for University fellowships and/or Foreign Language Area Scholarship (FLAS), you must complete the Financial Aid Statement.

Applications Components

Statement of Purpose

The faculty considers the Statement of Purpose to be one of the most important parts of your application. We look for a clear, well-written essay of appropriate length (2 pages single spaced) that demonstrates a sophisticated sense of the field of art history and that indicates the scholarly direction you wish to take. Another important factor affecting the decision of the Graduate Admissions Committee is the compatibility of your research interests with those of our faculty. Please review our current faculty members and their fields of expertise on the  Faculty Webpages . Please note that we also require a Personal History Statement. 

Writing Sample

All applicants are required to submit one writing sample of approximately 20 pages. The sample should be a formal, scholarly piece of writing that preferably addresses analytically a topic that is historical in nature. Post-MA applicants should submit their master’s thesis.  

Admissions FAQ

Can i contact a faculty member before applying.

  • Read more about Can I contact a faculty member before applying?

Can I visit the campus before applying?

Students are welcome to set up an appointment to meet with the Graduate Student Affairs Officer . The university offers walking tours of the campus daily

  • Read more about Can I visit the campus before applying?

Does Berkeley offer application fee waivers?

  • Read more about Does Berkeley offer application fee waivers?

Are there any prerequisites? Do I need to have majored in art history?

No. Students come from a variety of academic backgrounds.

  • Read more about Are there any prerequisites? Do I need to have majored in art history?

What are the specifics regarding the writing sample?

  • Read more about What are the specifics regarding the writing sample?

How long should my paper be?

  • Read more about How long should my paper be?

How long should my Statement of Purpose and/or my Personal History Statement be?

  • Read more about How long should my Statement of Purpose and/or my Personal History Statement be?

What is the difference between the Statement of Purpose and the Personal History Statement?

  • Read more about What is the difference between the Statement of Purpose and the Personal History Statement?

Is the TOEFL required? What is the minimum score?

  • Read more about Is the TOEFL required? What is the minimum score?

Is the GRE required? How important is it?

  • Read more about Is the GRE required? How important is it?

Can I have more than three Letters of Recommendation?

  • Read more about Can I have more than three Letters of Recommendation?

Do I have to complete the entire application again if I applied last year?

  • Read more about Do I have to complete the entire application again if I applied last year?

When will I be notified?

  • Read more about When will I be notified?

Does History of Art accept applications for both fall and spring?

  • Read more about Does History of Art accept applications for both fall and spring?

Are scholarships available?

  • Read more about Are scholarships available?

If I am admitted, can I defer my admissions?

  • Read more about If I am admitted, can I defer my admissions?
  • Search This Site All UCSD Sites Faculty/Staff Search Term
  • Chair's Message
  • Continuing Lecturers
  • Graduate Students
  • Postdoctoral Fellow
  • Emeriti Faculty
  • In Memoriam
  • Visiting Artists
  • Academic Advising
  • Major Requirements
  • Minor Requirements
  • Annual Schedule
  • Academic Opportunities
  • Scholarships, Grants & Internships
  • Career Paths
  • MFA Program
  • PhD Program
  • Financial Support
  • Speaker Series
  • Artist In Residence
  • Awards & Honors
  • EDI Graduate Student Funding
  • Academic Personnel
  • Compliance and Required Training
  • Financial Services
  • Human Resources
  • Instructional Resources for Faculty
  • Miscellaneous
  • Join our PhD Art History Program (VA76)

Ph.D. Art History Program (VA76)

The Department of Visual Arts offers a PhD in art history, theory, and criticism with specializations in cultural areas in which faculty do research (VA76). Offering a distinct alternative to other PhD programs in art history, our program centers on a unique curriculum that treats the study of art past and present—including fine art, media and new media, design and popular culture as part of a broad inquiry into the practices, objects, and discourses that constitute the art world, even as it encourages examination of the larger frameworks—historical, cultural, social, intellectual, and theoretical—within which the category “art” has been contextualized in the most recent developments in the discipline. This program is also distinctive in that it is housed within a department that has been for many years one of the nation’s leading centers of art practice and graduate education in studio, media, and—most recently—digital media. The offering of the PhD and MFA is based on the department’s foundational premise that the production of art and the critical, theoretical, and historical reflection upon it inherently and necessarily participate in a single discursive community. This close integration of art history and art practice is reflected in the inclusion of a concentration in art practice within the PhD in art history, theory, and criticism.

To Apply:   https://connect.grad.ucsd.edu/apply/

Application Opens:  September 6th, 2023 for the Fall 2024 application cycle

Application Deadline:  December 6th, 2023 for the Fall 2024 application cycle

Interdisciplinary Specializations

Students within the PhD program who are interested in the opportunity to undertake specialized research may apply to participate in an interdisciplinary specialization. Students accepted into a specialization program would be expected to complete coursework in addition to those required for their PhD program. The department offers interdisciplinary specializations with the following campus programs.

  • Anthropogeny:   for students with an interest in human origin
  • Critical Gender Studies:   providing specialized training in gender and sexuality
  • Interdisciplinary Environmental Research : for students interested in environmental solutions

Application Requirements

All applicants must satisfy the following to be considered for admissions to our department:

Completion of a four-year Bachelors degree or equivalent: 

  • 3.0 GPA minimum or 'B' average
  • Submission of unofficial transcripts required 

English Language Proficiency:

  • Demonstrated English language proficiency is required of all international applicants whose native language is not English. Non-native English language speakers may either display proficiency by meeting the minimum speaking scores listed below or can be exempt from the test scores requirement if they received a degree from an institution which provides instruction solely in English. Please refer to the following link for more information regarding the degree from an institution exemption: English Language Proficiency .
  • TOEFL iBT speaking scores of 26-30
  • IELTS speaking scores of 8-9
  • PTE speaking scores of 84-90

Letters of Recommendation:

  • Minimum of 3 recommendations required
  • Letters of recommendation should come from individuals, preferably previous professors, who can best explain why you are prepared and would be successful in rigorous academic studies at the graduate level.

Statement of Purpose:

  • 750-1000 word limit, not to exceed 3 pages
  • Focus your Statement of Purpose on the reasons you are interested in attending this graduate program. You can include the research you hope to pursue within our program and give the Admissions Committee a sense of who you are and what you hope to accomplish. The statement should be well organized, concise, and completely free of grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors.
  • Writing Sample
  • 2000 word Research Statement

Portfolio Requirements

Writing Sample (4000-8000 words):

Examples include: senior honors thesis, MA thesis, or other research or critical paper, preferably in art or media history.

Research Statement (2000 words maximum):

The Research Statement should explain the research that you wish to pursue within our program. There may be some overlap between the Research Statement and Statement of Purpose however these should be viewed as two distinct prompts that will give the Admissions Committee a greater sense of who you are and what you would accomplish at UC San Diego.

File Names for Portfolio Items:

Please name your files, with your Last Name, First Initial underscore and the document type. So if my name was Terry Triton, I would have the following File Names:

Graduate Student Research

Check out our annual Research Colloquium . PhD students who have recently advanced to candidacy present their research to the local community. Please explore the recent work completed within the department, in addition to the Faculty and Graduate Student personal pages. 

2023 Research Colloquium

2022 Research Colloquium

2021 Research Colloquium

2020 Research Colloquium

  • Join our MFA Program
  • Join our PhD Art Practice Program (VA77)
  • Art Degrees
  • Galleries & Exhibits
  • Request More Info

Art History Resources

  • Guidelines for Analysis of Art
  • Formal Analysis Paper Examples

Guidelines for Writing Art History Research Papers

  • Oral Report Guidelines
  • Annual Arkansas College Art History Symposium

Writing a paper for an art history course is similar to the analytical, research-based papers that you may have written in English literature courses or history courses. Although art historical research and writing does include the analysis of written documents, there are distinctive differences between art history writing and other disciplines because the primary documents are works of art. A key reference guide for researching and analyzing works of art and for writing art history papers is the 10th edition (or later) of Sylvan Barnet’s work, A Short Guide to Writing about Art . Barnet directs students through the steps of thinking about a research topic, collecting information, and then writing and documenting a paper.

A website with helpful tips for writing art history papers is posted by the University of North Carolina.

Wesleyan University Writing Center has a useful guide for finding online writing resources.

The following are basic guidelines that you must use when documenting research papers for any art history class at UA Little Rock. Solid, thoughtful research and correct documentation of the sources used in this research (i.e., footnotes/endnotes, bibliography, and illustrations**) are essential. Additionally, these guidelines remind students about plagiarism, a serious academic offense.

Paper Format

Research papers should be in a 12-point font, double-spaced. Ample margins should be left for the instructor’s comments. All margins should be one inch to allow for comments. Number all pages. The cover sheet for the paper should include the following information: title of paper, your name, course title and number, course instructor, and date paper is submitted. A simple presentation of a paper is sufficient. Staple the pages together at the upper left or put them in a simple three-ring folder or binder. Do not put individual pages in plastic sleeves.

Documentation of Resources

The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), as described in the most recent edition of Sylvan Barnet’s A Short Guide to Writing about Art is the department standard. Although you may have used MLA style for English papers or other disciplines, the Chicago Style is required for all students taking art history courses at UA Little Rock. There are significant differences between MLA style and Chicago Style. A “Quick Guide” for the Chicago Manual of Style footnote and bibliography format is found http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html. The footnote examples are numbered and the bibliography example is last. Please note that the place of publication and the publisher are enclosed in parentheses in the footnote, but they are not in parentheses in the bibliography. Examples of CMS for some types of note and bibliography references are given below in this Guideline. Arabic numbers are used for footnotes. Some word processing programs may have Roman numerals as a choice, but the standard is Arabic numbers. The use of super script numbers, as given in examples below, is the standard in UA Little Rock art history papers.

The chapter “Manuscript Form” in the Barnet book (10th edition or later) provides models for the correct forms for footnotes/endnotes and the bibliography. For example, the note form for the FIRST REFERENCE to a book with a single author is:

1 Bruce Cole, Italian Art 1250-1550 (New York: New York University Press, 1971), 134.

But the BIBLIOGRAPHIC FORM for that same book is:

Cole, Bruce. Italian Art 1250-1550. New York: New York University Press. 1971.

The FIRST REFERENCE to a journal article (in a periodical that is paginated by volume) with a single author in a footnote is:

2 Anne H. Van Buren, “Madame Cézanne’s Fashions and the Dates of Her Portraits,” Art Quarterly 29 (1966): 199.

The FIRST REFERENCE to a journal article (in a periodical that is paginated by volume) with a single author in the BIBLIOGRAPHY is:

Van Buren, Anne H. “Madame Cézanne’s Fashions and the Dates of Her Portraits.” Art Quarterly 29 (1966): 185-204.

If you reference an article that you found through an electronic database such as JSTOR, you do not include the url for JSTOR or the date accessed in either the footnote or the bibliography. This is because the article is one that was originally printed in a hard-copy journal; what you located through JSTOR is simply a copy of printed pages. Your citation follows the same format for an article in a bound volume that you may have pulled from the library shelves. If, however, you use an article that originally was in an electronic format and is available only on-line, then follow the “non-print” forms listed below.

B. Non-Print

Citations for Internet sources such as online journals or scholarly web sites should follow the form described in Barnet’s chapter, “Writing a Research Paper.” For example, the footnote or endnote reference given by Barnet for a web site is:

3 Nigel Strudwick, Egyptology Resources , with the assistance of The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, 1994, revised 16 June 2008, http://www.newton.ac.uk/egypt/ , 24 July 2008.

If you use microform or microfilm resources, consult the most recent edition of Kate Turabian, A Manual of Term Paper, Theses and Dissertations. A copy of Turabian is available at the reference desk in the main library.

C. Visual Documentation (Illustrations)

Art history papers require visual documentation such as photographs, photocopies, or scanned images of the art works you discuss. In the chapter “Manuscript Form” in A Short Guide to Writing about Art, Barnet explains how to identify illustrations or “figures” in the text of your paper and how to caption the visual material. Each photograph, photocopy, or scanned image should appear on a single sheet of paper unless two images and their captions will fit on a single sheet of paper with one inch margins on all sides. Note also that the title of a work of art is always italicized. Within the text, the reference to the illustration is enclosed in parentheses and placed at the end of the sentence. A period for the sentence comes after the parenthetical reference to the illustration. For UA Little Rcok art history papers, illustrations are placed at the end of the paper, not within the text. Illustration are not supplied as a Powerpoint presentation or as separate .jpgs submitted in an electronic format.

Edvard Munch’s painting The Scream, dated 1893, represents a highly personal, expressive response to an experience the artist had while walking one evening (Figure 1).

The caption that accompanies the illustration at the end of the paper would read:

Figure 1. Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1893. Tempera and casein on cardboard, 36 x 29″ (91.3 x 73.7 cm). Nasjonalgalleriet, Oslo, Norway.

Plagiarism is a form of thievery and is illegal. According to Webster’s New World Dictionary, to plagiarize is to “take and pass off as one’s own the ideas, writings, etc. of another.” Barnet has some useful guidelines for acknowledging sources in his chapter “Manuscript Form;” review them so that you will not be mguilty of theft. Another useful website regarding plagiarism is provided by Cornell University, http://plagiarism.arts.cornell.edu/tutorial/index.cfm

Plagiarism is a serious offense, and students should understand that checking papers for plagiarized content is easy to do with Internet resources. Plagiarism will be reported as academic dishonesty to the Dean of Students; see Section VI of the Student Handbook which cites plagiarism as a specific violation. Take care that you fully and accurately acknowledge the source of another author, whether you are quoting the material verbatim or paraphrasing. Borrowing the idea of another author by merely changing some or even all of your source’s words does not allow you to claim the ideas as your own. You must credit both direct quotes and your paraphrases. Again, Barnet’s chapter “Manuscript Form” sets out clear guidelines for avoiding plagiarism.

VISIT OUR GALLERIES SEE UPCOMING EXHIBITS

  • School of Art and Design
  • Windgate Center of Art + Design, Room 202 2801 S University Avenue Little Rock , AR 72204
  • Phone: 501-916-3182 Fax: 501-683-7022 (fax)
  • More contact information

Connect With Us

Facebook

UA Little Rock is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.

Writing Resources

Writing Guides for Students in Art & Art History created by Dr. Gabrielle Moyer, Stanford Program in Writing and Rhetoric.

For Undergraduate Students

Writing In Art History

For Graduate Students

Crafting a Persuasive Research Statement

Crafting a Persuasive Job Letter

Preparing to Go on the Academic Job Market

Writing Assessment

For Professors

Assignments in the Syllabus

University of Washington Links

  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Directories
  • Concentrations
  • Photo/Media
  • Painting + Drawing
  • 3D4M: ceramics + glass + sculpture
  • Field Studies
  • Student Work
  • Study Abroad
  • Art History BA
  • Art History Minor
  • Art History MA Thesis
  • Art History MA Practicum
  • Art History PhD
  • Student Research
  • Interaction Design
  • Visual Communication Design
  • Industrial Design
  • Laptop Requirement
  • Master of Design
  • BDes/MDes Shows
  • COVID-19 Updates
  • Voicing a Concern
  • News + Events
  • Exhibitions

Mobile Menu

  • Graduate Students
  • Visiting Artists + Lecturers
  • Seattle Arts + Culture
  • Jobs, Internships, and Opportunities
  • First Day Attendance
  • Final Exam Attendance
  • Career Fair
  • Design Travel Award Application
  • Finding an Internship
  • Finding a Job
  • Portfolio Advice
  • Resume Advice
  • Alumni Blog
  • Alumni Statistics
  • Prevention Plan
  • For Students
  • Press Releases
  • Stay Connected
  • Undergraduate Students
  • Jobs + Opportunities
  • Academic Advising
  • Student Voice Project
  • Scholarships + Awards
  • Advisory Board
  • A-Z Directory
  • Recent News
  • News Archive
  • Technology + Equipment
  • Rome Center
  • Exhibitions, 2022-2023
  • Exhibitions, 2021-2022
  • Exhibitions, 2020-2021
  • Exhibitions, 2019–2020
  • Exhibitions, 2018–2019
  • Exhibitions, 2017–2018
  • Exhibitions, 2016–2017
  • Exhibitions, 2015–2016
  • Exhibitions, 2014–2015
  • Jacob Lawrence Legacy Residency
  • The Black Embodiments Studio
  • BIPOC Graduate Student Curatorial Fellowship
  • Critical Art Writing Group

Piazza San Marco by Canaletto

You are here

  • Art History
  • Graduate Programs

Art History PhD Admissions

Each year, the Division of Art History receives more than 60 applications for its graduate programs. Applications are reviewed by the faculty of the division.

The selection process aims to identify students who are both well-prepared and whose interests and goals are well-matched to faculty strengths and program resources.

It is the School of Art + Art History + Design’s policy not to comment on specific admissions decisions.

Prerequisites for Admission

Before beginning work toward the PhD degree, students must have a master's degree in art history or a related field combined with coursework in art history. A minimum of a 3.0 GPA or B average is expected in art history courses. Applicants must also meet the Graduate School general admission requirements .

During their first year in the program, graduate students should be prepared to take reading exams in two languages relevant to their field of study as determined in consultation with their supervisor. If students do not pass the language exams in their first year, they will be asked to make verifiable progress toward this goal and pass exams as soon as possible. They may be asked to curtail art history coursework if satisfactory progress toward language requirements is not made. Evidence of ability to pass language exams will be a consideration in evaluating applications.

Please note that the UW Art History program does not include coursework in art conservation or restoration. For information about museum studies, see the UW Certificate in Museum Studies website . For information about the UW Museology Master of Arts Program, see their website .

The Graduate Application Process

Application to the School of Art + Art History + Design graduate programs is completed online through the University of Washington Graduate School website. The online application cycle opens November 15. Deadline for application is 11:50pm (PST) January 15. If you have any questions while submitting your material for review, please email [email protected] .

The Graduate School application website will request the following documents:

  • Application for Graduate Study at the University of Washington (online). To finalize your application, please submit the $85 application fee. After you have submitted your application, you will no longer be able to make changes online. Please contact [email protected] if you have to make any changes to your application once it has been submitted.
  • Transcripts: Applicants are required to submit an unofficial transcript from each institution from which they have obtained a degree. Applicants who are admitted to the program will be required to submit official transcripts prior to matriculation. Please ensure that the student’s name and school name appear and that the scan is legible. If you are scanning original transcripts, make sure the pages are oriented upright for screen viewing (vertical or landscape).
  • Letters of recommendation: Applicants will be prompted to provide the name and email address of 3 (maximum 4) recommenders. The recommenders will be sent a link to the online evaluation form via email. Each letter of recommendation should be written by someone who is able to comment on your qualifications for graduate study. As part of the application process, you will be given the opportunity to voluntarily waive your right to inspect the completed letters.
  • English Proficiency test scores (for international students): Proficiency in English is required for graduate study at the University of Washington, and every applicant whose native language is not English must demonstrate English proficiency. Please see Graduate School Memo #8 and English Proficiency Tests comparison tables for information on the University’s policy. When requesting official TOEFL scores from ETS use institution code 4854 for the University of Washington. TOEFL scores are valid for two years from the test date. The University of Washington only accepts scores submitted electronically directly from the testing center. The application will also prompt you to self-report your test scores. If you have not yet taken the test, please enter the test date on the form. Official scores must be received by the application deadline.
  • Resume/Curriculum Vitae: Your resume/CV should summarize your educational background, including institutions and degrees earned. It should also include a summary of academic positions held (e.g. teaching assistantships), awards and fellowships, and any academic publications, exhibitions, or other relevant examples of your work.
  • Personal Statement: This statement should clearly articulate your goals and the extent to which the program to which you are applying can be expected to prepare you for those objectives. The statement should also describe your background and experience in Art History or an allied discipline as well as preparation for advanced work in the field to which you are applying.
  • Writing Sample: Papers produced for art history classes are generally the most useful evidence for reviewers of your written work. Other helpful submissions include art-history-related articles, catalog essays, museum publications, or other writing dealing with art-historical topics. If none of the above are available, submit samples of writing you feel would be most useful for those evaluating (a) your ability to express yourself clearly in writing and (b) your ability to address subject matter relevant to art history. Writing samples should not exceed 50 pages in length; writing samples of 20-30 pages are most common.

art history phd writing sample

Department of the History of Art

You are here, dissertations, completed dissertations.

1942-present

DISSERTATIONS IN PROGRESS

As of July 2023

Bartunkova, Barbora , “Sites of Resistance: Antifascism and the Czechoslovak Avant-garde” (C. Armstrong)

Betik, Blair Katherine , “Alternate Experiences: Evaluating Lived Religious Life in the Roman Provinces in the 1st Through 4th Centuries CE” (M. Gaifman)

Boyd, Nicole , “Science, Craft, Art, Theater: Four ‘Perspectives’ on the Painted Architecture of Angelo Michele Colonna and Agostino Mitelli” (N. Suthor). 

Brown, Justin , “Afro-Surinamese Calabash Art in the Era of Slavery and Emancipation” (C. Fromont)

Burke, Harry , “The Islands Between: Art, Animism, and Anticolonial Worldmaking in Archipelagic Southeast Asia” (P. Lee)

Chakravorty, Swagato , “Displaced Cinema: Moving Images and the Politics of Location in Contemporary Art” (C. Buckley, F. Casetti)

Chau, Tung , “Strange New Worlds: Interfaces in the Work of Cao Fei” (P. Lee)

Cox, Emily , “Perverse Modernism, 1884-1990” (C. Armstrong, T. Barringer)

Coyle, Alexander , “Frame and Format between Byzantium and Central Italy, 1200-1300” (R. Nelson)

Datta, Yagnaseni , “Materialising Illusions: Visual Translation in the Mughal Jug Basisht, c. 1602.” (K. Rizvi)

de Luca, Theo , “Nicolas Poussin’s Chronotopes” (N. Suthor)

Dechant, D. Lyle . ” ‘daz wir ein ander vinden fro’: Readers and Performers of the Codex Manesse” (J. Jung)

Del Bonis-O’Donnell, Asia, “Trees and the Visualization of kosmos in Archaic and Classical Athenian Art” (M. Gaifman)

Demby, Nicole, “The Diplomatic Image: Framing Art and Internationalism, 1945-1960” (K. Mercer)

Donnelly, Michelle , “Spatialized Impressions: American Printmaking Outside the Workshop, 1935–1975” (J. Raab)

Epifano, Angie , “Building the Samorian State: Material Culture, Architecture, and Cities across West Africa” (C. Fromont)

Fialho, Alex , “Apertures onto AIDS: African American Photography and the Art History of the Storage Unit” (P. Lee, T Nyong’o)

Foo, Adela , “Crafting the Aq Qoyuniu Court (1475-1490) (E. Cooke, Jr.)

Franciosi, Caterina , “Latent Light: Energy and Nineteenth-Century British Art” (T. Barringer)

Frier, Sara , “Unbearable Witness: The Disfigured Body in the Northern European Brief (1500-1620)” (N. Suthor)

Gambert-Jouan, Anabelle , “Sculpture in Place: Medieval Wood Depositions and Their Environments” (J. Jung)

Gass, Izabel, “Painted Thanatologies: Théodore Géricault Against the Aesthetics of Life” (C. Armstrong)

Gaudet, Manon , “Property and the Contested Ground of North American Visual Culture, 1900-1945” (E. Cooke, Jr.)  

Haffner, Michaela , “Nature Cure: ”White Wellness” and the Visual Culture of Natural Health, 1870-1930” (J. Raab)

Hepburn, Victoria , “William Bell Scott’s Progress” (T. Barringer)

Herrmann, Mitchell, “The Art of the Living: Biological Life and Aesthetic Experience in the 21st Century” (P. Lee)

Higgins, Lily , “Reading into Things: Articulate Objects in Colonial North America, 1650-1783” (E. Cooke, Jr.)

Hodson, Josie , “Something in Common: Black Art under Austerity in New York City, 1975-1990” (Yale University, P. Lee)

Hong, Kevin , “Plasticity, Fungibility, Toxicity: Photography’s Ecological Entanglements in the Mid-Twentieth-Century United States” (C. Armstrong, J Raab)

Kang, Mia , “Art, Race, Representation: The Rise of Multiculturalism in the Visual Arts” (K. Mercer)

Keto, Elizabeth , “Remaking the World: United States Art in the Reconstruction Era, 1861-1900.” (J. Raab)

Kim, Adela , “Beyond Institutional Critique: Tearing Up in the Work of Andrea Fraser” (P. Lee)

Koposova, Ekaterina , “Triumph and Terror in the Arts of the Franco-Dutch War” (M. Bass)

Lee, Key Jo , “Melancholic Materiality: History and the Unhealable Wound in African American Photographic Portraits, 1850-1877” (K. Mercer)

Levy Haskell, Gavriella , “The Imaginative Painter”: Visual Narrative and the Interactive Painting in Britain, 1851-1914” (T. Barringer, E. Cooke Jr)

Marquardt, Savannah, “Becoming a Body: Lucanian Painted Vases and Grave Assemblages in Southern Italy” (M. Gaifman)

Miraval, Nathalie , “The Art of Magic: Afro-Catholic Visual Culture in the Early Modern Spanish Empire” (C. Fromont)

Mizbani, Sharon , Water and Memory: Fountains, Heritage, and Infrastructure in Istanbul and Tehran (1839-1950) (K. Rizvi)

Molarsky-Beck, Marina, “Seeing the Unseen: Queer Artistic Subjectivity in Interwar Photography” (C. Armstrong)

Nagy, Renata , “Bookish Art: Natural Historical Learning Across Media in Seventeenth-century Northern Europe” (Bass, M)

Olson, Christine , “Owen Jones and the Epistemologies of Nineteenth-Century Design” (T. Barringer)

Petrilli-Jones, Sara , “Drafting the Canon: Legal Histories of Art in Florence and Rome, 1600-1800” (N. Suthor)

Phillips, Kate , “American Ephemera” (J. Raab)

Potuckova, Kristina , “The Arts of Women’s Monastic Liturgy, Holy Roman Empire, 1000-1200” (J. Jung)

Quack, Gregor , “The Social Fabric: Franz Erhard Walther’s Art in Postwar Germany” (P. Lee)

Rahimi-Golkhandan, Shabnam , “The Photograph’s Shabih-Kashi (Verisimilitude) – The Liminal Visualities of Late Qajar Art (1853-1911)” (K. Rizvi)

Rapoport, Sarah , “James Jacques Joseph Tissot in the Interstices of Modernity” (T. Barringer, C. Armstrong)

Riordan, Lindsay , “Beuys, Terror, Value: 1967-1979” (S. Zeidler)

Robbins, Isabella , “Relationality and Being: Indigeneity, Space and Transit in Global Contemporary Art” (P. Lee, N. Blackhawk)

Sen, Pooja , “The World Builders ” (J. Peters)

Sellati, Lillian , “When is Herakles Not Himself? Mediating Cultural Plurality in Greater Central Asia, 330 BCE – 365 CE” (M. Gaifman)

Tang, Jenny , “Genealogies of Confinement: Carceral Logics of Visuality in Atlantic Modernism 1930 – 1945” (K. Mercer)

Thomas, Alexandra , “Afrekete’s Touch: Black Queer Feminist Errantry and Global African Art”  (P. Lee)

Valladares, Carlos , “Jacques Demy” (P. Lee)

Verrot, Trevor , “Sculpted Lamentation Groups in the Late Medieval Veneto” (J. Jung)

Von-Ow, Pierre , Visual Tactics: Histories of Perspective in Britain and its Empire, 1670-1768.”  (T. Barringer)

Wang, Xueli , “Performing Disappearance: Maggie Cheung and the Off-Screen” (Q. Ngan)

Webley, John , “Ink, Paint, and Blood: India and the Great Game in Russian Culture” (T. Barringer, M. Brunson)

Werwie, Katherine , “Visions Across the Gates: Materiality, Symbolism, and Communication in the Historiated Wooden Doors of Medieval European Churches” (J. Jung)

Wisowaty, Stephanie , “Painted Processional Crosses in Central Italy, 1250-1400: Movement, Mediation and Multisensory Effects” (J. Jung)

Young, Colin , “Desert Places: The Visual Culture of the Prairies and the Pampas across the Nineteenth Century” (J. Raab)

Zhou, Joyce Yusi, “Objects by Her Hand: Art and Material Culture of Women in Early Modern Batavia (1619-1799) (M. Bass, E. Cooke, Jr.)

student waving Cal flag

History of Art PhD

The Department of History of Art offers a two-stage integrated master's and doctoral program (MA/PhD) in preparation for college teaching, writing, and specialized curatorial careers. Students are not admitted to work for a terminal MA degree, though students may apply for the MA after meeting Stage I requirements toward the PhD. Students work closely with faculty in courses, seminars, and on independent research projects to develop independent thought and a thorough knowledge of the field and its critical methods. Cross-disciplinary work in Berkeley's distinguished departments of languages and literature, philosophy, rhetoric, film studies, women's studies, history, and the social sciences is strongly encouraged. A student may opt for a more formal relationship with other departments through Designated Emphases programs, including film studies; folklore; women, gender, and sexuality; and critical theory.

Contact Info

[email protected]

416 Doe Library #6020

Berkeley, CA 94720

At a Glance

Admit Term(s)

Application Deadline

December 4, 2023

Degree Type(s)

Doctoral / PhD

Degree Awarded

GRE Requirements

  • My Account |
  • StudentHome |
  • TutorHome |
  • IntranetHome |
  • Contact the OU Contact the OU Contact the OU |
  • Accessibility Accessibility

Postgraduate

  • International
  • News & media
  • Business & apprenticeships

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

You are here

  • School of Arts & Humanities
  • Postgraduate Research

Preparing a History PhD proposal

The carefully thought-out and detailed research proposal to be submitted with the formal application is the product of a sometimes prolonged negotiation with your potential supervisor. The supervisor may be enthusiastic about your project or might advise you to consider a different subject or change your angle on it; they may query aspects of your plan such as its breadth, the availability of primary sources or the extent to which you are familiar with the secondary literature. You may be asked to demonstrate the originality of your research question or be advised to consider applying to another institution which may have more appropriate expertise. During this process you will likely be asked to submit a specimen of written-up historical research, such as your Masters or BA dissertation. The sooner you start developing the structure that is expected in a research proposal, the more productive your exchanges with your potential supervisor will be.

You may find different advice for writing a research proposal across different OU webpages. Given that a research proposal can vary significantly across different disciplines, when applying to the History Department you should follow the guidance provided here.

The research proposal you submit in January should be approximately 1000 words, plus a bibliography, and should contain the following:

A title, possibly with a subtitle

The title should not take the form of a question and it may run to a dozen words or more. Like the title of a book, it should clearly convey the topic you propose to work on. A subtitle may explain the chronological or geographical focus of your work, or the methodological approach you will take. Choosing a title is a good way for focusing on the topic you want to investigate and the approach you want to take.

These are examples of poor titles and topics to research:

  • Captain Cook’s Third Voyage
  • Women in eighteenth-century England

These would be poor topics to research because they lack a strong question and it is not clear which approach they take to their already well-researched subjects. They are generic or merely descriptive. 

Examples of good research topics

  • Constructing the Eternal City: visual representations of Rome, 1500-1700
  • Rearing citizens for the state: manuals for parents in France, 1900-1950

These projects combine a sharp chronological and geographical focus with a clear indication of how the sources will be analysed to respond to a precise question. In the first case, for example, the premise is that visual representations are critical in the making of a city’s eminence. This indicates the type of sources that will be analysed (paintings, engravings and other visual sources). The chronology is particularly well chosen because in these two centuries Rome turned from being the capital of the Catholic world to becoming the much sought-after destination of the Grand Tour; interesting questions of change and continuity come into focus.

Brief summary of your argument

An acceptable PhD thesis must have a central argument, a 'thesis'.  You need to have something to argue for or against, a point to prove or disprove, a question to answer. What goes into this section of the proposal is a statement of your question and the answer you plan to give, even if, for now, it remains a hypothesis.

Why this subject is important

We expect originality in a thesis and so under this rubric we expect you to explain why the knowledge you seek on the subject you propose to work on is important for its period and place, or for historians’ views on its period and place. Finding some early-modern English laundry lists would not suffice  on its own  to justify writing a PhD thesis about them. But those laundry lists could be important evidence for a thesis about the spread of the Great Plague in London, for example.

Framing your research

Your proposal has to show awareness of other scholarly writing on the subject. This section positions your approach to the subject in relation to approaches in some of those works, summarising how far you think it differs. For instance, you could challenge existing interpretations of the end the Cold War, or you might want to support one historian or another; you could open up a neglected aspect of the debate - say by considering the role of an overlooked group or national government - and perhaps kick-start a debate of your own. All this is to show that you have read  into  your subject and familiarised yourself with its contours. We don’t expect you to have done all your research at the start, but it is essential for you to show familiarity with the key texts and main authors in your chosen field.

What sources might you need to consult in libraries and archives?

Here you should describe or at least list the primary materials you are likely to use in researching your thesis. This demonstrates your confidence that enough relevant sources exist to support a sustained scholarly argument. Many archival catalogues are available online and can be searched remotely, including The National Archives, the National Archives of Scotland, the National Archives (Ireland), the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland and Archives Wales. You can search the London-based Historical Manuscripts Commission and the National Register of Archives, both of which provide access to local county record offices. Databases such as ‘Eighteenth Century Collections Online’ and the British Library’s ‘British Newspapers Online 1600-1900’ will help you identify and locate relevant sources.

What skills are required to work on the sources you plan to use?

You need to show that you have the linguistic competence to pursue your research. With few exceptions, original sources must be read in the original languages; if the principal historical literature is not in English, you must be able to read it too. Palaeographic problems aren’t confined to ancient writing. You might have to tackle early modern or other scripts that are hard to decipher. Even with fluent German, an applicant baffled by the Gothic script and typeface would flounder without undertaking ancillary study. Training is available at The Open University, or in some circumstances you can be funded to undertake training elsewhere, and you should demonstrate awareness of the skills that you need to acquire.

Do you have the technical competence to handle any data-analysis your thesis may require?

Databases, statistical evidence and spreadsheets are used increasingly by historians in certain fields. If your research involves, say, demographic or economic data, you will need to consider whether you have the necessary IT and statistical skills and, if not, how you will acquire them.

How will you arrange access to the libraries and archives where you need to work?

Although primary sources are increasingly available in digitised form, you should consider that important sources may be closed or in private hands. To consult them may require some travelling and so you should be realistic as to what you will be able to do, particularly if you are applying to study part-time as not all archives are open out of regular office hours.

A bibliography

This should come at the end and include a list of the primary sources you plan to use and the relevant secondary literature on the subject. While you should show that you are on top of recent work (and of important older studies) on the topic, there is no point in having a long list of works only marginally related to your subject. As always, specificity is the best policy.

Please follow this link to see an  example of a successful research proposal [PDF].

All this may seem daunting, as if the department is asking you to write a thesis before you apply. But that is not our intention; the advice is to help you perform the necessary spadework before entering the formal application process. Working up a proposal under the headings suggested above will, if your application is successful, save you and your supervisor(s) much time if and when the real work begins.

  • Study with Us
  • News (OU History Blog)

art history phd writing sample

  •   @history_ou

Request your prospectus

Request a prospectus icon

Explore our qualifications and courses by requesting one of our prospectuses today.

Request prospectus

Are you already an OU student?

Go to StudentHome

The Open University

  • Study with us
  • Supported distance learning
  • Funding your studies
  • International students
  • Global reputation
  • Apprenticeships
  • Develop your workforce
  • Contact the OU

Undergraduate

  • Arts and Humanities
  • Art History
  • Business and Management
  • Combined Studies
  • Computing and IT
  • Counselling
  • Creative Writing
  • Criminology
  • Early Years
  • Electronic Engineering
  • Engineering
  • Environment
  • Film and Media
  • Health and Social Care
  • Health and Wellbeing
  • Health Sciences
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Mental Health
  • Nursing and Healthcare
  • Religious Studies
  • Social Sciences
  • Social Work
  • Software Engineering
  • Sport and Fitness
  • Postgraduate study
  • Research degrees
  • Masters in Art History (MA)
  • Masters in Computing (MSc)
  • Masters in Creative Writing (MA)
  • Masters degree in Education
  • Masters in Engineering (MSc)
  • Masters in English Literature (MA)
  • Masters in History (MA)
  • Master of Laws (LLM)
  • Masters in Mathematics (MSc)
  • Masters in Psychology (MSc)
  • A to Z of Masters degrees
  • Accessibility statement
  • Conditions of use
  • Privacy policy
  • Cookie policy
  • Manage cookie preferences
  • Modern slavery act (pdf 149kb)

Follow us on Social media

Google+

  • Student Policies and Regulations
  • Student Charter
  • System Status
  • Contact the OU Contact the OU
  • Modern Slavery Act (pdf 149kb)

© . . .

Art History

AHST 6301 Foundations I: Theories and Methods of Art History (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to research methods in art history. (3-0) Y

AHST 6302 Foundations II: Thesis Workshop (3 semester credit hours) Intended for MA AHST students in their third semester, this course helps students refine their thesis projects through detailed discussions of how to properly write abstracts, proposals, prospectuses, bibliographies, and research essays. Course time is also spent focusing on professional practice. Prerequisites: MA AHST students only and department consent required. (3-0) Y

AHST 6310 Topics in Art History (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to artistic production of a particular time, place, or movement, or a theme treated across chronology and geography. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6311 Topics in Architecture and Landscape Architecture (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of architecture and the built and natural environment. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6315 Topics in the History of Design (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of design. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6316 Topics in Decorative Arts (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of the decorative arts. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6317 Topics in the History of New Media (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of new media. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6320 Topics in the History of Collecting (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the history of collecting. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6321 Topics in Global Art Histories (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the global histories of art. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6322 Topics in Digital Art History (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the integration of qualitative inquiry and observation with methods of computation, natural science, and information design. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6323 Topics in the Histories of Art, Nature, and Science (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to intersections of the histories of art, nature, and science. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6324 Special Topics in American Art (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to American Art. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6325 Special Topics in Contemporary Art (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on topics related to Contemporary art and art history, broadly defined across media types, and created in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6326 Special Topics in Medieval Art and Architecture (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of Medieval Art and Architecture. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6327 Special Topics in Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of Renaissance and Baroque art and architecture. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6328 Special Topics in Islamic Art and Architecture (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of art and architecture of the Islamic world. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6329 Special Topics in Classical Antiquity (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of the classical world, including Ancient Greece, Etruria, and Ancient Rome. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6330 Special Topics in Cultural Heritage (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the methods, theories, and practices of conservation and preservation of material culture across cultures and time periods. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6331 Special Topics in the Art and Architecture of the Mediterranean World (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the cross-cultural exchange and histories of art and architecture as it relates to cultures surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6332 Special Topics in Modern Art (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of Modern Art. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6333 Special Topics in the Social History of Art (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the nexus of art history and social history, with a particular focus on issues pertaining to class, gender, and/or race. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6334 Special Topics in Art and Literature (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the intersections of the histories of art and literature. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6335 Special Topics in Asian Art (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the forms, theories, and histories of the arts of Asian cultures. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6336 Special Topics in Urbanism and Space (3 semester credit hours) Master's seminar on a topic related to the intersection of art history and public spaces. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (6 semester credit hours maximum). (3-0) R

AHST 6396 Special Topics in Art History (3 semester credit hours) Independent study course that may count toward minimum course requirements for the MA degree. May be repeated for credit as topics vary (9 semester credit hours maximum). Department consent required. (3-0) R

AHST 6V99 Thesis (3-9 semester credit hours) Advanced research project in art history (thesis). Only 15 hours will be counted towards the MA. Pass/Fail only. May be repeated for credit. Department consent required. (3-0) R

COMMENTS

  1. How to Apply to the PhD Program

    The writing sample is a very important component of the application. It should be an example of your best scholarly writing. Typically, the writing sample will be an undergraduate senior thesis, a seminar paper, or an article or other published work; it should be a critical or scholarly work in art history or a closely related field.

  2. PDF Graduate School Writing Samples

    Graduate School Writing Samples Bernhard Nickel · [email protected] July 10, 2022 1 The Goal of the Writing Sample A writing sample for graduate school primarily serves an evidentialfunction: its purpose is to give evidence of your qualifications to enter graduate school at the program you're applying to. Of course the central

  3. PhD Art History Admission

    Re-applicants must submit new supporting documents and complete the online graduate application. Writing Sample Requirement. In addition to the University application materials listed above, applicants in Art History are required to submit a writing sample. You should upload your writing sample along with your online application (only one ...

  4. Prospective Students at the Institute

    • One art history writing sample is required. Those PhD applicants who already hold an MA in art history must provide a copy of their thesis or another substantial research paper to be read by an appropriate member of the IFA faculty. • The Graduate School requires applicants who are not native English speakers to submit official TOEFL or ...

  5. What are the specifics regarding the writing sample?

    What are the specifics regarding the writing sample? One of the components of the application is an approximately 20-page piece of scholarly work for your writing sample. The 20 pages include images and footnotes. If you do not have a paper that is this long, you may submit two smaller papers or re-work an older, shorter, paper to reach the 20 ...

  6. Apply

    This, along with your writing sample, is the most important part of your application. Please provide a statement outlining your interest in pursuing a PhD in Art History. Outline as specifically as possible the proposed area of study within the discipline of art history. Indicate the faculty member(s) with whom you are interested in working.

  7. Admissions

    Application Deadline: January 5, 2024. Special Requirements: Writing Sample. Applications to the doctoral program in the Department of History of Art and Architecture are submitted to the Harvard Kenneth C. Griffin Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Do not send any materials to the Department of History of Art and Architecture.

  8. Admissions

    Many well-qualified applicants may not receive admission, but are certainly welcome to reapply. Applicants are required to submit a term paper or other writing sample. This should not exceed 20 pages and should demonstrate the applicant's capacity for scholarly research in his or her main area of interest. It may include a few photos or brief ...

  9. Graduate Admissions

    Writing Sample of two 10-15 page or one longer research paper, or MA thesis if applicable ... Why pursue a PhD in Art History? The UCLA PhD program in Art History prepares students for careers as college-level teachers, writers, curators, and museum or art world professionals. It is designed to encourage interdisciplinary critical thinking and ...

  10. PhD/MPhil in History of Art

    Sample of writing. You should submit a 1,500-word sample of academic writing. Where possible, the subject should concern art history, but if your background lies in other areas, we would welcome work in another field such as literature or history. Personal statement. We are keen to hear about your academic and other experience.

  11. Graduate Art History Programs

    Writing Sample: The Art History Program requires a sample of academic writing for both MA and PhD applicants. The writing sample should be a recent example of scholarly work demonstrating the applicant's strengths as a researcher and writer. ... Art History graduate students who are appointed as TAs usually receive either a 33% FTE graduate ...

  12. How to Apply

    Application deadline: March 5, 2024. To apply, prospective students must submit an online application through the Duke University Graduate School. Applications must include a statement of purpose, three letters of recommendation, writing sample as well as transcripts. For the 2023 application cycle, scores from the GRE General exam are optional.

  13. Apply

    History of Art Application Deadline: December 4, 2023. We look forward to your inquiries about our program and your applications to work with faculty in a diverse, global range of fields in the arts and visual cultures. We're here to answer questions and help you to envision joining our community, develop a program of advanced study and ...

  14. Join our PhD Art History Program (VA76)

    Writing Sample (4000-8000 words): Examples include: senior honors thesis, MA thesis, or other research or critical paper, preferably in art or media history. Research Statement (2000 words maximum): The Research Statement should explain the research that you wish to pursue within our program.

  15. Guidelines for Writing Art History Research Papers

    The following are basic guidelines that you must use when documenting research papers for any art history class at UA Little Rock. Solid, thoughtful research and correct documentation of the sources used in this research (i.e., footnotes/endnotes, bibliography, and illustrations**) are essential. Additionally, these guidelines remind students ...

  16. Writing Resources

    Writing Guides for Students in Art & Art History created by Dr. Gabrielle Moyer, Stanford Program in Writing and Rhetoric. For Undergraduate Students. Writing In Art History. For Graduate Students. Crafting a Persuasive Research Statement. Crafting a Persuasive Job Letter. Preparing to Go on the Academic Job Market. Writing Assessment. For ...

  17. Art History PhD

    General Information The PhD program in the Division of Art History prepares graduates for university-level teaching, curator positions at major museums, and independent research in the field. Before beginning work for the PhD, students should have completed a master's degree in art history. Requirements for the degree include 60 credits of coursework beyond the master's degree and research ...

  18. Art History PhD Admissions

    Art History PhD Admissions. Each year, the Division of Art History receives more than 60 applications for its graduate programs. Applications are reviewed by the faculty of the division. ... Writing Sample: Papers produced for art history classes are generally the most useful evidence for reviewers of your written work. Other helpful ...

  19. How to Apply to the MA in Art History Program

    The writing sample is a very important component of the application. It should be an example of your best scholarly writing. Typically, the writing sample will be an excerpt from an undergraduate senior thesis, a seminar paper, or an article or other published work; it should be a critical or scholarly work in art history or a closely related field that demonstrates the candidate's skills in ...

  20. Dissertations

    DISSERTATIONS IN PROGRESS. As of July 2023. Bartunkova, Barbora, "Sites of Resistance: Antifascism and the Czechoslovak Avant-garde" (C. Armstrong) Betik, Blair Katherine, "Alternate Experiences: Evaluating Lived Religious Life in the Roman Provinces in the 1st Through 4th Centuries CE" (M. Gaifman) Boyd, Nicole, "Science, Craft, Art ...

  21. History of Art PhD

    The Department of History of Art offers a two-stage integrated master's and doctoral program (MA/PhD) in preparation for college teaching, writing, and specialized curatorial careers. Students are not admitted to work for a terminal MA degree, though students may apply for the MA after meeting Stage I requirements toward the PhD. Students work ...

  22. MA Thesis

    The MA thesis is a substantial piece of critical writing that develops an original argument about an important issue in art and art history. It should not just summarize existing literature on a topic, but make a new contribution to the literature through research and critical thinking. You may focus, for example, on an artwork, a group of ...

  23. Preparing a History PhD proposal

    The research proposal you submit in January should be approximately 1000 words, plus a bibliography, and should contain the following: A title, possibly with a subtitle. The title should not take the form of a question and it may run to a dozen words or more. Like the title of a book, it should clearly convey the topic you propose to work on.

  24. Art History

    Art History. AHST 6301 Foundations I: Theories and Methods of Art History (3 semester credit hours) Introduction to research methods in art history. (3-0) Y. AHST 6302 Foundations II: Thesis Workshop (3 semester credit hours) Intended for MA AHST students in their third semester, this course helps students refine their thesis projects through detailed discussions of how to properly write ...